Page 1

APRIL 2017


SOUS LE SIGNE DU LION NECKLACE, SAUTOIR AND RING IN WHITE GOLD AND DIAMONDS

CHANEL.COM


APRIL 2017

44 A Grand Ambition Before Versailles there was Vaux-leVicomte, a grand chateau currently being restored to its 17th-century splendour. By Jean Bond Rafferty

50 This Must Be The Place The first Biennial held in the Whitney’s downtown New York home is connected to site and city in surprising ways. By Meredith Mendelsohn

54 Centuries of Style An exhibition at Chatsworth House tells the stories of its inhabitants’ lives and times through the fashions they wore. By James Reginato

24

THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, VIEW FROM GANSEVOORT STREET, NEW YORK. PHOTOGRAPH BY ED LEDERMAN, 2015

50

FEATURES


What will my children’s future hold? Will they be prepared? How can I give them the best start? Your children are your legacy. And you want them to be well equipped for the challenges ahead. In a changing world, you don’t know what skills they’ll require. Or how much you’ll need to set aside. We can help ensure you have the means to give them the best chance of success. Today. And tomorrow. For some of life’s questions, you’re not alone. Together we can find an answer.

ubs.com /childrensfuture The value of investments can go down as well as up. Your capital and income is at risk. In the UK, UBS AG is authorized by the Prudential Regulation Authority and subject to regulation by the Financial Conduct Authority and limited regulation by the Prudential Regulation Authority. © UBS 2017. All rights reserved.


APRIL 2017

38

DEPARTMENTS 8 The Scene Celebrating India Art Fair in New Delhi, fashion meets tech in London, Masters Week in New York and more

13 Access Georgia O’Keeffe’s personal style, Rodin’s inimitable touch, new art in Sharjah and the best of Dallas

24 Price Point Grid Accessible art and collectibles abound in Hong Kong’s spring auctions

26 The Vine How Domaine de la Romanée-Conti has achieved near-mythical status

28 All that Glitters Louis Comfort Tiffany translated nature’s poetic beauty into his jewels

30 Extraordinary Properties Owning a castle has its challenges, but the rewards are priceless

34 Curated

54

A cabinet of curiosities bridges the collecting traditions of East and West

36 The Value of Art Understanding a work’s condition allows for proper appraisal and restoration

Gloria Cortina is creating a new expression of Mexican design

60 Sotheby’s This Season A calendar of auctions and exhibitions worldwide, plus selected sale highlights

78 Sotheby’s International Realty Property Showcase

96 Anatomy of an Artwork Alex Prager’s cinematic Simi Valley exudes a noirish sense of isolation

(Above) This rare Northern Song dynasty Dingyao carved “peony” bottle vase will be offered in Song Ceramics from a Distinguished Collector on 5 April.

PHOTOGRAPH BY THOMAS LOOF © CHATSWORTH HOUSE TRUST

38 At Home with Art

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEJANDRO CARTAGENA

60


M I K I M OTO.CO M

The O riginat o r of Cult ure d Pe arls.

S i n c e 18 9 3 .


AN EXTRAORDINARY COLLABORATION

ON THE COVER This commanding 18th-century castle has been fully restored, yet retains its historic grandeur. The exceptional domain is comprised of 1,112 acres, including a 15thcentury manor house, an exquisite French garden, orchards, meadows and lakes. €7,350,000 PROPERTY ID: VQC2TD

sothebysrealty.com Orléans Sologne Sotheby’s International Realty Hugues Simon +33 (0)6 63 93 71 23

Visit page 30 to view a selection of enduring castles.

S

otheby’s has been uniting collectors with world-class works of art since 1744, and 273 years later it has grown into one of the world’s leading full-service art businesses. Innovation is in the company’s DNA, and it was that spirit that led to the launch, in 1976, of an exceptional real estate company bearing the Sotheby’s name. The Sotheby’s International Realty® brand is a commanding presence in the representation of the world’s most remarkable properties. With more than 20,000 independent sales associates located in approximately 850 offices in 65 countries and territories worldwide, the Sotheby’s International Realty network artfully unites extraordinary homes with extraordinary lives throughout the world. Art & Home was created at the heart of our partnership and demonstrates the unique synergy that exists between the worlds of art and real estate. Lavishly produced, Art & Home speaks to the sophisticated reader with a passion for fine art, beautiful environments and, of course, exquisite homes – all the elements of an extraordinary life.

Please note that all lots are sold subject to our Conditions of Sale and Terms of Guarantee or Conditions of Business and the Authenticity Guarantee, as applicable, which are printed in the back of the catalogue for the respective sale. All lots are sold “AS IS,” in the condition they are in at the time of the auction, in accordance of the Conditions of Sale or the Conditions of Business, as applicable. The respective catalogues can be found at www.sothebys.com. Sotheby’s, Inc. License No. 1216058. © Sotheby’s, Inc. 2017. Information here within is correct at the time of printing.


flawless service. each and every time! *+ .+./-)/,%./ #.+ '+*"./$%.$&--& ),

%./-&#.+/'+* -&&/*++-./*,/ "./,.*"/ +.$-).&/ "!//// .*+-# /&(. )//((,-.)!/

.+'.$,/'+*". /'-#-)%!// $$+*,./#*". &*,./).$-'-$) !/ - %,/)-./)%( *+,-),)/*,./*')/&*),/- -,/(' ,.+/)- #*,+.!/ //

- %,/-)/.*$,& $*+-# /(#/'+* /(#./-#$%/'(+*+/(' ".!/ .- %,/('/( ( "/('/'+*" -#$%.)/*(.,, /)$&,+.!/// ./-)/! %*#/,%./-&# -"())-&./+)% .+/,.*"/'(+/,%./ /*)./'(+ &&/$*&&/(/'+ ("/,%./.,!

!

1525 York Avenue, New York, NY 10028 212-744-6521 | www.eliwilner.com | info@eliwilner.com Antique Frames, Replica Frames and Frame Restoration Copyright Š 2017 Eli Wilner & Company, Inc.


THE SCENE Masters Week

New York top Walton Ford, Danny Moynihan and Paul Kasmin centre Sophia Paine and Roxy Paine bottom James Perkins and Hara Perkins

Masters Week

New York top Pablo Sáinz Villegas bottom Chloe Wise

Masters Week

New York top Lex Fenwick and Ikue Fenwick bottom Rob Levy and Afrodet Zuri

Masters Week

New York

MASTERS WEEK 18–27 January Sotheby’s New York Masters Week highlights included a Sunday brunch; a reception and dinner held in partnership with Sentient Jet featuring a performance by Spanish guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas; and the opening of Naturalia, a collaboration between Sotheby’s and Paul Kasmin Gallery, curated by Danny Moynihan.

8

SOTHEBY’S

MATTEO PRANDONI/BFA.COM

JULIAN CASSADY PHOTOGRAPHY

Nick Graham


PREVIEWS, PARTIES AND CHARITY GALAS AROUND THE WORLD

Art for Water

New York top Nicole Miller and Cheryl Hines bottom Robert F Kennedy, Jr and Alexandra Richards

Art for Water

Art for Water

New York top Wendy Abrams, Kerry Kennedy and Jim Abrams bottom Matteo Callegari and Ludovica Capobianco

SAMANTHA NANDEZ/BFA.COM

New York

Jeff Koons

Art for Water New York top Rosanna Georgiou and Daria Borisova bottom left Basmat Levin bottom right Alysia Reiner

ART FOR WATER 6 February Sotheby’s New York Waterkeeper Alliance president Robert F Kennedy, Jr and artist Jeff Koons hosted Art for Water, a benefit celebrating creativity and clean water. While DJ Alexandra Richards provided music during cocktails, guests participated in auctions to support the non-profit’s efforts to defend and protect the world’s waterways.

SOTHEBY’S

9


THE SCENE Fashion Meets Technology

Celebrating India Art Fair New Delhi top Nadia Samdani and Rajeeb Samdani bottom Lekha Poddar Celebrating India Art Fair New Delhi top Tahir Sultan and Ameeta Seth bottom Aarti Lohia

London top Will.i.am and José Neves bottom Narmina Marandi and Vefa Heseynzi

PRANAV BHASIN / OCCULAR SOLUTIONS

KATE COWDREY/SOTHEBY’S

Fashion Meets Technology London top Donna Air bottom Mariam Sawedeg and Dania Sawedeg

10

SOTHEBY’S

CELEBRATING INDIA ART FAIR

FASHION MEETS TECHNOLOGY

3 February

6 February

New Delhi, India

Sotheby’s London

Sotheby’s and designer Tahir Sultan hosted an intimate dinner at his home in New Delhi. Guests enjoyed champagne and Middle Eastern delicacies at the event, which was held ahead of this year’s India Art Fair, the most celebrated week on the Indian art calendar.

Will.i.am attended a British Fashion Council discussion at Sotheby’s London, where The Voice star spoke with José Neves, the founder of luxury fashion site Farfetch, about his new company, I.Am+, which seeks to merge the worlds of fashion, technology and artificial intelligence.


PREVIEWS, PARTIES AND CHARITY GALAS AROUND THE WORLD

Trailblazing Female Artists New York top Jasmina Denner and Lisa Merzon bottom Lela Goren and Lauren Solomon Trailblazing Female Artists

New York Claudia Kozma Kaplan and Taylor Olson

SAMANTHA NANDEZ/BFA.COM

Trailblazing Female Artists New York top Ghada Amer bottom Valerie Mason and Erica Stein

Boundless Hong Kong top Lesley Yu and Julia Liu bottom Mani Chung and Janet Leung

TRAILBLAZING FEMALE ARTISTS

BOUNDLESS

10 February

Sotheby’s Hong Kong

Sotheby’s New York Sotheby’s and Dior hosted a private reception for Now You See Me, a selling exhibition of works by nine influential 20th-century female artists. A string trio serenaded guests and Dior’s Claudia Kozma Kaplan discussed the show’s timeliness as the fashion house recently launched a collection designed by its first female creative director.

12 January Collectors gathered at Sotheby’s Hong Kong for the opening of the much-anticipated Boundless: Contemporary Art exhibition. Guests sipped cocktails amidst live music and works of art, ranging from celebrated design pieces, photographs and jewels created by artists to notable Western and Asian Modern and contemporary art.

SOTHEBY’S

11


THE SOTHEBY’S APP IS NOW AVAILABLE ON IOS AND ANDROID TM Instant Access to the World’s Greatest Treasures–All at the Touch of Your Fingertips. Watch Live Auctions, Browse Content, Works of Art and More.

APPLE, THE APPLE LOGO, AND IPHONE ARE TRADEMARKS OF APPLE INC., REGISTERED IN THE U.S. AND OTHER COUNTRIES. APP STORE IS A SERVICE MARK OF APPLE INC. GOOGLE PLAY AND THE GOOGLE PLAY LOGO ARE TRADEMARKS OF GOOGLE INC.

DOWNLOAD SOTHEBY’S APP FOLLOW US @SOTHEBYS


Sotheby’s guide to the people and events shaping the art world.

SONG DONG IN SHANGHAI

ACCESS

TWO MODERN MILESTONES

SHARJAH’S BIENNIAL

SPOTLIGHT ON DALLAS

Alfred Stieglitz’s portrait of Georgia O’Keeffe, circa 1920–22.

RADICAL CHIC

© GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM

AHEAD OF HER TIME Georgia O’Keeffe’s pioneering Modernism extended beyond the flowers and desert landscapes for which she is known. The Brooklyn Museum is taking a fascinating look at the artist’s fiercely independent life and how she used her distinctive style to forge a public persona.

Along with her own paintings and illuminating photographs of her by Alfred Stieglitz, Ansel Adams, Cecil Beaton, Bruce Weber and others, some of O’Keeffe’s garments from the 1920s to the 1980s are on display. With tailored suits, capes and caftans as well as white-collared black ensembles,

her elegantly androgynous wardrobe embodies a feminist desire to be judged by her work rather than by her gender – a concern still shared by women artists today. Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern, Brooklyn Museum, New York, through 23 July. —BELINDA BAKER SOTHEBY’S

13


ACCESS

THE SWEEPING ARC OF HISTORY

OBJECT WISDOM Since emerging from Beijing’s vibrant avant-garde art community in the early 1990s, 50-year-old Song Dong has become one of China’s leading Conceptual artists. Using everyday objects and the refuse of China’s rapid urban development, his works evoke life’s transience along with concerns about surveillance and control. The Rockbund Museum’s survey of Song’s production since the 1990s ranges from installations, paintings and videos to the presence of sixteen fibreglass policemen stationed throughout the museum. Highlights include a dazzling gridded structure of frames and mirrors; a city built out of biscuits that visitors can eat; as well as scavenged windows, doors and electrical outlets that form living spaces for the impoverished. A brand-new work features 50 porcelain dolls – some cooking, sleeping or writing, others spinning decapitated heads on turntables – a sentimental and darkly comic representation of the artist’s past performances. Song Dong: I Don’t Know the Mandate of Heaven, Rockbund Museum, Shanghai, through 26 March. —IAN JOHNS

14

SOTHEBY’S

(From top) Ilya Repin’s Portrait of Tsar Nicholas II, 1895; Otto Griebel’s Die Internationale, 1928–30.

STATE ARCHIVE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION / THE STATE HERMITAGE MUSEUM, ST PETERSBURG

CONCEPTUAL TRANSCENDENCE

IMAGES COURTESY OF ROCKBUND ART MUSEUM

(From top) Works by Song Dong at the Rockbund: Mantra Without Words, 2006–17; Policemen (detail); and Wisdom of the Poor, from 2011.

If this centenary year of the Russian Revolution presents an opportunity to revisit its extraordinary works of art, literature and fi lm, it also offers a timely reminder of the role art can play in periods of profound social and political change. At the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Revolution: Russian Art 1917– 1932 (through 17 April) covers the optimism of experimental art in the early years of the revolution through the emergence of Social Realism and the ensuing Stalinist clampdown. On show are works by major figures such as Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky, Isaak Brodsky and Alexander Deineka. Of course, a flurry of projects related to this anniversary is taking place in Europe and Russia as well. The Hermitage Amsterdam has 1917. Romanovs & Revolution (through 17 September), in which more than 250 objects recount the gripping story of fashionable St Petersburg, including the explosive political and social events that surrounded the Imperial family’s reign. In Moscow, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art is presenting its first Triennial of Russian Contemporary Art (through 4 May), a survey of recent art produced across the country. Looking ahead, the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin will be staging 1917. Revolution. Russia and Europe (20 October–15 April 2018), a comprehensive look at events in Russia and their many-layered consequences for its neighbours to the west. Also this autumn, at London’s Tate Modern, Russian-born Conceptual artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov will be unveiling a new exhibition (18 October– 28 January 2018) exploring the theme of failed utopia through their characteristic combination of melancholia, fictional characterisation and wit. Adapted from Tim Marlow’s Must-See Museum Shows: Russian Art. To watch this video and others, visit museumnetwork.sothebys.com.

© DEUTSCHES HISTORISCHES MUSEUM

ART OF CHANGE


:KDWEHJDQZLWKDVSDUN«


ACCESS

UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL

BODY OF WORK

SHARJAH’S NEW WAVE

(From left) Rayyane Tabet’s Cyprus, 2015; and a still from Nesrine Khodr’s video Extended, 2017.

16

SOTHEBY’S

CREATIVE TIDES Since its 1993 inception, the Sharjah Biennial in the United Arab Emirates has offered an important platform for contemporary artists in the Middle East. Its 13th edition, curated by Christine Tohmé, director of the Beirut-based Ashkal Alwan (the non-profit Lebanese Association for Plastic Arts), features more than 60 artists. The diverse lineup includes Colombian-born painter Oscar Murillo, Palestinian video artist and sculptor Shadi Habib Allah, Tokyo-based animator and painter Takashi Ishida, Puerto Rican multimedia duo Allora & Calzadilla, as well as the international art collective Futurefarmers. All are responding to the idea of tamawuj, an Arabic word for the rise and fall of waves or an undulating appearance. Along with talks, workshops and a yearlong education programme, the Biennial has launched artistic initiatives beyond Sharjah, beginning in January in Dakar. A fluid exchange of ideas continues with events in Istanbul (May), Ramallah (August) and Beirut (October). 13th Sharjah Biennial, various venues, 10 March–12 June, Sharjah, UAE. —BB

© MUSÉE RODIN / PHOTOGRAPH © CHRISTIAN BARAJA, STUDIO SLB / PHOTOGRAPH © JEAN DE CALAN

(From left) Auguste Rodin’s The Cathedral, 1908, and Shadows of Man and Child, 1880.

COURTESY SFEIR-SEMLER GALLERY, BEIRUT AND HAMBURG AND COURTESY RAYYANE TABET. IMAGE COURTESY SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION

COURTESY NESRINE KHODR

Whether it’s capturing a thought, an embrace, an outstretched arm or clasping hands, the work of Auguste Rodin is unmistakable. The French sculptor’s fascination with the human figure, and his lifelong effort to show the human body as it really is, made him a pioneer and a critical link between traditional and Modern figurative sculpture. The Grand Palais and Musée Rodin in Paris mark the hundredth anniversary of his death by bringing together some 200 examples by the artist, whose restless experimentation with form, scale and composition resulted in remarkable works in plaster, bronze, marble, ceramics and on paper. Along with lesser-known works and famous pieces such as The Kiss and The Thinker are paintings, drawings and sculptures by artists inspired or repelled by Rodin, ranging from Picasso and Joseph Beuys to Annette Messager and Antony Gormley. Other Rodin exhibitions can be found at San Francisco’s Legion of Honor (through 9 April) and the Groninger Museum in the Netherlands (through 30 April). Rodin Centenary Exhibition, Grand Palais, Paris, 22 March–31 July. —IJ


«HPHUJHVDVDQLFRQ

7KHGL‫ﺩ‬HUHQFHLV*DJJHQDX :HKDYHEHHQSHUIHFWLQJRQHRYHQIRU\HDUV2XUODWHVW UHQGLWLRQDFFHQWXDWHVLWVGLVWLQFWLYHGHVLJQWKHGRRUSDQHO LVQRZFUHDWHGIURPRQHLPSRVLQJFPZLGHVKHHWRI PPKLJKJUDGHVWDLQOHVVVWHHO,WUHSUHVHQWVRQHYDVW HQWUDQFHWRFXOLQDU\SRWHQWLDO 7KLVUHPRGHOOHGKDQGFUDIWHGZRUNRIDUWUHSUHVHQWVWKH FXOPLQDWLRQRIRXU‫ﺪ‬QHVWSULQFLSOHVVNLOOVDQGHWKRV:H FKULVWHQHGLWWKH(%LQUHFRJQLWLRQRIRXU\HDUVRI ZRUNLQJLQPHWDO7KLVKDVDOZD\VEHHQPRUHWKDQDQRYHQ LWLVDSURPLVHWRFUHDWHPDVWHUSLHFHV )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHYLVLWZZZJDJJHQDXFRP


LONE-STAR ATTRACTIONS This year’s Dallas Art Fair (6–9 April), one of the most engagingly casual events on the art calendar, is hosting more than 90 galleries from sixteen countries in the downtown Art District’s Fashion Industry Gallery. Along with presenting such exhibitors as Gagosian, Anthony Meier Fine Arts and Galerie Sébastien Bertrand, the fair opens leading art collectors’ homes and warehouses to attendees with the right passes and reservations. The beauty of the event lies in its intimate size as well as its convenient location. Right next door is the Dallas Museum of Art , where Mexico 1900–1950 (12 March–16 July) takes an in-depth look at the birth of modern Mexico through work by Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, Ángel Zárraga, Nahui Ollin and Rosa Rolanda. After your visit, relax in the gardens of the nearby Nasher Sculpture Center, next to works by Alexander Calder, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and many others. Inside the Renzo Piano-designed Nasher galleries, enjoy Richard Serra: Prints

18

SOTHEBY’S

(through 30 April), which displays the sculptor’s prolific work as a printmaker since 1972 – these highly textured Minimalist beauties have a physical presence all their own. Adjacent to the Arts District, The Joule hotel offers a luxurious base and a gallerylike experience, with a rotating installation of artworks by the likes of Andy Warhol and Ellsworth Kelly adorning the premises. And while the city’s landmark Reunion Tower may offer impressive views, you can also appreciate the skyline from The Joule’s rooftop bar. Another downtown hotel option is The Adolphus. Built in 1912, the extravagant Beaux Arts building is emerging from a $40 million renovation that includes brand-new guest rooms and a refurbished lobby and bar. For a quirkier choice, the boutique Hotel ZaZa puts guests between uptown shopping and restaurants and downtown cultural highlights. Downtown Dallas is a cluster of skyscrapers hosting the headquarters of oil firms that long defined the city’s early years and those of banks that shape it today. But across from the Arts District is Klyde Warren Park , a five-acre green oasis perched atop a sunken freeway. It’s an ideal place to unwind, especially at restaurant Lark on the Park, whose bright and breezy seasonal menu complements its laid-back, light-fi lled ambience. Equally feel-good is Gemma in Knox-Henderson, an uptown district of antiques shops, bohemian boutiques and rated restaurants. Owners Allison Yoder and Stephen Rogers bring a

COURTESY KATHERINE BERNHARDT AND CANADA LLC; COURTESY CHRISTOPHER LEBRUN AND ALBERTZ BENDA GALLERY 2013 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM OPPOSITE BOTTOM RIGHT: CHARLES DAVIS SMITH

GO FOR THE ART, STAY FOR THE FOOD

WALTER ROBINSON: COURTESY GALERIE SÉBASTIEN BERTRAND; ROBERT LAPRELLE ©

ACCESS


FEATURED PROPERTIES SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

MODERN MIGHT DALLAS, TEXAS

Californian vibe to the menu and wine list in an intimate dining space of soothing blues and whites, with an inviting bar and open kitchen in the back. Near the art fair, CBD Provisions is a good choice for breakfast or a sandwich with a gourmet twist. But if you seek that Texan steak experience with a difference, try the Texas Wagyu rib-eye with black truffle and mole negro at Flora Street Café, the latest venture by award-winning chef Stephan Pyles. Fort Worth, just 45 minutes from Dallas, has its share of great museums, too. Visit the Louis Kahn-designed Kimbell Art Museum and marvel at his use of vaulted concrete and natural light. The building is the fitting venue for Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture (26 March– 25 June), a survey of the work of a man who imbued his Modernist creations with the gravitas of ancient monuments. Pieces that are usually scattered across museums and private collections have been brought together at the Modern Museum of Fort Worth for Donald Sultan: The Disaster Paintings (through 23 April). Sultan’s monumental 1980s landscape series depicts conflagrations and urban decay with almost Turneresque otherworldliness. In stark contrast, the museum is about to feature Katherine Bernhardt (8 April–9 July), whose textile-based abstractions and patterned Pop imagery can be lush and vibrant with a touch of kitschy humour – qualities you may well come across while visiting Texas. –IJ (Clockwise from far left) The Lark on the Park restaurant; Untitled, 2016, by Katherine Bernhardt, the subject of a show at The Modern in Fort Worth; Christopher Le Brun’s Stop, 2015, and Walter Robinson’s Romance, 2013, both on view at the Dallas Art Fair; and the south galleries of Louis Kahn’s Kimbell Art Museum, which is hosting a retrospective of the architect’s work this spring.

Built in 1964, this award-winning Philip Johnson masterpiece will never be duplicated. With an exquisite and sensitive update completed in 2008, the lightfilled house features elegant living spaces, a stunning double staircase, a dining room with an arched canopy, five luxurious bedrooms and eight baths. The nearly seven parklike acres are home to a media house, a Modernist cabana, a pool and a tennis court.

$27,500,000 | Property ID: 4EJ68K | sothebysrealty.com Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty Faisal Halum +1 214 240 2575

CONTEMPORARY COOL DALLAS, TEXAS Floor-to-ceiling windows let in an abundance of natural light while presenting picturesque views of meticulous grounds at this stunning contemporary residence. Its refined architecture lends the entire home a tranquil yet sophisticated atmosphere.

$9,995,000 | Property ID: M5FV2Q | sothebysrealty.com Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty Caroline Summers +1 214 597 7513

SOTHEBY’S

19


ACCESS

MUST-SEE EXHIBITIONS AROUND THE WORLD

MUSEUMS

The Phillips Collection: George Condo, Double Heads Drawing #7 (detail), 2010.

BOSTON Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) 9 April–9 July MATISSE IN THE STUDIO

CHICAGO Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (MCA)

NEW YORK

BRUSSELS

The Met Breuer

Royal Museums of Fine Art of Belgium

21 March–23 July LYGIA PAPE: A MULTITUDE OF FORMS

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) 15 April–13 August MAKING SPACE: WOMEN ARTISTS AND POSTWAR ABSTRACTION

15 April–20 August TANIA PÉREZ CÓRDOVA: SMOKE, NEARBY

LOS ANGELES Geffen Contemporary at MOCA

1 April–23 July

GENOVA

FUTURE DESIGN

REUNIONS: A COLLECTOR’S JOURNEY

Palazzo Ducale

PARIS

16 March–16 July MODIGLIANI

Centre Pompidou 26 April–14 August

Yuz Museum

SUZANNE MCCLELLAND: JUST LEFT FEEL RIGHT

MOVING IS IN EVERY DIRECTION: ENVIRONMENTS – INSTALLATIONS – NARRATIVE SPACES

Ongoing

Palazzo Grassi and Punta della Dogana

BERLIN

HOWARD HODGKIN: ABSENT FRIENDS

SMALL MASTERPIECES

23 March–18 June

28 March–13 August KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS

OLGA PICASSO

26 April–28 August

EUROPE

30 March–30 July

21 March–3 September

VENICE

National Portrait Gallery

Alte Nationalgalerie

Musée Picasso Paris

The National Gallery CHRIS OFILI: WEAVING MAGIC

29 April–27 August

RODIN, L’EXPOSITION DU CENTENAIRE

17 March–17 September

GEORGE CONDO: THE WAY I THINK

Long Museum (West Bund)

22 March–31 July

5 March–4 September

LONDON

SHANGHAI THE YONGLE EMPEROR’S WORLD: IMPERIAL THANGKA AND ART WORKS FROM THE YONGXUAN ERA (1403–1435) OF THE MING DYNASTY

Grand Palais

MEXICO CITY

SOTHEBY’S

21 March–February 2018

Hamburger Bahnhof Museum für Gegenwart

11 March–25 June

HONG KONG Liang Yi Museum

Victoria and Albert Museum

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

The Phillips Collection

ASIA

RIK WOUTERS: A RETROSPECTIVE

WALKER EVANS

WASHINGTON, DC

20

TATE BRITAIN COMMISSION 2017: CERITH WYN EVANS

HAMBURG

CARL ANDRE: SCULPTURE AS PLACE, 1958–2010

100 AÑOS DE LA CONSTITUCIÓN MEXICANA. VENUSTIANO CARRANZA

28 March–20 August

RIDGEFIELD, CONN.

2 April–24 July

Museo Soumaya

10 March–2 July

Tate Britain

Opens 9 April DAMIEN HIRST. TREASURES FROM THE WRECK OF THE UNBELIEVABLE

MINATO, JAPAN Nezu Museum 12 April–14 May IRISES AND MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN SUMMER AND AUTUMN

IMAGE COURTESY SKARSTEDT GALLERY AND SPRÜTH MAGERS COURTESY THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

AMERICAS


THROCKMORTON FINE ART

FR I T Z HEN LE THE AMERICAS,1930-60

April 27th - June 24th, 2017 Image: Fritz Henle, Exotic Beauty - Nieves, 1943

145 EAST 57TH STREET, 3RD FLOOR, NEW YORK, NY 10022 TEL 212.223.1059 FAX 212.223.1937 info@throckmorton-nyc.com www.throckmorton-nyc.com


ACCESS

THIS SEASON’S LEADING INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS

ART FAIRS

SP Arte: Eikoh Hosoe, Simon: A Private Landscape (detail), 1971/1976 from Taka Ishii Gallery.

BUENOS AIRES

SAN FRANCISCO

LISTE

HELSINKI

MILAN

Art Market San Francisco

13–18 JUNE

Art Fair Suomi

Salone del Mobile

25–28 MAY

4–9 APRIL

28–30 APRIL VIP DAY 27 APRIL

arteBA 24–27 MAY VIP DAY 23 MAY

SÃO PAULO

SCOPE Basel 13–18 JUNE VIP DAY 13 JUNE

SP–Arte

DALLAS Dallas Art Fair

6–9 APRIL

Photo Basel

VIP DAY 5 APRIL

14–18 JUNE VIP DAY 12–13 JUNE

7–9 APRIL VIP DAY 6 APRIL

NEW YORK Collective Design Fair

VANCOUVER Art! Vancouver 26–28 MAY VIP DAY 25 MAY

3–7 MAY

Art Basel 15–18 JUNE VIP DAYS 13–14 JUNE

Rhy Art Fair

VIP DAY 2 MAY

Art New York

EUROPE & MIDDLE EAST

3–7 MAY VIP DAY 3 MAY

Context New York 3–7 MAY VIP DAY 3 MAY

BARCELONA LOOP Barcelona 25–27 MAY VIP DAY 25 MAY

TEFAF New York

BASEL

4–8 MAY

Design Miami/Basel

VIP DAY 3 MAY

13–18 JUNE VIP DAY 12 JUNE

Frieze New York 5–7 MAY

VOLTA 13

VIP DAY 4 MAY

13–17 JUNE VIP DAY 12 JUNE

22

VIP DAY 12 JUNE

SOTHEBY’S

16–18 JUNE VIP DAY 15 JUNE

BRUSSELS Independent Brussels 20–23 APRIL VIP DAY 19 APRIL

Art Brussels 21–23 APRIL VIP DAY 20 APRIL

COLOGNE Art Cologne 26–29 APRIL VIP DAY 25 APRIL

VIP Day 24 MAY

LIMA PArC Peru Arte Contemporaneo

MONTE-CARLO artmonte-carlo 29–30 APRIL VIP DAY 28 APRIL

20–23 APRIL VIP DAY 19 APRIL

Art Lima 20–23 APRIL VIP DAY 20 APRIL

LISBON ARCO Lisbon 18–21 MAY

ASIA

BEIJING Art Beijing 30 APRIL–2 MAY VIP DAY 29 APRIL

HONG KONG

VIP DAY 17 MAY

Affordable Art Fair – Hong Kong

LONDON

19–21 MAY

Photo London

VIP DAY 18 MAY

18–21 MAY VIP DAY 17 MAY

The London Photograph Fair 20–21 MAY

Masterpiece London 29 JUNE–5 JULY VIP DAY 28 JUNE

TOKYO Tokyo International Art Fair 26–27 MAY VIP DAY 26 MAY

© EIKOH HOSOE / COURTESY TAKA ISHII GALLERY PHOTOGRAPHY / FILM COURTESY SP ARTE

AMERICAS


RONALD PHILLIPS FINE ANTIQUE ENGLISH FURNITURE

A CHARLES II COCUS WOOD AND PIETRA DURA CABINET ON STAND

26 BRUTON STREET, LONDON W1J 6QL +44 (0)207 493 2341 ADVICE @ RONALDPHILLIPS.CO.UK RONALDPHILLIPSANTIQUES.COM


ART AT EVERY PRICE POINT An extraordinary range of accessible art and collectibles can be found at Sotheby’s spring auctions in Hong Kong.

UNDER $10,000

$10,000–$25,000

Yellow gold and diamond “Ludo” wristwatch, Van Cleef & Arpels, circa 1945 HK$80,000–120,000 ($10,000–15,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

$25,000–$50,000 VAN CLEEF & ARPELS A lady’s 18-karat white-gold and diamond-set double retrograde wristwatch, Lady Arpels Féerie HK$260,000–400,000 ($33,600–51,500) Important Watches

Jadeite, colourless jadeite and diamond butterfly brooch HK$120,000–160,000 ($15,000–21,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong

4 April, Hong Kong

WANG JINSONG Figure No. 8, 1997 HK$30,000–50,000 ($3,900–6,500) Contemporary Ink Art

4 April, Hong Kong

5 April, Hong Kong

A “huanghuali” mirror case, late Ming dynasty HK$130,000–200,000 ($16,800–25,800) Portable Treasures – The Dr S.Y. Yip Collection

A rare “Yue” figure of a mythical beast, Western Jin dynasty HK$300,000–400,000 ($38,500–51,500) Song Ceramics from a Distinguished Private Collector

5 April, Hong Kong

5 April, Hong Kong

YOSHITOMO NARA Sleepless Night (Sitting), 2007 HK$60,000–80,000 ($7,800–10,000) Contemporary Asian Art

TANG ZHEMING Trekking through the Misty Mountains, 2011 HK$250,000–350,000 ($32,000–45,000) Fine Chinese Paintings

4 April, Hong Kong

PENG JIAN Red Volume, 2014 HK$130,000–150,000 ($16,800–19,400) Contemporary Ink Art

18-karat gold and diamond bangle, Bulgari HK$320,000–450,000 ($41,000–58,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong

4 April, Hong Kong

Chateau Mouton Rothschild 1995, 12 bottles HK$35,000–48,000 ($4,500–6,000) Finest and Rarest Wines and The Macallan

2 April, Hong Kong

JU CHAO Flowers, Birds and Insects (selected leaf) HK$150,000–200,000 ($19,400–25,800) Fine Classical Chinese Paintings

3 April, Hong Kong

24

SOTHEBY’S

© YOSHITOMO NARA

3 April, Hong Kong


Visit sothebys.com/hk for the full auction and pre-sale exhibition information.

$50,000–$100,000

$100,000–$250,000

LIU DAN Poppies, 2003 HK$500,000–700,000 ($64,500–90,500) Contemporary Ink Art

$250,000 AND ABOVE

Jadeite “double hoop” and diamond pendant earrings HK$900,000–1,200,000 ($117,000–155,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong

An exquisite copper-red “three fish” stem cup, Xuande mark and period HK$30,000,000–40,000,000 ($3,850,000–5,130,000) Important Chinese Art

5 April, Hong Kong

4 April, Hong Kong

A rare yellow and green “bat” bowl with polychrome details, Yongzheng mark and period HK$400,000–600,000 ($52,000–77,500) Yellow-Ground Wares from the Collection of Maureen Pilkington

A unique pair of ruby and diamond bangles, BHAGAT HK$1,950,000–2,400,000 ($250,000–308,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong

5 April, Hong Kong

GEORGETTE CHEN Mooncakes and lanterns HK$1,200,000–2,200,000 ($155,000–284,000) Modern and Contemporary Art Evening Sale

LEE UFAN With Winds, 1987 HK$1,500,000–2,500,000 ($194,000–320,500) Brushwork II – All the World’s a Stage

2 April, Hong Kong

2 April, Hong Kong

Two diamond brooches, Suzanne Belperron, circa 1950 HK$590,000–750,000 ($76,500–97,000) Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

A “longquan” celadon vase (cong), Southern Song dynasty HK$1,200,000–1,800,000 ($155,000–230,000) Curiosity III

A magnificent and large famille-rose “hundred deer” vase, Qianlong seal mark and period HK$25,000,000–30,000,000 ($3,205,000–3,850,000) Important Chinese Art

4 April, Hong Kong

4 April, Hong Kong

5 April, Hong Kong

YAMAGUCHI TAKEO Kage (Shadow B), 1977 HK$650,000–850,000 ($84,000–110,000) Yamaguchi Takeo – Composing Monochrome

3 April, Hong Kong

A “huanghuali” dressing case with carved doors and gilt-bronze fittings, late Ming/early Qing dynasty HK$800,000–1,200,000 ($104,000–155,000) Portable Treasures– The Dr S.Y. Yip Collection

5 April, Hong Kong

SOTHEBY’S

25


THE VINE

BEST OF BURGUNDY Domaine de la Romanée-Conti has been Sotheby’s top-selling wine producer FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

for four years in a row – with good reason,

Mike Hoagland is a Los Angeles-based specialist for Sotheby’s Wine. A full range of wines by Domaine de la Romanée-Conti is available at auction this spring and at Sotheby’s Wine Retail. For more information, visit sothebys.com/wine.

26

SOTHEBY’S

No other Domaine can claim to make wine solely from the top-ranked grand cru sites that are found across such notable vineyards as Le Montrachet, Échezeaux, Richebourg, La Tâche and Romanée-Conti, among others. In fact, DRC’s standards are so high that occasionally they will choose to release a premier cru – one step below a grand cru – made from younger vines, rather than lower the quality of their top-tier offering.

PHOTOGRAPH BY STEEN ÖHMAN, WINEHOG.ORG

1. Grand Cru Grapes

PHOTOGRAPH BY ELISABETH ANDANSON/SYGMA VIA GETTY IMAGES CHARLES O’REAR/CORBIS/VCG

Undisputedly prestigious and highly coveted, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti is the most revered of Burgundian wines, whose acronym alone – DRC – commands the attention of anyone seeking to enter fine wine’s Valhalla. From monastic ownership, the Domaine first transferred to the hands of the Bourbon Prince de Conti; after it was dissolved following the French Revolution, the Duvault-Blochet family assumed ownership, consolidating and expanding the estate, a task it passed on to the current company principals, the de Villaine and Leroy-Roch families. Yet pedigree alone does not fully explain RomanéeConti’s prestige. This spring, as we look forward to offering a variety of DRC at auctions in New York, Hong Kong and London, as well as at our retail locations in Hong Kong and New York, five major factors stand out as the most important reasons why this Domaine consistently achieves the upper echelons of demand, price and acclaim.

PHOTONONSTOP / PHOTONONSTOP

as Mike Hoagland explains.


2. The Land In addition to its fully owned monopoles – areas controlled by one winery, a rarity in Burgundy – the Domaine is also the largest landowner in each of the red wine vineyards from which it produces grand cru red Burgundy. This is remarkable considering that all grand cru sites in Burgundy represent a mere two per cent of the region’s total vineyard area. It also demonstrates DRC’s commitment to acquiring land and ensuring that its holdings are well-situated. This shrewd management has led DRC to achieve sublime wines in the best vintages, as well as greatness in less heralded ones.

3. Quality Over Quantity Burgundy is the land of scarcity – it produces a fraction as much as other regions – and DRC is no exception with an average of 6,000 to 8,000 cases across all its crus annually. While the Domaine could make more, the philosophy of high-density planting of old vines keeps yields tantalizingly low, resulting in fruit with unparalleled intensity.

4. Tradition & Expertise Tradition and lineage extend to many parts of the Domaine, including to who is in charge of the cellar. Given that the current chef de cave, Bernard Noblet (pictured below), has been with DRC since 1985 and that he took over from his father, André, who spent 45 years in the cellars, the wines of DRC have been in trusted hands and reflect the Noblets’ unrivalled knowledge and memory.

5. The Intangible DRC represents the quintessence of Burgundy – an ethereal sum of many distinct parts. These wines express their site, pedigree, nuance and character with such consistent precision that they are often used as an example for the concept of terroir. With seemingly matchless depth of flavour, infinitely complex richness and incomparable concentration, the wines of DRC are truly in a class of their own.

SOTHEBY’S

27


ALL THAT GLITTERS

VIVIENNE BECKER

IN A NOUVEAU LIGHT Nature’s poetic beauty is captured in a rare and sublime collection of Art Nouveau jewels designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany.

(Above) An 18-karat gold, lapis lazuli, emerald and coloured diamond brooch designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany for Tiffany & Co. (Opposite) Intricately enamelled floral motifs decorating the chains of two necklaces by Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Say the name Louis Comfort Tiffany and chances are that warm, rich, gem-coloured, stained-glass lampshades come to mind. These elaborate and highly desirable pieces certainly represent this artist’s incontrovertible legacy to American decorative arts. Yet much like RenéJules Lalique – whose successful career as a glassmaker overshadowed his original genius as a goldsmith and jeweller – Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) also created evocative pieces that have come to define American Art Nouveau jewellery. The talented son of Charles Lewis Tiffany, whose Tiffany & Company (founded in 1837) specialised in stationery, silverware and jewels, Louis Comfort started out as a painter and turned to jewellery around 1902, when he became Tiffany & Co.’s first design director. Two years later, one-of-a-kind pieces began to emerge from his workshop. Highly individualistic, organic, handcrafted studies of nature, his jewels and their cerebral beauty enthralled collectors and connoisseurs. In 1889, Louis Comfort visited the Exposition Universelle in Paris, where he met painter Alphonse Mucha and was overwhelmed by the glasswork of Émile Gallé. Influenced by these artists, Tiffany tapped into the aesthetic revolution of the time – a drive to elevate jewels into true works of art. In tune with the spirit of Art Nouveau, he found inspiration in nature, and while studying the structure of plants and insects – wild flowers, vines, as well as the intricately veined gossamer wings of dragonflies – he also explored enamels with the

many skilled artisans in his studio, including such gifted female enamellers as Julia Munson. Choosing gems like opals, garnets, native American Montana sapphires, amethysts and citrines not for their value but rather for their artistic worth and painterly effects, he combined them with enamels in exquisite compositions. The sophisticated derived shapes and gorgeous interplays of hues and materials represented a precious, wearable form of Art Nouveau. Today, these striking jewels are astonishingly rare, so the appearance of multiple superb examples immediately captures the imagination. Comprising brooches, earrings and necklaces, Sotheby’s April offering showcases the wide palette of Tiffany’s gemstones – his favourite being black opal, with its flashes of deep blue and green – as well as his vivid colour compositions. One piece represents his celebrated interpretation of natural forms, with soft lilting leaves and scrolling vines framing a centre stone, while the jeweller’s best-loved grapevine motif clambers around the opals in a necklace, brooch and earrings set. A dramatic citrine pendant necklace with melting autumnal hues, ornamented with a bird’s nest and enamelled leaves, embodies the handcraftsmanship and lyrical details that make these jewels so appealing and keeps Louis Comfort Tiffany’s soulful artistry close to the heart. Vivienne Becker is a jewellery historian and a contributing editor of the Financial Times’s How to Spend It. Magnificent Jewels will be on view in New York, 21–25 April. Auction: 25 April. Enquiries: +1 212 606 7392.


SOTHEBY’S

29


EXTRAORDINARY PROPERTIES

Owning a castle requires respect for history and patience with renovations, but the rewards are priceless, writes Iyna Bort Caruso.

FRENCH NOBILITY UZÈS, FRANCE

A former royal possession passed to the House of Uzès by Philippe IV le Bel in 1281, this magnificent historic chateau, wonderfully restored and perfectly maintained, demonstrates the power of the families who lived there. Built in a commanding position on the edge of a village, it is set around a square dungeon and counts four towers connected by a walled walk. Price Upon Request Property ID: MQXCEZ | sothebysrealty.com Uzès Sotheby’s International Realty Grâce Fernandes + 33 (0)4 66 03 10 03

30

SOTHEBY’S

In the world of luxury real estate, perhaps no category of residence invites as much fantasy as the castle. Germany, England, Spain and, most notably, France, offer high concentrations of these historic buildings, where bedrooms number in the dozens and amenities include moats, towers and turrets. The US has its share of palatial counterparts, even if they lack 900-year-old masonry, says Elizabeth Corbin Murphy of Chambers, Murphy & Burge, a firm of restoration architects in Akron, Ohio. “The estates of Newport, Rhode Island, are wonderful,” she says, “but you can have a castle in any city depending on its culture and context.” Becoming king or queen of one’s castle outside the States can be surprisingly affordable. While fully restored palaces close to major centres like Paris, Geneva or London can exceed $30 million, others are on a par with two-bedroom flats in those same cities, says Alexander V G Kraft, chairman of Sotheby’s International Realty France. “Prices can start at $700,000, or even below for smaller, rural castles in need of some updating.” In areas with low labour costs and local tax incentives, buying such a property can be an attractive proposition. Still, owning a castle should be understood less as an investment than as a passion project. This kind of property requires “deep pockets and patience,” Kraft explains, and owners who approach restoration with respect and balance. “There’s nothing wrong with making a castle your home,” says Murphy, but buyers should understand that the reward of ownership is “being able to soak up the legacy of the families who invested in the property.” Kraft, the owner of a restored 19thcentury hunting chateau in Provence, understands the benefits firsthand. “One gets to live in an unusual, beautiful environment and become the guardian of a piece of history,” he says. “How many people can say that, even among the world’s elite?” New York-based writer Iyna Bort Caruso has contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Newsday and others.

PHOTOGRAPH © CLEMENT COUSIN

ROYAL WELCOME


ROYAL SEAT STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN

(Above) Fogelvik Castle was once the home of Carl Knutsson Bonde, Sweden’s reigning king on three different occasions in the 1400s, and was passed down through his heirs. In 1995, the current owners restored the castle and grounds to their former grandeur. This majestic residence offers a wonderful oval dining room that opens out to the terrace facing the sea and features a six-metre-high ceiling and wall paintings by local artist J B Masreleiz. Its adjoining two lounges, display room and library make it a perfect environment for entertaining.

NORTH RHINE-WESTPHALIA, GERMANY

(Right) Schloss Hüffe is a moated castle built between 1775 and 1784. Impressive and wellpreserved, the castle offers a living space of 1,500 square metres, including a main building with east and west wings, a manor house, an orangery, old stables, a baronial house and a private cemetery on an island. €6,400,000 Property ID: N463ZL | sothebysrealty.com Cologne Sotheby’s International Realty Tobias Schulze +49 221 99 77 350

32

SOTHEBY’S

PHOTOGRAPH © VISTABEE 2015

GERMAN GRANDEUR

PHOTOGRAPH © TOBIASVOLLMER.DE

KR35,000,000 Property ID: 4SHVHX | sothebysrealty.com Sweden Sotheby’s International Realty Helena Karnsund +46 739 82 80 87 Goran Heimer +46 739 82 80 27


OCEAN VIEWS NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

(Left) Known as Seafair, this Louis XIV-inspired chateau was designed with a crescent shape to complement the curve of the peninsula on which it sits and enjoy 270-degree ocean views. The iconic estate has undergone a complete restoration and renovation. A raised sea wall wraps around the entire property, adding to its commanding presence while guarding the luxurious grounds from storms. $17,500,000 Property ID: EH87XV | sothebysrealty.com Gustave White Sotheby’s International Realty David Huberman +1 401 848 6729

SCOTTISH TREASURE EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND

(Below) Offered for sale freehold for the first time in nearly 300 years, this extraordinary castle was originally built by William Adamson in 1542. Set over three stories, the property includes a stunning round tower that features exceptional views and attractive, stone-built two-storey stables. Its more than four acres of grounds contain landscaped gardens, a small area of mature woodland and an original walled garden. €6,000,000 Property ID: 27R9FM | sothebysrealty.com United Kingdom Sotheby’s International Realty Hamilton Lee and Cheryl Prime +44 (0) 1932 860 537


CURATED

2

1 3

CURIOUS CASES Capturing the eclectic spirit of history’s Wunderkammern, this exotic menagerie bridges the collecting traditions of East and West.

4

6

34

SOTHEBY’S

5


1 An impressive Allosaurus dinosaur skull, late Jurassic period, Wyoming, USA HK$2,200,000–2,800,000 ($284,000–362,000) 2 A pair of mammoth tusk Chukchi snow goggles, northeastern Siberia, early 19th century HK$120,000–180,000 ($15,500–23,300) 3 A wax anatomical model of a head, Italian School, late 18th/ early 19th century, possibly a follower of Clemente Susini HK$180,000–250,000 ($23,300–32,300) 4 Didactic flowers (one shown), late 19th century, probably by Robert Brendel or Reinhold Brendel HK$40,000–60,000 ($5,200–7,800) 5 CHANG CHIA-CHU (ZHANG JIAJU) Portrait, 2016 HK$100,000–150,000 ($12,900–19,400)

8

6 A wax anatomical head in profile, Italian School, 18th/19th century HK$40,000–60,000 ($5,200–7,800) 7 A Blachia siamensis Bonsai HK$60,000–80,000 ($7,800–10,400) 8 A very important gogotte, Oligocene (30 million years old), Fontainebleau, France HK$250,000–350,000 ($32,300–45,200)

7

9 A Roman marble head of Aphrodite Anadyomene, circa 1st/2nd century AD HK$70,000–90,000 ($9,100–11,700) 10 JAMIE SALMON Self portrait fragment, 2013 HK$150,000–200,000 ($19,400–25,800) Curiosity III will be exhibited in Hong Kong from 31 March–3 April. Auction: 4 April. Enquiries: +852 2822 8128.

10

9

SOTHEBY’S

35


THE VALUE OF ART

In the ten-part video series The Value of Art, global Sotheby’s specialists from across categories discuss the factors that determine an object’s value: authenticity, condition, rarity, quality, provenance, historical importance, medium, size, subject matter and fashion.

Episode 2

CONDITION How does an artwork’s physical state affect its value? Old Master Paintings specialist Jonquil O’Reilly explains.

Among the many criteria Sotheby’s specialists consider when determining the value of art, the most obvious may be condition, but evaluating it is no simple matter. Besides factoring in the date of the object’s creation, consideration should be given to the way its materials are known to age and to the various environments in which the work has been kept. Paint might be cracking on the surface, but is that typical of the artist’s canvases or a sign of damage? Once the piece has been bought, condition also plays into the decision to restore it, and there, tastes vary. Some collectors might want their Dutch landscape to appear as if fresh out of the studio, while others “might want it to look like it’s been sitting over a smoky wood fire for the last century,” says Old Master Paintings specialist Jonquil O’Reilly, who shares her expertise here. aging gracefully “Condition is incredibly important, particularly the earlier the painting. I work with a lot of medieval Italian works, for example, and if you’re looking at a gold-ground painting from around 1300, realistically it’s not going to be in pristine condition. If you find one that is, you are very lucky.”

Sotheby’s specialist Jonquil O’Reilly.

36

SOTHEBY’S

coming clean “One of the first things you have to work out is whether it was painted with organic substances. When egg tempera is cleaned, for instance, even the gentlest of solvents can eat through the more delicate glazes on the surface. Let’s say

you’re in a museum looking at early Renaissance paintings. You see a Madonna, and her face might seem a bit green. That’s because the artist used a green ground as the foundation for the skin tones and built glazes on top of that. The more the painting has been cleaned, the more top layers are likely to be lost – hence the Madonna’s odd skin colour.” altered state “Deciding how much to restore something – or how much of an old restoration to remove – is very tricky. You have to try to anticipate what you’re going to find underneath and determine how much value there is in a painting that’s been altered by a later hand, even if it was done for the good of the artwork.” Acquired Taste “There’s no one answer when it comes to restoration. Often a painting comes to us, and we say, ‘Actually, it’s better to offer this at auction not restored, so that the new owner can decide.’ Restoration is about personal taste. But that’s just one side of it. With a painting that’s been damaged, you have to decide how much you want it to be restored to what it would have been. In which case, you sort of knit its surface back together and make it more legible, while considering how much you really want to alter the artist’s primary strokes.” The Value of Art, an original video series presented by Sotheby’s Financial Services, is available online at sothebys.com/valueofart.


Š 2017 ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

ANDY WARHOL, $(4), 1982

TREASURE THE ART. UNLOCK THE VALUE. As the art market reaches new heights, it is time to look at your art in a new light. Sotheby’s Financial Services allows you to enjoy your investment in fine art, decorative art or jewellery with renewed liquidity, capitalising on its value while maintaining ownership. With over 25 years of experience in art lending, more than $4 billion in loans made to date, and in-depth knowledge of the international art market, we can arrange truly bespoke financing solutions for our clients. Comprehensive valuations from renowned specialists combined with unparalleled market expertise enable us to offer loans discreetly and with unmatched speed. Contact us for a confidential consultation today. Enquiries New York +1 212 894 1130 London +44 (0) 207 293 6006 Hong Kong +852 2822 8188 services@sothebysfinancial.com sothebysfinancial.com


© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

The relaxed living room created by Gloria Cortina for a home in Sierra Itambe, near Mexico City.


AT HOME WITH ART

BALANCE & BEAUTY A fine grasp of volume and void, culture and art defines Gloria Cortina’s interiors and furniture. Marisa Bartolucci meets the Mexico City-based designer.

hen it was time for college, Gloria Cortina desperately wanted to go to architecture school, but her fiercely conservative father forbade it, so adamant was he that she become a stay-at-home wife and mother. Ironically, marriage proved her liberation: “My husband Santiago introduced me to a world of possibilities,” says Cortina, now a much sought-after interior designer. Santiago’s great aunt was Inés Amor, the legendary founder of the Galería de Arte Mexicano (GAM), Mexico City’s first gallery of Modern art. Amor became Cortina’s role model. “I saw that being a woman could be extremely powerful,” Cortina explains. After the young couple moved to New York, Cortina studied at Parsons School of Design and worked for architect David Ling. Returning to Mexico City, she joined the architecture studio of Ricardo Legorreta and, some years later, opened her own interiors firm. Two years ago, she met New York design dealer Cristina Grajales, a native of Colombia, who recognised in Cortina a budding creator. Last autumn, Cortina introduced her collection of sculptural furnishings crafted from bronze, obsidian and quartz to great acclaim at Grajales’s gallery. The show then travelled to Mexico City’s GAM, bringing Cortina full circle to the institution whose founder first inspired her. Marisa Bartolucci caught up with the designer at this exciting point in her career.

PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL CALDERWOOD

W

SOTHEBY’S

39


(This page) Gloria Cortina at home, with a Mathias table of her own design in the foreground. (Opposite, from top) Art and furniture are perfectly balanced in the bar area of the Sierra Itambe house and in the living room of a city apartment.


RIGHT TOP: PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL CALDERWOOD OPPOSITE AND RIGHT BELOW: PHOTOGRAPH BY ALEJANDRO CARTAGENA

When did you first become interested in design? I’ve lived and breathed design since childhood. When I was fourteen, I redid my bedroom three times. I can remember visiting houses as a girl and questioning how the owners came up with their arrangements. I’m incredibly interested in the relationship between people and space. You have worked for two acclaimed architects, David Ling and Ricardo Legorreta. What did you learn from them? David showed me that if you have the correct approach, you can design anything – colour, size and scale do not matter. Ricardo worked with such passion on expressing his Mexican aesthetic language that every minute I spent working by his side made me understand things more profoundly. Culture and aesthetics became my priorities. How would you describe your approach to design and your style? My understanding of how people relate to their surroundings allows me to translate my clients’ needs into an aesthetic language. I believe this process, along with an awareness of cultural heritage, brings greater meaning to what I do. As to a particular style, I am not sure I have one. I’m more about the pursuit of balance and beauty. What engages me most is how people feel and how well they are represented in my designs.

SOTHEBY’S

41


PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL CALDERWOOD

The sophisticated living room of a Mexico City residence.

One of your first designs was a coffee table called Mathias. Who is mathias? It is named after Mathias Goeritz, an icon of Mexican art, who in the past was considered more of a designer than an artist. This distinction is irrelevant. Goeritz erased the line between art and design, and questioned how light affects objects and perception. Several years ago, the sun was shining through the windows, and I started seeing threedimensional light forms. I began drawing in my head and thought of Goeritz. This table is my connection to him. You often use materials with a strong Mexican heritage. What is their significance? I always designed furniture for clients. But after meeting Cristina Grajales, I went on a creative journey and started listening more to myself and to my culture. I probed Mexican mythology, explored native materials and worked on a new expression of Mexican design. I think culture is what defines us. In this incredibly connected world, how can we have a clear voice? Only by being authentic. How do you incorporate your clients’ art collections into their interiors? Art is the ultimate expression of human vision. It really reflects the character of the space, so it is essential in any

42

SOTHEBY’S

design concept. We work with existing collections, but we also build them and work with all sorts of commissions. In the past, you have said that your work frequently starts with a “three-way crack.” What do you mean by this? As in the letter “Y,” the three-part system represents the perfect balance for me: if you only have two parts you are missing the fundamental element. Working with a “threeway crack,” you can’t miss the relevance of the relationship between volume and void. The presence of materiality allows for the presence of negative space. It’s just a perfect balance. What is keeping you busy these days? I’m currently working on very ambitious, mainly residential projects. I’ve been incredibly fortunate in getting my clients to think of their homes as an aesthetic journey. Looking ahead, I am also developing a new concept for Cristina’s gallery for The Salon: Art + Design fair in New York this November, which has me working with butterflies as symbols of hope. # Marisa Bartolucci lives in New York, where she writes about art and design.


Do l c e St i l N ov o

www.sm e g.c o m


The largest private chateau in France and the inspiration for Versailles, Chateau de Vaux-leVicomte is being lovingly restored to its original splendour. Jean Bond Rafferty toured the estate with Alexandre de Vogüé, whose family

OPPOSITE: © XP PHOTOS

is guiding this historic project.

Preserving History

A GRAND


(This page) The facade of Vaux-le-Vicomte, designed by Louis Le Vau. (Opposite) Alexandre de Vogüé at Vaux-le-Vicomte. Photograph by Molly SJ Lowe.

AMBITION


L

ocated in the French countryside near Fontainebleau, set like a jewel in the centre of a rectangular moat, surrounded by spectacular French formal gardens, the Chateau de Vauxle-Vicomte may be this country’s most historically and aesthetically significant best-kept secret. As the first large-scale collaboration between three major 17thcentury figures in architecture, interior decoration and landscape design, the estate directly inspired Louis XIV’s Versailles. And as the highly sophisticated combination of Louis Le Vau’s magnificent Baroque architecture, artist Charles Le Brun’s imaginative decorations and André Le Nôtre’s exquisite jardins à la française, it is a true gem. Still, Vaux-le-Vicomte, the largest private chateau in France, has not received the international recognition it deserves. But Alexandre de Vogüé, who manages his family’s historic landmark with his brothers Jean-Charles and

46

SOTHEBY’S

Ascanio, is determined to change that. “Vaux is not known at all outside of Paris, nor in the United States,” says Alexandre de Vogüé. Awareness among foreign and domestic visitors alike is sure to increase as an ongoing series of extensive restorations is completed. One such project, the refurbishment of Le Brun’s spectacular Baroque ceiling paintings in the Chambre des Muses, will be unveiled on 25 March when the property reopens for the season. Erected between 1658 and 1661, Vaux-le-Vicomte was dreamed up by Nicolas Fouquet, who served as superintendent of finances for the young Louis XIV from 1653 to 1661, during which time he managed to reestablish the war-depleted French treasury and considerably embellish his personal fortune. “At the time, how you showed your wealth demonstrated your intelligence,” explains de Vogüé, who oversees the chateau’s communications and patronage. A fervent supporter of the arts, Fouquet enlisted great talents to design his new estate: Le Vau, the architect of the elegant houses on Paris’s Île Saint-Louis; Le Brun, an


THIS PAGE: © VAUX-LE-VICOMTE

© CHRISTIAN GLUCKMAN, COURTESY VAUX-LE-VICOMTE

OPPOSITE: © MOLLY SJ LOWE

(Clockwise from far left) Charles Le Brun’s The Triumph of Fidelity, with a detail inset, was removed from the ceiling of the Chambre des Muses for repair; a close-up of the meticulous work in progress; the ceiling prior to restoration.

acclaimed painter and decorator; and Le Nôtre, who worked with his father, Jean, at the Tuileries gardens, where he succeeded him as the king’s gardener. The ambitious Fouquet had a novel master plan. The creative trio would be given “a lot of money,” says de Vogüé, “and be free to do what they wanted, but the result had to be a completely new style, as bold and audacious as possible, and they had to work together, hand in hand.” That they did. At Vaux-le-Vicomte, harmony reigns on a grand scale. Steeped in the chateau’s history, de Vogüé explains that the young Louis XIV observed what his superintendent was doing – using art, architecture and landscaping to convey his power – and took away a crucial lesson. He continues: “The king planned to take it to another level at Versailles, which was then just a rustic hunting lodge, to show Europe and the world the extent of his own power.” But by 1661, when Vauxle-Vicomte’s buildings were being completed, Cardinal Mazarin, the Sun King’s all-powerful prime minister, died, and things changed. Aware that Fouquet would be competing with him for Mazarin’s position, Jean-Baptiste Colbert – a war commissioner who managed Mazarin’s financial affairs – had poisoned the king’s mind with accusations that Fouquet was embezzling from the royal coffers and raising an army. So by the time the flamboyant Fouquet honoured the Sun king at his chateau on 17 August 1661 – offering the most extravagant entertainment the French court had ever seen – his fate had already been sealed. Arrested three weeks later, Fouquet spent the rest of his life in prison. Vaux-le-Vicomte’s treasures were sequestered by the King, but the architecture, gardens and Le Brun paintings that dazzled from the ceilings of Fouquet’s formal state room, the Chambre des Muses and the Salle des Jeux, remained intact. Fast-forward two centuries to 1875, when de Vogüé’s great-great-grandfather Alfred Sommier, a sugar magnate, bought Vaux-le-Vicomte. “He came for the Le Brun paintings, especially those on the ceiling of the Chambre des Muses – he loved art,” de Vogüé explains. If Sommier was the first to restore the chateau’s 17th-century grandeur, his greatgrandson, Patrice de Vogüé, Alexandre’s father, took up the mantle a century later. After receiving the chateau as a wedding present in 1967, Patrice opened it to the public in 1968 and instigated a programme of restorations in 1976. Repairing six acres of roof took six years and cost “seven times” what is being spent on current work, Alexandre notes, but this crucial investment ensured the chateau’s preservation for the next generation. Walking through Vaux-le-Vicomte today is to understand Fouquet’s genius in bringing these masters of form together. The sun breaks through the clouds to dazzling effect as you cross the Grand Salon, whose soaring dome and panoramic views of seemingly infinite gardens captivate visitors. “This room is a symbol of the transparency that inspired the Sun

SOTHEBY’S

47


(This page) Inside the domed Grand Salon. (Opposite) The chateau at night.


THIS PAGE: © ERWANN MAIGNAN, COURTESY VAUX-LE-VICOMTE

OPPOSITE: ©GUILLAUME CROCHEZ, COURTESY VAUX-LE-VICOMTE

“VERSAILLES WAS BUILT TO INTIMIDATE,” SAYS PATRON ALEXIS GREGORY. “BUT VAUX CAN BE COSY.”

King’s Versailles,” de Vogüé notes. In the Chambre des Muses, Le Brun’s fabled ceiling – decorated with the nine muses and two remarkable paintings, The Triumph of Fidelity and The Night – is behind scaffolding. “None of the canvases are one hundred per cent 17th-century painting,” de Vogüé explains. “Fifty to fifty-five per cent are 17th-century, and the rest have repainting, mainly from the 19th-century and 1976 restorations.” The canvas of The Triumph of Fidelity has been brought down and placed against a wall for easier access. Four conservators are retouching part of the picture where the black serpentine form of Envy is visible. At the top of the scaffolding, more restorers are working directly on the ceiling. “The task now is to decide if the restoration has been badly done and if we can see original 17th-century painting under it,” de Vogüé says. “Then, we can do nicer retouching or we can decide if the repainting is okay.” Vaux-le-Vicomte’s team of restorers is headed up by the atelier of Ariel Bertrand, who worked on the Galerie des

Glaces at Versailles, with the participation of Bénédicte Gady, a Le Brun specialist and member of Vaux’s scientific committee, founded two years ago. These scholars work like detectives. “Gady was working at the Louvre’s Cabinet des Dessins and sent me a drawing of the same Le Brun nude that was completely lost to water damage on our ceiling,” de Vogüé notes; it is being used to model lost images. He himself solved an uncertainty around the damaged drapery and arms of Calliope, the muse of epic poetry, when he was doing research at Paris’s Musée Carnavalet and found an identical image that Le Brun had created for a long disappeared town house. Such extensive and meticulous work requires time and money, of course, but the $450,000 restoration of the Chambre des Muses is being financed by American collector and former book publisher Alexis Gregory, a longtime visitor to the chateau who has become a de Vogüé family friend. “It’s terrific, a brilliant creation and the centre of everything,” says Gregory, a devoted supporter of preservation efforts in Venice and elsewhere. “Versailles was built to intimidate, but Vaux can be cosy,” adds Gregory, who is so at home there that he celebrated his 80th birthday in the company of Le Brun’s muses. While growing up at Vaux-le-Vicomte seemed “normal” to the three de Vogüé boys, Alexandre concedes that he “didn’t realise at all the privilege I do feel I have today – the huge privilege to preside over Vaux’s destiny.” And so at age eighteen, reluctant to move into his parents’ lifestyle, he took a break – a long one. “I was a mountain guide in Chamonix for fifteen years,” he says. “About five years ago, I began to think, ‘Isn’t it time to come back down to earth and save what needs to be saved – this big chateau that has been in my family for almost a century and a half? So I came back and learned.” As did his brothers, who also took sabbaticals before returning: Jean-Charles was first, when he came to help their father fifteen years ago, and Ascanio arrived two years ago. Today, if Alexandre de Vogüé is a chatelain, he’s a 21stcentury version. “We represent a completely different generation,” he remarks. “I hate tweed, I don’t hunt or go to fancy parties. We don’t care about the aristocratic part of this life.” What the brothers do care about are imaginative ideas that help owners of historically significant estates preserve their family’s heritage, from donors’ “adoption” of Vaux treasures to the application of Alexandre’s mountaineering skills to change the lights that illuminate the chateau’s exterior. Roping up and scaling the facade to replace a light “saves the thousands of euros that calling in a special company” would cost each time, he notes with a smile. Clearly, at Vaux-le-Vicomte, Fouquet’s innovative and ambitious heart is still beating strong. ( Paris-based Jean Bond Rafferty writes about art, interiors and design.

Sotheby’s Museum Network Discover videos from Vaux-le-Vicomte and other leading cultural institutions on the Sotheby’s Museum Network. Visit museumnetwork.sothebys.com.

SOTHEBY’S

49


THIS MUST BE THE

t is no surprise that the idea of place runs throughout the 2017 Whitney Biennial. This year’s edition (17 March–11 June) is the first in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s two-year-old downtown home, a Renzo Piano-designed building that has become the nucleus of Manhattan’s Meatpacking District since it opened in May 2015. This venue offers a very different experience from past Biennials at the museum’s former location. In Marcel Breuer’s Upper East Side landmark, thick concrete walls and an abundance of stone conveyed a certain amount of gravitas, but with a fortress-like insularity. By contrast, the new Whitney connects site and city in a way that the inward-facing Breuer building does not, like the long-missing final piece of a puzzle that expands east across Greenwich Village and west along the Hudson River. “The building helps to set up a real conversation with the city,” says the museum’s Christopher Y Lew, who co-organised the show with independent curator Mia Locks. “A lot of the artists are excited at the prospect of engaging with the building.”

I

(Above) Biennial co-curators Mia Locks and Christopher Y Lew. (Right) The Whitney’s terraces, with views of the Hudson River.

50

SOTHEBY’S


museum’s contemporary art survey held in its expansive downtown New York home – is connected to site and city in surprising ways, finds Meredith Mendelsohn.

© BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

PORTRAIT: SCOTT RUDD

PLACE

This year’s Whitney Biennial – the first edition of the

SOTHEBY’S

51


52

SOTHEBY’S

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY CARRIE MOYER AND DC MOORE GALLERY, NEW YORK; COURTESY OCCUPY MUSEUMS; PHOTOGRAPH BY ULI HOLZ; PHOTOGRAPH BY SAMARA GOLDEN, COURTESY LESLIE THORNTON AND JAMES RICHARDS; COURTESY POSTCOMMODITY; COURTESY KEVIN JEROME EVERSON, TRILOBITE-ARTS DAC, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA, AND PICTURE PALACE PICTURES, NEW YORK; COURTESY TOMMY HARTUNG AND ON STELLAR RAYS, NEW YORK;

Postponed by a year so that the curators could make the most of the new surroundings, this Biennial includes 63 participants ranging from artists in their twenties to such seasoned practitioners as Jo Baer and Larry Bell, age 87 and 77, respectively, along with artist collectives. With media including painting, sculpture and film along with performance, virtual reality and video game design, this Biennial feels particularly all-encompassing. And while organised during the lead-up to the 2016 US Presidential election, the exhibition was not conceived as a response to the political climate. “People often ask us about that, but the artists were thinking through a lot of these ideas long before the election was fully on the radar,” says Locks. If the show “is by nature socially responsive,” she adds, “it’s more of an entwining and enmeshing than a direct reaction.” A fitting theme in a building that is a feat of urban and civic transformation, place emerged in multiple ways as an intensely relevant and fertile approach to digging into current events. From “the importance of place and land” to “the individual’s place in a turbulent society,” to how place factors into “how we all live together,” the idea was on artists’ minds, as the curators discovered while they toured the country to make their selection of participants. “There was no predetermined notion of what the show should be,” says Lew. “It came out of conversations with artists and what we were seeing in studios.” Adds Locks: “The conversation kept returning to large questions about what was happening in this country, how people are thinking about collectivity and about more imaginative ways of considering infrastructure.” In many cases, the artists’ investigations directly involve the Whitney’s building and environs. The New Orleans native Zarouhie Abdalian has created a site-specific audio project: installed on a staircase landing linking two outdoor terraces, Abdalian’s piece incorporates the sounds of tools used in the meatpacking and shipping industries that once dominated this waterfront district; it points to the disappearance of that manual labor in the late-20th century. For Los Angeles artist Samara Golden and Brooklyn-based Raúl de Nieves, the Whitney’s wide windows and views have inspired new works – Golden looking out toward the river and de Nieves east, toward the city. In its ongoing Debtfair project, the collective Occupy Museums addresses the financial pressures incurred by artists with an open call for submissions from debt-drowned creators across the US. Its contribution to the Biennial, Stress, Fear and Anxiety Bundle, 2015, comprises paintings, sculptures and drawings by ten artists whose collective debt totals more than $732,462 and is embedded directly into the museum’s walls. In some cases, the site-specificity transcends the physical architecture. “More than one artist asked what the IT network was like in the building,” says Lew. Among them is Irena Haiduk, who has set up a Wi-Fi network that


(Clockwise from top left) Carrie Moyer, Glimmer Glass, 2016; Occupy Museums, Stress, Fear and Anxiety Bundle, 2015; KAYA, Swarm Living Is For Bodybag Onion Braid, 2015; Samara Golden, installation view of A Fall of Corners, 2015; Leslie Thornton and James Richards, still from Crossing, 2016; Postcommodity, still from A Very Long Line, 2016; Kevin Jerome Everson, still from Ears, Nose and Throat, 2016; and Tommy Hartung, still from The Lesser Key of Solomon, 2015.

piggybacks on the Whitney’s. When museumgoers access the network on their devices, they discover that a “.yu” extension has been added to the URL of any website they visit as a kind of ghost network of the former Yugoslavia. There is a second aspect to Haiduk’s project: Once on the network, visitors are invited to make investments into a virtual cooperative bank the artist has set up. The funds will ultimately be used to purchase land to counter foreign development in Serbia. Not all variations on the theme of place are so global in scope, or in such unconventional media. Sculptor Larry Bell, for instance, is showing his largest installation ever, a series of red cubes within cubes that become increasingly transparent and change hue as you move by them on the outdoor terrace. “People know his work, but now he’s scaling up and thinking about how these minimalist cubes engage with the body,” says Lew, noting that Bell’s installation is conducive to slowing down and contemplating one’s own physical space amid the cubes and within the city. Compared with some of the more immersive experiences on offer, painting might seem to have two-dimensional limitations, but at the Biennial that medium also manages to speak to the importance of place. Portraits by artists such as Aliza Nisenbaum and Henry Taylor bring to mind the way our surroundings affect our experience of the world. Similarly, a series of paintings by Jo Baer – who is best known for her early Minimalist work – features rock formations in Ireland, where she used to live, as a way of exploring people’s ties to the land. Other than the fact that these paintings have never been shown in the US, “The reason why we were so excited about including them,” explains Lew, “is that they investigate the importance of place through landscape and a certain kind of reverence for the land – something that feels especially relevant now.” As for the emotional power of place, one of the Biennial’s most political entries may be a disorienting, fourchannel, floor-to-ceiling video projection by the collective Postcommodity. Titled The Very Long Line, 2016, it shows the border between the US and Mexico whipping around four gallery walls. “We selected that piece almost a year ago,” says Locks. “Now, of course, it has a different resonance, and if anything, it is more pertinent.” Even at their most topical, the artists celebrated by the Biennial can be counted on to transcend the everyday. # Meredith Mendelsohn is a Brooklyn-based art and design writer and a contributor to Taschen’s forthcoming book on photographer Marvin E Newman.

© DUMMY COPYRIGHT FILL IN WITH REAL TEXT

Major support for the Whitney Biennial is provided by Sotheby’s.

Sotheby’s Museum Network Discover videos from The Whitney Museum of American Art and other leading cultural institutions on the Sotheby’s Museum Network. Visit museumnetwork.sothebys.com.

SOTHEBY’S

53


54

SOTHEBY’S


CENTURIES of STYLE Drawing on a rich archive of fashion, jewellery and more, Chatsworth’s most ambitious exhibition yet tells the story of the grand estate and its inhabitants through the clothes they wore. James Reginato meets the designer who’s bringing it all to life.

THIS PAGE: © MARIO TESTINO / ART PARTNER

OPPOSITE: PHOTOGRAPH BY THOMAS LOOF © CHATSWORTH HOUSE TRUST

C

hatsworth House, the Derbyshire seat of the Dukes of Devonshire and home to the Cavendish family for five centuries, has long been celebrated as one of the great treasure houses of England. Its stupendous holdings of Old Master drawings, paintings and sculpture, among many other categories, contain superlative works by such artists as da Vinci, Canova, Rembrandt, Reynolds and Veronese. Until quite recently, however, another significant collection under its roof remained virtually unrecognised: a trove of costume and fashion. This collection is soon to be revealed with the exhibition House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth, on view 25 March through 22 October. And in April, a lavishly illustrated companion book, which includes a foreword by the current Duke as well as essays and rarely seen archival photos, is being published by Rizzoli. Both the exhibition and the book focus on the extraordinary Cavendish women, beginning with Bess of Hardwick, one of the most powerful nobles of the 16th century, and Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, the 18th-century

“Empress of Fashion.” In the 20th century, Chatsworth’s legacy of style continued with such figures as Adele Astaire, sister and dance partner of Fred Astaire and wife of Lord Charles Arthur Francis Cavendish; Kathleen “Kick” Kennedy, a sister of John F Kennedy and wife of the Marquess of Hartington, heir apparent to the 10th Duke of Devonshire; and of course, Deborah Devonshire, Chatsworth’s chatelaine for a halfcentury, and her sister Nancy Mitford. More recently, the Devonshire glamour has been upheld by a generation that includes models

(Above) Mario Testino’s photograph of Deborah Devonshire and Stella Tennant in front of Chatsworth House, 2006. Originally published in American Vogue, November 2010. (Opposite) Mistress of the Robes coronation gown, worn by Duchess Evelyn at the 1911 and 1937 coronations and by Duchess Mary at the 1953 coronation.

SOTHEBY’S

55


BEFORE THE EXHIBITION WAS SUGGESTED, “I HADN’T PROPERLY REALISED HOW MUCH ‘FASHION’ THERE IS AT CHATSWORTH,” NOTES THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE.

Stella Tennant and Laura Burlington, who in 2007 married William Burlington, Earl of Burlington and heir to the present Duke. It was Laura, Countess of Burlington, a former stylist for Harper’s Bazaar UK, who conceived the exhibition. During weekend visits to Chatsworth, she became dazzled by the garments and accessories of every sort that she found hidden in cupboards and attics. Her suggestion to organise a fashion exhibition at Chatsworth was met with ready approval by her father-in-law. “I hadn’t properly realised how much ‘fashion’ there is at Chatsworth,” he writes in the book’s foreword. Following the Duke’s green light, Lady Burlington conscripted an array of talent to produce House Style, beginning with Hamish Bowles, international editor-at-large of American Vogue, who served as curator. Visual and performing arts polymath Patrick Kinmonth, meanwhile, took on the role of creative director and designer, along with Antonio Monfreda, with whom Kinmonth has worked on some memorable fashion exhibitions in recent years, including 2006’s AngloMania: Tradition and Transgression in British Fashion at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute in New York. “No one could have been better placed than Laura to mastermind this project: she is extremely interested in contemporary art, she has been a significant model, and she loves clothes, design and art,” Kinmonth said recently. “The genesis of the show was a conversation between Laura and Hamish, when he was staying for a weekend at Chatsworth. They began kicking the ball around, talking about finding a way into this

56

SOTHEBY’S

collection, which is just so varied and extraordinary.” But unlike many conversations, this one wasn’t just talk. “She didn’t let Hamish off the hook,” Kinmonth continues. “And, then, Hamish put me on the hook.” As he commenced work on House Style, the Anglo-Irish Kinmonth – who has had a protean career as a writer, architect, set- and costumedesigner, director and, most recently, as a designer of interiors and landmark exhibitions – was both challenged and delighted by the embarrassment of riches he confronted. “When we began going through Chatsworth, we started opening boxes, opening wardrobes, opening trunks, lifting lids – objects just kept appearing and we kept finding more and more things. Robes of state that family members had worn at coronations, couture gowns, liveries, military uniforms, clothing for riding, hunting and shooting. With so many objects, it became a gargantuan project,” he recalls. “Clearly, there has been a constant interest in fashion in the family throughout the 500 years the show covers,” Kinmonth continues. “I started to make connections between the clothes and the incredible collections of art, prints, drawings and books in the house. I started to conceive of dialogues between the people who have lived in the house and these objects.” As a result, House Style – which is made possible with the support of principal sponsor Gucci, together with Sotheby’s – is on display throughout the 297-room Baroque house, including in its most magnificent interiors. The show opens in the portrait-lined Painted Hall with “a big statement,” says Kinmonth: an oversize photograph of Stella Tennant dressed as a punk, confronting her forebears in their state regalia. Many of the rooms suggested subjects, he adds. “The chapel has a piece by Damien Hirst that has an almost pagan quality. That drew me to the idea of the circle of life. So we have clothes from christenings and funerals.” Another section is devoted to the Devonshire House Ball, a grand 1897 affair thrown by the 8th Duke and Duchess at Devonshire House, their London residence, which was originally designed for the 3rd Duke by eminent architect and landscape designer William Kent and built between 1734 and 1740. While spectacular entertainments here were customary, the milestone of Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee offered the family “the perfect opportunity to give the ball of the century,” Lady


COLLECTION OF THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE, CHATSWORTH HOUSE, UK © DEVONSHIRE COLLECTION, CHATSWORTH / REPRODUCED BY PERMISSION OF CHATSWORTH SETTLEMENT TRUSTEES / BRIDGEMAN IMAGES © VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM, LONDON THE DEVONSHIRE COLLECTION © CHATSWORTH HOUSE TRUST © THE CECIL BEATON STUDIO ARCHIVE AT SOTHEBY’S

(Clockwise from top left) A Cecil Beaton portrait of the Duchess of Devonshire, 1960; Thomas Gainsborough’s portrait of Duchess Georgiana, 1785–87; Lafayette Ltd’s Lady Wolverton as Britannia, 1897; the 1969 christening of the Earl of Burlington, who wears the Cavendish family christening gown; Equestrian Portrait of the 1st Duke of Devonshire, attributed to Adam Frans van der Meulen, circa 1670; and Lord Charles Cavendish and Adele Astaire on their wedding day, 1932.

SOTHEBY’S

57


INSTALLATION PHOTOGRAPH BY ROB MCKEEVER, COURTESY GAGOSIAN


Sophia Topley, a sister of the present Duke, writes in her essay for Rizzoli’s House Style. The fancy-dress ball – the invitation stipulated that attire should be “allegorical or historical before 1815” – drew the crème de la crème of British and European royalty and aristocracy. While the Prince of Wales came as a Grand Prior of the Order of St John, it was Louise, the Duchess of Devonshire, who stole the show. Portraying Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra, she had her gown designed by the House of Worth, which fashioned a skirt of gold gauze appliquéd with tinsel medallions and peacock plumes spangled with sequins, worn over an ivory satin underskirt wrought with silver thread and diamonds. Kinmonth’s approach to exhibition design is similar to his opera direction – he is currently preparing productions of Mozart’s La clemenza di Tito and Wagner’s Tannhäuser for the Badisches Staatstheater Karlsruhe and the Cologne Opera, respectively. “It is always about telling a story, setting up reverberations,” he explains. “The way you arrange objects can suggest connections to the viewer. But I try to do that without rubbing it in.” Although House Style covers half a millennium of history, the mood of the show is anything but fusty. Nothing ever is at Chatsworth anyway, Kinmonth says. “The current Duke is absolutely fascinated by the present and the future,” he notes. “The wonders of today are as welcome as the splendours of the past in the house. So I tried not to be nostalgic. I designed the show in a super avant-garde way.” Indeed, even though Kinmonth and his cohorts have masterfully conjured the spirits of past generations of Devonshires, visitors looking for ghostly figures will be disappointed. “Ghosts need a bit of damp, the odd leaky roof, but Chatsworth is so un-dusty: there is not much room for ghosts,” he says. “It is just so beautifully looked after. It’s the most pulled-together establishment on the planet.” The perfect backdrop for a presentation of the great house’s fashionable riches. $

“THE WONDERS OF TODAY ARE AS WELCOME AS THE SPLENDOURS OF THE PAST IN THE HOUSE,” SAYS EXHIBITION DESIGNER PATRICK KINMONTH.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY THOMAS LOOF © CHATSWORTH HOUSE TRUST

James Reginato is writer-at-large of Vanity Fair and author of Great Houses, Modern Aristocrats (Rizzoli, $60). House Style: Five Centuries of Fashion at Chatsworth is on view at Chatsworth, in Derbyshire, 25 March– 22 October, www.chatsworth.org, and the accompanying book will be published in April (Rizzoli, $60).

Sotheby’s Museum Network

(Above) A diamond tiara created for Duchess Louise, AE Skinner, 1893–97; a tiara created for Lady Louisa Egerton, 1870; and photographs of the current Duke and Duchess of Devonshire on their wedding day, 1967, and Deborah Devonshire wearing the 1870 tiara as a necklace, 1951.

Discover videos from Chatsworth and other leading cultural institutions on the Sotheby’s Museum Network.

(Opposite) A fancy dress costume by the House of Worth worn by Duchess Louise, 1897.

Visit museumnetwork.sothebys.com.

SOTHEBY’S

59


CALENDAR

APRIL 2017

Upcoming auctions and exhibitions in North America, Europe and Asia. All Sotheby’s exhibitions are free and open to the public.

MARCH

22 FINE JEWELS Exhibition 17, 19–21 March Auction 22 March London

(Above) An outstanding and extremely rare celadon jade figure of an elephant, Western Han dynasty HK$5,000,000– 7,000,000 Important Jade Animals from the Chang Shou Studio

31 SOTHEBY’S DIAMONDS 31 March–5 April Hong Kong

5 April, Hong Kong (Below) PABLO PICASSO Gros oiseau visage noir (A. R. 118) £100,000–150,000 Important Ceramics by Pablo Picasso

10 April, London

APRIL

2 FINEST AND RAREST WINES AND THE MACALLAN Auction 2 April Hong Kong

BRUSHWORK II – ALL THE WORLD’S A STAGE Exhibition 31 March–2 April Auction 2 April Hong Kong

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ART EVENING Exhibition 31 March–2 April Auction 2 April Hong Kong

1 S|2 Selling Exhibition

TRAUMATA: BOURGEOIS/KUSAMA 23 February–13 April London

24 Online Auction

IN MOTION: PHOTOGRAPHS BY EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE Exhibition in New York 30 March–4 April Online Auction 24 March–10 April

1 A MONUMENTAL COLLECTION FROM THE CELLARS OF A CONNOISSEUR PART III Auction 1 April Hong Kong

3 The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 3 April, with pre-sale exhibitions 31 March–3 April.

FINE CLASSICAL CHINESE PAINTINGS MODERN ASIAN ART MOMENTS OF FLASH MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART YAMAGUCHI TAKEO – COMPOSING MONOCHROME

60

SOTHEBY’S

An Umayyad brass astrolabe, signed by Muhammad Ibn al-Saffar, Cordoba, dated in Western Abjad 411 AH/1020 AD, with later Ottoman Turkish rete £300,000–500,000 Arts of the Islamic World

26 April, London


4 PRINTS & MULTIPLES

5 MADE IN BRITAIN Exhibition 31 March–4 April Auction 5 April London

SCARFE AT SOTHEBY’S Exhibition 1–4 April Auction 5 April London

PHOTOGRAPHS (Above) A rare gem-set and diamond necklace, Mauboussin HK$5,900,000– 7,500,000 Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong (Below) An exceptional Junyao purple and blue glazed tripod circular narcissus bowl, Early Ming dynasty HK$8,000,000– 12,000,000 Chinese Art from Two American Private Collections

5 April, Hong Kong

Exhibition 30 March–4 April Auction 5 April London The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 5 April, with pre-sale exhibitions 31 March–4 April.

SONG CERAMICS FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTOR YELLOW-GROUND WARES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MAUREEN PILKINGTON PORTABLE TREASURES – THE DR S.Y. YIP COLLECTION BEASTS OF ANTIQUITY – IMPORTANT JADE ANIMALS FROM THE CHANG SHOU STUDIO IN HIS MAJESTY’S PALM: EXQUISITE PORCELAIN PLAYTHINGS CHINESE ART FROM TWO AMERICAN PRIVATE COLLECTIONS

Exhibition 1–4 April Auction 4 April London The following Hong Kong auctions will be held on 4 April, with pre-sale exhibitions 31 March–3 April.

FINE CHINESE PAINTINGS CURIOSITY III CONTEMPORARY INK ART MAGNIFICENT JEWELS & JADEITE

7 AMERICAN ART Exhibition 1–6 April Auction 7 April New York

10 IMPORTANT CERAMICS BY PABLO PICASSO Exhibition 7–10 April Auction 10 April London

(Above) An extremely rare doucai stem cup, Chenghua mark and period HK$8,000,000– 12,000,000 Exquisite Porcelain Playthings

5 April, Hong Kong (Below) JU MING Taichi: Single Whip, 1997 HK$1,200,000– 1,800,000 Modern and Contemporary Art Evening

2 April, Hong Kong

IMPORTANT CHINESE ART FISHES IN THE IMPERIAL POND – AN EXCEPTIONAL XUANDE BOWL IMPORTANT WATCHES

SOTHEBY’S

61


CALENDAR

APRIL

18

12

Two KPM porcelain vases (one shown), late 19th century $8,000–12,000 Luxe: The Art of the Table

26 April, New York

CONTEMPORARY CURATED Exhibition 8–11 April Auction 12 April London

S|2 Selling Exhibition

A SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY: TUNG CHIAO AND HIS STUDY 18–29 April, Hong Kong

25 MAGNIFICENT JEWELS (Above)

Property of a Lady Platinum, sapphire and diamond brooch, formerly from the Collection of John E Rovensky, Cartier, Paris $200,000–300,000 Magnificent Jewels

25 April, New York (Below) GALILEO GALILEI Discorsi e Dimostrazioni matematiche, 1638 €700,000–900,000 Books & Manuscripts from the Jean A Bonna Library

26 April, Hôtel Drouot, Paris

Exhibition 22–24 April Auction 25 April New York

WATCHES Exhibition 21–24 April Auction 25 April London

20TH CENTURY ART/ MIDDLE EAST Exhibition 21–25 April Auction 25 April London

THE ORIENTALIST SALE Exhibition 21–24 April Auction 25 April London

27 PRINTS & MULTIPLES Exhibition 22–26 April Auction 27–28 April New York

IMPORTANT FURNITURE, SCULPTURE & WORKS OF ART Exhibition 22, 24–26 April Auction 27 April Paris

24 THE MAURICE F. NEVILLE COLLECTION OF MODERN LITERATURE (PART III) Exhibition 19–23 April Auction 24 April New York

26 LUXE: THE ART OF THE TABLE Exhibition 21–25 April Auction 26 April New York

ARTS OF THE ISLAMIC WORLD Exhibition 21–25 April Auction 26 April London

IMPORTANT SILVER, GOLD BOXES & OBJECTS OF VERTU Exhibition 21–25 April Auction 26 April Paris

BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS FROM THE JEAN A BONNA LIBRARY Exhibition 24–25 April Auction 26 April Hôtel Drouot, Paris

FINEST AND RAREST WINES Auction 26 April London

Sotheby’s New York 1334 York Avenue Hours: Mon–Sat 10 am–5 pm Sun 1 pm–5 pm +1 212 606 7000 Sotheby’s London 34–35 New Bond Street Hours: Mon–Fri 9 am–4:30 pm Weekends noon–5 pm +44 (0)20 7293 5000 Sotheby’s Paris 76 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré Hours: Mon–Sat 10 am–6 pm +33 1 53 05 53 05 Sotheby’s Hong Kong 5/F One Pacific Place 88 Queensway, Hong Kong Hours: Mon–Fri 10 am–6 pm Sun 11 am–5 pm +852 2524 8121 Sotheby’s Hong Kong auctions and exhibitions are held at the Hong Kong Convention & Exhibition Centre 1 Expo Drive Wanchai, Hong Kong Hours: Daily 10 am–6:30 pm +852 2524 8121 Visit sothebys.com/onview for the latest exhibition information.

62

SOTHEBY’S


HOW TO BUY AT AUCTION

3

Register At least 24 hours before the auction, visit sothebys.com and register for the sale in a few simple steps. Or telephone the Sotheby’s location where the auction will take place. Either way, it will only take a few minutes.

An auction is the simplest and most trusted way to buy art – and at Sotheby’s, it has never been easier.

4 1

COURTESY OF TRANSISTOR STUDIOS

2

Browse the Catalogue Go to sothebys.com and browse the complete catalogue of art for sale. Or download Sotheby’s free iOS and Android apps on your mobile device.

5

Bid Join in the excitement of the auction in person, by phone or online. You decide when to stop bidding, and therefore you only pay as much as you think a work of art is worth.

Pick Up After the sale, you may settle your account and take your newly acquired art with you. Or we would be happy to arrange delivery.

Visit the Exhibition The week of the sale, visit our beautiful galleries to view the art you are interested in owning. All exhibitions and auctions are free and open to the public.

6

Enjoy! The thrill of acquiring a painting or drawing may start with the auction, but the pleasure of living with your art lasts a lifetime.


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

F

rom the renowned 34.40-carat Stotesbury Emerald, the whereabouts of which were

unknown since 1971, to a Victorian necklace owned by a member of the legendary Vanderbilt family, the 25 April Magnificent Jewels sale honours the history of jewellery design and its most discerning collectors. An impressive sapphire brooch by Cartier is offered alongside vivid jewels designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany and diamonds in various hues, making this sale a vibrant celebration of springtime.

(Left) The Stotesbury Emerald, a magnificent and legendary Colombian emerald and diamond ring, the emerald weighing 34.40 carats, Harry Winston $800,000–1,200,000 Magnificent Jewels

25 April, New York

64

SOTHEBY’S


F

ollowing a stellar season of Modern British art, Made In Britain showcases the very

best across the categories of painting, works on paper, prints, photography, contemporary and studio ceramics as well as design. The sale features an exciting array of fresh-to-market works, including a celebration of 1960s London. With estimates starting at only £400, this auction offers something for every collector at all price levels.

(Above) CHRIS LEVINE Lightness of Being, 2004 £50,000–70,000 Made In Britain

5 April, London

SOTHEBY’S

65


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

F

or the first time in an evening sale

᭜⁎៺䈐仃⁎ॵ⢨㺬᫦⪣А㬊㶀უ҉৮喑

series in Hong Kong, we are

࠲᠙ᅇeㆠỚeጡ᫜ധϋࣷ㞫ᓤ䛹Ⴖeᵩ

delighted to present important

ᅩ喑ॵ⤫Პ㺬᫦⪣А㬊㶀ᕊ⒛㇫倀ȡ⤫⪣

Western contemporary works, including

Аϋ≟䘕Ъ‫࠲ݴ‬᠙ᑢ᯶‫ވ‬Ί̶Ꭱ‫⮱҉ޢ‬

Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Water-Worshipper

Ȩ㵭㌐喟⃺㜴ၽȩࣷᰫᷢᔄ⮱Ȩ䲏‫ڤ‬㈨݄6

and Adrian Ghenie’s Self-Portrait in 1945.

㮌ȩȡ᳄䷕ⱍጕ፲⇦⪘Ȩ䅽ᩣ⮱ᬖᮕȩ⣺㒂

Among the Asian highlights are Zhang

㊂՘Ƞ䋆♎ẢρȓᎡАȨᰵ␬ࡰጳȩ㾖ᘼ⯻

Xiaogang’s Bloodline, Mother and Son,

♣Ƞ⟯㡶᭯᱌Ȩ17.07.67ȩ߈⮩ࡰ䝋Ƞॠ‫ۍ‬

Zeng Fanzhi’s Mask No. 6 and Lin

͚䷕ᮜ䰆⧔Ȩ䛻㣷ȩࣷȨỂὦ㜴㨛㟞ȩ㊏叄

Fengmian’s Harvest at Dawn. Revered

ⴇⰛȡ䮑ₑ͸ใᰡᣕ‫ܧ‬叻䂉Ƞᑢ㢁㠞Ƞ䭬܎

painter Zao Wou-Ki’s Bateaux au Claire

䔗ࣷ㈱⦌๘eᖖᵯ∏᣽ぶᲞࢄϋ‫ٵ‬䟿ϧ➖⮱

de la Lune, executed in the 1950s, joins

㒂㺸҉৮ȡຯₑ‫ॵ㉈҉־‬喑̺ღ䡜䕻喆

two works by Wu Guanzhong: Field Chrysanthemums and A Banyan and Lotus Flowers. Alongside varied insights into the region’s artistic triumphs, the sale also offers works by significant pioneers of Southeast Asia such as Le Pho, Georgette Chen, Affandi and Joseph Inguimberty.

66

SOTHEBY’S


(Rightठృ) KUSAMA YAYOI NET-No.2 Yellow, 1960 㡶䫀ᑹ⩌ Ȩ台㞟㋟ 2㮌ȩ 1960Ꭱ҉

HK$18,000,000– 25,000,000 (Opposite ᄺ䴮) ZHANG XIAOGANG Bloodline, Mother and Son, 1993 ᑢ᯶‫ވ‬ Ȩ㵭㌐喟⃺ 㜴ၽȩ 1993Ꭱ҉

© YAYOI KUSAMA

HK$25,000,000– 35,000,000 Modern and Contemporary Art Evening

2 April, Hong Kong ⤫⪣А㬊㶀 ᮇ䫀៺䈐 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ 2ᬒ

SOTHEBY’S

67


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

T

he Chinese Paintings department has curated a number of special collections to be offered in the

upcoming spring sale, such as an array of paintings and calligraphy previously from the collection of Wu Hufan, along with art by his students and works from the infamous Guangdong book collector Mo Boji. The sale features masterpieces by Zhang Daqian, many of which were gifts to his close friends, including a splashedink and colour landscape on gold paper created for Tai Jingnong, a splashed-ink lotus painting made for Wu Hufan’s 70th birthday and red lotuses given to his friend Mao Yingchu.

͚సᰥ⪘䘕㇫ᓰゃް็䴲ᄵ䵹᫩ϷᎡ᭒៺ᣕ ‫ܧ‬喑⋢㧸ຯȪᶲᮜᰥᅸȫᩣ㫼ࣷፘ⩌ᰥ⪘Ƞ Ȫρ࡮㥙ࢤὀȫ㫼ऺუ҉৮ぶ喑㔹ᑢ๔ࡰ็ ፲䈵ࣸ͸҉ᰡᆙⴇⰛϛ吋喑ຯ䇭㜧䲉䓟䰆㻗 㿂䓝͸⑾ᒖᆞⅡ䝲㸪Ƞຯสॠ⎃ጳ̰࡮⩌ᬒ ͸෕㢤Ƞຯ䈵झ▐䏺⩹㔳წ℈╈݊͸㈲㢤 ぶ喑̭യ㪵㤰喑㒻̺ࠊᩣ喆

(Left ጓృ) ZHANG DAQIAN Lush Mountains in Misty Gleam, 1967 ᑢ๔ ࡰ Ȩ ╷䰺 ⦋䱱 ȩ 1967Ꭱ҉

Estimate upon request ѝ‫ئ‬ᒲ 㾏

Fine Chinese Paintings

4 April, Hong Kong ͚సᰥ ⪘ 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ4ᬒ

68

SOTHEBY’S


T (Above ̷ృ) A “huanghuali” dressing case with carved doors and giltbronze fittings, Late Ming/Early Qing dynasty ᬻ᱘㜠⌲݊ ȟ 台㟞ᷕ䰂ϧ ➖䢼䛾䞲 У Ⴥ⯛マ

HK$800,000–1,200,000 Portable Treasures – The Dr S.Y. Yip Collection

5 April, Hong Kong

he Dr S.Y. Yip Collection is an

㥶ឬ㔭䛘⩌͸ᩨ⢶ᆞᝬ喑᝭㫼ᬻᐼუ‫ڤ‬喑⣺

internationally acclaimed,

㦽᫩̷̓㈭‫ژ‬Ί࡮ᎡА喑䯲䕥㜨઱喑̓⩹ⴒ

exquisite group of Ming

ऺ喑㎩2015Ꭱ10ᰵᄵൡ喑‫ں‬⢨㷃⣺ᄼகȠᵵ

dynasty furniture avidly assembled

䵚უ‫ڤ‬喑倅㜡䯲䕥喑Ⰾᆂᬻ᱘⌲݊᪴ϧუᅲ

during the last two decades of the

͸⌲㤜㙘Ԅ喑⹵‫ں‬㎹Ҡ㍫ȡ⪣͚㇫৮㺮᪥台

20th century. Following the spectacular

㟞ᷕ䰂ϧ➖Ⴥ⯛マࣷᄼ◂ᵹ喑ᱽҠጒ㌨喑ࡍ

success of the furniture sold in October

ᓰ⢕䕸ȡ

2015, this fine group consists of smaller furniture items and tabletop pieces, embodying the elegance and refinement of scholarly interiors in the late Ming and Qing dynasties. Highlights of the collection include two rare “huanghuali” items: a dressing case with carved doors and gilt-bronze fittings as well as a small kang table.

䑂ጔ㷃⣺ᄣ 喟 ᩨ⢶ᆞᝬ㫼 ᬻᐼუ‫ڤ‬ 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ5 ᬒ

SOTHEBY’S

69


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

T

his outstanding Xuande lobed

აᓤ๔⯹喑ໆ҉࡮⨐㟞ᐼ喑⡣㠒㢤㥶ࡷ㋨᱗

bowl, intricately painted in the

ᩫ喑⺋㎗⍥傇ఈᅫ喑‫Ⱕږږ‬ᄺ喑ံ∠Ⅱ㬨↍

most brilliant tones of underglaze

㨛͸䫀喑ჱ⌲⮪᏶⒁͸ᓤȡ㋀₤̓А‫נ‬ឬ喑

blue with a design of fish swimming in

Ꭵ⡣Ⴙ㒻♎᤺喑੼吻ᬻ݊䱿㟞䮣ۣ͸ጁȡ⻮

a pond and preserved in extraordinary

ϧᩣ㫼͚㊂♎‫ײ‬ᰶ喑‫̓נ‬㎗Ⱕह傇㬨㈸͸ა

condition, is arguably the greatest

ᓤ⯹喑गᰶझࡄᩲმࢇ➖䮏㫼‫ږ‬Ҹज䇴℁

example of early Ming blue and white

䐰喑♣ᅧᄥ⮳䐰ᄼȡₑა⿝๔⯹喑ᬖ᫩1963

porcelain in private hands. The only

ᎡౕᲞϙస⿸ࢇ➖乕‫ڙ‬䪸ᆂ‫ܧ‬喑㦄䠱⩇䅽喑

comparable examples are two smaller

ౕᬒ᱙◧ϧ᝭ᚂ喑⤫㺸᫩స䯈㬊㶀ጯൡ喑䰐

bowls preserved in the National Palace

㘪ज䇡Όȡ

Museum in Taipei. Revered and extensively published in Japan since its first public exhibition at the Tokyo National Museum in 1963, its appearance on the international art market now is a cause for celebration.

(Above ̷ృ) An exceptionally large, fine and important blue and white lobed “fish pond” bowl, Xuande mark and period ᬻაᓤ ȟ 䱿㟞傇 㬨㈸ ࡮Ḟ 㤞 ऐ ๔⯹ Ȩ๔ᬻ აᓤ Ꭱ㸪 ȩ 

Estimate upon request ѝ‫ئ‬ᒲ 㾏

Fishes in the Imperial Pond – An Exceptional Xuande Bowl

5 April, Hong Kong 傇䆘Ꭺ 㫺喟 ᬻაᓤ 䱿㟞 傇㬨㈸ ࡮Ḟ 㤞ऐ๔ ⯹ 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ 5 ᬒ

70

SOTHEBY’S


F

ollowing the extraordinary

2016Ꭱ᭒႐㒲‫⥢־‬䛾䵀ᄵൡ᜽㍫᪽♣ȡឬₑ

success of the Pilkington

Ҡ㍫喑๘ϧ㠶⥠⥢䛾䵀⻮ϧ⣺㫼喑‫ښ‬У⩞ᬻ

Collection of Chinese Art sold in

᜽ࡃ㜠⌲䯺ₐ台䛶⨤கᄴϛⰥ᱙႐៺䈐ȡₑ

April 2016, this additional group, formerly

㉱⨤கҳ⎽䶜䊘喑౴◧‫⩌ٵ‬᝭䈵ȡ‫͚ڣ‬ᰶ⎽

in the collection of Maureen Pilkington

㜗H.R.N. Norton⮱ᬻ᜽ࡃ台䛶Ⱁࣷᰫ◧๔

(1928–2011), consists of six exceptional

㋚ᓤ❢ธ᝭㫼͸ᬻᑅ⇨台ౝ䱿㟞᷁ၽ㟞Ⱁȡ

yellow-glazed porcelain works ranging (Above ̷ృ) An exceptional yellowground blue and white “gardenia” dish, Hongzhi mark and period

from the Chenghua to Yongzheng periods,

ᬻᑅ⇨ȟ叱 ౝ䱿㟞᷁ ၽ㟞Ⱁ Ȩ๔ᬻᑅ⇨ Ꭱ㸪ȩ

The highlights of the sale are a rare

HK$2,500,000–3,500,000 Yellow-Ground Wares from the Collection of Maureen Pilkington

all specially given to her by her husband Roger Pilkington (1928–1969) and endowed with truly illustrious provenance. Chenghua monochrome dish from the collection of H R N Norton and a blue and yellow Hongzhi “gardenia” dish that once belonged to Sir Percival David.

5 April, Hong Kong ⌲⒑ᴁ䑊喟 㠶⥠⥢䛾䵀 ⣺㫼叱 䛶 ᓎ⨤ 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ5 ᬒ

SOTHEBY’S

71


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

R

are and exquisite treasures from legendary makers feature alongside jewels by exclusive

contemporary design masters in the upcoming spring jewellery sale. A luxurious 8.64-carat Kashmir sapphire is complemented by a unique pair of ruby and diamond bangles by design extraordinaire BHAGAT as well as a remarkable gem-set and diamond necklace by Mauboussin.

ϷᎡఈᰵ᭒៺ॵ⢨็᳇⣺⼭⦝叄⮱ᄣⴠ喑 ϓᰶ⪣А㽚㼵๴᝺হ‫נ‬๴㋀‫⤍ڥ‬ᄣ৮❹⮱ ⦭⧕仃丫हൡ〣㞤ȡ⪣͚࠲᠙̭䵳 8.64 ࢎ ៶ભϭㆠ❫㫺ᄣⴠࣷ䷕ᵩ⢕➦⮱ BHAGAT ㈲ᄣⴠ䙺䦪ⴠ᝸䥟̭ᄺВࣷ⤍ᄣऺუ Mauboussin ᄣⴠ䙺䦪ⴠ䴲䣵喑䪰㔭㊂㒻 ䷕㤜ȡ

(Left ጓృ) An important natural pearl and diamond necklace ๖♣⊤ Ⅱ⣺ ⤍䙺䦪 ⴠ䴲 䣵

HK$3,000,000–3,900,000 Magnificent Jewels & Jadeite

4 April, Hong Kong ⦝叄⤍ ᄣࣷ 㔎㔍仃 丫 仆⍜ 4 ᰵ4ᬒ

72

SOTHEBY’S


O

ver recent decades, a wine lover and entrepreneur has carefully amassed an extraordinary

collection of wine in London and New York. Having recently taken stock, he decided to reduce his collection and has selected gems for three sales this spring in New York, London and Hong Kong. The collection encompasses some of the most desirable wines in the world, including rarities in a variety of different formats.

̭Ѻ㦎㤱䙿ᙈສ㔲‫ک‬Юẚუౕ䕻ࣨ᪥࡮Ꭱ᫩ ՘᪓হ㈽㈱㇫ᓰᩣ䯳γ̭㈨݄ࢀ䊷䲋܎⮱㦎 㤱䙿ȡᰭ䓾̭⁎⌲吋ႅ䙿ᒹ喑Ѓᘼ䂅‫ݝ‬Ѓ̺ ᓄ̺⍈ᄾЃ⮱ᩣ㫼䛼喑᫩᭜ᠾ䖥γ⪣͚⮱⦝ ᄣ᫩ϷᎡ᭒႐ౕ㈽㈱Ƞ՘᪓হ仆⍜䕟㵹៺ 䈐ȡ㾟㈨݄࠲᠙̭ψ◧㫼უᰭ䋕͸㠒勖⮱㦎 㤱䙿喑⪣͚࠲᠙ऱ̺ह⨣㸊⮱⣺⼭Ҡ䛭ȡ

(Rightठృ) LA TÂCHE, DRC 1978, 3 bottles 1978Ꭱ὆⏃㸊 3⨣

HK$60,000–80,000 LA TÂCHE, DRC 1985, 1 imperial 1985Ꭱ 6‫ࡴڙ‬㸊 1⨣

HK$170,000–220,000 ROMANÉE CONTI, DRC 1990, 1 magnum 1990Ꭱ 1.5‫ࡴڙ‬㸊 1⨣

HK$160,000–200,000 A Monumental Collection from the Cellars of a Connoisseur

Part I – 25 March, New York Part II – 29 March, London Part III – 1 April, Hong Kong 䶜䊘Ҡ䛭‫ ڥ‬㫼 䥾㫼უ⿃㫼 ⣺৮ す̭䘕ܳÿ㈽㈱ 3ᰵ25ᬒ すι䘕ܳÿ՘᪓ 3ᰵ 29ᬒ す̶䘕ܳÿ仆⍜ 4ᰵ 1 ᬒ

SOTHEBY’S

73


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

T

he Orientalist Sale brings together paintings and sculpture representing the

landscapes, people and customs of North Africa, Egypt, the Levant, Arabia and the Ottoman world during the 19th and early 20th centuries. This year’s sale is distinguished by two monumental depictions of the hajj: Opiz’s The Arrival of the Mahmal at an Oasis en Route to Mecca and Deutsch’s Procession of the Mahmal through the Streets of Cairo.

(Above) GEORG EMANUEL OPIZ The Arrival of the Mahmal at an Oasis en Route to Mecca £800,000–1,200,000 The Orientalist Sale

25 April, London

74

SOTHEBY’S


D

ated to 1020, this astrolabe is among the earliest known Western scientific instruments,

produced under the aegis of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain. Representing a celestial sphere viewed on a flat scale, it was used to calculate solar and stellar altitudes, for navigation and to read time, particularly for the five daily prayers as prescribed in Islam. The maker of this astrolabe, Muhammad Ibn al-Saffar, is known to have produced only three other scientific instruments.

(Right) An Umayyad brass astrolabe, signed by Muhammad Ibn al-Saffar, Cordoba, dated in Western Abjad 411 AH/1020 AD, with later Ottoman Turkish rete £300,000–500,000 Arts of the Islamic World

26 April, London

SOTHEBY’S

75


GLOBAL SALE HIGHLIGHTS

I

n 1946, Picasso was introduced to the Madoura pottery and workshop in Vallauris. This encounter was the

starting point for his exploration of a new creative medium that would show his full versatility as an artist, blending his interests in painting, drawing, sculpture and printmaking. Sotheby’s Important Ceramics by Pablo Picasso sale in April includes plates, vases, pitchers, bowls and tiles, featuring a range of forms from classical to mythical, human to animal.

(Above) A selection of ceramics by Pablo Picasso Estimates range from £1,000–60,000 Important Ceramics by Pablo Picasso

10 April, London

76

SOTHEBY’S


® MMXVII Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office is Independently owned and operated. | Photography: Jim Bartsch

SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

THE ART OF LIVING

Explore our selection of extraordinary homes currently for sale around the world.

FEATURED Santa

Property ID: XX39TZ | sothebysrealty.com

Barbara, California

SOTHEBY’S

215


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

HARBOUR ISLAND, ELEUTHERA BAHAMAS

Buttonwood Harbour Estate Impressive harbour front estate with 120 ft. of water frontage. Six bedrooms, six and one half bathrooms, pool, pool house, 90 ft. dock, with incredible sunset views. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID N7V7WX DAMIANOS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JAMES MALCOLM +1 242 376 9858 JAMES.MALCOLM@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$4,950,000 BSD

PARADISE ISLAND BAHAMAS

Ocean Club Residences and Marina, C3.4 Enjoy exquisite bay views from this luxurious three bedroom, three and one half bath, 2,496 sq. ft. condominium located in the gated beachfront and golf course community of Ocean Club Estates on Paradise Island. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 9HTK65 DAMIANOS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CRAIG PINDER +1 242 457 2282 CRAIG.PINDER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,750,000 US

PROVIDENCIALES TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS

The Shore Club Penthouse, Long Bay Beachfront Perhaps one of the largest terraces, the Governor’s Perch terrace flanks the front-end of the suite providing outdoor living and entertaining space. 6,240 sq. ft., three bedrooms, three and one half baths, 70 ft. frontage. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID X4QFBT TURKS & CAICOS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JOE ZAHM, DEE AGINGU +1 649 231 6188, +1 649 231 3534 JOE.ZAHM@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$5,500,000 US

ST. BARTH CARIBBEAN

St. Barth’s Most Spectacular Estate Nine bedrooms including a caretaker residence. Panoramic views including, the islands of Saba and Statia and year round sunsets. Private five bedroom main residence, two bedroom guest house, two pools and more. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 9KSEEX ST. BARTH PROPERTIES SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 508 570 4481, +590 590 29 90 10 STBARTH@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

PRICE UPON REQUEST


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

KREMMLING COLORADO

Masterpiece Ranch Home with Majestic Views This stunning 24,000 sq. ft. ranch home rests privately on 350 acres within the shared ranch community of Grand River Ranch. Just 15 minutes to a jet airport or a two hour drive to Denver. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID ZW394M LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JACK WOLFE +1 970 368 0018 JACK.WOLFE@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$28,500,000

VAIL COLORADO

Iconic Vail Estate The closest large estate to Vail Village. The elegant main and guesthouse with outdoor pool and patio have huge Gore Range views and ultimate privacy. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID KLNEG4 LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MALIA COX NOBREGA, JONI WHITE TAYLOR +1 970 390 1402 MALIA.NOBREGA@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$19,950,000

CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE COLORADO

The Ultimate Modern Estate Perfectly sited on private acres. Open floor plan with a seamless, organic flow. Smooth and flawless transitions from inside to outside. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID Y2Q6BB LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY LINDA BEHR, JOSH BEHR +1 720 275 7725 LINDA.BEHR@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$9,500,000

CHERRY HILLS VILLAGE COLORADO

1013 E. Belleview Avenue Italian villa of crafted elegance, situated on private gated and tranquil grounds, featuring guest quarters, pool and cabana and sumptuous main floor master suite. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM LIV SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JEFF HENDLEY +1 303 877 6767 JEFF.HENDLEY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,600,000

SOTHEBY’S

79


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

PEBBLE BEACH CALIFORNIA

Pebble Beach Oceanfront Estate Privately situated on Pescadero Point and a short stroll to The Lodge at Pebble Beach, this landmark home is one of thirty one rarely available water front properties in Pebble Beach. This iconic ocean front estate offers stunning views from every room of the Pebble Beach Golf Links, Carmel Bay and Beach, Carmel Valley and Point Lobos. Offering four ocean view suites, including an expansive master suite with a dressing lounge and sitting room, this gracious residence is bathed in natural light. The home is designed for the best of indoor / outdoor living, offering vaulted ceilings, an open floor plan, a chef’s dream kitchen, multiple living and dining areas for intimate or large scale entertaining, and a grand informal family room leading out to an ocean side terrace including an outdoor kitchen and infinity swimming pool. A one bedroom, one bath guest house completes the property. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID DCRSKX DREYFUS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL DREYFUS +1 650 485 3476 MICHAEL.DREYFUS@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$49,888,000

80

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

LOS ALTOS HILLS CALIFORNIA

Silicon Valley Estate Resort-like estate in a bucolic setting in Los Altos Hills, one of Silicon Valley’s exclusive residential communities. The 20,000 sq. ft. home on over eight acres is designed for entertaining on both a corporate and personal level for events in the tens or hundreds. Amenities include an indoor swimming pool with a retractable roof, massage room, movie theatre, vineyard, wine cellar and tasting room. The home features a freestanding office building perfect for board meetings or other business needs. Easy access to San Francisco and San Jose Airports make the home a perfect West Coast hub for its owner. This is a secure and private retreat from which to welcome guests and explore all California has to offer. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID F5MT74 DREYFUS SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL DREYFUS +1 650 485 3476 MICHAEL.DREYFUS@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$88,000,000

SOTHEBY’S

81


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

BEVERLY HILLS CALIFORNIA

Opulent Hollywood 1920’s Estate Richly detailed Beverly Hills Spanish compound steeped in Hollywood glamour, designed by John Byers, AIA, sited on lush and private one plus acres with sweeping city and ocean views. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0344078 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONALL REALTY PACIFIC PALISADES BROKERAGE ENZO RICCIARDELLI, SUZETTE ABBOTT +1 310 255 5467, +1 818 621 4908 ENZO.RICCIARDELLI@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$26,900,000

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA

Prewar Perfection Stunning views and light at the prestigious Park Lane on Nob Hill. Sprawling three bedroom residence is ideal for entertaining and an art collector’s dream with its dramatic entrance gallery. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0088329 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY SAN FRANCISCO BROKERAGE DON DEFRANCO +1 415 901 1732 DON.DEFRANCO@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$5,750,000

CAREFREE ARIZONA

Stunning Carefree Contemporary Home This 7,706 sq. ft. masterpiece has multiple areas for entertaining. Warm interiors with custom cabinetry throughout, a chef’s kitchen with a stainless steel appliance package, a home theatre and a fitness room. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID RCRTTV RUSS LYON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY FRANK AAZAMI, JAN LILLEY +1 480 266 0240, +1 480 488 2015 FRANK.AAZAMI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,500,000

ROLLINS MONTANA

Montana Shelter’s Island Estate Over 22 private island acres in the middle of Flathead Lake. Five bedroom, eight bath estate is a luxurious 22,000 sq. ft., 4,800 ft. of private, lakefront access. Includes guest/boathouse. Exquisite finishes. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 4RJC2C GLACIER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DAWN MADDUX +1 406 550 4131 DAWN.MADDUX@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$29,000,000

82

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

AUSTIN TEXAS

Spectacular Lake Travis Waterfront Estate Enjoy this world-class, gated compound on a 13 plus acre peninsula surrounded by exquisite views of the water. Architectural detailing, ultra-luxurious and elegant finishes, commanding landscaping including global monuments, grand pool and custom boat dock make this property truly one-of-a-kind. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 7MG292 KUPER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY RICK KUPER, JOE LONGTON, CAROLINE KUPER +1 210 240 8282 RICK.KUPER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM +1 512 633 5186 JOE.LONGTON@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM +1 210 240 7809 CAROLINE.KUPER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$8,450,000

SAN ANTONIO TEXAS

Exquisite Home in Bentley Manor Celebrating privacy and beauty on a one plus acre tree studded lot, this exquisite residence is brilliantly designed featuring a wine room, gourmet kitchen, stately office, and gorgeously landscaped yard and pool area. Entertain on the covered veranda with summer kitchen and fireplace. Doors and windows are aligned to let sunlight and air flow throughout the home. Highly desirable upstairs game room. The master suite is a paradise with fireplace and polished master bath including dual walk-in closets. Enjoy a luxurious, peaceful lifestyle at the end of a cul-de-sac/greenbelt. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID RZVJJC KUPER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY RICK KUPER, CAROLINE KUPER +1 210 240 8282 RICK.KUPER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM +1 210 240 7809 CAROLINE.KUPER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,250,000

SOTHEBY’S

83


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

KAHALA, HONOLULU HAWAII

Elegant Kahala This privately-gated, five bedroom home affords comfort and style. An expansive floor plan is enhanced by wood-framed glass egresses. Pool amenities and the one bedroom cottage provides a resort-like feeling. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID MDBJYT CARVILL SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY SCOTT CARVILL, KELLY ALLEN +1 808 216 0089, +1 808 306 7005 SCOTT.CARVILL@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$6,395,000

SAINT PETERSBURG FLORIDA

Stunning Waterfront Retreat Minutes from vibrant downtown St. Petersburg, this five bedroom, five bath home sits across from a wildlife preserve and offers deep water dockage on open water. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID XTP748 PREMIER SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY JESSICA DENIG, SANDY WATERBURY +1 813 713 1301 JESSICA.DENIG@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,500,000

HOBE SOUND FLORIDA

Jupiter Island Oceanfront Luxurious Bahamian inspired estate designed and custom-built in 2010 by international superstar Celine Dion for her and her family. Located on the exclusive Jupiter Island, this five and one half acre property with over 415 linear ft. on the Atlantic Ocean is being sold turn-key with almost all its contents. A security post welcomes you onto the estate which is completely fenced in for maximum privacy and security. The property is comprised of the main residence and five individual pavilions including a double four bedroom guest house (for a total of eight bedrooms); a tennis house with simulated golf range leading to the tennis court; a pool house with built-in grill and separate kitchen; and a cozy beach house with second floor sleeping loft and massage room. There are three separate pools on the property, one at the rear by the ocean, and two connecting pools at the front with a most unique water park feature to be enjoyed by children and adults alike. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0077138 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PALM BEACH BROKERAGE CRISTINA CONDON, TODD PETER, FRANCES PETER +1 561 301 2211 CRISTINA.CONDON@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM +1 561 281 0031 TODD.PETER@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM +1 561 273 6128 FRANCES.PETER@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$38,500,000

84

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

PALM BEACH FLORIDA

Il Palmetto When architect Maurice Fatio was commissioned to build ‘Il Palmetto’ in 1930, the five plus acre ocean-to-lake estate was declared exceptional. Years later, Fairfax and Sammons oversaw a four year meticulous restoration of the Italian Renaissance-style palazzo, Il Palmetto’s architectural detail was maintained. The result is an estate without peer in Palm Beach. The main residence is designed as a series of pavilions connected by cloisters, beginning with the two story entrance hall. The pièce de résistance is the living room with a shield-decorated ceiling and architecturally-framed sunset views over Lake Worth. The formal dining room with a 16th century carved ceiling accommodates elegant dinner parties. The main level is completed by the chef’s kitchen featuring custom appliances, butler’s pantry, family room, theater, billiards room, library, office and pavilion, all circling a courtyard and fountain. An outdoor loggia connects the inner courtyard to a large swimming pool lined with dark blue tiles. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0077024 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PALM BEACH BROKERAGE CRISTINA CONDON +1 561 301 2211 CRISTINA.CONDON@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$137,000,000

SOTHEBY’S

85


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA

Villa Jasmine Located on prestigious and gated Sunset Island 1 with Miami skyline views. This 6,670 sq. ft. home has seven bedrooms, seven and one half bathrooms, three car garage and a 22,000 sq. ft. lot. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID M67VYH ONE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MIRCE CURKOSKI +1 786 395 2139 MCURKOSKI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$21,500,000

BOCA GRANDE FLORIDA

Las Olas Gasparilla Island’s most historically significant seven bedroom, six bath Gulf front residence originally built by Francis and Louise du Pont Crowninshield. 145 ft. of Gulf frontage and one acre. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID WVQZPX GULF TO BAY SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY RICH TAYLOR +1 941 258 0036 RICH@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$14,650,000

KEY LARGO FLORIDA

Florida Keys Oceanfront Compound Situated on five plus acres featuring two main homes, two guest homes, private club house, 9-slip deep water marina, paved private driveway, elevators, two oceanfront swimming pools and spas, and sandy beach. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID H5S6WL OCEAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY NANCY HERSHOFF +1 305 712 8888 NANCY.HERSHOFF@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$11,900,000

ISLAMORADA FLORIDA

Development Opportunity in the Florida Keys Oceanfront enclave of five cottages situated on five and one half acres with 557 ft. of ocean frontage, two boat basins and development rights for four single family homes and 3,255 sq. ft. non-residential. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID R3RP67 OCEAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CHERI TINDALL +1 305 712 8888 CHERI.TINDALL@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$8,000,000

86

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

CHICAGO ILLINOIS

Unprecedented Urban Estate 25,000 sq. ft. masterpiece on Chicago’s finest street. Sited on more than eight city lots. Manicured grounds with multiple fountains, reflecting pool and antique garden pavilion transport you to another world. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID CF7PGF JAMESON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY TIM SALM, MATT LEUTHEUSER +1 312 929 1564 TIM.SALM@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$50,000,000

PAWLEYS ISLAND SOUTH CAROLINA

Classic Oceanfront Gem Masterfully crafted, elegantly appointed, this oceanfront gem is one of a kind in Prince George. Seven bedrooms, impressive master suite, chef’s kitchen, amazing ocean and marsh views. The best of lowcountry living. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 6XJ3DV PEACE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CAROL JAYROE, RHONDA BRYANT +1 843 237 7711 CAROL.JAYROE@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,650,000

JAMESTOWN RHODE ISLAND

Beavertail Point Mackerel Cove waterfront offers extraordinary privacy with views spanning from beach to ocean. Multiple decks and stunning interiors with state-of-the-art kitchen and cathedral ceilings. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID 58LG96 GUSTAVE WHITE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 849 3000

$3,750,000

NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND

The Villa Beautifully restored Victorian gem on Bellevue Avenue with renovated carriage house. Walk to Newport’s Cliff Walk, restaurants, and harbor. Comfortable yet elegant with seven en-suite bedrooms. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID MGKESW GUSTAVE WHITE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 849 3000

$3,650,000

SOTHEBY’S

87


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

NEWPORT RHODE ISLAND

The Wyndham Estate Historic mansion circa 1891 sits at the highest point in Newport with 360 degree water views. Designed by William Ralph Emerson, the property is situated on four acres of secluded grounds. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID TXQ9GE MOTT & CHACE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 314 3000

$6,895,000

WESTERLY RHODE ISLAND

Sun Up Located in a secluded neighborhood near the coast, this 4,995 sq. ft. home designed by architect Charles Moore offers unique architectural play with cathedral ceilings and octagon wall shapes. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID EV33SJ MOTT & CHACE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 401 315 0808

$1,775,000

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS

Historic Masterpiece Award-winning single family residence in Boston’s prestigious Beacon Hill. Complete with an elevator, an au pair suite and a charming front garden entrance. Breathtaking views of Boston and the Charles River. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID KDYVT3 GIBSON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL L. CARUCCI, JAMIE N. IMPERATO +1 617 901 7600, +1 917 299 9026 MICHAEL.CARUCCI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,900,000

BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS

Four Seasons Residence Stunning corner two bedroom unit at the Four Seasons Residences. This spacious and sunny unit has been renovated with superior craftsmanship and luxurious finishes. One valet garage space and storage are included. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID K6XPCG GIBSON SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHAEL L. CARUCCI +1 617 901 7600 MICHAEL.CARUCCI@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,995,000

88

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

ORLEANS MASSACHUSETTS

Stunning Bayside Estate Boasts Sweeping Views Enjoy the calm waters of Pleasant Bay from your private beach. Lovely six bedroom home and carriage house offer spacious surroundings. Open floor plan affords stylish coastal living. Extraordinary. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID JBJCQW OLDCAPE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY HARDMAN LIBERLES +1 508 237 3996 CHRISTINE.HARDMAN@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$2,395,000

ROWAYTON CONNECTICUT

Exceptional craftsmanship in Rowayton Newly priced one of a kind custom built home with artist’s studio in charming waterfront town of Rowayton. Enjoy breathtaking sunsets from the two tier deck with stone fireplace. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID KW9C3C WILLIAM PITT SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MICHELLE DONZEISER, DEBORAH COLE +1 917 620 0898, +1 203 858 2545 MDONZEISER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$3,595,000

STAMFORD CONNECTICUT

A Grande Masterpiece A gentle blend of classic styling and a fresh contemporary feel for the discriminating buyer looking for either a full time residence or weekender on over five gloriously private acres. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID DYST77 WILLIAM PITT SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY BARBARA HICKEY +1 203 912 0578 BARBARA.HICKEY@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$1,649,000

RUMSON NEW JERSEY

Prestigious Shore Community Stunning Colonial set on one half acre in-town location. Decorated to perfection. Offering four bedrooms and four and one half bathrooms. Blue-ribbon schools, close to beach, 45 minute ferry to New York City. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID YGJW7G HERITAGE HOUSE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY +1 732 842 8100

$1,999,999

SOTHEBY’S

89


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

OCEAN CITY NEW JERSEY

Tranquil Oceanfront Living Custom new construction beachfront features two, five bedroom condominiums. Luxurious amenities include chef’s kitchens, master suites with ocean views and direct beach access from private yard. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID RLMEVN GOLDCOAST SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EMILY L. WILKINS +1 609 513 2029 EMILY.WILKINS@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

FIRST FLOOR: $2,349,000, SECOND FLOOR: $2,699,900

EAST HAMPTON NEW YORK

Further Lane Estate One Block to Ocean Modern design on two acres in prestigious location. Double-height living room, gourmet kitchen, six ensuite bedrooms and finished lower level. Private grounds, heated gunite pool and tennis. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0047495 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST HAMPTON & BRIDGEHAMPTON BROKERAGES FRANK E. NEWBOLD, MARILYN CLARK +1 631 375 4942, +1 516 695 6590 FRANK.NEWBOLD@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$12,500,000

EAST HAMPTON NEW YORK

Georgica Designer’s Own New Construction New 8,600 plus sq. ft. modern construction built to the highest standard sited on a private gated acre. Seven bedrooms, seven full and two half bathrooms, pool house, heated gunite saltwater pool and spa. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0047396 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST HAMPTON BROKERAGE RYLAN JACKA +1 516 702 5707

$10,195,000

SOUTHAMPTON VILLAGE NEW YORK

Village Classic with Tennis Iconic 1940’s nine bedroom, six and one half bath house is a rare opportunity in the Village. Offers a deep and private one plus acres with specimen trees, pool, pool house and all-weather tennis. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0056709 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY SOUTHAMPTON BROKERAGE JONATHAN SMITH +1 631 227 4950 JONATHAN.SMITH@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,375,000

90

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

UPPER BROOKVILLE NEW YORK

Chateau d’Elegance Elegant brick manor on five manicured acres. Beautiful gardens, pool, Har-Tru tennis court. Custom gourmet kitchen with fireplace. Three room master suite. Masterpiece listing. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID T4H55R DANIEL GALE SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY CAROL COTTON +1 516 759 4800 CAROL.COTTON@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$6,399,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

784 Park Avenue, Apartment 2A Located in a prestigious prewar cooperative in the heart of the Upper East Side, this incredibly well-proportioned seven into six room apartment features 40 plus ft. overlooking Park Avenue. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB 00111296 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE JEANNE H. BUCKNAM, NIKKI FIELD +1 212 606 7717, +1 212 606 7669 JEANNE.BUCKNAM@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,850,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

36 Gramercy Park East, Apartment 7W A gracious two bedroom home with two full bathrooms is available at 36 Gramercy Park East, a historic prewar luxury condominium residence. The building offers 24 hour doorman and concierge. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111281 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE HIDEKO HORIGUCHI +1 212 606 7674 HIDEKO.HORIGUCHI@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,200,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

129 East 69th Street, 10B This meticulously-renovated three bedroom, three bath home defines the term turn-key with only the highest quality fixtures, hardware, finishes, and appliances. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0139112 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN BROKERAGE JEREMY V. STEIN +1 212 431 2427 JEREMY.STEIN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$4,995,000

SOTHEBY’S

91


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

NEW YORK NEW YORK

The Baccarat, 20 West 53rd Street, Apartment 22A Interior design by Tony Ingrao offers refined elegance and warmth to this two bedroom, two and one half bath apartment located on the 22nd floor of the Baccarat Hotel and Residences. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111284 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE KEVIN B. BROWN +1 212 606 7748 KEVIN.BROWN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$6,300,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

151 East 85th Street, Apartment 12E This 2,480 sq. ft., three bedroom, three bath corner apartment is located in the highly sought after E-Line at The Lucida with interiors designed by S. Russel Groves. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111290 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE MAX COLLINS, STAN PONTE +1 212 606 7720, +1 212 606 4109 MAX.COLLINS@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$6,295,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

One Beacon Court, Apartment 35F This spectacular two bedroom condominium apartment boasts unobstructed and dramatic views of the Manhattan skyline from every room and is ideally situated in the heart of Midtown Manhattan. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111205 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE SERENA BOARDMAN +1 212 606 7611 SERENA.BOARDMAN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$6,000,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

High Floor Tribeca Loft Located in Tribeca’s famed Textile Building, this sprawling three bedroom corner loft offers grand proportions, 16 oversized windows, original steel columns, and a state-of-the-art chef’s kitchen. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 0139184 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN BROKERAGE KAPTAN UNUGUR +1 212 810 4992 KAPTAN.UNUGUR@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$5,750,000

92

SOTHEBY’S


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

NEW YORK NEW YORK

19 East 61st Street The Carlton Mansion, 19 East 61st Street. Exquisite blend of a private 35 ft. wide, five story limestone mansion with luxury amenities and services including pool and gym. Grand living at its best. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111247 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE NIKKI FIELD +1 212 606 7669 NIKKI.FIELD@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$40,000,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

15 Central Park West Perched high above Central Park, this sun flooded approximately 3,157 sq. ft. corner residence enjoys truly phenomenal views from the 35th floor and is a marvelous example of a New York City trophy apartment. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00110830 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE SERENA BOARDMAN +1 212 606 7611 SERENA.BOARDMAN@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$29,000,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

730 Park Avenue This beautiful mint condition eleven into ten room apartment has views looking south at the Manhattan skyline and west over Central Park. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111015 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE EVA J. MOHR +1 212 606 7736 EVA.MOHR@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$19,995,000

NEW YORK NEW YORK

955 Fifth Avenue, Apartment 13B Spectacular park views, pre-war, eight rooms with two wood burning fireplaces and 44 ft. on Central Park. The living room, master bedroom, library or second bedroom face the park. SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM, WEB ID 00111203 SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY EAST SIDE MANHATTAN BROKERAGE LOIS NASSER +1 212 606 7706 LOIS.NASSER@SOTHEBYSHOMES.COM

$10,600,000

SOTHEBY’S

93


SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY PROPERTY SHOWCASE

ANNAPOLIS MARYLAND

Extraordinary Waterfront Estate Very rarely does a waterfront estate of this magnitude make itself available to the public. Historic Holly Beach Farm with its 1908 Georgian mansion, exquisitely renovated by acclaimed Arlene Critzos and Warnock Studios, is magnificently sited on a 26 acre oasis with three quarter of a mile of waterfront and private beach. From every exposure of the home and property are breathtaking scenic water vistas. The home itself consists of over 11,000 sq. ft. of formal and informal rooms providing for both full scale entertaining and comfortable family living. From the dramatic two-story foyer with circular floating staircase, to the exceptional formal living and dining rooms, to the gourmet chef’s kitchen and private paneled library, no detail has been compromised in presenting this masterpiece reflecting the pride of ownership.

94

SOTHEBY’S

Further enhancing the home’s wide appeal are sensational English gardens, private beach and fantastic pool house. Ideally located within an hour of Washington, DC and only seven minutes by boat and ten minutes by car to downtown Annapolis, this one of a kind estate has only had two owners since its construction in the early 1900s. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID TKKHQ2 TTR SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MARC FLEISHER +1 202 438 4880 MARC.FLEISHER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$14,500,000


SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

WASHINGTON DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

DC’s Finest Residence This five-part regency styled stucco home is a collaboration between Jones & Boer Architects, Banks Development, and Arentz Landscape Architects. Modeled after early 18th century English precedents by such renowned architects as Sir John Nash, this new 14,774 sq. ft. house presents itself as a careful study in symmetry, balance and proportion. Finely detailed, load bearing Indiana limestone porches and accent details give the home a stately charm and presence on the street. The interior spaces feature hand carved stone mantels, custom millwork trim, cabinetry and details ensuring the vocabulary of the exterior flows through to the interior to create a seamless elegant experience that is timeless in style. Rarely, if ever will one find a home constructed and designed with unparalleled materials and workmanship as this masterpiece.

Extraordinary landscaping, pool and separate pool house complement this stunning property. 3030 Chain Bridge Road, NW is nominated for two highly prestigious architectural awards, John Russell Pope Award and Palladio Award. SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM, PROPERTY ID VWCGMC TTR SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY MARC FLEISHER +1 202 438 4880 MARC.FLEISHER@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM

$22,000,000

SOTHEBY’S

95


ANATOMY OF AN ARTWORK

VIRTUAL REALITY

It wasn’t until 1999, when then nineteen-year-old Alex Prager visited an exhibition

ALEX PRAGER Simi Valley, 2014

of William Eggleston’s work at the Getty Museum, that she considered being

$30,000–50,000

a photographer. Now, the Los Angeles native meticulously arranges the scenes

Photographs New York Exhibition: 30 March–4 April Auction: 5 April Enquiries: +1 212 894 1149

she photographs with stylised, cinematic melodrama. Enhanced with digital effects, Prager’s pictures evoke the atmosphere of films by Alfred Hitchcock, Jean-Luc Godard and David Lynch with a slickness that borders on the theatrical. From morbidly saccharine women to faces captured in a crowd, her subjects exude a noirish sense of isolation, even when they are rendered in her signature Technicolor aesthetic. “I never wanted to take a picture that looked realistic,” Prager has said, adding she’s always wished her photographs “to have that false appearance and marry the worlds of reality and fiction.”

5 1

3

2

4

Prager uses the software programme to compile images from the mass media and her own camera without attempting to conceal her manipulations. The ensuing visual flatness is a trademark of her style.

96

SOTHEBY’S

2. MID-CENTURY FASHION Makeup, clothing and pop culture references from the 1950s and 1960s abound in Prager’s bold compositions, but contemporary fashions also appear, keeping the time period ambiguous.

3. CROWDS Prager has long been fascinated by crowds – the subject of her first solo US museum exhibition in 2013. To create her staged worlds, she compresses large groups of aimless, apathetic-looking models into small spaces.

4. CINEMATIC EFFECT Prager, also a filmmaker, is inspired by the suspense and melodrama of Alfred Hitchcock and David Lynch, as well as the synthetic glamour of Los Angeles, a common setting for her photographs.

5. ROBERT FRANK Simi Valley shares similarities with Robert Frank’s 1955 Trolley—New Orleans, the cover image for his seminal photobook, The Americans. As in Frank’s picture, a wall of windows conveys the riders’ alienation and isolation.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND LEHMANN MAUPIN GALLERY, NEW YORK AND HONG KONG

1. PHOTOSHOP


Discover one of the world’s greatest collections on a journey through 13 fascinating episodes. Watch the original video series. SOTHEBYS.COM/CHATSWORTH

#SOTHEBYSGREATCOLLECTORS

DOWNLOAD SOTHEBY’S APP FOLLOW US @SOTHEBYS


DOU BL E TOU R BI L L ON 3 0 ° T E C HN IQUE Sapphire Case Unique edition of 8 pieces

CELLINI NEW YORK

STEPHEN SILVER SAN FRANCISCO

BELLUSSO L AS VEGAS

509 Madison Avenue Phone +1 212 888-0505 www.cellinijewelers.com

2825 Sand Hill Road • Menlo Park Phone +1 650 292-0612 www.stephensilverfinejewelry.com

Casino Level . Palazzo Resort-Hotel-Casino Phone +1 702 650-2988 www.bellussojewelers.com

Profile for Danielle Thompson

Art & Home | April 2017  

Art & Home | April 2017  

Advertisement