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Sheffield School Of Architecture

Studio

Collaborative Production 2017 - 18


Studio Collaborative Production Studio: Collaborative Production is a design studio run as part of

The project began with a detailed investigation of the Don

the MArch degree course at Sheffield School of Architecture at

Valley corridor and its surrounding communities. The notion of

the University of Sheffield. The studio explores the creation of a

collaborative production extended to the working methodology

built environment which supports the collaborative production of

of the studio, with students working collectively, sharing

objects, processes and infrastructures; generating an architecture

resources, ideas and approaches. Following an introduction by

which utilises local resources and expertise and is responsive

representatives from Storying Sheffield, visual narratives were

to local needs. The Studio ran over a 20 week period between

used to analyse the physical and social context, interpreting the

November 2017 and May 2018, and was attended by 13 students

past and anticipating the future. Students then worked with

in the 5th and 6th year of their studies, working towards their RIBA

conceptual artist Steve Pool to create an assemblage of physical

Part 2 professional qualification.

and digital artefacts in a former steelworks in Attercliffe.

Informed by a reading of post-capitalist theory, the studio

Based on their initial findings, the students have developed a

positions itself in a future where a sharing economy has become

strategic framework which enables individual projects to interface

mainstream, promoting non-market production and social

spatially, functionally and economically as part of a sustainable

enterprise; a future where automation and robotisation have

neighbourhood, linked via a network of shared green energy and

changed the nature of labour and production, and transformed the

smart technologies. The ‘Island Loop’, a 10km running, walking

way people engage with local governance, education, healthcare

and cycling route, connects the projects via an active public realm.

and cultural exchange. How can we ensure that the new society which emerges from this change enriches people’s lives, is socially inclusive and is protective of the environment?

Individual projects aim to deliver a shared sense of happiness, wellbeing and inclusion through the provision of new research, education and recreational facilities, alongside high quality housing

The studio is located in Sheffield’s proposed Advanced

and opportunities for social interaction. In considering how

Manufacturing Innovation District (AMID) which aims to link

projects might be delivered, students have explored alternative

new forms of advanced manufacturing to existing centres of

funding and procurement models which prioritise social value,

production, education, sport and recreation. At the heart of AMID

environmental remediation and public health and wellbeing. Taken

sits the Olympic Legacy Park (OLP) and Advanced Wellbeing

together, the projects offer a future vision of a healthy, vibrant and

Research Centre (AWRC) which aim to develop technical

socially responsible city.

innovations around sport, health and wellbeing. Initial meetings with David Hobson and Richard Caborn from the OLP and Professor Steve Haake from the AWRC revealed the project team’s

Daniel Jary Studio Leader

aspiration to go beyond existing models of urban regeneration, embracing new technologies and design innovation in the creation of an active public realm.

With Thanks Ryan Bramley and Lucy Paige-Hamilton

Storying Sheffield

David Hobson and Richard Caborn

Olympic Legacy Park

Steve Pool

Poly-Technic

Professor Steve Haake

Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre

Richard Bland

Creative Sheffield

Patrick Meleady

Pitsmoor Adventure Playground

Maria Joao Villas-Boas

Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon

Darren Robinson

Sheffield School of Architecture

Ellen Page

Hutchworks


The studio

Daniel Jary

Caroline Green

Petros Antoniou

Bianca Man

Tom Moore

Michael McGuinness

Naomi Bailey

Beth Mamicha

Becky Smith

Laura Spence

Will Kreibich

Claire Yu

Ben Bradish

Jess Rees


The Island Loop Studio Collaborative Production: Studio Project2 1 Steel to Timber: The Phyto-Economy 2 The Happiness Research Fairground: On dopamine and data 3 The Hyperreal Oasis: Destinational Retreat 4 The Precarious Exchange: Food and Bio-waste exchange 5 The antidote to manufacturing - A carft centre 6 The Artist Labs: Science and art collaboration 7 Artificial Intelligence: Multi-operational Yielding Officer 8 Community Incubator: Live/Work/Collaborate 9 Active living made easy: Mixed-use residential scheme 10 Parialment of human augmentation: Bio-Hacking 11 Urban Forum: Virtual Reality Research Centre 12 NHS Vanguard: Closing the wellbeing gap 13 Good-ness Grief: Creative civic engagement with grief Studio Collaborative Production: Semi-Autonomous Neighbourhood 14 The Island Loop

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15 The green corridor 16 Remedial Landscape from industry 17 Cable Car Nuclei of 3rd Spaces 18 Multipurpose Tramline 19 Community Nodes (Decentralised Network) 20 Pedestrianisation of the ‘island’ 21 Intergenerational Housing and leisure

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22 Repurpose Meadowhall 23 Heritage spectacle and event! 24 Action to Decentralise Businesses 08

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The Phyto-Economy

Caroline Green Year 5


Based in Attercliffe, Sheffield, this project draws on the area’s history of engineering and steel to propose a new kind of manufacturing for the region. Advances in the production of

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engineered timber can now be seen as sustainable, viable alternatives to the structural steel currently used in large-scale architecture. Combining phyto-remediation (the planting of trees in order to remove or stabilise soil contamination caused by industry) with the production of engineered timber using the by-products of phyto-remediation (the timber); the first intervention is for Sheffield’s disused airport runway to be planted with trees for remediation, which can then be cyclically harvested for engineered timber production. The building houses a phyto-laboratory for the long-term monitoring of the remediation process across the wider site; an engineered timber manufacturing factory and a prototype building area for testing the capabilities of engineered timber and training people in its construction techniques. Here is an opportunity for the building itself to be a demonstration project to showcase the materials being manufactured; and a more open, community-led form of manufacture which is embedded deeply

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into its site and context. Drawings 01. Aerial phasing plan showing building & planting 02. Long section, West to East 03. Early concept collages 04. External perspective toward the South-West 05. Reference text: ‘Phyto’ (2015) Kennen & Kirkwood 06. Section, North to South 07. First floor plan 08. Aerial of Attercliffe, showing runway line extruded 09. Sketch collages showing disconnect of existing developments 10. Raised walkway collage 11. Steel to Phyto collage 12. Detailed indicative section 13. Timeline & context 14. Conceptual map of planting & gridded approach 03


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The Happiness Research Fairground

Petros Antoniou Year 6


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In a world where culture is completely driven by our digital data, where the sovereign is being challenged by the free-market, and where society is starting to question technology’s role in human wellbeing, all you need to do to escape is step inside ‘The Tober’!

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Located on the top of Sheffield’s brand new icon - the refurbished Wicker Viaduct - ‘The Tober’ promises a phantasmagorically magical experience of fun and escapism. Nothing suspicious with our free entry, we just care for your wellbeing. Step inside the ‘sniff-tangle’ and crawl your way through lively aromas, or ride the ‘Spotifi Coaster’ through captivating simulation chambers, or even enjoy a captivating adventure inside the moving ‘Bliss Simulator’. And don’t forget to beep-beep-beep your bio-watch everywhere! The fun never stops. The happiness research fairground is a joint venture between the

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Sheffield City Council, IBM and the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre. Our aim is to expand our knowledge on the human happiness, through a research program that blends the private, public and academic narratives of today’s free market world. Drawings

01. Project narrative. The client acquires run-down viaduct (a) and activates the area through a conventional fairground (b). The institute appears in the in-between spaces and pretains a certain uninterest in the faiground (c). The institute starts altering the fairground with data-capturing infrastructure (d) for their research ventures, slowly corrupting the fairground to an unrecognisable state (e) 02. Map of the ‘Tober’

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03. Client aspirations and three example rides. The academic (a) the public (b) and the private (c) 04. Entering the Tober as a fairground user (a) and entering the Institute as a worker (b) 05. The vaults as part of the fun (a) and as part of business (b) 06. Infrastructure passing through the tober (a) and new rides being created inside the workshop (b) 07. View of the fun from the cable car (a) view of the research inside a chemical room (b) 08. Riding the coaster with the bio watch, the source of all data (a) and fixing the data capturing infrastructure inside the institute tower (b) 09. The institute, standing alone 10. Model Snapshots

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MOR

E CO

MIN

G SO

THE TOBER

ON

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YOUR MAP TO HAPPINESS

CHECK IF SHEFFIEL IS HAPPY TODAY!

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helta skelta 5

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THE KEY TO YOUR MAP

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1. Grab your free bio-watch here! Beep Beep Beep it everywhere! 2. Up the ramp to visit the phantasmagorical exhibition on happinness and fairgrounds brought to you by IBM!

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3. Buy your happiness here! Shots of dopamine for only £2! Bargain!

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4. Crawl your way through spicy and sweet aromas and follow your favourite ones in the ‘sniff tangle’.

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Having fun - Active data gathering

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Cable Car - The tober from above

5. Sliiiiiiiide your way down this special helter skelter 2.0 and race your friends to the finish with ‘ghost mode’ DOWN TO THE VAULTS

6. Relax under the roller coasters wooshing hecticaly about you 7. Be a dare devil and ride this adrenaline pumping slide over the viaduct! 8. Enter the music and ride this environment-simulating coaster brought to you by ‘Spotifi’ 9. Follow the path down the viaduct for the cable car entrance 10. Down the escalator for more fun under the vaults! Arcades and simulation rooms can all be found here!

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11. Forget what you know about ferris wheels, this is the evolution! Imagine dragons and fairies. 12. Enter magical new worlds, in the ‘bliss simulator’. 13. Another one for the daredevils, ride under, in and over the institute before hitting a wall and back. Take a peek at the scientists working restlessly inside! What heros.

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14. Sit on the wicker arch and enjoy these shape-shifting Lizy the elephants!

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YOU ARE HERE THE TICKET HALL

YOUR HAPPINESS BROUGHT TO YOU BY

UP THE RAMP TO THE EXHIBITION

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TO

THE

TRAM

STOP !

Forgemasters

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The Joint Venture AWRC

Manifesto

databook

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Trajectories - Passing with the tram

Client Board Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre With UoS and SHU

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The

ure

t Vent

Join

AWRC

o ifest

Man

ook

datab

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The Vaults - a space for fun

Client Board Sheffield City Council

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The

Joint

Ventu

re Mani

AWRC

festo

databo

ok

Client Board Databook, a subsidiary of IBM Data Analytics Inc

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The Tober Ticket - A biometric intelligent wrist sensor


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The Data Tower - Housing the data collecting, logging and storing infrastructure

07b The lab and the guinnea pigs - View from the clean room

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06b The Workshop - Building new data capturing rides

05b The vaults - Coorporate space

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09 The Happiness Research Institute Ticket - Do your job

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The Hyperreal Oasis

Bianca Man Year 6


In the anxiety-inducing city, how can hyperreality in architecture provide escape, relief, and purpose for the anxious? Situated in close proximity of converging infrastructure networks, ‘The

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Hyperreal Oasis’ acts as a physical and psychological retreat; a fantasy in reality. Engaging in the thematic issues of isolation and anxiety in the digital age, the project desires to integrate digital technology into the built environment to positively improve the experience of anxious inhabitants of the city. The scheme is a response and critique of the limitations of the high-energy nature of innovation districts and the collective; favouring individual choice, meditative experience and transcendental experience through physical and metaphysical connection of users with nature and of their own consciousness. Hyperreality is achieved through blurring the imaginary and reality by juxtaposing augmented landscapes, therapeutic spaces, and immersive experiences. Step inside the otherworldliness of “The Hyperreal Oasis” today.

Drawings

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01. Welcome to the Oasis! 02. Escape Tower at Dusk 03. Escape in the Satosphere 04. Roof Plan of the Oasis 05. Exploded Axonometric 06. Walled Gardens and Retention Basins 07. Noticing the Beacon 08. Undulating Research Plots 09. Boardwalk along Therapeutic Landscape 10. Bathhouse Entry Mural 11. Central Plunge Pool 12. Bathhouse Gallery 13. Escape Tower Half Section/Elevation 14. Escape Tower Detail Section 15. Elevated view of Augmented Landscape 16. Bathhouse and Therapeutic Landscape 17. Reclusive Pods 18. The Sleeperie 19. Sleeping Pods 03


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A Precarious Exchange

Tom Moore Year 6


The Precarious Exchange develops a new infrastructure for the exchange of food, culture and energy. Providing security for an increasingly precarious national labour force, in the context

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of Sheffield’s post industrial Don Valley. Choosing a point of convergence between industrial networks, the building is positioned as a node between established networks in the city: 1. Food production and sharing - housing the Sheffield Food Network. 2. Cultural performance as a base for Sheffield Culture Consortium 3. Energy research and engagement, a home for Sheffield University’s Grantham Centre for Sustainable Research. The architecture provides escape from its post-industrial context through its layered threshold, the transition from metal skin, to services, to membrane is as though one was entering a human stomach. The building exhibits the production of energy from waste as an immersive experience. A living factory. The project positions questions of sustainability and resource scarcity as an assemblage of immersive experiences, delivering the message of waste re-use and decentralised energy through the medium of a narrative journey, while actively engaging users

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in mutual economic and cultural exchange as a means to provide security to communities who are precarious now, and will only be more so in the future. Drawings 01. Learning from the fairground - A transient city. 02. Testing Fairground Architecture to promote Biogas through the exchange of (laxative) fig pies for human waste. 03. Arrival By Train - A celebratory node 04. New Infrastructure of Culture, Food & Energy Overlaid onto the industrial rail and canal network. 05. Process Model - Developing the process of anaeraobic digestion as interactive experience. 06. Arriving by Island Loop - The building’s roots 07. Arrivial by canal - Interaction of floating allotments and fruit pickers 08. Section through 3 infrastructures 09. Section through food infrastructure - An immersive infrastructure for food security 02


Culture

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Food

Energy


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Craftsmen of Tomorrow

Michael McGuinness Year 5


Craftsmen of Tomorrow forms part of the ‘10km Island Loop’ strategy and improves the connections to the Olympic Legacy Park and Tinsley Canal through a new green route. It opens out onto the

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canal and is a destination where people can engage in the skilful process of making and learn to work with their hands. This social environment creates opportunities for people to come away from the ever-increasing machine-led world. ‘The values of the craftsman, whether in a Stradivari violin workshop or a modern laboratory, can enrich our lives and change the way we anchor ourselves in the world around us.’ Richard Sennett

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Drawings 01. Craftsmen of Tomorrow Concept 02. Craftsmen of Tomorrow Combined with the ‘Island Strategy’ 03. Approach from Darnall 04. Roof Plan | New Routes and Landscaping 05. 1:100 Scale Model of Timber Cantilever 06. Approach from Darnall through a New Green Route 07. Approach from Tram Stop via Main Road 08. 1:20 Detail Sectional Model 09. Section A-A 10. Gallery Walkway 11. Cafe 12. Workshop 13. Exploded Axonometric 03


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The Artist Labs

Naomi Bailey Year 6


The art of creating and innovating fulfils an instinctive, humanistic desire to self-actualise and progress, leading to possible positive behavioural change. Located in the heart of Sheffield’s industrial

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district in the Lower Don Valley, the Darnall ward suffers from poor health with over 50% of the population considered ‘inactive’. The ‘Artist Labs’ aims to help regenerate the area by providing a mental wellbeing centre for creative therapy & research. The facility allows the local population to regularly activate their minds with specific arts activities from model making, painting to expressive movement. Similarly to how physical exercise is regarded key to achieving a healthy lifestyle, activating cognitive functions with creative arts may, in the future, be considered an equal necessity to achieve health and wellbeing. The Artist Labs provides a playful landscape and explorative walkways that connects the arts workshops to its neuroscience and cognitive research laboratories. Inspired by architects who use painting to

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innovate architectural design ideas, in particular Steven Holl and Will Alsop, engaging in the arts has informed The Artist Labs’ programme, concept and design methodology. Drawings 01. Illustration of the Arts & Science Dichotomy 02. The Artist Labs Place within the Island of Innovation 03. Will Alsop Inspired Painting Experiment to Generate Ideas About Building Form & Site Strategy 04. The Opening of The Artist Labs 05. Progress Diagrams Linking the Research & Artist Workshop Spaces 06. View Along the Landscaped Water Channel 07. The Autonomous Arts Bridge 08. Covered Walkway of Beside Artist Workshops 09. Material Palette & Components of The Workshops & Laboratory 10. Stevenson Road Level Plan 11. Artist Workshop Level Plan 12. River Don Level Plan 13. Photograph of 1:500 Model of The Artist Labs 14. Long Perspective Section 03


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The M.O.Y.O. Centre ‘the heart of the A.M.I.D.’

Beth Mamicha Year 5


The Multi-Operational-Yielding-Officer (Moyo also translates to

‘heart’ in Kiswahili), is the Artificial Intelligence that helps the Sheffield Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District (A.M.I.D),

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run this smart city in the year 2050. The M.O.Y.O. Centre acts as the mainframe and destination to help create and collaborate services for the city to AMID firms with local independent firms and surrounding neighbourhoods. New and game changing innovations are exhibited using advanced augmented reality experience set in the sky exhibition 30m above ground. In the context of the Collaborative Production Studio, a ‘10km Island Loop’ strategy was designed to improve the connections outside of the loop to Attercliffe in order to promote health and well-being. With the building set on a 1.15km perimeter site that is densely forested, adaptive protocell concrete paving has been provided to give open running routes to promote the studio theme.

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Drawings 01. View of the exhibition hall 02. Main entrance into the building 03. Augmented Reality ramp experience 04. Perspective sectional drawing 05. Longitudinal section drawing 06. Larch glulam beam assembly 07. Larch glulam beam horizontal and diagonal bracing assembly 08. Part section of facade details 09. Larch glulam beam connection to floor plate I-Beam assembly 10. Interior view of the workshop 03


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Community Incubator

Becky Smith Year 5


The Community Incubator aims to provide a space to open the door for economic change within the borough of Attercliffe, Sheffield. Due to the effects of the local economy on both the

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physical and mental health of citizens, the economic status of the area was a concern. The project aims to bring together the simple idea of local business with affordable housing and a place to centre the community around. The programme of the building would allow for spaces that would open up a dialogue between locals and allow for idea sharing, centred around a new market space with an active public realm above. At a neighbourhood level, the building has become the landscape due to the fluctuating roof structure of the market hall, while the tall infrastructure provides facilities at a city level and thus becomes a landmark for Attercliffe.

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Drawings 01. Concept Diagram 02. Typical Floor Plan 03. Final Sectional Model 04. Community Centre Lecture Theatre 05. Market Hall Space 06. Final Model in Sections 07. Perspective Section 08. Apartment View of Public Realm 09. Approach from Olympic Legacy Park 10. Project Spatial Vision 03


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Active Living Made Easy.

Laura Spence Year 6


Studio CP, in partnership with housing developers Places for People, Sheffield City Council and the Attercliffe/Darnall

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Community, offer a response to the current state and lack of affordable housing provision in Sheffield. The redevelopment of brownfield sites in Attercliffe (an area of industrial decline) will deliver ‘Active Attercliffe’, a series of lively new homes in a mixed-use and shared environment to encourage increased physical activity and improved Health and Well-being. Active Living Made Easy is the first and pioneering project to kickstart ‘Active Attercliffe’. The Scheme delivers a mixed-use development of 104 Mixed Tenure homes, Indoor Winter Gardens, Outdoor Canal Swimming, Public sauna and Shared Community Spaces that come together to encourage physical and social activity while improving the lifestyles of a growing and diverse community. Introducing community ownership, community-led design and a sharing economy, residents can gain experience with the security and help of design and housing professionals to reduce associated risks and ensure successful project delivery. Active Living Made Easy homes redefine typical dense city living through a catalogue of dwelling and garden typologies that bring together and support different

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types of household and demographic. Residents value shared environments that enhance affordable lifestyle, with individuality, diversity and strength in an increasing community spirit.

Drawings 01. Building Typology and Community Residents 02. Ground Floor Plan 03. Mixed-Use Development around an Active Infrastructure 04. Long Elevation: Residential Homes and Public Winter Gardens 05. Community Shared Living Room 06. Playful Streetscape and Rain Water Gardens 07. Outdoor Canal Swimming and Overlooking Public Sauna 08. Indoor Tropical Winter Gardens and Community Cafe 09. Natural Canal Water Filtration and Aquaponics 10. Long Section through neighbouring Story Telling Centre, Outdoor Canal Swimming/ Public Pedestrian Bridge, Indoor Bathing Pool, Winter Gardens and Island Loop

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gniviL derahS lanummoC

10 Long Section

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The Centre For Human Augmentation

Will Kreibich Year 5


Maintain connection with OLP and AWRC

AUGMENTATION INNOVATION DISTRICT

LIVING

PROSTHETICS PRODUCTION

ATTERCLIFFE

LABS

Involve local communities in decision making and production

DARNALL

Expanding on studio themes of the future of health, well-being and technology, the Centre for Human Augmentation is a forum and research facility exploring the possibilities of combining

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technology and the human body, known as ‘Biohacking’. With current concerns over the rapidly developing AI and wearable tech, the ethics of integrating technology directly into human lives is an important part of this. Although these discussions are taking place worldwide, they’re disconnected from the people who are experimenting on their own bodies, who are at the centre of this emerging movement. The building focuses on two aspects of this, exploring the experimental unregulated aspects of human augmentation and the controlled research-led testing. The scheme responds to the site’s industrial context whilst also creating a facility which will adapt to the potentially rapid change within this field over the next 5-10 years.

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Drawings 1.

Augmentation Innovation District Strategy

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Parliament of Biohacking Concept Image

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Biohacking Forum Concept Image

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External Perspective

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Exploded Axonometric

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Street View Entrance

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External Forum Space

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South West Elevation

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Phasing Diagrams

10. Assembly Exploded Axo 11. Construction Sectional Perspective 12. Upper Walkway 13. Cybernetic Lab Space 14. Implant Booth 15. Sectional Perspective 03


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Sheffield Urban Forum

Claire Yu Year 5


As a response to the top down approach of the Advanced Manufacturing Innovation District (AMID), the Sheffield Urban Forum aims to engage the local communities into the process of

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the masterplan development. At the core of the Urban Forum is the forum space, a platform for debate and discussion for regeneration plans in the region, which will be open to the public, in-residence urban researchers and local authorities. This will allow all sides of the debate to be represented and considered. The discovery centre and smart city research centre provide the foundation of knowledge and a place for physical interaction to support the discussions. Multimedia, interactive exhibitions in the discovery centre present information on the local history and the latest sustainable technologies. Workshop and event spaces will further encourage engagement with local schools and community groups. In-residence researchers will be able to closely observe and collect data from the neighbourhood and develop smart city solutions to the urban system. The garden is a test bed for public spaces, where different functions and facilities could be experimented. Winding pathways create the environment of a pedestrianized city and open squares that can become event

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spaces for cultural exchange.

Drawings 1.

Program

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AR technology concept

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Entrance view

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Capitalized leisure

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Discovery Centre

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Environmental strategy

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Approach

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Research Centre

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Long Section

10. Exploded Axonometric 11. Garden at night 03


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Vanguard for the Valley

Ben Bradish Year 6


With the increasing strain on UK healthcare services becoming all the more evident, questions are rising over the future direction of the NHS and its services.

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The UK national demographic is in transition, with population levels set to rise along with life expectancy and sedentary living; C

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the need to address the ‘Health and Wellbeing Gap’ in both the NHS and wider society is imperative. As part of its ‘Forward View’,

Vanguard

the NHS has looked to employ ‘Vanguard’ sites in its attempt to explore new models of care. ‘The Vanguard for the Valley’ aims to explore the links between the built environment, architecture and the shift towards collaboration and prevention in our approach to health care in the community. Notions of collaboration in this context will be explored through the integration of health and social care services, public recreational facilities, and community functions all tied together through an active landscape in the centre of a residential setting. 02

Drawings 1.

Creaking NHS

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Vanguard Manifesto

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Darnall Vanguard Courtyard

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North Entrance

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Construction / Sectional Perspective: Darnall Health

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Landscape Strategy Site Plan

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Darnall Forum

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West Approach

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Forum Walkway

10. Forum Elevation Study 11. Schematic Sections 12. Darnall Health Elevation Study 13. Community Kitchen 14. Community Swimming Pool 02

FORMER SHEFFIELD AIRPORT RUNWAY


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Creating space for Grief in the City.

Jessica Rees Year 6


Inspired in a belief that the city should cater for the variety and diversity of life’s experiences, this project looks at creating space for grief in the city. A key text inspiring this is Amin and Thrift’s

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“Cities: Reimagining the Urban” which talks about the rich texture of the city fabric that should be on offer to cultivate healthy citizenship and a culture of engaged participation. The project seeks to use urban space and a programme of art and drama, story-telling to engage people in sharing stories of grief and exploring personal and collective experiences together. A gallery and performance space act as containers of these stories and share them with the rest of the city. The studio location of Attercliffe, in the post-industrial heartland of Sheffield provides a site of loss, both of industrial activity and heritage, and the communities that once lived here. In response to this, the project is viewed as a regenerative stimulus and offers an opportunity to archive memories and stories as a way of celebrating and preserving the heritage of place. 02

Drawings 1.

‘Threshold.’ Looking along street edge into gallery space.

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‘Participate.’ Immersive performance space.

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‘Retreat & Reflect.’ Contemplative garden.

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‘Navigate.’ Urban contemplation courtyard. 1.50 model.

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‘Engage.’ Gallery for stories. Place to reflect.

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Quote. R. Sennett. The Conscience of The Eye. The Design and

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View through into project from street. 1.200 model.

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View through courtyard to proposed residential development across canal (project of Laura Spence, Studio C.P.).

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Connection between cafe space & courtyard model. 1.50 model.

10. View from canal to workshop space internally & two courtyards. 1.200 model. 11. Facade development models; cast impressions, aluminium louvres, recorded textures of place. 03


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“A city ought to be a school for learning how to lead a centred life. Through exposure to others, we might learn how to weight what is important and what is not. We need to see differences on the streets or in other people neither as threats nor as sentimental invitations, rather as necessary visions. They are necessary for us to navigate life with balance, both individually and collectively.� Sennett, R., The Conscience of The Eye. The Design and Social Life of Cities. (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1992) p. xiii

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‘JOURNEY’ ˈdʒəːni

noun

An act of travelling from one place to another. A long and often difficult process of personal change and development. “Deep grief sometimes is almost like a specific location, a coordinate on a map of time. When you are standing in that forest of sorrow, you cannot imagine that you could ever find your way to a better place. But if someone can assure you that they themselves have stood in that same place, and now have moved on, sometimes this will bring hope” Gilbert, E. Eat, Pray, Love. (New York, Penguin, 2006.) p. 71

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Studio: Collaborative Production 2017-18  

Studio: Collaborative Production is a design studio run as part of the MArch degree course at Sheffield School of Architecture at the Univer...

Studio: Collaborative Production 2017-18  

Studio: Collaborative Production is a design studio run as part of the MArch degree course at Sheffield School of Architecture at the Univer...

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