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Reality Check

Reflector 2006 Dalat International School Penang, Malaysia

Reality Check

Volume

Reflector 2006


6

24

Reality Check

36

54

86

145

Academics

Race the Clock

Groups

Dress it Up

Sports

Stretch the Limits

People’s Lives

Plan the Time

Advertisements

Just Get Out

Index


Ocean perfectly mir roring the azure sky, vv the sun retires from another day on the tropical island of Penang. The calm of evening allowed for a moment of peace; a moment of quiet introspection. As the sun sank lower, dipping first behind the hill until only faint bands of color brushed the sky, you praised God for his intricate creation.

Reality Check

Reflector 2006 Volume 44

Dalat International School Tanjung Bunga 11200 Penang, Malaysia Tel: (60-4) 8992-105 Fax: (60-4) 8902-141 Website: www.dalat.org E-mail: office@dalat.org Population: 337 Students: 124 Staff


Ready, Set, Check A Reality Check also made the difference in thankfulness. With all the bluster about food and homework and rules and regulations, you sometimes forgot just how amazing a school you attended. Sometimes you needed a closer look at a situation. You needed a Reality Check for a better perspective. The first day of school arrived. Your alarm screeched at 6:50 a.m., and you rose, ready to attack a new year. That faint inkling of schoolwork became reality after your first class, but then you met your friends. Silently you pledged to perform a Reality Check throughout the year.

Dressed to kill, Uncle Scott Cairn cross and Uncle Ja son Phillips jive to the infamous “Numa-Numa” dance at the Dorm Valentine’s Banquet. The dorm staff threw the party to show their love and appreciation for dorm students. Mr. Cairncross debuted as a dateless nerd, and Mr. Phillips became Maya, a suspiciously muscular woman.

JONATHAN DYCK

—By Jonathan Dyck

Opening

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JONATHAN DYCK

Eyes bulging wildly, Joshua Manfred advances on Christa DeVette. Ping-Pong balls created the desired ocular effect for Manfred, who played a crazed, fast-talking, “caffeineaddict“ at the “Junior Java” After Sneak Dinner. The seniors returned after a long trip back from Redang to a night of dessert and well-scripted comedy.

adventures on public transportation down to Gurney. What made this school different from others? The question simply took too much time to think about. That question, however, merited a closer look. It just took a second glance, a Reality Check, to realize it. After all, what other school boasts of beach-front property on a tropical island? What other year saw a full 23 percent increase in student population from the previous year for a grand total of 337 students? Sure, at a glance you often missed the changes or the uniqueness of school but looking deeper showed you just how much God had blessed you.

Sitting patiently, Andrew McClary waitsfor Tara-Lynn Kennedy and Jubilee Adleta to finish braiding his hair. Testing hairstyles provided a way to spend free time in the afternoon as students pushed the boundaries of what the school allowed. From braids to mohawks, students experimented with hair throughout the year.

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As the last precious days of summer break slipped by, the faint inkling of impending schoolwork caught your mind. You slowly realized that your tradition of sleeping until noon needed a bit of adjusting seeing as school required your attendance. Anyway, constant holidays became boring after a while; so on 9 August, whether tired or rested or excited or glad or mad, you returned to school. You loved parts of school and hated others and generally just lived your life. You complained and groused about being so busy so much that complaining about it took too much time. You strolled up to Hillside with friends and took

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The First Step

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Opening

He had given you and also for His help. You definitely needed God’s help, and He gave it to you. Lunch formed the first test. Shortly before cracking a joke with James Hawthorne about chicken goo, you glanced into the kitchen. Mr. Balu stood hard at work on lunch, and Mr. Kumar readied himself to clean up your mess. A lot of work went into preparing a meal for an entire school, you realized abruptly. Then you did something new; you thanked them. As you meandered up the stairs, you realized that while you still had a long way to go, the first step lay just behind you. —By Jonathan Dyck

Staring in amaze ment, Jasmine Wood Singh, Jennifer Seong, Andrew Kim, Josiah Steinkamp, and Tim Phan watch Mark Watson extinguish a flaming barrel of oil with only a fire extinguisher and some extra help. Mrs. Carol Schaller and three firemen supervised the activity which the Boy Scouts put on to teach safety.

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Squinting against the water, Norman Kiehl slides belly-down on a slippery tarp. For final exams week, dorm parents looked for ways to help students take a break from their busy schedules. Uncle Jason Phillips came up with the idea of laying out a simple tarp and putting soap and water on it. The result, pure stress relief.

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the dirty ocean and about His making life so difficult. You, of course, knew all the answers for everything. Somewhere, in between complaining of how the Internet had died yet again, you stopped. A small folder popped up from among your other files and on it appeared two words, “Reality Check.” You found yourself thinking. Could these plans withstand a Reality Check? Not really; in fact, you realized you had almost closed your mind instead of opening it to the truth of things; and you ended up making some pretty unfair judgments along the way. So you prayed. You asked God for His forgiveness for mocking the life

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Arms and bouquet outstretched, Sin Myung Park asks Marigan Dyck to the Junior-Senior Banquet by way of a guitar solo and the element of surprise. March began a flurry of asking as male students grade 10 and above struggled to find ever more creative ways of asking their female counterparts to the banquet only one month away.

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“Reality Check,” you thought to yourself, “a way to see the facts realistically, without bias.” The idea sounded pretty good and fairly easy too. You simply looked at a problem, saw both sides of the issue and, no sweat, plotted the correct attitude from both. It made a pretty good way to define a year. But the idea proved harder than it sounded. At lunch you stood in line, sneered at the food, and then jokingly complained about a Dalat student’s diet of “rice and meat and sauce.” You griped at the administration for making rules because you knew that if you ran the school… well, yeah. You even complained to God about

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“Blah blah blah blah blah... you betrayed me!”

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-Mr. Rick Hurlbut

Academics Division Page

Engrossed in their work, Hee Eun Song, Yena Kim, Yoo-Sun Joung, and Eric Han await the next instructions from Ms. Wendi Maze in ESL Middle School Bible. The class gave ESL students a chance to study biblical truths while learning English. “Bad thing: there’s lots of homework,” said Joung.

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Crossing the Chao Praya River, Howard Kao, Karen Wong, Lindsay Parks, Terry Hsiang, Carolyn Whiting, Sophia To, Laura Danneker, Tokihito Shioya, and James Hawthorne take in the sights of Bangkok. When not performing, band students took boats to see a snake show and the world’s largest reclining Buddha.

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Academics

rized the Preamble to the American Constitution through song. Mr. Gerry Steiert took fitness students on numerous long marches and also to the bowling alley. Elementary students dressed up as anything from Darth Vader to lions for their costume parade. And, of course, school included tests. PSATs for juniors, SAT II’s for seniors, and plain old SATs for both. Oh, and it included quizzes and finals to study for, never mind papers and due dates and the extra work from Advanced Placement courses. Some nights you looked at your growing pile of homework in dismay, trying to figure out the easiest way to do all of it without cutting out time with friends. Other nights you just sighed, wishing for a weekend to come and end it all. But now you hurriedly logged off, gathered your books, and bolted out of the computer lab. Behind you rose the voice of Chris Foster telling you that you had precisely 30 seconds to make it to your next class, Values and Decision Making with Mr. Rick Hurlbut. Waving an acknowledge- ment over your shoulder, you sprinted past the lockers and darted, gasping, into Room 11.

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Your heart raced as you flew up the steps to the computer lab. Hastily, you logged onto a Dell, silently muttering at it for taking so long to boot up. Finally, the familiar Internet Explorer button appeared; and you opened Dalat’s home page. Carefully you typed your name and password into PowerSchool, relishing the last keystroke a bit before you slammed your pinky down on the enter key. You waited more, chalking this experience down as a lesson in patience, and then…nothing. Only the frozen screen of a downed PowerSchool appeared. Of course, checking grades formed only one aspect of a normal day at school. True, sometimes the hours between 8:20 a.m. and 3:25 p.m. defied the laws of space and time and seemed to stretch into infinity— but not always. Unconventional teachers combined with unconventional students produced a rather entertaining, if random, learning experience. Could you admit that, possibly, you actually looked forward to classes? After all, Mr. Kerry Mahoney not only taught the skill of note reading in choir but also the much admired art of hand farting. American Government students, under Mr. Karl Steinkamp, memo-

MR. JOHN “TOMMY” TOMPKINS

Race the Clock

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EN in hand, Mikaela Steinkamp finishes her picture of a blue pizza. During their free time, students had the chance to color, paint, or draw pictures to show their classmates

Pizza, Play, and

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UTTING the last puzzle pieces into the wooden frame, Shannon Heng tries to match the circles and the squares. Puzzles provided ways for students to learn their shapes and colors.

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AT it, and put it in the garbage!” says Margaret Moss to Bernard Combrink. Cleaning up became part of their game as students threw away their “food” in the bucket.

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students a break from their everyday lessons and assignments. “We get to make crafts sometimes,” said Kasey Rogers. “We colored long paper snakes that hung from the ceiling.” Busy children need food, however, and these proved no exception. Every afternoon, students had a break for snack outside on the field and extra time to play on the playground. “I like to play tag because I get to run after people, and sometimes I can catch them,” explained Tyler Cairncross. “One, two, three, four, five, six honeybees!” counted Combrink as he pulled the laminated cutouts towards himself. Looking around, he saw his classmates still counting their bees; and he smiled to himself. —By Liesl Williams LIESL WILLIAMS

“And our favorite is the computer. We like playing Candyland,” stated Jackson McKenzie and Robbey Boucher. “And I like to play in the house with Seon [Bin],” added Tian Ooi. The sandbox and water table proved a big hit in the Preschool-4 classroom. “I like to use the sandbox, and Mikaela [Steinkamp] likes the water. See, I can make castles and dig holes in the sand,” said Kenlee Stenlund. Preschool-3 students used plastic food to serve elaborate “banquets” to Mrs. Mahoney, along with any visitor who happened to pass their way during their free time. “I can make banana pizza and pepperoni pizza and even cheese pizza,” said Moss. Teachers tried to add crafts and activities into the schedule to allow

YES glued to the screen, Gia Kim puts candy onto a cookie while Devin Schaller awaits his turn. “You have to put the right amount of candies on, or it doesn’t make the cookie,” said Schaller.

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“Can I have number three?” asked Bernard Combrink of Mrs. Robin Mahoney when told to sit around the table for the number game. “Bernard,” answered Margaret Moss, “last time you got number three. This time it’s my turn.” The Preschool-3 class, with Mrs. Mahoney, used games and activities to learn their letters and numbers. Counting out the right number of honeybees to put with their honey pots brought many smiles and lots of happy chatter to the small classroom as it helped them to learn the alphabet. Kindergartners took this to another level by coloring letters corresponding to sentences explaining what they had learned about God. “U is for all the unusual and funny things that God has given us,” recited Jennifer Lupinacci. Their days did not consist solely of numbers and letters. “Centers“ and “free time” gave students time to play and interact with their classmates and teachers. “We have centers. Drawing is my favorite one!” said Lupinacci.

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The necessities of life

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Pre-3, Pre-4, K, 1

Pre-3, Pre-4, & Kindergarten, 1

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LOWLY setting the table, Mar garet Moss looks for Bernard Combrink. Students in the Pre-3 class let their imaginations roam as they played house or dress-up during their daily free time.

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Important Life Skills

Six times seven is forty-two

The second, third, and fourth graders did not, however, spend all their time playing games. Students immersed themselves in the world of the Herdmans in “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever.” During a class discussion, Justin Strong said, “I like when Imogene Herdman smokes the cigars in the ladies’ room.” The love of reading spanned all of elementary, including the second graders. “I like to take a book and go read somewhere. I usually read the I-Spy books or the Bible stories, but I’ve already read most of those,” said Charlotte Combrink. In fact, fourth graders enjoyed reading as a class the most. “The Mouse and the Motorcycle” and “The Wheel on the Schoolhouse” proved popular books as

students gathered around to listen. Trips off campus provided opportunities to see in action what the students spent their year studying. “I liked the reptile place and the butterfly farm best,” said Stephanie Jones. Apart from core classes, students enjoyed “specials” and “centers“ that provided more time for them to allow their creative juices to flow. “My favorite class is art because I like to make stuff, especially cutting paper into shapes and gluing them onto other pieces of paper,” said Kenya Gimson. ”OK, the big hand is at the 12. You can start doing it now,” began Sullivan. “Five, 10, 15, 20, 25 seconds,” she said to herself. —By Liesl Williams

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“Player A has to shuffle the cards and put them around the board. Then player B, who is Nicole [Phillips], has to multiply all the numbers by the middle number; and I have to see how long she takes!” explained Kiernan Sullivan as she placed laminated numbers in a circle for “Around the Moon.” Whether flying around the moon or telling stories using finger puppets, third graders always found ways to enjoy what they had learned in class. “I like when we have math class because then we get to add things up and play games,” said Mariana Moss. “And I like math because we get to learn multiplication and other skills!” said Hung Jie Song with a smile.

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TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

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ITH hands raised and mouth opened, Daniel Rogers examines part of a squid. Experiments involving dissecting caught the interest of many fourth graders as they studied the anatomy of living creatures.

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2nd, 3rd, & 4th

TROLLING down the street, Joyce Lee follows the parade around campus as students display their costumes. Elementary students enjoyed the chance to dress up and walk around during the annual costume parade.

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INGER puppets in hand, Lucia Combrink prepares to tell the Bible story to her partner Justin Strong. Group activities helped students learn to express themselves and explain difficult concepts to each other.

Second, Third, & Fourth Grade

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HIS piece goes here, I think,” says Kiernan Sullivan to Nicole Phillips as she places the picture on the paper. “Centers” gave students time during their day to work on crafts or play word games with their friends.

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Hittin’ Home

the hard concepts said Noriah Matanick. In order to get to know students from St. Christopher, teachers planned an Amazing Race around Penang. Alex Gimson said, “We did activities like going to the Botanical Gardens. My group got chased by monkeys!” Looking back, Ben Weidemann and Reagan Mahoney summed up their expericances, “It seems like we just started middle school, and we’re already almost done with our first year!” Preparting to identify another set of rocks from Mr. Tyas, the sixth graders continued working. “What color is it?” asked Emily Brokaw. “And try scratching it on the glass. Maybe that will give us a clue about the kind of rock.” —By Liesl Williams

AUGHING with his teammates, Joseph Kim prepares to add the next piece to his boat. Sixth graders enjoyed time in class to work on their ancient explorers and to talk with their friends about the daily goings on.

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OU need to add a little more oil and some water,” said Juliet DeVette to Jae-Hyun Chung and Joseph Kim. Building a model of a land mass interested students as they mixed playdoh for their science fair project.

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“Take your rock from the back of the classroom to your desk. You can look at it, smell it, or scratch it on a piece of glass,” explained Mr. Dennis Tyas to his sixth grade class. In science, experiments invited students to pick up, touch, smell, and hear the concepts they studied all year round. Both fifth and sixth grade classes participated in these so-called “learning experiences,” finding more in them than plain boredom. “My favorite was the one where we had to experiment with metals and find their qualities so that we could know what they are by looking at them,” added Nathan Danneker. “We put red food coloring in hot water and blue food coloring in cold water. Then when we flipped the jars, the blue water went down; and the hot water went up to the top,” explained Chanel Huang. Social studies brought laughter and creativity into the class as Mrs. Mary Sheddan had her fifth graders make Christmas trees from around the world. “I liked the pioneer-American one best,”

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APER in hand, Chanel Huang glues the question above the answer on her fold. In preparation for tests, teachers used folds, games, and study guides to help students remember the information they had studied in class. ­­­­­LIESL WILLIAMS ­­­­­LIESL WILLIAMS

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Fifth & Sixth Grade

YES focused on the dice he had just thrown, Reagan Mahoney tries to pick up two more from the floor while catching the first. Fifth graders learned a new Korean game called Gong Gi which they taught to the sixth graders.

Fifth & Sixth Grade

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XHAUSTED, Tony Suh and Hank Wong try to stay above water as Mrs. Donna Hansen counts to 30. In P.E., students participated in various kinds of activities including basketball, soccer, swimming, and volleyball.

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Training for Life

Exploding, fizzing, and fuming

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ND there were these giant clams that live on the coral reef!” exclaimed Sydney McKenzie to Hannah Jones, Harry Mak, and Lakshmi Meyyappan. During social studies, students related their knowledge to recent news.

“Is this bag sealed?” asked Andy Jung of Mrs. Donna Hansen. As she nodded her head, Jung began passing the bag from one hand to the other and talking to his fellow classmates Se-Chan Hwang and Esther Park. Optional classes provided bonding time between seventh and eighth graders as they learned important life skills and participated in extra activities. Students like Jung joined Food Studies to heighten their abilities in cooking. Vivian Lee and Edwin Tan took part in a small group learning Spanish before high school. P-periods gave students a chance to participate in activities normally not part of school, such as the middle school hike. “[Jung] and Mrs. Hansen ran the whole way, but I stopped halfway up because I was tired. Then Benny [Kim], Se-Chan, and I swam at the beach,” said YoungMoung Kim. Other classes learned from nature as well. In math, eighth graders directed their own movies that showed how their newly acquired math concepts fit into

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time capsules containing items from the novel My Brother Sam Is Dead. “In my time capsule, I put a button from my uniform, letters that I wrote, and old newspaper articles that I got from the Internet,” said Matthew Nyugen. In the midst of all their classes, students looked forward to their optional classes and the break they provided from schoolwork. In the Home Ec. room, Jung continued to play with his bag of flour. Suddenly it opened, plastering his face and hair in the white powder. As screams of laughter sounded around the room, he shook the flour off his head, and tried to prepare for his next class. —By Liesl Williams

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URROUNDED by fellow middle school students, Axel Loehden and Joshua Wong wait to begin the annual hike up Penang Hill. Inviting their parents to join them, students took the opportunity to share a meal atop the hill.

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Seventh & Eighth Grade

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ILLING in the worksheet, Joycelyn Woo looks for input from her group. “We learned about all the different Biblical characters, what happened in their lives, and the lessons we can learn from them,” said Linnea Williams.

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OPEFUL, Miranda Steinert, Anna Fu, and Khalie Mahoney prepare to drop their box off the middle school building. Seventh graders wrapped eggs in paper and straws and placed them in boxes, trying to keep their eggs whole during the drop.

everyday life. “We have to find things outside that have to do with math, like plants and patterns, and videotape them,” said Joycelyn Woo. In Science eight, students found out for themselves how chemical reactions happened. Kim explained, “We put vinegar in film canisters with baking soda and put the tops on. When we put them on the ground, the plastic containers flew up almost seven feet into the air! One almost went into the tree next to the science building! We were trying to imitate volcanoes when they explode.” Seventh graders also saw how chemicals react; but instead of seeing explosions, they observed corrosion. “We put hydrogen peroxide on cow livers and potatoes. When we put it on the potatoes, they started fizzing for a while. When we put it on the liver though, it exploded; and the beaker got really hot! Then it died down,” remarked Beth Nguyen. Social studies also required hands-on experiences and creativity. Students made

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Back to the Past

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RY looking for nineteen fif tie’s music on Google,” says Zack Lindsay to David Robertson. Learning about past cultures meant examining their music as well. Classes searched for famous singers and their works to play during class.

Learning from their mistakes

“I liked learning about myself an how my mind works,” said Yumi Yamauchi. Students learned not only about their minds, but also about their world. In their World Events class, students read articles about happenings around the world; and in Geography, they memorized specific facts to go along with the names they had only heard in history books. “The capital of Austria is Vienna, and the capital of Columbia is Bogota,” recited Rami Lee. Where some students studied about distant countries, others studied the countries they called home. “I liked learning about my home country,” remarked Canadian citizen Matt Hansen. “And it’s a good way for other people to find ways to relate to me!”

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AINTBRUSH in hand, Malaina Gaddis adds the final coat on the base for her plastic sculpture project. By choosing their own projects, students in Mrs. Carolyn Butler’s art class had the opportunity to create what they wanted to create.

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ISTENING carefully to Nathan Danneker, Marie Giezendanner writes his thoughts on bullying while Jordan Strong and Jared Williams wait for their turn. Psychology students interviewed students from all age groups to find information for their projects.

Social Sciences, Psychology, Bible, Art

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EADY to shout out her an swer, Charis To drops her folder back onto the desk. Teachers kept classes busy by using competitive activities to review, not only providing a break from class work, but also motivating students to remember the material.

Other students enjoyed interaction over the mere book-work. “I think it’s fun to learn about my country’s history and especially to talk about it with my teachers and friends,” explained U.S. citizen Scott Poulter. Talking about history did not only happen during social studies classes; and no one knew this better than the students in Early Church History, where they explored what events happened the church’s expansion. In Bible 12, students told stories to summarize what they read, bringing laughter along with serious discussions about defending their faith. This creativity spread across campus reaching even the far recesses of the shop class where Fatemeh Shahabi Haghighi made a lamp out of wood. In the art room, Monay Ng wrote a story to go along with her cloth throne. Finally, Mr. Klassen ended the mad dash, and the room began to quiet down as groups formed and order returned to the classroom after yet another activity. —By Liesl Williams

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“OK guys. When I say SUHUPU, I want you to stand up, put your hands up, and pair up,” said Mr. Nathanael Klassen. Teachers looked for ways to hold their students’ interest in class. Mr. Klassen, in his Who Is God? class, used games to help students get to know their fellow classmates and hear their opinions about God’s character. Psychology students took IQ tests on the Internet, trying to achieve a high score and win their class a party. “One person in my class scored really high on the IQ test, so Ms. Ruth Strong let us have a pizza party,” said Audrey Ang. With a hint of fun, these activities brought new knowledge along with them.

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AKING sure he includes all the right information, David Robertson copies his work onto the poster as Drew Steiert cuts triangles. Math projects allowed the students to explain what they had learned in a visual way.

Pulleys and Tangents Hand in hand, two students walked slowly down the beach and sat down on a rock. The boy’s mouth moved and the girl’s eyes lit up. Suddenly, her arms wrapped around his neck as he picked her up off the rock. Not a romance movie, this scene took place in everyday life as Computer Production Technology students learned to express themselves through movies and music videos. Students wrote and directed their own movies, asking fellow students and friends to act in them. “I liked making music videos because it was something I had never done, and it was like what they had on MTV, ” said Yumi Yamauchi. Not all computer classes, however, relied on the magic of movie making. Computer science students looked at computers from a closer angle. “Students had a brief introduction to computer

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ATIENTLY waiting for the next set of data, David Lee watches Kenny Kim and Matthew Mah drain the solution into a beaker. Science experiments helped explain difficult concepts and gave students time away from the books.

programming and networking,” explained Mr. Carlo Hansen Information Processing students studied graphical design and image manipulation. “I thought it was cool because you could take pictures of yourself and put them into a ‘fantasy world,’” said Jubilee Adleta. “It didn’t look fake because we learned how to do it the right way.” Chemistry students tried to filter precipitates, balance equations, and combine chemicals. “I had to keep doing the same experiment four times before I finally got the answer I needed!” said Michelle Nagel. Experiments did not happen only in the lab though. “We went out to the basketball court one day to light some chemicals on fire. Mrs. Corinne Rogers said it would make a tall white flame, but all we got was a bunch of broken matches and some smoke,” said Kenny Kim. Science cannot stand alone, however, and needed the assistance of math. This assistance, provided by Mr. Greg Stenlund and Mrs. Lyn Holden, came in the form of projects, assignments, and tests. “Mr. Stenlund is a really good teacher and helps us to understand the concepts we have to learn for the test,” said Sarah Cairncross. “He’s also

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Future designers and scientists really funny!” she added. Geometry students made posters conveying the universal phrase “SOH CAH TOA,” and Precalculus students took it to the next level when they measured the surface area of the white tables. Calculus students quietly studied higher level math in preparation for college. “I like to say we study derivatives and integrations because it makes us look smart!” said Matt Hansen. Group projects allowed for a different atmosphere from the typical “students sitting at desks.” “Pam [Hidajat] and I did our project on the water temperatures in Washington, D.C. I wanted to do it on the temperatures in Seattle, but it’s always cold so it would be a boring graph!” explained Allison McClary. Back at the beach, Rivka Matanick turned off the camera and put it away. “OK, guys, that was good,” she said. “I think that’s all I need right now. Thanks for helping me out!” Christa DeVette and Joel Babcock began the walk back up the beach towards the school, now no more than friends again but with the satisfaction of a movie well-finished. —By Liesl Williams

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YES focused on the tennis balls in the air, Howard Kao uses his newly attained knowledge of physics to keep the four balls under control. Breaks in class gave students a time to relax and to find new ways to impress friends.

Science, Math, Computer Technology

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Social Sciences

O stand next to the pole and face this way,” directed Steven Ong as he positioned Olivia D’Cruz. Students in the Computer Production Technology class wrote and directed their own movies with the help of their friends.

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Finely Tuned Skills

And well-exercised minds

get to know their teachers outside class. Christa DeVette said, “Tommy [Mr. John Tompkins] bought this great hat at the floating market in Thailand. At first, the price was really high; but he bargained for it and got it for a lot less.” Though unable to go on a trip, the choir enjoyed its share of goofing off. “I like it because Mr. [Kerry] Mahoney is so funny and jokes all the time. It doesn’t feel like we’re getting anything done; but in the end, we do,” said Paul Sawatzky. With all the distractions, the class pulled off a number of difficult additions to their repertoire. “We sang ‘Gloria Patri,’ which was hard because it was in Latin; but I liked the challenge,” said Marie Giezendanner. Although choir students focused on

singing, English students learned to analyze “rhetorical devices” in various novels. “After writing essays for seven months straight, I hope we’re ready for the AP test,” said Giezendanner. As English classes worked towards their finals, the small journalism class worked towards its deadline. “With only five people in the class, everyone has to do extra work; but we’ll have a great yearbook,” explained Jubilee Adleta. As the class period neared to a close, the working became less; and the quiet chatter of concentrating students grew to a full-blown class discussion. When the bell rang, Ms. Tyack ended the debate with a cheerful “au revoir!” and the class filed out again, just as excited as before. —By Liesl Williams

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N time with the rest of the band, Riley Mahoney plays a scale as a warm-up at the start of class. Songs perfected at the concerts became that way through hours of practicing together as a band as well as individually at home.

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ISTENING intently, Ms. Marie- Hélène Tyack and Maria Miner try to find the murderer using clues from the room, the weapon, and the character described by Naomi Tami. Games in French, such as Cluedo, helped students review and made class more interesting.

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“Comment ca va,” said Ms. Marie-Hélène Tyack as her students filed into the room. One by one, French students sat down, still excitedly talking about their day. After a few minutes of chaos, they settled down to work. Not all classes called for constant bookwork and piles of papers. French classes enjoyed their position as the first to have Ms. Tyack as a teacher. Mandarin 3 and 4 classes opened up for those students who couldn’t stay away from it. “There are six of us in the Mandarin 3 class. We get to do more interesting things because we know the language better now,” explained Allison McClary. Level five music appeared on every band student’s music stand, as he or she learned to play “Peace Maker” and “The Incredibles” well enough to deserve a trip to Bangkok for the band competition. “When I first started playing, I wasn’t very good; but after three years in band, I have gotten better and am more confident in my playing,” said John Kim. The band trip not only provided a chance for students to show off their finely tuned talent; it also helped students

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EADY to run back to her group, Joan Lin awaits the next Spanish word from Mrs. Tara Stenlund. Races to see which team could draw their words the fastest caught students’ attention and motivated them to remember vocabulary from previous chapters.

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ITH hands positioned in front of her, Catherine Foster practices CPR on the mannequin Annie. Exercises such as these gave health students a chance to practice their skills without the pressure of a real situation.

Fit as a...

...lighthouse?

gave me a chance to run every week with other people.” Chess, rattan weaving, and whittling P-periods allowed interested students to learn new hobbies. “I like the Chess Club because I get to learn new stuff. It makes you think of new moves; you can play differently every time,” said Lisa Kim. Jazz Band practiced once a week to learn new songs which they later played at concerts and events off campus. “Even though we could only practice for half an hour a week, we pulled off some pretty crazy songs,” said Kaz Hayashi. As the class turned to leave, Kiehl whispered to Kyle Ladner, “I bet I can beat you back down.” In an instant they began the run down, forgetting for a time their recent exhaustion. —By Liesl Williams

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INTENTLY looking ahead, Kyle Ladner and Norman Kiehl run laps around the campus during Fitness to practice for the mile. Students timed their mile runs and compared them with times taken earlier in the semester.

­­­­­LIESL WILLIAMS

­­­­­LIESL WILLIAMS

Climbing the last steps in front of them, a group of students stepped out onto the hill and walked to the lighthouse. “I can’t believe we actually made it all the way up here,” said Norman Kiehl, looking around after the annual fitness hike. The hike provided time off campus while putting to use the information they had studied all semester. Aside from learning how to live a healthy life-style and exercise correctly, students learned new sports and spent time at the beach. “We played Ultimate Frisbee, hockey, and soccer and had beach days where we went jet-skiing and kayaking,” said Michelle Nagel. Health students took these activities to a whole new level when they learned how their bodies reacted to different situations. “We made posters to show how bad smoking is for your lungs,” said Sin-Myung Park. Students had chance to put this information to use by participating in extra P-period classes at the end of the day such as high school dance, jogging, and floorball. Sarah Cairncross explained, “I signed up for the jogging P-period because it

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Physical Education, Fitness, P-periods

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TTEMPTING the line-dance, Josh Manfred and Paul Sawatzky follow af ter Mr. Gerry Steiert’s lead. High school dance became a popular choice with students as they learned to foxtrot, to waltz, and finally, to line dance.

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ITH a steady hand, Yumi Yamauchi finishes Amanda Hansen’s make-up. The Girls Only P-period on Fridays provided time for girls to get together to experiment with each other’s make-up before the weekend.

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Group Division Page

Group Division Page

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-Joel Babcock

Arms outstretched in frustration at her group’s bewildering incompetence, Lindsay Parks “encourages” her fellow companions to do things her way. Parks played the overconfident Pink Witch in the NHS induction ceremony, which took inductees on a trip through the wardrobe to a Narnia in need of some new rulers.

LIESL WILLIAMS

“I would make a scary woman.”

JONATHAN DYCK

Groups gave you new experiences, opportunities for a change in activities. You branched out of the average. Sarah Cairncross tried out floorball as a goaltender. Nathan Rice and James Hawthorne entered the forensics tournament in Kuala Lumpur and won second place in debate. Groups provided an excuse for you to get out and try something completely new. Sometimes, a group decided you belonged in it whether you wanted to or not. The National Honor Society inducted new members every year, and no one turned that invitation down. For it meant an honor, a delicious lunch, and a prime opportunity for ending up in a skit as the Pink Witch like Lindsay Parks. You joined groups to belong. Reality Check: you joined for reasons way more complex than just belonging. You joined for experiences, for the love of the group’s activities, or for simple enjoyment. And, yes, sometimes you did join to belong. For drama at least, you joined for the love of it, the experience, and somewhere deep down, you joined to hear Foster exclaim, “I have to wear what?” when presented with a little old granny dress and clip-on earrings. —By Jonathan Dyck

Groups

Mornings usually began in the same, average way. You got up, cleaned up, finally woke up, and then all of a sudden, your day changed. You found yourself wearing a beaver costume in a skit or scoring a goal in a game of floorball. You found yourself staring down an overbearing debate team or lifting praises to God in worship practices. What happened to that perfectly average day? In a word, groups happened. And why did people join groups? “To belong,” you generalized, shrugging your shoulders. Now belonging, the feeling of companionship within a group or organization, developed through shared experiences, which evolved into a bond or a sense of unity. “So students joined groups to belong,” you oversimplified. Hold on, oversimplification; maybe this “groups thing” deserved a Reality Check. Sure, belonging provided some of the reason you joined the group, but you had only scratched the surface. A lot of the time, you joined for the activities. Few students who abhorred the very thought of appearing on stage in layers of makeup in front the entire school joined drama. You entered drama fully aware that you might end up wearing a dress like Chris Foster— and you loved it anyway.

Up

In an excerpt from “Kate’s Secret,” a play about two women at a rehabilitation center, one a bulimic and the other an anorexic, Marie Giezendanner reasons with and comforts Naomi Matanick. The two performed the piece for practice in chapel before they entered it in the duet acting competition at the Forensics Tournament.

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“Oh brother, talk about having one of those days,” laments Chris Foster after being beaten to a bank robbery by a rival thief. Foster played “Little” Pat Turgesson, a sometime criminal with a soft spot and an allergy to cats, in the drama production “Every Little Crook and Nanny.” The play centered on a bank heist and three little old ladies.

JONATHAN DYCK

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ISTENING to Nathan Rice, who played a police chief, Laura Danneker and Allison Rice wait to hear what he had to say. “I enjoyed playing with handcuffs. I found the whole policeman thing to be very interesting,” said Nathan, who borrowed the handcuffs from Uncle Brian Weidemann, a former Wheaton, Illinois police officer.

Speak-Shine from the stage “Drama rules; it is as simple as that,” said Jonathan Dyck. That attitude helped the high school drama students through the fall production. With limited time and participation, the drama cast, led by Mrs. Barb Case, worked hard to put on the play “Every Little Crook and Nanny.” The cast, made up of students from grades nine through twelve with a special guest appearance from sixth grader Nathan Danneker, worked together for the performances on 29 November and 3 December. “It was one of the best plays I’ve ever been involved in. I loved my role, and it was such a delight to portray it on stage in front of everyone,” said Chris Foster. Another kind of acting had students competing with those from other schools in a forensics tournament. Marie Giezendanner, who with Naomi Matanick represented Dalat in impromptu and duet acting, said, “Impromptu speaking is just a kind of a crazy thrill, something like trying to steer your own roller coaster when you do not know all the turns.” Debate also produced a “forensics

thrill,” giving teams of two opportunities to perfect their “arguing” skills. Dyck, Liesl Williams, Nathan Rice, and James Hawthorne worked to find information for both the affirmative and the negative side of the topic, “Developed countries have an ethical responsibility to eliminate poverty in developing nations.” They nervously prepared their speeches. The 10 forensic participants traveled to Kuala Lumpur for the competition on 22-26 February. “Although debate can be a lot of work, the opportunity to go to KL makes up for it!” explained Williams. With the willingness to try new things, both the drama and forensics groups worked and prepared for a time in the spotlight. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

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LL caught up on stage, Jonathan Dyck, Chris Foster, Laura Danneker, James Hawthorne, and Catherine Foster listen intently to Monay Ng as she hurriedly tried to get everyone out the door. The cast of 10 students met every Thursday afternoon with Mrs. Barb Case for rehearsal.

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ACK straight, shoulders back, and eyes forward, Nathan Rice stands in front of an auditorium of students and five judges during finals and presents his side of the debate. Rice and James Hawthorne received silver in the debate competition in KL.

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TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

AND to her face like a phone, Kirsten Gamble performs her solo act “The Duel.” Gamble and other forensics participants took the opportunity to display their skills before a Dalat audience before they headed off to Kuala Lumpur, where they performed in front of judges.

UEST star Nathan Danneker, who played a mischievous little boy, digs through a briefcase he found sitting on the desk. Often times, alumni back for a visit or middle school students would make special appearances in the high school plays.

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RS. Loehden, am I doing this right?” Angel Chung asks as she makes the next fold with her paper; she eventually created a penguin. Each week, Mrs. Carla Loehden found a simple origami animal pattern to make with the students in her club.

A Hive of Activity

TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

wards Day; on 30 November, all of the elementary students came to school with their clothes on backwards! “Working with the Elementary StuCo is especially fun,” said Mrs. Steinkamp. “They are so enthusiastic about doing something special for the elementary.” Thursdays brought many different activities. In Keyboarding Club, Mrs. Karen Robertson helped third and fourth grade students work on their typing skills. Soccer Club, headed up by Mr. Jimmy Um for kindergarten through first grade students, met in front of the gym to run around outside and play together. And Arts and Crafts, under the instruction of Mrs. Barb Case, became a well-sought-out club for students in second through fourth grade. Each week the students received an activity, instructions, and the materials required to make a craft. Then with the help of Mrs. Case, they constructed their creation. Whether running around outside, playing soccer, sitting quietly inside typing, or baking a pan of biscuits; these young students had many activities on campus to keep themselves busy. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

IMON says hug a friend,” John Watson said to his fellow Swimming Club-mates. Andrew Kim turned and wrapped his arms around Michelle Hebard while Mark Watson hugged Daniel Hebard, and Kevin Pyee and Tim Phan embraced.

TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

A wide assortment of clubs for young students met Mondays through Fridays in various locations on campus. Mondays brought an exciting time of learning as students in first grade met with Mrs. Donna Hansen in the Home Ec. room to learn how to make easy, yet delicious, foods such as pizza and biscuits. “I made my biscuit into the shape of a heart,” Kasey Rogers said. “I like that class because my friends Ivana [Smit] and Jasmine [Wood-Singh] are in it with me. As well, a group of students met with Mrs. Carla Loehden to learn how to make origami animals. A group of students also had the opportunity to swim and play in the pool in Swimming Club. Also on Mondays as well as on Tuesdays, students who wished to play basketball received an extra time of practice with Mrs. Loehden. Together the students worked on drills and plays. On Wednesdays, a select few students from first through fourth grades met as the Elementary Student Council in Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp’s office first semester and with Ms. Esther Tovell second. They thought up new activities such as Back-

TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

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RAVELING!” Mr. Gerry Steiert calls from the sidelines. Dribbling down the court, Moses Park looks to pass the ball to team⇢mates Hank Wong or Bryan Song. Opponents Tony Suh, Austin Rice, and Jirawat Keeratitharakul attempt to steal the ball. Whether during club time or at recess, elementary students enjoyed playing basketball and Four-square.

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AREFULLY adding the next ingredient that Mrs. Donna Hansen had handed her, Mina Um contributes to the making of biscuits in Cooking Club. This Monday afternoon club gave six little first grade girls a special time to cook, bake, and hang out together, learning to become little “Betty Crockers.”

ONGUE out in concentration, Joseph Haw thorne strategically places the Popsicle sticks in order to spell out “Jesus.” Under the supervision of Mrs. Barb Case, students had the opportunity to make many crafts like their “Jesus box.”

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IGHT arm out, Hung Ching Song stands ready to begin his pattern. Each week Tae Kwon Do students learned a new step to their pattern before finally perfecting it, testing, and then advancing to their next colour belt.

Kicking it up to the next level

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EG up high and left arm up by his face Mat thew Nguyen kicks at the mat as his partner Joshua Strong stands firmly and counts out eight kicks during kick-boxing practice. The part⇢ners took turns doing kicking patterns and then switching off and holding the mat.

sport and club program. A group of 25 boys, teachers, and staff worked hard in the Sunday night practices to get ready for tournaments against local teams and church groups. Although not an official school sport, Dalat’s team had shirts with their numbers and nicknames on them. They worked hard and played well in their tournaments taking place against the Blazin’ Eagles, a church club from the Tabernacle of Worship, and local teams such as the Penang Islanderz and Youth Focus. Playing in three tournaments since the end of September, the boys took fourth and fifth in the first two. In the three on three tournaments the teams took first and second. Mr. Selvanayagam said, “We did really well considering we had between two and four practices before each tournament and we were playing guys that had been doing this for years. We were especially proud of Riley Mahoney and Bryan Cairncross, who were the top scorers this season. Mahoney had eight; and Cairncross, seven.” After running several times around the chapel with the class, Mrs. Loehden called the group of 15 together to start doing stretches before Mr. Ronnie Teo, the instructor, came to test them for their next color belt. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

ACING his opponent, Sashitheran Gopalan prepares to pass the ball to either teammate Michael Whiting or Paul Sawatzky. Guys from Kuala Lumpur came to Penang almost every weekend to challenge the Dalat team to floorball matches.

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“Lets start with about four laps around the chapel,” Mrs. Carla Loehden said to the Tae Kwon Do class that normally met in the gym but could not this particular Saturday because of the basketball tournament. Students and parents of all ages gathered for Tae Kwon Do on Saturday mornings. “I have been doing Tae Kwon Do for about two years because it is good exercise, and I like doing the patterns [combinations of kicking and punching],” Matthew Nguyen, a green belt, said. As well, kick-boxing, a new activity, became a popular way to have a good time and exercise for students Michelle Nagel, Lindsey Yow, and a number of others. “I can’t manage to keep my balance,” Yow said as she attempted yet another kick at the blue mat Nagel held. “Kick-boxing can be pretty hard when you are not sure of what you are doing; but I really like the kicking combos, and the instructors are really nice,” Joshua Strong said. Coached by Mr. Jason Selvanayagam, floorball made its entrance on campus and proved a popular addition to the

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Providing Leadership around campus

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HILE Grace Sun records how much Ben De Vette has spent in the canteen, Lindsay Parks asks about his latest World Affairs assignment; and Rivka Matanick listens on as she flips through “Newsweek” magazine. During second semester, students used their new I.D. cards to pay for their purchases.

ANDS raised, Jonathan Dyck, Sarah Cairn cross, Drew Steiert, Barret Loehden, Allison McClary, Michelle Nagel, Charis To, and Pamela Hidajat repeat the pledge during the NHS induction ceremony. A luncheon prepared by the teachers and dorm parents followed, welcoming the new inductees.

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to do. This group provided opportunities for the dorm students to have a voice in the decisions made concerning where they live and what they do. “[Dorm Council provides] a good way for us to give input on things such as curfew and what to do on a long weekend. It’s nice that the [resident supervisors] aren’t overwhelmed with kids. If someone has a question or concern, he or she can talk to the dorm reps., and then they can take it to the RS in the next meeting,” said Sarah Cairncross. “Now,” Rice replied, “we have to find new kings and queens who have displayed the four specific qualities we need. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

Tara-Lynn Kennedy

worked together with Student Council. “Being apart of excom is a wonderful experience; I enjoyed meeting new people in my class and interacting with them,” said sophomore rep Joshua Peace. “Working with excom is a challenge, but that’s how we grow. It’s a chance to serve and a way to reflect Jesus,” said Sophia To, one of the freshman class reps. High school Student Council’s excom met weekly to discuss and plan what to sell in the canteen, pep rallies before soccer and basketball games, and “Special Things for Special People” days. For a Valentine’s movie night, StuCo opened the chapel for students to bring their pillows and enjoy free drinks and popcorn as they watched “Sweet Home Alabama.” Middle and Elementary School StuCo’s also planned activities off campus for the older kids such as “Now You See ’em” at Bukit Jambul and “Backwards Day” for all the younger students. Dorm Council, supervised by Uncle Brian and Aunt Val Weidemann, met monthly to discuss what dorm activities

S Liesl Williams

“So now what?” Heather Hill exclaimed to Nathan Rice, who had dressed as a lion to portray Aslan from the movie, “The Chronicles of Narnia.” The National Honor Society recognized students with outstanding scholarship, service, leadership, and character in an induction assembly on 7 March. Using Narnia as the scene of the skit, the eight “old” NHSers stressed the qualities needed to enter NHS; and then 11 juniors and one senior lit a candle, signed the registrar, and joined the Society. Other organizations elected officers to lead them, too. The senior excom worked hard to organize activities within their class. The junior class worked hard to provide candy and freezies for the students after school. Once a week, Uncle Tim Steinert brought out the snow cone machine for junior-class fund-raising. For most of second semester, the juniors worked on the Junior-Senior Banquet. The sophomore and freshman classes each had two class representatives who

TUDENT body president John Kim shares some of his favorite memories from his recent missions trip to Khao Lak, Thailand. Student Council members and class excoms showed leadership skills on and off campus in various activities and missions trips.


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YES closed and singing loudly, Andrew McClary, Wednesday night prayer meeting leader, starts the night off with the song “Here I Am to Worship.” Students gathered together in the chapel or canteen or on the basketball courts or beach to sing and pray together in a midweek service.

A time to worship many different ways Wednesday afternoons included many different activities for the students; but for Andrew McClary and a group of juniors that helped by playing, singing, or doing Power Point, those afternoons brought long practices, rushed dinners, and then an exciting night of worshiping the Lord in prayer meeting. “Singing for prayer meeting gave me the opportunity to get involved and plugged into Dalat at the beginning of the year. Prayer meeting is awesome because it is made up of people who are truly passionate about God. It’s not mandatory; so when people go, they go because they are excited to worship God and not because they have to,” Sarah Cairncross said. “It is a great ministry to reach out to other students,” Josh Manfred said. But Wednesday nights were not the only time students had the chance to sing. Ambassadors, led by Mrs. Valeri Brokaw, met weekly to practice together. “Within the small band room, it can get frustrating to hear all the noise we make. But it pays off in the end when we can lead people to worship God, who is bigger

than bad practices or wrong notes,” said Monay Ng. As well, the elementary and middle school kids received time to shine in quarterly musicals and concerts led by Mrs. Brokaw. First quarter students and parents got caught up in the cast made up of seventh and eighth girls in a play called “Thanks Is Something You Give.” Bethany Weidemann said, “It is always fun working with Mrs. Brokaw, and this play was especially exciting because we had a few new Asian girls who had never done a play with us before.” In December, the kindergarten through fifth grade put on a Christmas musical entitled “Christmas Joy.” Though challenging for the adults, the younger children enjoyed the new opportunity for bigger and better parts in their production. Whether on Wednesday or Friday, in worship team, Ambassadors, elementary musicals, or just kids goofing off during lunch—musical notes echo across campus. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

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N a special evening chapel during Spiritual Emphasis Week, Christa DeVette sings and jumps on stage. “S.E.W. greatly challenged my spiritual walk, especially the night when Rob [Robert Toews] spoke about doubting. Looking back, I know that I am much deeper in my relationship with God because of that week,” DeVette said.

FTER singing worship songs led by Andrew McClary, Sarah Cairncross, and alumnus Jason Pohl, Josh Manfred shares a few verses during a special prayer meeting. “See You at the Pole” has now become an annual tradition Dalat and other high schools around the world participate in.

LIESL WILLIAMS

RMS raised and eyes closed in worship, Mrs. Valeri Brokaw on the keyboard with the help of Andrew McClary, Marie Giezendanner, and Sin-Myung Park lead students and parents in worship. At least once a month Mrs. Brokaw and the Ambassadors held a special worship night on Sunday.

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TARING intently at his drum music, Kaz Hayashi prepares for Ambassadors’ practice. Students in Ambassadors had only one chance a week to rehearse during an elective P-period. In order to preform to the best of their ability, they had to work extra hard.

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Dashing past a defender, Joel Babcock drives towards the net in a friendly game against George Town before the Varsity Boys’ Basketball Tournament. Dalat won the game 78-28 and then proceeded to win the tournament, ending the se-mester’s season on a high note. All told, the team finished the season 6-0, undefeated at home.

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Soaring though the air, Hiro Kawabata competes in the run ing long jump event on Track and Field Day. The day provided a break from the normal rhythm of school, allowing students to get out and compete against one another just for the fun of it. Four teams competed, and Green, as it had the most points, won a pizza party.

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-Jubilee Adleta Sport Division Page

JONATHAN DYCK

—By Jonathan Dyck

“We renamed Mr. [Steve] Liss, Stephany.”

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Secure in his man hood, Scott Poulter shakes his pom-poms, aiming to inspire the varsity boys’ basketball team as part of a pep rally. Held before major tournaments, pep rallies often involved rather outrageous costumes and antics, anything from John Kim dressed up as the Dalat Eagle to Mr. Clay Moss playing an evil villain.

beating out nine other teams including number-one-seeded Chung Hwa, probably not due to the cheerleading. “Focus on practice,” you reprimanded yourself, catching your concentration gliding off again. Your mind, however, soon wandered off once more. The Green team had won Track and Field Day— again. It had almost looked like Blue would win, until Green suddenly jumped ahead by over 100 points in the standings. Your team, Yellow, finished third, beating out Red. Pausing to wipe sweat from your eyes, you caught the flit of elementary students dashing about. “So much energy,” you thought as they dashed past. The little kids ran just for the sake of it, becoming imaginary eagles or ponies or princesses, not really caring where they went so long as they went there. “Okay, enough daydreaming and back to practice,” you told yourself. Then, suddenly, you realized it. The soreness, the missed homework, the drilling, the practice, it all paid off now, not just in the end. It paid off every time you played as a team. It paid off every time you won. It even paid off when you lost. “Whoa,” you thought to yourself, “Reality Check.”

Sport

Eventually it paid off. Eventually the practices and the hours of running, of stretching, of drilling paid brought their rewards. Eventually you looked back on it all and gave thanks for the practices. But now, you lamented sore muscles and tired limbs and blisters and the homework that practice made you miss. Between the rivulets of sweat running down your face, you gazed across the basketball courts. There in the corner Nathan Danneker, Reagan Mahoney, Jared Williams, and Sydney McKenzie played a game of foursquare. Your eyes followed the bouncing motion of the ball as it rose and fell. “Duel,” McKenzie yelled, initiating a one-on-one, no-holdsbarred contest with Mahoney. Turning your eyes the other way you spotted a pickup football game on the field. It looked like high school students versus everyone younger— again, not very fair. Inwardly you chuckled as Kris Brink doggedly pursued ball carrier Scott Poulter. Brink did a pretty good job for being only half Poulter’s size. Wait, Poulter, didn’t he and David Robertson dress up as cheerleaders for the pep rally before the Varsity Boys’ Basketball Tournament? The team won gold at the tournament too,

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YES on the ball, Francis Wong runs down the field as May Yamauchi, Linnea Williams, and Beth Nguyen watch with three Garden School opponents. The girls tied the game 3-3 for the first contest of the season.

Pressing On

HOOTING the ball, Beth Nguyen aims to get it to her teammates during the Varsity Tournament against the Dalat varsity girls. “My slogan for this year is ‘never kick with your toes cause it hurts really bad,” Nguyen said.

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LIESL WILLIAMS

At eight in the morning, the boys huddled around each other, adrenaline rushing, talking about their offense and defense before the game against Chung Ling. “Defense,” the team roared as they threw their hands up. On 1 October, the boys and girls got up early for the Dalat Junior Varsity Tournament. Putting all their hard work and practices to use, the teams gathered at Penang Free School for a day of fun, excitement, and football competition. “Mrs. [Lyn] Holden pushed us and was a great teacher; it was fun and really good exercise,” Tanya Krishnamani said.

At the tournament, the boys played against Chung Ling, Uplands, Garden, and Kedah. They only beat Chung Ling, 1-0, the goal scored by Bruce Mak. The team took third in tournament action. “We only won one game, but still we got third in the tournament. The best part of this season was when Mak’s shot hit the crossbar and bounced in, so close the goalie got scared. We had a lot more teamwork by the end of the season,” Hung-Yi Song said. Also at the tournament, the girls competed against Garden International School’s U-13 and U-15 squads and against Kedah. Losing to every team, the girls

kept their heads high. “The tournament was hard work, but it was worth it,” Estefania Diago said afterwards. Using their talents in every game, the girls learned the true meaning of teamwork. The boys and girls had no other games, but continued to pressed on throughout practices and the tournament. “I like football because it was really good exercise,” Naomi Matanick. Walking off the field, the boys let out a sigh of exhaustion from a long and hard day. The teams had a chance to improve their football skills and enjoy company. —By Jubilee Adleta

JV Girls’ Football

LIESL WILLIAMS

3-3 1-2 2-3 0-2 0-2 1-1 0-4 1-2 0-5

LIESL WILLIAMS

Season Record: 0-2-7

JV Boys’ Football 0-1 0-5 2-4 1-0 0-4 MSSPP

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Junior Varsity Football

UICKLY moving the ball away from his goal, Harry Mak dribbles it down the field with keeper Norman Kiehl thankful for his teammates’ support. The boys played against Uplands and lost 0-5. They continued playing all day in the JV tournament, working hard so they could wear the bronze medals.

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Junior Varsity Dalat Tournament: 3rd Place Season Record: 2-0-6

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0-5 0-9 3-1 JONATHAN DYCK

St. Xavier Tanjung Bunga Sri Inai

N an attempt to get the soccer ball to Hung-Yi Song, Josh Strong throws it in hard while watching the Chung Ling opponents. The boys beat Chung Ling, 1-0; they then played against eight junior varsity teams during the JV Dalat Tournament, coming in third.

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Raising the Bar

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YES focused on the ball, Matthew Hansen steals it from Chung Ling’s player. The boys worked hard to take home third place. Each game brought new difficulties that taught them more about football and good attitudes.

Varsity team hits a new high for Dalat Hansen dribbled down and shot, tying the game 1-1. They then lined up for a shoot-out. First up was Jonathan Kue; the whole team cheered him on, and he kicked the ball and scored. Chung Ling took turns kicking the ball between the players. Josh Manfred, Scott Poulter, and Robertson also kicked in the shoot-out for Dalat. Chung Ling only made one of their goals. Kue, Manfred, and Robertson made theirs, winning 4-2. Then, later on that day, the boys played against Pen Khas and Garden, each a very tough game. While the boys played Pen Khas for bronze, Garden and Mont Kiara played each other for first and second. In the end, Garden came out with gold; and Mont Kiara took silver. “We won! We got third place in our home tourney! That was the highlight of my season,” Drew Steiert said after beating Pen Khas

1-0. The boys had played in the MSSPP Tournament and worked their way into the semifinals against Westlands for third. On 7 October the girls’ and boys’ teams loaded up and traveled four hours to the capital to compete in the ISKL Invitational. Enjoying the time away from school and time with friends, the teams worked hard in Kuala Lumpur to receive a medal. Both teams placed third. Even though Dalat’s teams did not win, they kept a good attitude. “Our defense was so amazing that in the whole tournament I only touched the ball eight times!” keeper DeVette said. By the end of the season, both teams had succeeded in raising the bar. “The season was a great turnaround. We worked together and played hard; and in the end, we reached a new high,” Po Lai stated. —By Jubilee Adleta

S Paul Im goes in to take the ball, Drew Steiert moves away. The varsity boys’ played against a visiting U.S. Navy team for an extra practice. Since the Navy only had four players, half of the boys’ joined the Navy’s team.

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“This season was great. My overall best memory was the Kuala Lumpur tourney. Even though we didn’t get a medal, the team grew a lot closer,” said Maria Miner. “We got off to a rough start, not having enough players or a goalie; but we eventually managed to get more players, and Christa [DeVette] saved the day by being our goalie.” During the two-month long football season, the boys’ and girls’ teams practiced hard to raise the bar at two different tournaments. At first, the Dalat Invitational Tournament on 23–24 September brought 21 teams together to play. Six girl teams played at College General, and the boys played downtown at Penang Free School. When the boys played against Chung Ling on 24 September, their opponents led the whole game by one point. With a minute left to go on the clock, David Robertson passed the ball to Matthew Hansen.

Varsity Girls’ Football

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1-1 0-2 0-1 3-0

Dalat Tournament: 3rd Place Season Record: 1-2-1

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Dalat Tournament: 3rd Place Kuala Lumpur Games: 3rd Place MSSPP—Penang Island Zone: 3rd Place Season Record: 6-7-1

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AREFULLY, Allison McClary looks down the field to throw the ball in. The girls played the staff and JV girls’ to get ready for the upcoming season. “It was really awesome! My team worked together as a team and ended up winning,” McClary said.

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RIBBLING the ball down to shoot, Olivia D’Cruz avoids opponent Susheela Meyyappan. The varsity girls played against a combined team of JV girls’ and staff, in the Dalat International tournament, tying 1-1 which took them on to play for third place.

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Tanjung Bunga 3-7 Uplands 3-0 Dalat Invitational A Pen Khas 1-0 Chung Ling 1-1 Garden 0-1 Pen Khas 1-0 Garden 2 Penang Free Uplands MSSPP Teluk Bahang 0-1 Pendidikan Khas 6-0 Haji Zainul Abidin 3-1 Westland’s 0-3

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Laid-Back

AREFULLY watching, Kyle Ladner receives the ball from Eun-Hae Kim. Every moment they could, kids enjoyed playing the traditional Four-square game with others, giving them exercise and a great time with friends.

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Students have fun outside school and after school; and elementary students rode the school’s tricycles around the court. High school students, however, played more active sports like basketball and soccer. By participating in these various activities, students stayed fit and in shape for team sports and for personal reasons. “During my leisure time, I enjoy playing basketball; it helps me accomplish my goals, and it also helps me improve my skill as I play,” Tiffany Hsiang said. Besides keeping students active, leisure sports provided the day students an excuse to stay on campus and relax with their friends and exercise. “I’d rather play sports than

study or do homework; sports also help me stay active rather than being bored,” Andy Jung said. “Guys, it’s time to wrap it up,“ said Uncle Tim Steinert; “Caleb and Kael need to get ready for dinner, and it’s time to go home.” Steiert and Caldwell preformed one last trick with the ramp and then went inside to clean up as Hokyo and Kennedy headed home after the long day. —By Jubilee Adleta

PIKING the ball, Joseph Hawthorne passes it to Nathan Danneker, who waits patiently. Foursquare became the new favorite pastime activity for elementary and middle school students, especially during lunch; the fierce tropical sun didn’t keep them from keen competition.

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LIMBING up the spiral ladder, Elisabeth Brokaw works her way to the slide. Elementary students loved to play on the colourful playground while waiting for parents to pick them up.

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Almost everyday after school, Kael Steinert, Jeff Hokyo, Zack Lindsay, Caleb Caldwell, and Gary Kennedy congregated outside Jaffray Dorm to skateboard on homemade pipe rails and over the speed bumps. “Skateboarding is not a crime; whenever I hear people say this, I just smile and laugh because to me, they are too caught up in the fact, in thinking we are ‘bad’ and that the whole world is out to get us. I really think they should just keep [their thoughts] to themselves,” Lindsay said. Most students participated in after-school activities such as basketball, skateboarding, indoor soccer, football, and swimming. The middle school kids exercised by playing Four-square before

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HOWING off his skills, Jeff Hokyo preforms a rail slide. After school, the boys went out and practiced their tricks and moves outside Jaffray Dorm for the tournament on 15 March down in Kuala Lumpur.

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TEADILY, Lindsay Yow, Liesl Williams, and Maria Miner sprint in the U16-girls 100-meter dash. With five races between girls, Olivia D’Cruz took first place with Allison McClary coming in second.

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RMS held in the air, YongWon Song soars as far as he can for the high jump in the middle of the day. Earning points for participation as well as placing first, second, third, or fourth; Song’s Blue team came in second.

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Upper school students strived for the prize “Ready for a great day of activities?” Honour Adleta said, turning to Tiffany Hsiang. “Yup, ready to go out there and have fun while working hard,” Hsiang replied. On 9 November, students eagerly came to school for Track and Field Day. With everyone divided up into four teams, the middle school and high school loaded the buses and headed for the USM track. Everyone kept busy, working hard through all the different events, earning points for participating and for winning. “Track and Field was cool. It was great to try some events that I had never done before,” Sarah

Cairncross said. Students cheered for their team or just relaxed in between events. “Track and Field was great because you were cheering for people you didn’t even know,” Scott Poulter said. Exhausted students moved to the edge of the track to watch the final relays of the day. “I like Track and Field Day because you get to skip a whole day of school. I enjoyed selling for junior class while watching everyone run like eagles. I also liked embarrassing Kaz [Hayashi] when I asked him to the Christmas Banquet,” said Pam Hidajat. While boarding the bus for the trip back, Adleta turned to

Hsiang and asked, “So, how was your day?” “Great! I’m glad they have Track and Field Day. It’s kinda educational because you learn different things and just might earn something from it, like ribbons; it’s also a time when new things were taught which many people didn’t know how to do,” said Hsiang. —By Jubilee Adleta FF to good start, the U1 12 boys run hard in the 100-meter dash during Track and Field Day. Harry Mak won the U-12 100-meter race. Boys and girls competed in the 100, 200, and 400 meter races.

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EAD held high, Ben DeVette runs to the finish line, ending the last relay of the day. The Green team won the pizza party, with Blue, short 100 points, coming in second.

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UMPING high, Matt Hansen flies through the air dur ing the triple jump. Steven Ong won first in the Over16 triple jump, Howard Kao took second, and Matt Hansen came in third place.

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And That’s the Way...

JV Girls’ Basketball GIS George Town Convent Green Lane Penang Chinese Girls Kong Min Can 2 Heng Ee Kong Min Can 2 Japanese Penang Chinese Girls

...the ball bounces

AREFULLY aiming at the basket, Victor Ho shoots, adding two more points to the already close score.“Every point counted. We played together as a team because it was the only way to keep the game close,” Hung-Yi Song said.

Season Record: 4-0-5

JV Boys’ Basketball Taiwanese Chung Ling Uplands George Town Heng Ee Berapit Japanese Penang Girls’ State Team

Season Record: 4-0-4

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ITH all his might, Gilbert Weng jumps to score two more points for the team. The boys played a close game against the Penang Girls’ State Team, only to fall behind in the last five minutes.

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IGHTING to get in place, Angela Steiert shoots the ball. The girls used their exceptional dribbling, shooting, and ball handling skills that they learned in practice for the game and their future careers in basketball.

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ITH familiar words, Coach Gerry Steiert talks to Frances Wong, Angela Steiert, Chan-Mi Kim, Honour Adleta and Maaya Yamauchi during a time-out. In the game against Convent Green Lane, the girls won 41-15.

practice, the girls had enough players for two teams; so they would split up and scrimmage against each other. “Although I don’t have a lot of basketball skills, JV girls basketball was fun. You always have to try your best and don’t give up,” Maaya Yamauchi said. Under the leadership of Coach Gerry Steiert, the girls learned to play as a team and not to get down. The girls hope to improve their skills so that they can play on varsity. “I’m proud of you boys, you worked hard; and even though we lost, I thought ya’ll did really well on defense,” Coach Um told the boys before they went home. —By Jubilee Adleta

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MSSPP,” Ben DeVette said. On 24 March, four teams joined together in the gym for the Dalat Invitational Tournament. Winning their first match against Uplands, they moved on to play George Town. During the game, Hung-Yi Song dribbled the ball down the court and passed it to Weng. Weng then took it straight to the basket and scored. “The best part of our season was playing other teams; we were able to last longer in games and press on more than before,” Andy Jung said. The JV girls worked hard all season. At practices, the girls would work hard on learning all the new plays and practicing their shots. Sometimes at the end of each JUBILEE ADLETA

The team huddled together and listened as Coach Jimmy Um told them what defensive and offensive positions they would be playing. A whistle blew, and the team threw its hands in the middle. “Boys, this is our time; let’s get out there and do it,” Coach Um said before the five starters scattered onto the court. The JV boys started a new season with a new coach, Coach Um. The boys learned more things in new ways because Coach Um had different teaching skills and plays. The varsity squad recruited Gilbert Weng, even though this was his first year at Dalat. “I enjoyed having Weng on our team. He was a great addition to our team, and helped us out during

16-19 69-23 41-15 35-39 20-22 16-79 44-32 30-44 51-38

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Demonstrating Abilities

Varsity Girls’ Basketball Heng Ee Convent Green Lane Berapit Penang Chinese Girls Heng Ee

Preparing minds and bodies for the game

42-58 38-26 37-17 40-54 39-68

“OK, guys; we need to work on our defense; and remember, we don’t want to turn the ball over. OK?” Coach Steven Liss emphasized before the game. “Yeah guys, and watch the base line; they are sneaky and will take it if you don’t,” Allison McClary added before putting her hand in for prayer before the game. The girls’ season kicked off in October with scrimmages and practice games. The preseason gave the girls a time to get to know each other and to learn to play more like a team before the actual action. Some of the girls learned new plays and pieced them together so that

Season Record: 2-0-3

Season Record: 1-2-1 Varsity Boys’ Basketball George Town Chung Ling Youngsters Heng Ee Berapit Uplands Heng Ee George Town Alice Smith ISKL Chung Hwa George Town Uplands

80-23 62-55 57-76 29-42 59-18 70-56 78-28 37-22 67-37 62-40 80-33 41-12

they would remember them. The coaches set up friendly games with other teams from around the city for extra practices. With four new players on the team, the other girls had to work hard and help them out wherever possible. “It was fun to play with a lot of new players this year. Although we didn’t do well at MSSPP, we finally played like a team. With all the hard work we put in, I believe we’re the best team on the island,” Grace Sun said. With a new head coach, the varsity boys stuck it out and became a winning team. Winning gold at Dalat’s Invitational Tournament,

OR the fast break, Angela Stevens dribbles the ball past her Penang Chinese Girls’ opponent. The girls practiced everything from layups to jump shots, working hard to improve for the games.

INDLESS coordination, Allison McClary shoots the ball after being fouled during the game against Heng Ee. “When it comes down to it, every foul shot counts,” Christa DeVette said.

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the boys started their season and won the first 12 games. The 12game-winning streak came to an end when the team lost two starters, Howard Kao and Andrew McClary, on the same day. At that point, the team went on a five-game-losing skid. “We play as a team, and [Coach Clay Moss’s] coaching style makes us want to play perfect, to the best of our abilities,” McClary said. With the occasional ups and downs, the teams worked their hardest to pull ahead of every other team. The boys and girls ended their seasons with pride and class. “Good job everyone; even though we didn’t win, you guys played really well. I’m proud of you guys,” Coach Liss said. Coach Donna Hansen finished talking; and her girls headed home, preparing their minds for the next —By Jubilee Adleta game.

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UICKLY looking towards the basket, Howard Kao prepares to shoot. Dur ing practices, the team would play 5-on-5 to prepare for quick shots and the upcoming tournaments.

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ASSING the ball, Drew Steiert gives it to Howard Kao as the George Town op ponent rushes to play defense. The boys played incredible defense and trounced George Town 78-28.

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Learning New Skills

OSITIONING herself under the ball, Angela Steiert bumps the ball back to her partner Honour Adleta. The girls practiced hitting the ball with their partners to get the feel for their practice games against the varsity.

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Junior Varsity Girls work hard while learning play in any official games because all the other schools have their season during the summer. Everyone learned how to encourage others when the shot did not go in the right direction or when it fell out of bounds. “[Our main focus] was to give the girls more exposure to the sport and to help them improve their basic skills,” said Mrs. Holden, “all in hope of maybe being able to have a competitive varsity girls’ volleyball team.” The JV team enjoyed the practices because they could break away from school books and just have a good time with their friends with school. “We worked hard, and by

the end of season we all were really good at being loud and calling ‘mine’ when we were going to get the ball,” Maaya Yamauchi said. “I like volleyball because our team was always laughing and having fun. It was hard, though, because even though I tried, I could never hit the ball just right and get it to go where I wanted it to go. I hope we have volleyball again next year,” Angela Steiert said. Walking out of the gym arm in arm, Adleta said “That was great practice; I can’t wait till Thursday. See you later, May!” “Yeah, I know; me too! See you later, Honour,” Yamauchi replied as she walked to her ride home. —By Jubilee Adleta

ITH all her might, Carolyn Whiting serves the ball as Maaya Yamauchi prepares. The girls played friendly games against the varsity girls and staff for exercise and to improve their skills.

OSSING the ball to the girls, Aunt Carrie Myles makes them practice bump ing the ball back to her. Working hard at practice, and learning new skills, the girls prepared for the games against varsity and staff.

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Walking into the gym just in time for practice, May Yamauchi and Honour Adleta greeted the girls with a smile on their lips and anticipation on their faces, ready to play volleyball. Volunteer Coach Aunt Carrie Myles started off as the head coach for this season and taught the girls until she had to step down because of other work obligations. When Aunt Carrie stepped down, coaches Mrs. Carla Loehden and Mrs. Lyn Holden stepped up to teach the girls. They would each take one of the two practices during a week; the girls helped along so that no one would get confused. “It was amazing how it all worked; we got to learn different things from the three different coaches who helped each of us find and learn something that we didn’t know already,” said Adleta. The JV worked on their basic volleyball skills as well as sportsmanship. They were not able to

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ITTING the ball softly, Honour Adleta passes the ball to Maaya Yamauchi while Frances Wong waits. The coaches encouraged the girls to improve their basic skills and to enjoy the time they had together during practices.

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frequent move, Christina Gaddis bumps the ball to May Yamauchi. During practice, the girls got to improve their bumps, serves, and sets. Even though the girls did not have any games, they kept their heads up.

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Varsity Boys’ Volleyball

Varsity players keep up the good work

MSSPP 18-25 8-25 25-16 25-19 8-25 18-25

Penang Free Chung Ling

“Mine,” Andrew McClary called out as he ran to hit the ball. “Got it,” Paul Sawatzky said as he set the ball for Brendon Buntain. Buntain spiked the ball over; then the game continued. “Although we didn’t have any official games, I loved practicing and playing friendly games with the staff and JV girls,” Angela Stevens said. The girls did not play against anyone besides the staff and JV girls as not all of the girls knew how to play volleyball. Not to waste their time, Coach Kerry Mahoney and Coach Carrie Myles taught them vital skills and how to play as a team. “We taught each player where she needed to cover on the court, what her responsibilities were, and JUBILEE ADLETA

Season Record: 2-4-0

how to keep the ball in play,” Mr. Mahoney said. Learning on and off the court, students realized the importance of becoming a “team.” Although some just said it was a sport, others thought differently. “I learned to play the game in a short time, working hard as a team and having a great time with my friends,” Elaine Ang said. “Playing volleyball gave me a great way to get out some of my frustration, learn new skills, and hang out with great people all together in one afternoon,” Marie Giezendanner said. Along with the girls, the boys had no official games because of the scheduling until the MSSPP tournament. They practiced hard and learned the skills needed to have a shot at winning first. Since

some of the students went home for the Christmas break and did not return until 30 January, not everyone on the team participated in MSSPP competition on 20, 23, and 24 January. At the tournament, the boys who lived in Penang played three matches with two games in each. Although the boys did not place, they did not give up either. “We faced grueling competition, and it proved to be too much for our team. I felt we did well for how long the team had actually been together,” Drew Steiert said. As they walked off the court, McClary and Sawatzky kept their heads high, looking forward to their next match. —By Jubilee Adleta

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APPILY in place, Tamara Herring bumps the ball to Marigan Dyck, who then spiked it to the JV girls. The varsity team improved their skills and exercised while playing friendly games against the JV girls, which they won.

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Poised on the edge, Banaphol Ariyasan tichai struggles with Steven Ong as Olivia D’Cruz dashes up to give the final push. Ariyasantichai ended up in the pool shortly thereafter, the victim of a dunking. At the Harvest Festival, for five ringgit the junior class locked students in the pool-side jail; 10 ringgit put students in the pool.

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“Peek-a-boo!” motions Kirsten Dewey, hiding her face and making Mrs. Laurie Dewey laugh. Cuteness factor aside, small children in the dorms brought smiles to the faces of dorm residents— and occasional grimaces. “Kirsten’s hair fountains up when put into a ponytail, a bit like a really cute onion,” said Monay Ng.

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Imitating extra hyper penguins, Josh Man fred, Christa De Vette, and Sarah Cairncross hop madly out of high school Choir. Mr. Kerry Mahoney showed choir class videos of a “going to work Monday morning” slothful polar bear and a “coming home Friday afternoon” crazed penguin. Students seized the chance to act like the animals.

People’s Lives Division Page

“Ask not for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee,” wrote John Donne, read on a Friday afternoon in AP English 12, the last “official” class of the day before the weekend. You caught your mind slipping, failing to grasp the slick concepts and sly metaphysical conceits of Donne. Too close not to think about, the weekend loomed over your thoughts. Where to go, whom to go with, how to get there—the choices abounded. Would you go to Gurney and watch a movie, or would you rather buy a movie at Midlands? Would you take a bus or a taxi? Would you eat at McDonald’s or the newly opened A&W? Or would you simply stay on campus, talking with friends, watching the sunset, and perhaps zipping up to Hillside for a refreshing iced coffee? Hey, the weekend usually had some sort of school-sponsored activity planned. You smiled as you remembered the Harvest Festival and David Thompson and Josh Manfred as they dutifully caught students and threw them in the pool to raise money for the junior class. Then, the basketball team decided to throw Mr. Karl Steinkamp into the pool; it took the entire team to do. The minutes grated on. “Why can’t

the bell toll already?” you groaned, your mind pressed under the burden of metaphysical poetry. Then you remembered, the Dalat Ambassadors had scheduled a worship meeting in the chapel on Sunday night, and your dorm had planned a Christmas party for next Friday evening. “If anything, the next few weekends won’t be empty,” you mused absently. The weeks never looked empty either. School started at 8:20 a.m. and lasted until 3:35 p.m. Life took on a fairly strict rhythm, especially for dorm students. Prayer meetings on Wednesdays and AP courses kept you jumping to stay ahead of the next due-date. Often, the weekdays rarely left much time for free time. On the weekends, though, you relaxed. Finally the bell tolled for thee. Hastily, you snapped shut your textbook, stuffed it into your backpack, threw your backpack over your shoulder, and bolted out the door. Whatever you decided on doing, the entire weekend lay open for it. Struggling to contain a laugh, you basked in the joyous feeling of unimpeded time. Then, with near perfect timing, Mr. John “Tommy” Tompkins’s voice called out behind you reminding of your AP paper due Monday. Uh oh, Reality Check. —By Jonathan Dyck

“Every study party needs an unpooper.”

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Cell phone in hand, Grace Sun talks to her parents while Rivka Matanick and Lindsay Parks lean on a pole together, waiting for Sun to share her plans for the afternoon. As soon as school let out, seniors met at the lockers to talk with each other and find out what to do for the rest of the day.

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The Name of the Game “Hey, where are you headed to after school?” Matt Hansen asked Joel Babcock. “Ben [DeVette]’s place,” Babcock answered. “Howard [Kao]’s gone to get his car.” After a long week of school, every senior had something to look forward to. Whether hanging with friends or family or spending some time alone, the class of ’06 could still find time for quality recreation. “I like the weekends because I can go places with people and talk with them,” said Jonathan Dyck. Highlights of the weekends included going to Gurney to see the latest hit movie like “King Kong,” or to get a quick bite at Nandos, visiting friends at their homes, or even going down to the Midlands’ bowling alley. The class tried to get the most out of its waning time at Dalat before they all would go their separate ways. If they couldn’t find

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Audrey Ang, Penang, Malaysia

StuCo 2,3; Choir 4; Drama 2; Choral Speaking 1; Japanese Club 3; Tae Kwon Do 1,2; Badminton 1; Prefects 1,2; Liddsoc 1,2; Dance 1-3; Girl Guides 1,2; Interact 1-3; Basketball 1, Track 1, Foreign Language 3

Joel Cooper Babcock, Vientiane, Laos

Class Officer 4; Dorm Officer 3,4; Band 4; Drama 1,2; Football 1,4; Volleyball 1,2; Basketball 2-4; Track 1,3,4; MSSPP 3,4; English 1,2; Science 3; P.E. 1,2; Foreign Language 1, Social Studies 1

Ben Charles DeVette, Penang, Malaysia

Band 1,4; Basketball 3,4; Swimming 1

Dorm Officer 3,4; Choir 3,4; Drama 3,4; Forensics 4; Ensemble 3; NHS 4; Reflector 4

Jonathan William Dyck, Pontianak, Indonesia Christopher Foster, Balikpapan, Indonesia

Dorm Off. 2, Drama 1-4; Forensics 2; Instrumental Lessons 1-3; Volleyball 1,2; Reflector 3,4

Ted Chi-Wei Fung, Wujiang, China

StuCo Officer 1,3,4; T.A. 1,3; Choir 2; Band 1,2,4; Jazz Band 2,4; Football 1-4; Indoor Soccer 1-4; Basketball 1-4; MSSPP 1-3; Math 1; Foreign Language 2; NHS 3,4

Hands gripping the handle bars, Andrew McClary sits on his motorcycle as he waits for his sister Allison. As opposed to driving cars, some seniors found motorcycles a convenient and easy mode of transportation.

Malaina Camille Gaddis, Penang, Malaysia

T.A. 4; Instrumental Lessons 1-4; Ensemble 1,2; Orchestra 1; English 3

Matt Hansen, Penang, Malaysia

Class Off. 3; Choir 2; Worship Team 3,4; Football 1,3,4; Indoor Soccer 1-4; Volleyball 1; Basketball 1-4; Track 1-4; MSSPP 1-4; Floorball 4; Math 1

James McLean Hawthorne, Penang, Malaysia

Heather Anne Hill, Penang, Malaysia

StuCo Class Rep. 2, Class Officer 2,4; T.A. 3,4; Dorm Officer 4; Choir 2-4; Band 1-4; Worship Team 3,4; Ambassadors 3,4; Tutor 3,4; Volleyball 1,2; NHS 3,4

CHRIS FOSTER

Class Officer 3,4; T.A. 2,4; Choir 2; Band 1,2,4; Drama 2-4; Forensics 3,4 Instrumental Lessons 1-4; Voice 2-4; Tae Kwon Do 1-4; Badminton 1,2 Jazz Band 2,4; Ambassadors 4; EE Youth 3,4

CHRIS FOSTER

enough time to socialize in school, they could still spend time out after school. “It’s nice to talk right after school because I get a chance to chat with friends and find out how their day at school was,” said Jonny Kue. When the homework load fell to a minimum, seniors could find time to socialize right in the middle of the week, on or off campus. “Though it’s tiring, I like the long walks Lindsay [Parks] and I take up Pearl Hill. It’s good to talk and exercise at the same time,” said Rivka Matanick. Though the seniors usually socialized among themselves, some found pleasure in the company of those outside their class. “I like to hang out with people I don’t see often,” said James Hawthorne. A large portion of the class took full advantage of the privileges that came with their age and often carpooled to different restaurants, such as Subaidah, for lunch on school days. “I like to go off campus for lunch because you have more of a choice on what to eat, like wan tan mee; and it’s cheaper,” said Kao. “Hey Kao! Come on, I can only be out until eleven,” said Babcock as he, DeVette, and Hansen piled into Kao’s blue Proton. —By Chris Foster

Terry Hsiang, Penang, Malaysia

Class Off. 4; T.A. 4; Band 1,3,4; Martial Arts 1,2; For. Lang. 1

Badminton 2,3; Church Choir 1-4; Floorball 4; Tennis 2; Art Club 2,3; Football 1,3,4; Indoor Soccer 2-4; Basketball 1; MSSPP 3; Social Studies 2; Art Master Studio 4 Band 1,4; Badminton 1-3; Football 1,3,4; Indoor Soccer 1-4; Volleyball 1; Basketball 1-4; Track 3,4; MSSPP 1-4; Floorball 4; Science 3

Hiroyuki Kawabata, Tokyo, Japan Grace Kim Eun Hae, Penang, Malaysia

Class Officer 4; T.A. 1-4; Tutoring 1-4; Band 1,2,4; Badminton 1-3; Science 2, Bible 2,3; For. Lang. 1,2; Band 1; NHS 3,4; Salutatorian 4

John Kim, Penang, Malaysia

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StuCo Officer 3,4; T.A. 1,2; Band 1,2,4; Badminton 1; Jazz Band 1,2,4; Computer Product Technology 3; NHS 3,4

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Seniors (Ang – Kim)

Taking a rest on the white benches, Po Lai sits with senior class sponsor Mr. Steve Liss after soccer practice. Seniors tried to spend time with staff members and share in talks about life, school, and social events.

Sitting with Heather Hill in Ziemer Dorm, Jonathan Kue munches on a peanut butterchocolate bar. Senior treat brought the rather small group of dorm seniors together once every week to catch up on events.

Senior Socializing

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Howard Kao, Penang, Malaysia

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Paul Sung Min Im, Seoul, Korea

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Survivor Redang

Submerged in clear, tranquil seawater, Matt Hansen gazes around as a few fish swim by him. On snorkeling trips, the seniors saw spectacular sights only nature could provide.

Outswim, Outrest, Outtalk

JONATHAN DYCK JONATHAN DYCK

boat, Mrs. Carolyn Butler, Audrey Ang, Hiro Kawabata, and John Kim gaze out to sea. Snorkling groups travelled many miles for prime swimming locations off this west-coast island.

with the clear-blue ocean and white sand and different locations to sit back, relax, read, or listen to music. “Even though we were at a beautiful place, it was a so great to hang out with people all around the resort. It was such a great bonding experience,” said Rivka Matanick, reflecting back on the various talks by the pool and beach. Certain events during the sneak brought out qualities most members of the class did not know people had. “When Yumi [Yamauchi] and I lost our bags at the beginning of the trip, I was worried about what would happen later. But I was really surprised when my classmates got together and gave us both money to buy supplies. It touched me that people could be so unified in helping others,” said Lindsay Parks. When the morning of 16 October arrived, the seniors gathered up their belongings and made their way over to the jetty, some of them looking back towards the island, reflecting on all the great memories they had just collected in the past few days. —By Chris Foster

JONATHAN DYCK

Sitting at the end of the

They were so well behaved; and they were considerate of others, including some of the other resort guests,” said Mr. Moss. During the four-day retreat, the class had the chance to snorkel off colorful reefs, complete with equally colorful fish and marine life. “The snorkeling was my favorite part of the weekend! It was so neat to be around the fish and sea turtles!” said Jonny Kue. On the snorkeling trips, the seniors had their photographs taken via special underwater cameras and later purchased the pictures on a disc. “It was really cool to see myself diving underwater; I just wish the pictures were a little cheaper,” said Jonathan Dyck. If the tropical sights, sounds, and smells could not already satisfy the seniors’ need for a getaway; the resort also supplied a number of amusements, including a Jacuzzi, some snooker tables, and a dance club. “It was so cool to see Lachlan [Modrynski] doing some freestyle rapping. I thought it was very humorous,” said Audrey Ang. For those less adventurous, Sneak still provided time for them

JONATHAN DYCK

The harsh, bright sun penetrated skin and eyes alike. Over the dull roar of a ferry’s motor, bodies emerged from below and stepped out onto the dock, gasping from the heat as much as from the beauty in front of them. On 12 October, the senior class traveled away to the tropical island resort of Redang. With their belongings all packed and ready to go, the group of eager seniors boarded the bus for a nine hour trip on the road, followed by an hour-long ride on a ferry. But their patience finally paid off. Led by their sponsors Mr. Steve Liss, Mr. Raj Pillai, and Mr. Clay and Mrs. Vicki Moss and extra chaperones Mr. Chris and Mrs. Carolyn Butler, the seniors relieved their stored anticipation for their trip by enjoying the resort around them. “I’m really proud of the class.

Eyes closed in worship, Yumi Yamauchi, Grace Sun, and the rest of the seniors sing “Light the Fire.” Sneak still provided a time for the seniors to worship and give thanks to God.

Senior Sneak

With brute strength, Ted

Fung prepares to hurl Lindsay Parks into the pool below. Sneak provided many opportunities for the seniors to cut loose and play with each other.

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his snorkel, James Hawthorne surveys the coral in front of him. During sneak, seniors had the chance to get close enough to touch coral .

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Breathing air out through

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looking Ahead Shirts, Food, and College Acceptance could choose between two designs or get both. Most members looked to class meetings as a time of getting work done, along with some socializing over food and refreshments, such as homemade chocolate chip cookies provided by Hawthorne. “It’s cool that we can get some food because when we’re finally done at 2:00 or 3:00, we get hungry from all the talking,” said Grace Sun. While keeping up with their studies, the seniors also spent a lot of time deciding, planning, and working with Ms. Ruth Strong on their plans for next year. “The whole thing was really overwhelming, but it was really great that I could get something important done and make my dream job more tangible,” said Stella Park, who

received acceptance into the Rhode Island School of Art and Design. “All right, if you’re not with a group or if you’re meeting later, you can go!” Mr. Liss shouted to the seniors at 2:00 on Saturday. Picking up their belongings, the class filed out of Mr. Liss’s room, chattering about the meeting they had just had and heading off on their different paths, much like they would after 7 June. —By Chris Foster

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Hiro kawabata write down their ideas. During the Senior Transition Seminar, the class wrote down notes about changing schools and what to expect from new experiences and friend-

Jonathan Kue Khon Kaen, Thailand

Perched up near Ms. Ruth

StuCo Rep. 1; Choir 2,4; Band 1,2,4; Badminton 1,2,4; Football 1,2,4; Indoor Soccer 1,2,4; MSSPP 1,2,4

CHRIS FOSTER

Po Tsang Lai Penang, Malaysia

CHRIS FOSTER

Strong’s office wall, Malaina Gaddis signs her name and adds a symbol. After receiving admission letters from a college, seniors signed their names on a wall in Ms. Strong’s office.

Pencils ready, Paul Im and

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“Hey James [Hawthorne], what time is the meeting tomorrow?” asked Nathan Rice. “We have to be in [Mr. Steve] Liss’s room by at least 12:00,” Hawthorne said in reply. Aside from the hassles of schoolwork and their own social lives, the seniors attended class meetings to discuss about important matters that would bring their final year of high school to a good close. Along with deciding who would speak at graduation and designing graduation invitations, the 28 seniors spent months debating what their class shirts would look like. Originally intended as a spin off of the uniform, the seniors decided to switch to regular T-shirts. “I’m excited that we finally got them,” said Heather Hill. Seniors

Band 1,3,4; Badminton 1; Football 1-4; Indoor Soccer 1-4, Volleyball 1,2

Rivka Beth Siti Matanick Penang, Malaysia

Class Officer 2; T.A. 3,4; Choir 4; Band 1,2,4; Volleyball 1; Foreign Language 2; AP Psychology 3; NHS 3,4

Andrew McClary Penang, Malaysia

Class Officer 4; Tutor 3,4; Choir 2,4; Band 2-4; Instrumental Lessons 1,2; Jazz Band 2-4; Worship Team 1-4; Ambassadors 3,4; Prayer Meeting Leader 4; Football 1-4; Indoor Soccer 1-4; Volleyball 4; Basketball 1-4; MSSPP 2-4

Lachlan Jacob Modrzynski Penang, Malaysia

Class Officer 2; Badminton 2; Varsity Junior Coach 4; Indoor Soccer 1; Basketball 2; Track 1-4; P.E. 3; Foreign Language 1

Stella Jin-Sun Park Kyongkido, Korea

StuCo Officer 4; Class Officer 1; T.A. 1; Choir 1,2; Band 4; Voice 2; Badminton 2; Watercolor Club 2; ESL Tutoring 4; Track 1; Math 1; Social Studies 1; Master Studio Art 4

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Lindsay Joy Parks Penang, Malaysia

StuCo Officer 4; Class Officer 1,3; T.A. 3; Band 1-4; Ensemble 3; Worship Team 4; Football 1; Indoor Soccer 1-3; Volleyball 1; Basketball 1,2,4; English 3; Bible 1,3; Foreign Language 1; NHS 3,4; Valedictorian 4

Nathan Robert Rice Penang, Malaysia

T.A. 2,3; Dorm Officer 3; Choir 3; Drama 3,4; Forensics 4; Tae Kwon Do 2-4; Kickboxing 4; Tutor 3,4; Football 2-4; English 2; Math 2,3; Social Studies 2,3; NHS 3,4

Grace Heng-I Sun Penang, Malaysia

CHRIS FOSTER

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StuCo Class Rep. 1; StuCo Officer 4; Class Officer 1-3; T.A. 3; Tutor 4; Band 1,2,4; Instrumental Lessons 2,3; Football 2-4; Indoor Soccer 1-4; Volleyball 1; Basketball 1-4; MSSPP 3; NHS 3,4

Shinobu Toyama Penang, Malaysia

Class Officer 4; T.A. 4; Choir 2; Badminton 2-4; ESL 1; English 2

Patty Tsai Penang, Malaysia

T.A. 4; Band 1-3; Information Processing 3

Mr. Steve Liss motions to a list of events relating to graduation. As the end of the year approached, seniors met to decide on programs and their chapel.

Class Meetings & Outings

Yumi Yamauchi Penang, Malaysia

StuCo Officer 4; Tutoring 4; AMD 3; Football 4; Indoor Soccer 3,4; Volleyball 4; Basketball 4; MSSPP 4; NHS 3,4

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shirt, Joel Babcock examines the detail and design on both sides. At the end of third quarter, the seniors received their shirts and wore them with pride.

Using a marker as a pointer,

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Holding up his new class

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Looking over at Pam Hida-

LIESL WILLIAMS

jat, Monay Ng tells Hidajat the number of hot dog buns to cut for customers. Members of the class had to endure long hours in the heat to help raise money during tournament games.

Working for the JSB

lison McClary cuts off the top of a freezie as Tara-Lynn Kennedy and Liesl Williams decide what to buy from the cooler. Juniors supported their class funds in buying some of their own food.

Junior Fund-Raising

David Lee, 11 Penang, Malaysia Joan Lin, 11 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Zack Lindsay, 11 Penang, Malaysia Barret Loehden, 11 Penang, Malaysia Matthew Mah, 11 Penang, Malaysia Josh Manfred, 11 Phnom Penh, Cambodia

JUBILEE ADLETA

Robbie Mangham, 11 Penang, Malaysia Allison, McClary, 11 Penang, Malaysia Michelle Nagel, 11 Penang, Malaysia Monay Ng, 11 Penang, Malaysia Steven Ong, 11 Nibong Tebal, Malaysia Katy Otanez, 11 Penang, Malaysia Scott Poulter, 11 Penang, Malaysia David Robertson, 11 Penang, Malaysia Paul Sawatzky, 11 Penang, Malaysia Haruki Shinohara, 11 Penang, Malaysia Tokihito Shioya, 11 Penang, Malaysia Drew Steiert, 11 Penang, Malaysia Angela Stevens, 11 Penang, Malaysia Kazuki Takahashi, 11 Penang, Malaysia David Thompson, 11 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Charis To, 11 Hat Yai, Thailand Takehiro, Toyama, 11 Penang, Malaysia Chia-Wen Tsai, 11 Penang, Malaysia

Juniors (Adleta – Tsai)

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With a pair of scissors, Al-

Brian Colfax, 11 Battambang, Cambodia Olivia D’Cruz, 11 Penang, Malaysia Raymond Deou, 11 Penang, Malaysia Christa DeVette, 11 Penang, Malaysia Marie Giezendanner, 11 Palangka Raya, Indonesia Kaz Hayashi, 11 Iwata-gun, Japan

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our company,” said Liesl Williams The juniors also baby-sat several of the staff kids while their parents attended the ICEC conference in ChiangMai. Regardless of some setbacks and difficulties with food shortages and scheduling, the juniors still found strategic ways of pulling in plenty of money, including sales at the annual Harvest Festival and plenty of food and refreshments during tournaments hosted by the school. “Selling is best when it’s for tournaments. We can sell more items for more people that way,” said Charis To. Within minutes, only a fraction of the huge amount of candy on the table remained. Smiling from the success of the afternoon, Manfred and Cairncross packed up the candy cooler and hauled it off to the junior class fridge, where it would wait until needed on the following afternoon. —By Chris Foster

wipes down the dirty parallel windows at the Penang Retirement center. Juniors participated in their Serve-athon for nine hours, accumulating over 10 thousand ringgit.

Jubilee Adleta, 11 Penang, Malaysia Elaine Ang, 11 Penang, Malaysia Banaphol Ariyasantichai, 11 Bangkok, Thailand Sarah Cairncross, 11 Penang, Malaysia Fidel Carey-Realmo, 11 Penang, Malaysia Fumina Chihama, 11 Penang, Malaysia

Pam Hidajat, 11 Semarang, Indonesia Hoon Kang, 11 Penang, Malaysia Tara-Lynn Kennedy, 11 Penang, Malaysia Kenny Kim, 11 Il San go, Korea Lisa Kim, 11 Penang, Malaysia Daniel Lee, 11 Penang, Malaysia

Junior sales Not one minute after the final bell of the day had rung, did kids and adults alike crowd around the white tables by the computer lab, waving fistfuls of money at Sarah Cairncross and Josh Manfred, overwhelmed with requests. The Class of 2007 planned and carried out a variety of events and activities to earn money, which would later fund the JSB and other class functions. “It’s interesting how people can spend so much on candy and freezies alone,” David Robertson noted. Even with regular activities and events, such as candy sales after school and food services during tournament games, juniors could still think positively about selling and sacrificing for the seniors. “Selling freezies for the junior class is a way I can fulfill my dream of working at a friendly diner, right here at school,” said an enthusiastic Marie Giezendanner. Along with regular candy sales, the junior class found other productive ways of making money, including a trip to the Penang home for the Retired and Elderly, where they spent nine hours cleaning windows and fans. “It was nice to go and help older people out, and it was great that they appreciated our work and enjoyed

Rag in hand, Allison McClary


Richard Tsai, 11 Penang, Malaysia Liesl Williams, 11 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Luke Wilson, 11 Penang, Malaysia Brendon Buntain, 10 Penang, Malaysia Caleb Caldwell, 10 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Jun-Ho Choi, 10 Penang, Malaysia

Miho Kawabata, 10 Penang, Malaysia Gary Kennedy, 10 Penang, Malaysia Chris Kim, 10 Pusan, Korea Sin-Yian Lau, 10 Penang, Malaysia Joy Li, 10 Lampang, Thailand Kyle Lin, 10 Penang, Malaysia

Joel Roberts, 10 Penang, Malaysia Kohei Shimizu, 10 Penang, Malaysia Kael Steinert, 10 Penang, Malaysia Naomi Tami, 10 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Paul Wang, 10 Taipei, Taiwan Michael Whiting, 10 Vientiane, Laos

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Juniors (Tsai) — Freshmen (Debatin)

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Lindsey Yow, 10 Penang, Malaysia Kirsten Brink, 9 Medan, Indonesia Tako Chang, 9 Penang, Malaysia Yi Chen, 9 Penang, Malaysia Boch Chiao, 9 Penang, Malaysia Melanie Debatin, 9 Seoul, Korea

Uncle Keith Henderson talks about how Pharoah hardened his heart and would not change. MEW focussed on what people need to change about themselves.

Tuck, Mr. Rob Toews, spent three days giving his testimony of living in Canada and sharing pictures of his family and life back home; he also explained the basics of Christianity and the steps believers can take to grow in faith. The school received a pleasant surprise for Missions Emphasis Week in early April with the arrival of former dorm parent and alumnus Uncle Keith Henderson. During his six-day stay back in Penang, Uncle Keith shared his own molding experiences of change as a student as well as times he went through during his time as a dorm parent between 2001 and 2004. “I knew from the moment I was going to come be the speaker that God was at work. To see the staff and students alike captivated with what I was saying was totally a God thing,” said Uncle Keith. As the sun continued to climb the sky, students continued to read scripture on Christ’s resurrection and what He has done for all of them. Others prayed silently, knowing their Saviour could hear their every thought. —By Chris Foster

JONATHAN DYCK

Maria Miner, 10 Mostar, Bosnia Herzegovina Ashley Nam, 10 Penang, Malaysia Hannah Park, 10 Penang, Malaysia Sin-Myung Park, 10 Dae gu, Korea Josh Peace, 10 New Delhi, India Allison Rice, 10 Penang, Malaysia

Using the Bible as a reference, JUBILEE ADLETA

The sun rose steadily from behind the overgrowth of trees that covered the upper field of campus, painting the wispy clouds brilliant shades of orange and red on Easter morning. Soft, sleep-worn voices began to sing the lyrics to “My Redeemer Lives” as Andrew McClary strummed his guitar and James Hawthorne beat the Djembe. To help students grow in their religious beliefs, Chaplain Ryan Tuck organized Sunday evening “Digging Deeper” groups hosted by different staff. “These Sunday evening groups are an awesome way to get to know people outside school, and it’s a great time for Christian fellowship,” said Catherine Foster. The Spiritual Emphasis Week theme “To Be Continued...” served as a metaphor for the life that has not yet finished. A friend of Mr.

Jeff Hokyo, 10 Penang, Malaysia Regina Hong, 10 Seoul, Korea Cindy Hsieh, 10 Penang, Malaysia David Im, 10 Penang, Malaysia Andrew Jo, 10 Penang, Malaysia Sung-In Kang, 10 Penang, Malaysia

The Word Spreading

Laura Danneker, 10 Bangkok, Thailand Amber Dobbie, 10 Penang, Malaysia Marigan Dyck, 10 Pontianak, Indonesia Kirsten Gamble, 10 Dushanbe, Tajikistan Amanda Hansen, 10 Penang, Malaysia Tamara Herring, 10 Bangkok, Thailand

Over campus

speaking into the microphone, Mr. Rob Toews tells the audience about growing spiritually. During his visit, Mr. Toews shared testimonies from his life back in Canada.

Outside Jackson dorm, Mr. Ryan Tuck asks for prayer requests from the students. “Prayer Walking” during prayer meeting encouraged students to pray for specific sites around campus.

SEW, MEW, Prayer Meeting

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Estefania Diago, 9 Penang, Malaysia William Dobbie, 9 Penang, Malaysia Catherine Foster, 9 Balikpapan, Indonesia Deon Gouws, 9 Penang, Malaysia Breanne Hansen, 9 Penang, Malaysia Jonathan Hayashi, 9 Iwata-gun, Japan

Trendy styles Keeping the Look Good and a leg on it. But I was happy with the purple dress I got for JSB,” said Marie Giezendanner. “Dude! Where did you get that? I totally need to get something to match!” said an enthusiastic Park. “All right, next time we go to Gurney, I’ll show you. You’ll really like what you can get there,” said Yamauchi. —By Chris Foster

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way, Zack Lindsay sports his green Jumpa Lagi shirt. The staff made the shirts available to all students of all ages returning to the school the following year.

CHRIS FOSTER

Strolling down the walk-

Riley Mahoney, 9 Penang, Malaysia Bruce Mak, 9 Bangkok, Thailand Naomi Matanick, 9 Penang, Malaysia Susheela Meyyappan, 9 Penang, Malaysia Seung-Yoon Nam, 9 Penang, Malaysia Risako Okazaki, 9 Penang, Malaysia

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Arms wrapped around an umbrella, Jon Kue grins as he shows off his spiky hair. If some people couldn’t express themselves through clothing, they let their hair do the talking: new styles for girls and spiky tops for boys.

Fashion & Dress

On their way to class, Christa DeVette and Allison McClary don large sunglasses as protection from the afternoon sun. Apparel with uniforms helped students to express their individuality in ways just uniforms could not.

Helen Kim, 9 Ilsan-gu, Korea Sung-Bum Kim, 9 Penang, Malaysia Tanya Krishnamani, 9 Penang, Malaysia Kyle Ladner, 9 Subang Jaya, Malaysia Ji-Soo Lee, 9 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Rami Lee, 9 Lawas, Malaysia

Yu-Shin, Park, 9 Dae gu, Korea Fatemeh Shahabi Haghighi, 9 Penang, Malaysia Mei-Xian Shee, 9 Penang, Malaysia Hung Yi Song, 9 Penang, Malaysia Willis Stebbins, 9 Penang, Malaysia Abigail Thompson, 9 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Sophia To, 9 Hat Yai, Thailand Gilbert Weng, 9 Penang, Malaysia Carolyn Whiting, 9 Vientiane, Laos Honour Adleta, 8 Penang, Malaysia Jonathan Brokaw, 8 Penang, Malaysia Andrew Chee, 8 Penang, Malaysia Frank Cheng, 8 Taipei, Taiwan Peter Choi, 8 Penang, Malaysia Ian Chung, 8 Penang, Malaysia Ezra Dass, 8 Penang, Malaysia Victor Ho, 8 Penang, Malaysia Tiffany Hsiang, 8 Penang, Malaysia

Freshmen (Diago) — 8 (Hsiang)

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Bo-Suk Hong, 9 Seoul, Korea Jason Hsiao, 9 Penang, Malaysia John Jang, 9 Penang, Malaysia Katherine Kang, 9 Penang, Malaysia Min-Ji Kang, 9 Palangka Raya, Indonesia Norman Kiehl, 9 ChiangMai, Thailand

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students had the chance to wear “Jumpa Lagi” shirts and regular jeans on four separate Fridays in the fourth quarter. “Jumpa Lagi,” translated to mean “see you again,” encouraged students to register for tuition for the following year. “It’s not really that big a deal, but I like wearing jeans and taking a casual break from the regular stuff,” said Angela Stevens. Special events, particularly the JSB or even the Christmas Banquet, allowed students to express their individuality and clothing choices by selecting their ideal outfit. “I wanted to find something good, but I didn’t want to spend an arm CHRIS FOSTER

“Hey Stella [Park]! What do you think of my new shirt top?” asked Yumi Yamauchi. “It looks really good on you, honey!” Stella Park squealed upon seeing Yamauchi’s new apparel. In the ever-changing world of the media, students strived to keep up with the latest trends that defined what makes a teenager “cool.” Whether wearing baller-bands (colorful rubber bands as worn by basketball players) or donning hip new Nikes, each student went with his or her own unique style to express his or her individuality. To break the normality of wearing uniforms at school, returning


Se-Chan Hwang, 8 Yongin-si, Korea Esther Joo, 8 Penang, Malaysia Andy Jung, 8 Penang, Malaysia Bill Kang, 8 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Benny Kim, 8 Il San gu, Korea Bona Kim, 8 Penang, Malaysia

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Akshay Krishnamani, 7 Penang, Malaysia Terry Law, 7 Penang, Malaysia Rachel Leung, 7 Penang, Malaysia Khalie Mahoney, 7 Penang, Malaysia Harry Mak, 7 Bangkok, Thailand Sydney McKenzie, 7 Penang, Malaysia

8 (Hwang) — 7 (McKenzie)

Campus Escapes Dorms Break the Routine “All right, everybody in the van!” Uncle Jason Phillips hollered to his Ziemer Dorm kids. After everyone checked for his or her roommates, Uncle Jason shifted the transmission, pressed the gas pedal, and drove off campus, taking his dorm for a night on the town. Whenever a long weekend or a special event appeared on the calendar—or sometimes at the spur of the moment—the dorms would travel off campus to bond with one another, whether by having dinner out at Batu Ferringhi or going to Gurney for a little shopping at FOS or Tower Records. Before school let out for Christmas, the staff took their dorm students out to different restaurants to make the season more memorable.

“My dorm went to Roadhouse Grill, where we threw peanut shells at each other while we were waiting for our food to come,” said Jonathan Dyck. “I put some shells in my pocket for throwing at my sister [Marigan] later on.” Sometimes, to celebrate a student’s birthday, dorms would travel off campus and go somewhere special like Baskin-Robins. “I was really surprised that we were given the privilege to go. It was fun to do something like that for my birthday celebration,” said Catherine Foster. On one trip down to KL, Jaffray Dorm spent hours pelting each other with paintballs. “I had never gone paintballing before; it was really cool to shoot people and see

the welts on their arms and backs later on,” said Caleb Caldwell after playing earlier. After stuffing themselves at Subaidah’s, the Ziemer kids piled out of the van and headed on into their rooms, all of them laughing and talking about what a great time they had just had eating roti and watching Bollywood music videos. —By Chris Foster Soaked to the bone, Benjamin Unruh and Kris Brink gaze over the edge of a giant “water ball.” Trips to places like Bukit Merah water park kept dorm students engaged in physical activity while also sharing bonding experiences.

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Anna Fu, 7 Penang, Malaysia Christina Gaddis, 7 Penang, Malaysia Kevin Huang, 7 Penang, Malaysia Hannah Jones, 7 Penang, Malaysia Keith Kamono, 7 Penang, Malaysia Chan-Mi Kim, 7 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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May Yamauchi, 8 Penang, Malaysia Kyung-Keun Chee, 7 Daejeon, Korea Daniel Chong, 7 Penang, Malaysia Christopher Colfax, 7 Battambang, Cambodia Luke Dalton, 7 Penang, Malaysia Andrew Fan, 7 Penang, Malaysia

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Breanna Roberts, 8 Penang, Malaysia Sophie Shin, 8 Penang, Malaysia Hee-Eun Song, 8 Penang, Malaysia Linnea Williams, 8 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Joshua Wong, 8 Penang, Malaysia Joycelyn Woo, 8 Penang, Malaysia

Bryan Cairncross talks with his dad, Uncle Scott, as he reaches for a tortilla chip. On long weekends, staff would treat their dorm kids to restaurants they didn’t normally go to, like Chili’s.

UNCLE LARRY BIELING

Rolland Leung, 8 Penang, Malaysia Elmo Lin, 8 Penang, Malaysia Axel Loehden, 8 Penang, Malaysia Matthew Nguyen, 8 Hanoi, Vietnam Esther Park, 8 Penang, Malaysia Han-na Park, 8 Penang, Malaysia

Taking a sip of his Sprite,

Ben Weidemann reaches for the next hand-hold. On 17 March, Jackson, Ziemer, and Chandler Dorms took a one-day trip to KL to shop, eat, and enjoy the services of One Utama Mall.

CHRIS FOSTER

Jamie Kim, 8 Penang, Malaysia Jennifer Kim, 8 Penang, Malaysia Young-Moung Kim, 8 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Jennifer Lee, 8 Penang, Malaysia Joseph Lee, 8 Penang, Malaysia Vivian Lee, 8 Penang, Malaysia

Gritting his teeth together,


Lakshmi Meyyappan, 7 Penang, Malaysia Beth Nguyen, 7 Hanoi, Vietnam Santi Niramitvijit, 7 Bangkok, Thailand Ji-Hyun Park, 7 Penang, Malaysia Theresa Phan, 7 Penang, Malaysia Catherine Rice, 7 Penang, Malaysia

New memories With a Bounce of a Ball

Jet Song, 7 Penang, Malaysia Margaret Stebbins, 7 Penang, Malaysia Angela Steiert, 7 Penang, Malaysia Miranda Steinert, 7 Penang, Malaysia Josh Strong, 7 Bangkok, Thailand Edwin Tan, 7 Penang, Malaysia Bethany Weidemann, 7 Penang, Malaysia Frances Wong, 7 Penang, Malaysia Maaya Yamauchi, 7 Penang, Malaysia Katya Brink, 6 Penang, Malaysia Emily Brokaw, 6 Penang, Malaysia Bryan Cairncross, 6 Penang, Malaysia Andy Cho, 6 Penang, Malaysia David Chong, 6 Penang, Malaysia Jae-Hyun Chung, 6 Penang, Malaysia Nathan Danneker, 6 Bangkok, Thailand Juliet DeVette, 6 Penang, Malaysia Alex Gimson, 6 Penang, Malaysia

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Hae Kim tries to catch it as Bryan Cairncross watches with a smile on his face. Middle schoolers tried to spend social time with students outside their own group either from elementary or high school.

Middle-School Activities

Jordan Nagel, 6 Penang, Malaysia Moses Park, 6 Penang, Malaysia Lucas Samuel, 6 Penang, Malaysia Brian Song, 6 Penang, Malaysia Hung Ching Song, 6 Penang, Malaysia Kaden Stenlund, 6 Penang, Malaysia Katie Stevens, 6 Penang, Malaysia Jordan Strong, 6 Bangkok, Thailand Benjamin Unruh, 6 Tarakan, Indonesia Jared Williams, 6 Phnom Penh, Cambodia Roc Wu, 6 Penang, Malaysia Jassy Chang, 5 Penang, Malaysia

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With her hands pressed together, Miranda Steinert copies Maaya Yamauchi’s movements as they play A&B, a hand game where players have to slap each others hands. Even if they lived off campus, students in middle school made time for friends who lived on campus and enjoyed playing in activities together.

Eric Han, 6 Penang, Malaysia Jeffrey Hsiao, 6 Penang, Malaysia Se Ra Hwang, 6 Geyonggi-do, Korea Jirawat Keeratitharakul, 6 Penang, Malaysia Joseph Kim, 6 Penang, Malaysia Chi-Yuan Lo, 6 Penang, Malaysia

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groups,” said Harry Mak. At the end of each week, students had different ideas on how to spend their time away from school. “On Friday, I normally play games like basketball or run around the playground with people outside. Then when everyone is tired, we go into someone’s dorm and play video games,” said Nathan Danneker. “On the weekends, I like to go to the mall with my friends; but during the week, I like to go to the band room and practice playing my trombone,” said Matthew Nguyen. Throughout the semester, middle schoolers made new friendships and spent memorable moments together. “A really crazy thing I did with Catherine [Rice], Frances [Wong], and Miranda [Steinert] was when we went up the muddy part of Hillside to get to 7-11 instead of using the stairs. After we reached the top, people who saw us looked at us funny,” said Beth Nguyen. Soon after the final afternoon bell had rung, the bouncing of a rubber ball issued from the basketball court; and if one looked, they would see another game of Foursquare. —By Chris Foster

LIESL WILLIAMS

In the middle of the morning, the sound of a rubber ball bouncing echoed from the basketball court. From an eye shot, one could see a game of Four-square in play, everyone furiously trying to get someone out so that they could advance up the line. “I like playing Four-square or basketball in the morning because you get to use your energy up so that you’re not hyper in class, and it’s a good way to start the day,” said Austin Rice. It would come as no surprise to some that the upper middle schoolers enjoyed their recreation time to the fullest. In preparation for the transition into high school, the seventh and eighth graders moved up the social ladder and took on a score of responsibilities. But with new responsibilities came new privileges and opportunities, such as later bedtimes for dorm students and the chance to go on the eighth- grade field trip in April. “Upper middle school is great because we get more freedom; teacher’s don’t have to always keep their eyes on you. And you get to hang out with people your own age, instead of mixed

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Maria Choi, 5 Penang, Malaysia Erin Dass, 5 Penang, Malaysia Shelina Hsieh, 5 Penang, Malaysia Chanel Huang, 5 Penang, Malaysia Yoo-Sun Joung, 5 Penang, Malaysia Ye-Na Kim, 5 Penang, Malaysia

Peering out from a wound-

up swing, Roy Kim prepares to lift his feet up and twirl around. Elementary students found countless ways to keep themselves entertained for hours.

Reagan Mahoney, 5 Penang, Malaysia Noriah Matanick, 5 Penang, Malaysia Soo Jin Park, 5 Penang, Malaysia Yu-Min Pyee, 5 Penang, Malaysia Austin Rice, 5 Penang, Malaysia Tony Suh, 5 Penang, Malaysia

dangling from the railing

bars, Jennifer Seong sparks a conversation with Tian Ooi. On the playground, elementary kids talked in ways they never could have in class.

Chris Foster

Daniel Sullivan, 5 Penang, Malaysia Bertha Wang, 5 Penang, Malaysia Ben Weidemann, 5 Penang, Malaysia Hank Wong, 5 Penang, Malaysia Kris Brink, 4 Medan, Indonesia Kenya Gimson, 4 Penang, Malaysia

Joseph Hawthorne, 4 Penang, Malaysia Daniel Hebard, 4 Penang, Malaysia Stephanie Jones, 4 Penang, Malaysia Paul Joo, 4 Penang, Malaysia Eun-Hae Kim, 4 Penang, Malaysia Joyce Lee, 4 Penang, Malaysia

Keeping Things Fast

Chris Foster

Vincent Lee, 4 Penang, Malaysia Ashtyn McKenzie, 4 Penang, Malaysia Seok Kyo Oh, 4 Penang, Malaysia Dan Rogers, 4 Penang, Malaysia Josiah Steinkamp, 4 Penang, Malaysia Kendall Stenlund, 4 Penang, Malaysia

Max Speed

Jamie Sullivan, 4 Penang, Malaysia Joshua Watson, 4 Penang, Malaysia Thirawut Wiphatprasit, 4 Penang, Malaysia Angel Chung, 3 Penang, Malaysia Lucia Combrink, 3 Penang, Malaysia Nicholas Gimson, 3 Penang, Malaysia

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5 (Choi) — 3 (Song)

Chris Foster

Marianna Moss, 3 Penang, Malaysia Tim Phan, 3 Penang, Malaysia Nicole Phillips, 3 Penang, Malaysia Seung-Hun Pyee, 3 Penang, Malaysia Erik Seong, 3 Penang, Malaysia Hung Jie Song, 3 Penang, Malaysia

Late afternoon came with the bright, harsh sun pouring down onto campus, making almost everyone outside break into a sweat. In the cool shade provided by the tree over by Chandler Dorm, a group of elementary kids happily played around. Whether Mariana Moss chased her sister around or a group shared a bag of fresh popcorn, time did not leave space for a second of dullness. During time off, even the elementary students tried to keep things interesting. “One of my favorite things to do is to go over to the Chillax game center on the other side of the street and play for hours!” said Kendall Stenlund. From dribbling basketballs in right foot behind his head, Cade Ernsberger watches Joseph Hawthorne attempt to do the same. Energetic elementary students showed off unique talents to impress friends and then challenged them to follow.

the beginning of the morning to swinging around on the jungle gym in the late afternoon, nothing seemed to keep the elementary kids down. Their energy seemed absolutely boundless. “When I’m not in school, I like to play soccer with my friends or some of the bigger kids,” said Kris Brink. And when their energy seemed spent, all would take a rest on the table inside the playground area, sharing with friends whatever afternoon snack their mothers had sent with them. Though arguments arose between youngsters once in a while, in the end, all worked out. “We just try to have fun anyway we can,” said Justin Strong. As the day darkened and campus quieted down, so too did the screams and yells issuing from the playground. As vans drove by to pick up all the kids, each felt ready for a break from all the good exercise they’d just had. —By Chris Foster

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Reaching across the table,

Sarah Cairncross points out the answer to Josh Manfred’s math problem. Students would get together during weekends to help each other with homework in classes they shared. With her Bible and a notebook

CHRIS FOSTER

CHRIS FOSTER

Ji-Woo Moon, 1 Penang, Malaysia Christopher Phillips, 1 Penang, Malaysia Kasey Rogers, 1 Penang, Malaysia Garrison Schaller, 1 Penang, Malaysia Jennifer Seong, 1 Penang, Malaysia Ivana Smit, 1 Penang, Malaysia Jena Um, 1 Penang, Malaysia Mina Um, 1 Penang, Malaysia Jasmine Wood-Singh, 1 Penang, Malaysia Yeo Rin Yun, 1 Penang, Malaysia Robbey Boucher, K Penang, Malaysia Tyler Cairncross, K Penang, Malaysia Yen-Han Chen, K Penang, Malaysia Danielle Combrink, K Penang, Malaysia Maureen Huang, K Penang, Malaysia Seung Wie Jin, K Penang, Malaysia Han-Vit Kim, K Penang, Malaysia Jennifer Lupinacci, K Penang, Malaysia

3 (Strong) — K (Lupinacci)

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John Cotton Watson, 2 Penang, Malaysia Mark Watson, 2 Penang, Malaysia Angelene Woo, 2 Penang, Malaysia Michelle Hebard, 1 Penang, Malaysia Andrew Kim, 1 Penang, Malaysia Peter Kim, 1 Penang, Malaysia

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Video camera in both hands, Hiro Kawabata looks at the film footage that David Thompson had just taken. Day students took time out of their weekends to come to campus and help dorm students with class projects.

CHRIS FOSTER

Freedom for All you can’t relax!” said Nathan Rice. “Yeah,” said Terry Hsiang in agreement. “The weekends give me time to stay home and study when I’m not already out.” When students didn’t want to study, they simply came over to campus to participate in a little bit of Friday late-night indoor soccer or perhaps to sit with friends by the white tables and go over the latest gossip and news. Though students visited plenty of places on a regular basis, new stores and entertainment centers made themselves known. “The new Chillax Gaming Center is so cool, and it’s great that it’s so close to campus for us dorm students,” said Brian Colfax. As Sunday evening crept in, some found themselves wishing that they had more time on their hands to do what they wanted or to finish their homework. Because, like it or not, they would soon transition back to the routine of classes and bells. —By Chris Foster

Morris Huang, 2 Penang, Malaysia Seung Ju Jin, 2 Penang, Malaysia Daniel Kim, 2 Penang, Malaysia Roy Kim, 2 Penang, Malaysia Sunny Kim, 2 Penang, Malaysia Licky Lee, 2 Penang, Malaysia Peter Lee, 2 Penang, Malaysia Jeremy Lupinacci, 2 Penang, Malaysia Hye-Jin Park, 2 Penang, Malaysia Kassy Steinkamp, 2 Penang, Malaysia Chardin Stengele, 2 Penang, Malaysia Kristian Stenlund, 2 Penang, Malaysia

The Final Bell It’s a time that every student looks forward to every week: the end of it. After the final bell on Friday, every student from the third up to the twelfth grade felt a huge sense of relief as he or she transitioned into freedom from school routine. “Because all five days are stressful for me, it’s great to have a chance to do what I want to do. I always look forward to the weekend because then I can spend time with my friends. It’s the highlight of my week,” said Yumi Yamauchi. Whether going down to Gurney to see the latest hit movie, stopping at Island to sip down an Ice Blended, or just hanging out at friends’ houses, the weekend meant two and a half days of freedom and relief from the scholastic environment that each student experiences five days a week. Whether living inside the dorms or off campus, students found opportunities to socialize with each other both on or off campus. “I like to sleep in and then hang with people later in the day. I try to socialize with a lot of people because it’s a really fun thing to do,” said Michael Whiting. Though weekends could provide a time of relaxation, for some it meant extra hours to do work. “Weekends are some great days for rest, except when you have a ton of homework due on Monday. Then

in hand, Marie Giezendanner starts her devotions on Saturday morning. Two days off from school gave students a chance to catch up on devotions and give some time to God.

Justin Strong, 3 Bangkok, Thailand Kiernan Sullivan, 3 Penang, Malaysia Jay Wood-Singh, 3 Penang, Malaysia Elizabeth Brokaw, 2 Penang, Malaysia Charlotte Combrink, 2 Penang, Malaysia Cade Ernsberger, 2 Penang, Malaysia

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One day a year Times for Family and Friends said Carolyn Whiting. During some long weekends, including the four-day weekend in November, some families took advantage of the time off to skip the country. “It was great to get away from Malaysia for a few days and head back to Indonesia to be with my family again,” said Catherine Foster. Sooner than anyone could believe, the holiday they had so enjoyed came to an end and left them with no alternative but to go back to work or school. But they still felt revived and energized from the extra-long break they just had. —By Chris Foster Holding his position in line, Riley Mahoney waits for his turn to grab some food. Canadian Thanksgiving united Canadians of all ages for a meal at the Paradise Sandy Beach Hotel.

B MR. LARRY BIELING

family in the Philippines!” said Grace Kim. The scholastic calendar observed all the important Malaysian holidays—like Hari Raya and Deepavali—as well as Christian days like Good Friday and Christmas. In keeping with all the holidays, students frequently experienced long weekends of three or four days. “The long weekends take away the stress of the year and really give everyone more time to re-energize,” said Monay Ng. Certain religious holidays, including Easter and Christmas, received more attention toward celebration. For Christmas, the dorms took a special trip to see the premier of “The Chronicles of Narnia,” followed by a Christmas party for each dorm. “It was nice to go see the movie as a group so we could all talk about it later, and it was fun to get stuffed stockings and exchange presents at our party,”

JONATHAN DYCK

On 14 April, the sun rose like on any other Friday; but even by 9:00, the entire campus remained bare, dorm kids still sleeping in their beds with air conditioners running. Outside, bird calls echoed out; and a gentle breeze floated in from the ocean, mixed with the soft morning sun—nothing more than an extra day off. Even with the temporary relief of the weekends, sometimes an extra day or two to blow off steam and catch up on school work felt needed. This need could come true with the arrival of holidays that peppered the school year. “During holidays and breaks, I can sit back, reflect, and think about God because it’s hard to do that in school,” said Joy Li. While some families went as far away as the United States during the Christmas break in December, others chose to stay within Asia. “I had a great time visiting my uncle’s

MRS. JANET PHILLIPS

Jackson McKenzie, K Penang, Malaysia Annelie Mohr, K Penang, Malaysia Seon Bin Oh, K Penang, Malaysia Tian Ooi, K Penang, Malaysia Shione, Stengele, K Penang, Malaysia David Um, K Penang, Malaysia

Daniel DeBello, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Scott Heng, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Gia Kim, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Jenny Kim, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Robin Ong, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Devin Schaller, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia

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Quoting scripture, Bill Kang speaks into the microphone as Mrs. Valeri Brokaw stands ready for the next song. The Easter sunrise service brought the campus together for a time of worship. Outside the Weidemann’s, Ziemer dorm proceeds to sing “Silent Night.” To bring the tradition of caroling to Asia, Ziemer students donned hats and toured campus, singing all the way.

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Kindergarten (McKenzie) – Pre-3 (Phillips)

Holidays

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Mikaela Steinkamp, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Kenlee Stenlund, Pre-4 Penang, Malaysia Bernard Combrink, Pre-3 Penang, Malaysia Shannon Heng, Pre-3 Penang, Malaysia Margaret Moss, Pre-3 Medan, Indonesia Alaina Phillips, Pre-3 Penang, Malaysia


Ms. Rachel Abraham, B.Sc.

Time outside work

Dorm Assistant, Website upkeep

Eckman Dorm

Eckman Dorm

Mrs. Kathy Bieling, B.A. Mr. Larry Bieling, M.Ed.

Mrs. Valeri Brokaw, M.M.

Ambassadors, Band 6, Beginning Band 7/8, Elementary Music, MS Choir, MS Drama, Music 5, Piano Lesson Coordinator, SAT

Advanced Art, Foundation Art, Master Studio, MS Art, Diving Deeper Small Groups, SAT

Jackson Dorm

Jackson Dorm

Grade 2, Forensics, HS Drama, Elementary Drama Club, Elementary Craft Club

Mrs. Carolyn Butler, B.F.A.

Mrs. Debbie Cairncross, B.A. Mr. Scott Cairncross, M.A. Mrs. Barb Case, B.G.S.

Mr. Earl Case, P.G.D.

Distance Education, Director Extension Services

Biology, Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics

Preschool Four, Girl Scout Brownies

Basic English 9/10; ESL English 9/10; Grades 3, 4, 5 ESL; ESL Tutoring

Maintenance Facilitator, MS Exploratories

Miss Denise Chiles, B.Sc. Mrs. Lori D’Cruz, B.S.

Laughing and a smile on

Ms. Barbara de Leeuw, B.Ed. Mr. Jake de Leeuw, M.Ed. CHRIS FOSTER

her face, Ms. Ruth Strong strolls through the underground corridors of Gurney Plaza. During time off, staff would go to satisfy their shopping and entertainment needs at Gurney.

MS Counselor

Miss Julia Bieling, B.F.A.

and play sports,” said Mr. Kerry Mahoney. “I like to spend time with my family and, when possible, go for a good run up Penang Hill,” said Mr. Carlo Hansen. So contrary to what students may have thought, staff actually had more on their minds than just their school jobs. —By Chris Foster

Bean or shopping. When I have more time, I love to do something outdoors, like going for hikes or over to the waterfalls,” said Mrs. Kathaleen McClary. Even the dorm staff cherished the chance when they could take their families and forget the hassles of parenting dorm students. “The best part of my time off is concentrating on my regular family. I see the dorm as sort of my extended family, but I like the chance to be with my nuclear family,” said Aunt Janet Phillips. While some staff had general interests, others had more specific ideas of how to have good free time. “On my time off, I read Robert Ludlum, watch James Bond movies,

Special Services Coordinator (Elementary )

Mr. James Allen, M.A.

Expatriates’ After Hours

Mrs. Trix de Leeuw

Guest House Coordinator

Chandler Dorm

Chandler Dorm

MS Counselor, Basic English 9/10

Kindergarten

Mr. Evan Dewey CHRIS FOSTER

Students see their teachers at school and may wonder what they do in their time off—if they even have any. Do they use those hours to focus on their work at school? Actually, the expatriate staff try to have a good time during their off hours. Students may or may not know what goes on in their teachers’ lives when they leave school at the end of the day or the beginning of weekends. Whether sharing with friends and family or spending a little downtime by themselves, staff members find plenty of ways to keep their lives enriched. “During the weekends, I enjoy doing stuff with my family and friends, such as going to Coffee

Mrs. Lori Dewey Mrs. Serena Foo

Ms. Nancy Friesen, B.A.

Mr. Andreas Gross, B.A.

ESL Science 7/8, HS Tutoring Coord., Physical Science, Study Skills 7, Welcome Class Ext., Diving Deeper Small Groups

American History 8, English 7/8, Social Studies 7, Study Skills 8, “The Eaglet”

Computer Production Technology, Computer Science, Industrial Arts, Information Processing, Varsity Boys’ Football

MS ESL, MS Food Studies, MS PE, Varsity Girls’ Football, Varsity Girls’ Basketball, MS Intramurals

Smith Dorm, Movie Reviewer

Mrs. Vicki Gross, M.Ed.

Mr. Carlo Hansen, M.Ed. Mrs. Donna Hansen Mr. Mark Hill, A.A. Mrs. Melinda Hill

Smith Dorm, Diving Deeper Small Group Leader

Accounting, Geometry, P.E., Pre-Calculus, JV Girls’ Football, JV Girls’ Volleyball, Women’s Indoor, JV Indoor, HS StuCo

MS Coordinator, Math 7/8, Bible 8, Weight-lifting, Mind Benders, Varsity Boys’ Football, MS & HS Student Council

Apologetics, Issues of the Christian Life, Values & Decision Making

Bible Study Methods, Early Church History, Intro. To the Bible, Who Is God?

Mrs. Charlyn Holden, M.S. Mr. Michael Holden, B.A. Mr. Rick Hurlbut, M.A. CHRIS FOSTER

Mr. Nathanael Klassen, B.A.

Miss Nellie Koethler, R.N.

Health Office

Algebra 8, Bible 7, Math 5/6, MS Spanish, Varsity Girls’ Football, Varsity Girls’ Basketball, Senior Class Sponsor

Elementary P.E., HS Health, MS Health, Elementary Club Coordinator, JV Girls’ Volleyball, MSSPP Golf, Tae Kwon Do, Elementary Soccer Club

Concert Band, Concert Choir, MS Band, Guidance Counselor, Music Theory, Varsity Girls’ Volleyball

Preschool 3, Elementary Art, Outdoor Games Club, Lego Club

Mr. Steve Liss, M.Ed.

After Hours

Out by the student center, Lachlan Modrzynski asks Mr. Greg Stenlund about his Saturday. Teachers would spend some of their weekends with students to get to know them on a more personal basis.

Mrs. Carla Loehden, M.S.

Mr. Kerry Mahoney, M.Ed.

Mrs. Robin Mahoney, B.Ed.

Staff (Abraham – Mahoney)

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Plaza corridor, Aunt Debbie Cairncross talks with Aunt Val Weidemann and her children. Staff would try to spend time with their families and socialize with friends when possible.

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Strolling down a Gurney

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Ms. Wendi Maze, M.A.

Welcome Class, MS ESL, Diving Deeper Small Group Leader, Women’s Indoor Soccer

AP Environmental Science, VHS AP Environmental Science, Biology, Curriculum Coordinator, Accreditation Coordinator

Librarian, AV Coordinator, SAT Leader

World Geography, Senior Class Sponsor

Ziemer Dorm

Off site

Mr. Dean McClary, M.S.

Mrs. Kathaleen McClary, A.A&S Mr. Clay Moss, B.S.

Different from the Dorm

Mrs. Janet Phillips, B.A.

Mr. Jason Phillips, B.S.

Ziemer Dorm

Southeast Asian Studies, Test-taking Skills, U.S. History, World History

Music—Preschool, Kindergarten, Grade 1; Substitute Teaching —Preschool, Grades 1, 2, 5

ESL Grades 3-5, Social Studies 8 Survey, ESL Coordinator

Grade 4, Keyboarding Club, Science Video Club, Clean-up & Recycling Club

“So are you ready to go?” Christa DeVette asked Charis To. “Yeah, I can’t wait to hang out at your place!” To giggled in reply. Promptly after the final bell of the day rang, the noise level of campus lessened considerably. Only staff remained to finish up the day, along with dorm students. All the day students had departed for elsewhere. Because they lived off campus, day students could enjoy a whole range of privileges and opportunities unavailable to dorm students. “The great thing about being a day student is that your schedule is more flexible, and you have more freedom during the day and at

Ms. Cathye Riley, B.A. Mrs. Lydia Roberts

Mr. John Robertson, M.A.

Mrs. Karen Robertson, B.A.

Mrs. Corinne Rogers, B.Sc.

Algebra 1, Physical Science, Chemistry, Physics, Biology

Facilities Coordinator

Elementary ESL, Special Services, Swimming Club

Elementary/MS Principal, ESL Study Hall, JV Boys’ Football, Varsity Boys’ Volleyball, Track & Field Assistant

MS Worship Team, Floorball Club, Floorball “League”

Mr. Patrick Rogers

Mrs. Bonnie Sawatzky, B.G.S. Mr. Wayne Sawatzky, B.Ed.

Mr. Jason Mark Selvanayagam, B.Ed.

Mrs. Mary Sheddan, M.S.

Bible 5, Language Arts 5/6, Social Studies 5/6

Substitute Coordinator, Special Services (High School), Charity & Compassion

Athletic Director, Fitness, P.E., Under-15 Girls’ Basketball, Under-12 boys’ Basketball, Track & Field Coordinator

ESL, P.E., Teacher’s Assistant

Jaffray Dorm, Under-14 Basketball, Junior Class Sponsor, Digging Deeper Small Group Leader

Mrs. Beth Steiert

Relaxing on a comfy couch and grinning from ear to ear, Frances Wong tells of her latest weekend plans to Honour Adleta and May Yamauchi. Day students could escape the pressures of campus life and relax at home.

Mr. Gerry Steiert, M.A. Miss Jacqui Steiert

JUBILEE ADLETA

Mr. Tim Steinert, B.Th.

Jaffray Dorm, Junior Class Sponsor, Diving Deeper Small Group Leader

Elementary Counselor, Elementary StuCo, Girl Scouts

Interim Director, American Government, World Affairs, Varsity Boys’ Basketball

English9/9 Honors, English 10, 11, 12

Advanced Math, Algebra 1/2, AP Calculus, Varsity Boys’ Basketball, Cub Scouts

CHRIS FOSTER

Mrs. Vi Steinert, B.BS.

night,” said Jubilee Adleta. Day students had more of an advantage to go where they wanted and when as they could drive their own cars or motorcycles. Day students spent time during the weekends either socializing with family or finishing school assignments for the upcoming week. Though some left homework to the last minute, others worked hard so that they could relax later. “I like to get my work done on Saturday so that I have more devotional time on Sunday,” said Michelle Nagel. In spite of living off campus, some day students found pleasure in coming on campus after hours or on weekends; others enjoyed having their dorm friends to their homes. “Hey Christa, thanks for having me over again. I really have forgotten what it’s like to be a day student,” said To. “No problem. You just enjoy yourself,” replied DeVette. —By Chris Foster

Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp, M.S. Mr. Karl Steinkamp, B.A.

Mr. David Stengele, M.A. Mr. Greg Stenlund, B.S.

Mrs. Tara Stenlund, B.A.

Spanish 1/2

AP Psychology, H.S. Counselor

Mandarin

AP English 11, AP English 12, Honors English 10, Journalism 1/2, “Eagle’s Eye,” Reflector, NHS, Alumni Association

Grade 3, “Can You Hear Me” club, Encouragement Club, Elementary Student Council

Ms. Ruth Strong, B.A. Mrs. Eunice Teoh

Mr. John “Tommy” Tompkins, M.S.

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Miss Esther Tovell, B.E.

CHRIS FOSTER

Mr. J. Ryan Tuck, B.A.

Chaplain, Life of Jesus, Old Testament Issues, JV Boys’ Football, Junior Class Sponsor

Registrar, ESL Bible, ESL English, JV Girls’ Football, Junior Class Sponsor

French 1/2

Bible 6, MS Science, Cub Scouts

Elementary Library, Special Services (Middle School)

Mrs. Shelly Tuck, B.R.E.

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Mrs. Gayle Tyas, M.A.

Expat Staff (Maze — Tyas)

Sprawled on the metal

swing, Rivka Matanick shares her long day with Heather Hill. Day students got together after school to catch up with each other and exchange gossip.

Messing around with each other, Ted Fung makes a bet with Po Lai to see if he can kick the ball into the goal. “It was close, but I lost five ringgit to Ted!” said Lai later.

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Miss Marie-Hélène Tyack, B.A.

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PROVIDING a secure and

safe campus, Mr. Brian Weidemann confers with Mr. Loh in the guard house by the front gate. Eight guards patrolled upper and lower campus 24/7.

Residence Supervisor, Chandler Dorm

Grade 1, Reading Club

HS Principal, Comparative Religions, Chess Club

Mrs. Tamilselvi Agamrom Housekeeping Mr. Patrick Aloyius Guard Mrs. Mary (Penny) Aloysius Housekeeping Mrs. Adeline Ang Office Mrs. Indrani Arokiadass Laundry

Mr. Jeston (John) Arulandoo Kitchen Mr. Muniandy (Raja) Doraisamy Yard Mrs. Nagamal (Rose) Doraisamy Housekeeping Mr. Naranyanasamy Doraisamy Maintenance Mrs. Palany Ganapathy Housekeeping

Mr. Goh Seng Hock Kitchen Mr. Ramasami Govinda Maintenance Mr. Henry Gregory Guard Mr. An Khang Ho Kitchen Mr. Francis Kanasamy Maintenance

CHRIS FOSTER

Mrs. Valliammah Karpaya Library Mr. Samarasan Karuppiah Guard Mrs. Amy Khoo Office Mr. Steven Koo Office Mr. Mani Kuppusamy Kitchen

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Ms. Ah Mooi Leow Office Mrs. Ah Chai Lim Housekeeping Mr. Boon Leng Loh Guard Mr. Kumar Mareemuttoo Kitchen Mr. Rajeen Mareemuttoo Maintenance

Mr. Ravi Moses Yard Mrs. Thana Letchmi Laundry Ms. Sarasvathi (Joyce) Navaseelam Preschool Assistance Ms. Huey Fern (Lilian) Ooi Office Mr. Parkinathan Kuppusamy Guard

Staff (Um) — National Staff (Parkinathan)

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Mr. David Wilson, M.R.E.

CHRIS FOSTER

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Deputy Director, Residence Supervisor, Chandler Dorm

Mrs. Barbara Wilson, M.R.E.

From the East and West

Arms up, librarian Mrs. Kathaleen McClary shares a joke with library assistant Mrs. Valliammah. A good work environment provided a way for staff to connect on a deeper level with one another.

Mrs. Valerie Weidemann, B.A.

Timely bonds different races, the more you begin to see the similarities instead of the differences,” said Mr. DeLeeuw Though interaction between races came with their jobs, some staff members bonded and shared moments together out of friendship for one another. Whether on the weekends, holidays, or even on time off in the middle of the day, both sides could find some mean of sharing moments together. “Well, I have to go, but you’re going to have to take me to one of those Indian music shows again,” said Uncle Brian after dinner. “No problem, Brian!” Balu called out as Uncle Brian started leaving. —By Chris Foster

Elementary/MS Computer, MS Science, 7/8 Welcome Class, JV Boys’ Basketball, K-Grade 1 Soccer Club

Mr. Brian Weidemann

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“Hey, Balu [Perumal]! How’s your son doing?” Uncle Brian Weidemann asked cheerfully down at dinner. Balu smiled on hearing the mention of his newly adopted son. “He’s doing well,” replied Balu. When working in an international school, camaraderie between different races becomes unavoidable. But many staff members of both the Western and Asian groups saw this as a chance not only to get a feel for the other culture, but also to make good friendships. “I enjoy Nara[nyanasamy Doraisamy]’s company because of his expertise in sports and his involvement with ‘Malaysia Elite Athlete’s with Disabilities,’” said Mr. Carlo Hansen. With the sudden departure of Mr. Patrick Rogers at the end of the first semester, staff alumnus Mr. Jake DeLeeuw agreed to fill in his position for the remainder of the year. “I just love working with [national workers] because the more you get to know people of

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Cairncross with postal information, Mrs. Amy Khoo shares some recent local news. Along with helping expats, the office staff would share life.

Mr. Jimmy Um, B.S.

marie giezendanner

After helping Aunt Debbie


Hunched down under the

roofing, Mr. Wei Ming Voon nails new boards to cover the wiring and insulation. Maintenance worked around campus to keep various structures in shape.

Eyes focussed on the ground, Mr. Sangaran Ramu Thaver sweeps bunches of leaves away. Yard workers swept campus daily during rainy season to clear all the debris off the roads.

Backstage workers What Goes on Behind-the-Scenes The harsh morning sun beat down on campus Monday morning, and any room without fans or air conditioners running could feel the effects of the heat, including room 14. Wiping sweat off her brow, Ms. Denise Chiles called maintenance to come down and figure out why her air-conditioner in her room would not work. Soon, Mr. Rajeen Mareemuttoo arrived to check on the cables as the students continued with the lesson. During school and afterwards, the national staff worked tirelessly to keep the campus functional. The

laundry room for dorm students opened at 7:00 and closed at 3:30; the maintenance team worked from 7:30-4:30; the guards, however, worked around the clock. To aid security in watching campus in the daytime and at night, the school bought special video cameras and installed them all around campus to give live video feeds into the guard shacks posted by the seawall and the main gate. “Those cameras are pretty nifty. Before, if we had two guards, they could only cover two vantage points. But now they can cover

Moving the chair away, Mrs. Palany Ganapathy cleans the floor under the desk. Before classes started each morning, housekeeping came to clean class rooms, washing the boards and sweeping the floors.

Video feed on, Mr. Boon Leng Loh focuses on the camera displays. During the day, and especially at night, security would rely on 12 new cameras scattered all over campus to keep a watchful eye for possible intruders.

at least eleven apiece, which gives them an advantage to keep intruders out of campus,” said Uncle Brian Weidemann. When not on campus, the workers took joy in time with their families. Mr. Henry Gregory said, “I like to go home and work on my gardening and see my family,” “During the December holidays, my family and I take a trip up to the Cameron Highlands to be involved in a ministry for young people. And while everyone is working, I help out by doing the cooking,” said Mrs. Indrani Arokiadass with a smile. After checking the circuit breakers, Mr. Rajeen flipped a switch; and cool air flooded into the room. “Thanks for your help,” said Ms. Chiles. Mr. Rajeen smiled as he left the room, ready to take on any new problem that came his way. —By Chris Foster

Mr. Balu Perumal Kitchen Mr. Raj Pillai Office, Senior Class Sponsor Mr. Bascaran Raja Manikam Yard Mrs. Lily Rajiah Housekeeping Mr. Muniandy Ramasamy Kitchen Mr. Sundram Ramasamy Guard Mr. Sangaran Ramu Thaver Yard Mr. Sundaraj Rangasamy Guard Mrs. Margaret Sabastian Housekeeping Ms. Catherine Sabastian Office Ms. Shama Sankaran Office Mr. Steven Sellasamy Yard

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Mr. Jacob Simeon Guard Mr. Muru Subramaniam Maintenance Mrs. Saroja Supamaniam Laundry Mrs. Seok Yeng Tung Office Mrs. Khatijah (Mimi) Velloo Housekeeping Mr. Wei Ming Voon Maintenance

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Just Get

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MARIE GIEZENDANNER

Advertisement Division Page

—By Jonathan Dyck

“I don’t go off campus; I appear off campus.” -Liesl Williams Advertisement Division Page

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Half in-half out, David Robertson and Paul Sawatzky relax and cool off in the pool on a hot Saturday afternoon. In order to beat the heat on hot weekends, students often swam in the thermometer-shaped pool on campus, prayed for rain repeatedly, or used the pool facilities at Paradise Beach Resort, which gave free pool passes to students.

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Weekends exhausted you, but they also ate away at more than energy. Escaping school cost money. You paid for bus rides or even taxis as you traveled to such distant locales as Gurney or Batu Ferringhi. Then you paid for meals, ranging from rm4 at the Hillside stalls to rm40 at Mario’s. Entertainment cut a large swathe in your wallet as you watched a movie for rm9 at Gurney. Then you shopped at Batu for genuine fake brand names or at Gurney for the real thing or anywhere else enterprising individuals set up “legitimate” ways to relieve you of your cash. Absentmindedly, you added up the total cost of an average weekend and subtracted it from your allowance. Your head slipped, smacking hard against the desk. Reality Check: staying on campus sounded pretty good right about then. Then again, your friends had gone off campus; and you looked forward to the next big movie at Gurney. “I guess the money’s worth it,” you muttered, only half believing yourself. Meanwhile, your overtired head lulled itself back into half-asleep wanderings. “The weekend is coming up, I’ll rest then,” you reasoned, slipping back into the cycle.

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Waiting patiently in line, Linnea Williams, Se-Chan Hwang, Joshua Peace, Liesl Williams, Mr. Jason Phillips, Jared Williams, Nathan Danneker, and Paul Wang wait to place their orders at Dairy Queen. Even dorms took a break from campus from time to time as Jackson, Ziemer, and Chandler dorms escaped to KL.

In class, your head slipped from upright, to propped up, to flat on your desk, and then shot upright again in an unavoidable cycle. “They need a nap time at this school,” you murmured groggily to yourself. It seemed that no matter how good your intentions, you never got enough sleep. “I’ll catch up on sleep on the weekend,” you reasoned, slipping back into the cycle. Reality Check: weekends drained energy even faster than weekdays. You felt a driving urge to utilize every moment of your precious weekends correctly. Usually that meant filling up the time with relationships and pushing homework to the last possible day. So you stayed up late talking with dorm-mates or friends, and then spent Sunday doing your homework because by then you had no other choice. And of course most weekends felt incomplete without a trip off campus. You looked at the same surroundings all week; so by the time the weekend rolled around, you joined the mass exodus of students from school and invaded the promised land of Penang. You ignored the fact that most weekends you went to the exact same places. Only their locations mattered: away from school.

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Penang Adventist Hospital

C&MA Thailand

The Christian and Missionary Alliance

Congratulations to our graduate

Jonathan Kue and the

Class of 2006 it out!

r. Sandman Bobcats to Wolves

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Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp

how much they slept, and how many times they brushed their teeth. After completing the program, Mr. Stenlund hopes the boys will have learned skills that will help them in their future lives. Although some of these apply directly to the boys’ everyday lives, many will show “OK, you guys, come over here,” Mr. Greg Stenlund called to the in indirect ways. “I was surprised with some of the things these boys needed to learn,” group of seven rowdy boys in his Cub Scout’s group. They bounded over with eager grins spread across their faces as he Mr. Stenlund admitted. “I got to teach them how to do somersaults, for example. Sometimes, we work on just throwing and catching a ball lined out the afternoon’s activity for them. “We get to do all sorts of stuff,” Mark Watson said. “Like we got or simple stuff like that, too.” To work on balance, the boys set up boards across increasingly to make napkin holders up in the shop.” The Scouts began their journey toward the ultimate goal of becom- wide spaces. They then had to walk across with their peers cheering ing “Eagle Scouts” with Mr. Stenlund as a nameless troop; but as they them on. The second grade Bobcats, soon finished their activities, they became becoming Wolf Scouts, fall in between the “Bobcat Scouts.” the two other groups of Boy Scouts, “Right now, we’re working towards the Tiger Scouts and Cub Scouts. This becoming Wolf Scouts,” Mr. Stenlund program gives them a chance to set an told Joel Babcock, a senior interested example for boys younger than they and in helping him out. “That’s when the to learn from older boys as well. real fun will start. Right now we’re just “My favorite was when the firemen nailing down the basics.” came and did a show for us,” Kristian As Wolf Scouts, the boys can parStenlund said. “I loved watching the fire ticipate in exciting activities like hiking and putting it out.” and kayaking; but first they must learn Other boys eagerly agreed, buzzing preliminary activity and safety skills. happily and talking about the after In the Scout program, the boys learn noon’s experience with each other. respect for themselves, their country, “OK, let’s wrap it up!” Mr. Stenand each other through a variety of around a “campfire,” Josiah Steinkamp, Jordan Nagel, lund called to the boys. “See you again activities. For two weeks, they each SITTING Kendall Stenlund, and Joseph Hawthorne rest after working toward kept a journal recording their health their badge. The boys cooked a meal of hot dogs after learning how next week!” habits; for example—when they ate, to start the fire safely by themselves. —By Marie Giezendanner

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Globe Missionary Evangelism

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Mrs. Carla Loehden

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it out!

“Let’s get the van loaded,” Mrs. Carla Loehden said. “Okay, let’s go Barret [Loehden],” Drew Steiert replied before he climbed in the van. Golfers hit the road for the MSSPP Golf Tournament at Kristal Golf Resort over on the mainland. The seven students who participated—Jeffrey Hsiao, Roc Wu, Willis Stebbins, Jason Hsiao, Jubilee Adleta, Loehden, and Steiert—arrived at school by 5:45 a.m. to give enough time for the hour drive to the resort. Students, upon arrival, signed in, put their clubs on the golf carts, and enjoyed the players’ breakfast. At 7:40 a.m., the golfers headed out to the carts and got ready for their tee-offs. Students then spread out along the golf course and began playing 18 holes for the day. “The best part of the golf tournament was that I got to skip school—and that we got to drive golf carts,” Loehden said. “The carts weren’t in good shape, though; on the second day, we got a flat tire. The carts also couldn’t make it up some of the steep hills, so we had to have another cart come and bump us up.” Students went back the next day for another 18 holes. The judges placed the students’ scores together and ranked them. After a total of 36 holes, all the students who parGETTING ready to tee off at the 16th hole, ticipated attended the Barret Loehden waits his turn. Students awards ceremony. Stebcompeted against 52 other schools in MSSPP bins, whose score totaled golf action in April. 100 on the second day, had the lowest score of all the Dalat golfers. Although Dalat didn’t place, the students learned more about the competitive side of MSSPP Golf. “Good job, guys; where would you like to be dropped off?” Mrs. Loehden said. “At my house please,” Steiert replied quickly. —By Jubilee Adleta Kingdom Photo Studio

from all of us at

Globe Missionary Evangelism

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P.O. Box 3040, Pensacola, FL 32516, U.S.A. www.GME.org, Phone: 001-850-453-3453

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Dalat Chapel

Mr. & Mrs. Hansen

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r. Sandman

pictures. As students sat down in front of the air-conditioners, Aunt Vi Steinert got up on stage and said a word of prayer before the junior class started working on JSB-related material. “How in the world are we supposed to take a picture of the end?” The class’s excom introduced each committee before giving the individuals a chance to sign up for the one that interested them; Jubilee Adleta and Tara-Lynn Kennedy wondered. On 24 February, the junior class made its way to the chapel for a everyone split up into the committees and started planning. After meeting for a while, the committees shared their ideas with night full of games, laughs, and JSB work. Students enjoyed eating pizza and drinking pop, and games of their classmates. Students provided feedback, and applause filled the “Shuffle Your Buns” and “I Have Never” bought laughs from even chapel as each group completed their presentation. “The ideas and feedback the students came up with was amazing. the quietest members of the class. “Playing ‘I Have Never’ was hilarious. I found out so much infor- I was so proud of them,” Aunt Vi said happily with a smile. mation about people that I really didn’t need to know,” Olivia D’Cruz The work part of the party came to an end, and some of the boys headed up to play indoor soccer. Meanwhile, “Minority Report” came said, laughing. “My favorite game we played was the picture scavenger hunt,” Josh onto the screen as the rest of the class got comfortable on beds made of the chapel’s brand new chairs. Manfred said. “Tom Cruise is so hot,” Scott Poulter said mimick Uncle Tim Steinert broke the junior class up into ing some of the girls as the Hollywood hero appeared groups of six students. Team captains received the on screen. list of pictures as the rest of the team talked about “No, he’s not! He is so old,” Kennedy said as she the funniest ways to take their pictures. Each group smacked Poulter over the head with her pillow. took 30 pictures kissing the flagpole, climbing the At 2:00 a.m., the lights went out in the chapel; and clock tower, forming a human pyramid, modeling the juniors settled in for the night, thinking back on by the ocean, and the end. all the fun memories. “What was your favorite picture to take?” Mr. “I’ve got it,” Adleta screamed as she finally figures Ryan Tuck asked Paul Sawatzky. “Definitely the modeling picture. David Rob- POSING for the camera, GQ models out how to take a picture of “the end.” Their group ertson and I were the best models ever,” Sawatzky David Robertson and Paul Sawatzky linked arms and started walking away as Kennedy junior class fashion at its peak. snapped a picture of their backs. asserted. “I don’t see why anyone would not want show The first team to take 30 pictures of to hire us. Our pictures were perfect.” weird and unique events won the prize. “Priceless!” Kennedy said as their group made its way to the chapel. Groups rushed into the chapel sweaty and laugh- Adleta’s group won. —By Allison McClary ing as they fulfilled the task of capturing all their

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Allison McClary

Picturing the End

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Evangelism Explosion International

Mr. Steve Liss

Congratulations, Class of 2006

Senior Basketball Girls

Do you want to be an alumnus that stands out?

“...For the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” Joshua 1:9

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r. Sandman Tangible Love

Rivka Matanick

Roles switched as experienced student trainers helped staff new to EE learn the outline. “Lindsay [Parks] is the best trainer imaginable,” shared Mr. Steve Liss. “She’s patient and really knows her stuff.” “They’re so cute!” Rivka Matanick cried as soon as she saw the group The experience did not end at simply memorizing words, however. of Thai children warily watching her as the van In addition to ministering to local teenagers pulled up in the village. As Andrew McClary and through soccer, playing with little kids, and buildRobbie Mangham began to plug in sound equiping relationships with shop owners, the mission ment for the evening concert, however, the kids team individuals verbally expressed their faith began to warm up to these “new strangers.” and guided others into conversations while in In the beginning of April, a group of students Thailand. joined Mrs. Barb Mangham and Miss Susan Each team found contacts to share with in difTaylor on the annual Evangelism Explosion ferent ways. Whether meeting up with a friendly (EE) missions trip. Instead of boarding the plane shopkeeper like James Hawthorne’s team or to Myanmar, however, as students had done in finding a barber and getting a haircut, like Mr. earlier years, they packed their bags for Khao Liss’s, each group of three or four people found Lak, Thailand on the tsunami-affected island that finding a new friend and sharing the greatest of Phuket. news they had ever heard with them did not turn In the mornings, those who already had trainout as difficult as they had feared. ing in EE helped those who had not yet learned On the final night in Khao Lak, the group the outline get basic tools for sharing the Gospel. visited a government-sponsored tsunami survivor Some girls got an early start on the day by runrelocation village where they had already sung a ning down to the beach about 15 minutes away few songs and played with the children earlier and watching the sunrise. in the week. Again, they led worship music and, As the week wore on, Olivia D’Cruz exwith the help of a translator, gave the EE Gospel pressed the hearts of the trainers watching their outline in dramatized form. new trainees: “It amazed and inspired me how WHEN the vans pulled up at the end of the When the vans pulled up at the end of the Thai kids swarm a delighted Kaz Hayashi. dedicated the new kids were to learning all this! night, Students always had kids clamoring for pig- night, Thai kids swarmed Kaz Hayashi. Students It took us a whole semester, and they did it in gyback rides and other tangible expressions always had kids clamoring for piggyback rides. of love. a week!” —By Marie Giezendanner

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As you move on next year, remember these three things: 1. No boyfriends! And certainly NO KISSING! 2. You have many friends here who are praying for you! 3. God loves you! I’ll miss you girls! Coach Liss

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“Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens, and those who lead many to righteousness, like stars for ever and ever.” Daniel 12:3

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We are so proud of you

Remember the promise: “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.” Jeremiah 29:11

Thanks to all of the teachers, dorm staff, and sponsors who have come along side me: Mrs. Carla Loehden Mr. Dean McClary Ms. Shannon McCabe Ms. Maike Horn Ms. Ruth Strong Mr. Kerry Mahoney Mr. Raj Pillai Mr. Steve Liss Mrs. Mary Sheddan Mr. Dake Erwin Mrs. Amy Erwin Mr. Rick Hurlbut Mr. Clay Moss Mrs. Vicki Moss Mr. Michael Holden Mrs. Lyn Holden Mr. Carlo Hansen Mr. John “Tommy” Tompkins Mr. John Robertson Mrs. Karen Robertson Mr. Mark Hill Mrs. Melinda Hill Mr. Ron West Mrs. Shelly West Mr. Greg Stenlund Mrs. Tara Stenlund Mr. Gerry Steiert Mrs. Katherine Tulloch Mrs. Corinne Rogers Ms. Denise Chiles Mr. Karl Steinkamp Mr. Joel Steinkamp

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A Night to Remember

With Compliments

“Hey, Honey. Lookin’ good. How’s the family?” Astonished students stared at the screen waiting to see what would happen next in the movie “Sweet Home Alabama” on Friday night, 17 February, at the StuCo’s Valentine’s movie night. For Valentine’s Day, instead of having “couple” activities, StuCo planned a “bonding” time together for all students in the chapel. StuCo members welcomed them with free popcorn and iced lemon tea. After grabbing pillows, students made themselves comfortable with their friends and prepared themselves for the movie. Some students brought along blankets and their stuffed animals to make themselves more comfortable. But curiosity still hung in the air as to what movie StuCo had chosen. The light finally dimmed, and “Sweet Home Alabama!” flashed on the screen. The movie not only fulfilled the girls’ desire to watch a chick flick, but it also provided sufficient laughter for the guys. Heather Hill stated, “I thought the movie night was a good success for StuCo, and I enjoyed the movie; ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ is EYES glued to the screen, Joy Li and a cute chick flick!” Katherine Kang enjoy “Sweet Home Alabama” at StuCo’s party. The girls StuCo had borrowed the especially liked this “chick flick”; popcorn machine from the PTO, the guys enjoyed sharing an evening and Grace Sun, Yumi Yamauchi, with their friends—as well as the free and Stella Park enjoyed serving evpopcorn and drinks. eryone while joking around with each other under the popcorn machine’s light. The buttery smell of freshly popped corn increased the hunger of the audience. Olivia D’Cruz mentioned, “It was a cute night where people had fun chillin’ on the comfy pillows and eating yummy popcorn! StuCo should do more movie nights!” Kirsten Gamble agreed, “It was fun,” she said. “We should do more of them. And whoever picked the movie did a good job.” “The StuCo movie night was a great success because it gave students a chance to just come and relax with their friends and laugh,” said Lindsay Parks. “Plus the popcorn smell in the chapel made you almost feel like you were at a theater!” —By Pamela Hidajat Sing Guang Hing Furniture & Electrical

SING GUANG HING FURNITURE & ELECTRICAL

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You have come a long way

From Nathan:

it out!

Chris Foster

CONGRATULATIONS NATHAN RICE

Avion Holidays

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Mr. & Mrs. Rice

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Real People. Real Faith. Real Learning. At NYACK, we’re serious about being real. And we have a lot of fun doing it. The faculty, staff and student body at NYACK create a spiritual and academic environment that maximizes your hopes of serving God according to your unique gifts and interests. NYACK is committed to equipping you for a life connecting your faith and your career. You’ll develop your mind, body and spirit among people who share your core values, and who challenge you to live purposefully, graciously and lovingly. Our residential campus is located in Nyack, NY—a beautiful suburb of New York City—with a commuter campus in Manhattan. NYACK offers a college experience that is not just suburban: students minister in local towns, New York City, and impact the world around them through ministry groups, overseas missions, internships, and student teaching. Student athletes compete nationally in NCAA Div. II athletics. Ranked in the nation’s top 10 private colleges for ethnic diversity, multiple student groups and activities keep it real.Contact us today!

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Sandman Ar.Cup of Cool Water

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allison mcclary

made it clear that new friendships had begun. Other then helping out, the team did take a day trip to a beautiful beach with other Madan Puduli (Cares) members. On the way, they saw village after village that had suffered complete devastation. “What opposites are David Robertson and Robbie Mangham showing “The saddest part for me was seeing families still living in tents here?” Mrs. Barb Mangham asked as a fellow team member translates even a year later,” James Hawthorne commented. “It really made me the question into Bahasa Indonesia to a group of about 30 third-grade realize how much I have and how I shouldn’t take it for granted.” As the trip came to a close, none of the team members wanted to Acehanese students. A group of 18 Penang International Church members set off for leave. “My heart is now in Aceh. These people just need so much help, Banda Aceh, Indonesia, on 16-23 December. Taking two short flights, and I didn’t want to leave them. I will always remember the smiles on the team found themselves met by a wave of hot air and hugs by friends all the girls’ faces; they had lost everything and yet were so thankful for the bouncy balls and hair clips we gave them,” of the Mangham’s. Tara-Lynn Kennedy said as she wiped away Jobs of service included painting a church tears. fence, attending and worshiping with local “During the time in Aceh, the team had a Christians, visiting villages and providing chance to bond because of the common purpose them with gifts, and just listening to those we were participating in. Helping out those in who needed to talk. need put us out on the front line of the spiritual “In our nightly reflections as a team, I volbattle. God was amazing!” Andrew McClary unteered to teach English at the village Desa said with a smile. Nusa the next day with my family. We taught As the team once again boarded the plane to the kids colors and body parts. The smiles on take them back to Penang, Robbie Mangham their faces touched my heart. These kids who thought back to the day he had spent in the had lost everything were so happy with us bevillage. Bravely one of the Acehanese girls had ing there,” Gary Kennedy said. raised her hand and asked if the opposites were Many of the other team members felt the same way. Stories of tsunami victims brought HANDING out coloured markers and school sup- frowning and smiling. tears to their eyes. This motivated team mem- plies, a tudung-garbed Allison McClary and Gary “Awesome job!” Robbie replied as he gave bring joy to a group of school children. bers to help out as much as they could. Even Kennedy A group of students and staff from Penang Inter- the beaming girl a high five, and his words of though different languages kept verbal com- national Church spent a week in Aceh, Indonesia, encouragement were translated. —By Allison McClary munication to a minimum, hugs and smiles helping with tsunami relief.

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With Best Wishes Tanjung Bunga Hardware

From start...

...to finish,

Gettin’ Dunked

to the

Graduating Class of 2006 from

HARDWARE SDN. BhD.

…You’ve always been a joy to us!! We praise God for this milestone and rejoice with you! Love, Mom & Dad and all of your family around the world

We pray that Christ will live in you as you open the door and invite Him in, that with both feet planted firmly on love, you’ll be able to take in the extravagant dimensions of Christ’s love. Reach out and experience the breadth! Test its length! Plumb the depths! Rise to the heights! Live a full life, full in the fullness of God.

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God can do anything, you know—far more than you could ever imagine or guess or request in your wildest dreams! He does it not by pushing us around but by working within us, His Spirit deeply and gently within us! (The Message, Ephesians 3)

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Chris foster

TANJUNG BUNGA

“Can we pay to throw Mr. [Karl] Steinkamp in?” the senior guys asked the juniors in charge of the swimming pool, temporarily renamed the Junior Jail. On 12 November, groups from all around Penang started setting up food and game booths for the Harvest Festival, which was starting later that day. A slow drizzle didn’t dampen the spirits of staff, students, parents, and other locals as the festival started. “I was impressed at all the different activities that were available throughout the evening,” Lindsay Parks commented. These activities ranged from snake shows, to the blow-up-bigtoys, to live music, to the Junior Jail, to henna, to many varieties of food. The junior class had four booths set up to help raise money ALL her kicks and screams come to nought; Ben for JSB and their DeVette gleefully throws Heather Hill into the pool senior sneak. Of single-handedly. The senior guys joined the juniors in the food booth, throwing their friends into the pool. merchandise, Junior Jail, and henna, most found the jail the most creative and fun. For rm6, students could put someone in jail for 10 minutes; and for rm10, their friends would take a dunking in the pool. “Putting Tommy [Mr. John Tompkins] in jail was the best! He didn’t resist at all, only took his food, sat down in jail, and continued to eat,” Josh Manfred said, laughing. Others resisted and took off running. “The funniest was when people started throwing adults in. Sometimes 10 people were needed to carry one person,” Andrew McClary said. As the sun started to set, a group of junior boys went to arrest Mr. Steinkamp. “It was a struggle, but in the end, seeing the look on Steiny’s face right before we got him in was priceless,” Ben DeVette said. Screams of laughter started to die off as another fun evening came to a close, and the clean up began. —By Allison McClary Kampong Restaurant

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—Lindsay Joy Parks—

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Mr. & Mrs. Parks

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Mr. & Mrs. Hawthorne

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killing me,” Williams remarked as Foster returned to his iMac following the cessation of the printer. “Why does it keep doing this Jubi?” Kennedy asked Adleta as her iMac reformatted another spread without her consent.” Yet another quiet Saturday morning dawned on the tropical island “I dunno,” Adleta replied, scooting over to take look at the offendof Penang. Somewhere in the distance, a chicken crowed, an engine ing page. roared, a dolphin squeaked. Well, not a real dolphin, but definitely “My computer froze again,” remarked Williams. “Hit it,” Jonathan Dyck shot back, “Hitting stuff always solves an inflatable rubber one. Taken from the shelf in the journalism room, the dolphin now problems.” formed a protective barrier between a mock-angry Chris Foster and a “Wait a second,” Foster said, “Say that again, I want to write it down.” “I can’t believe that Jon’s the only one of you who likes coffee,” defensive Liesl Williams. “How many copies did you print?” Foster said, his voice increasing lamented Mr. John “Tommy” Tompkins from his computer. With only five students in the class, the odds of finding an avid in volume. “Um, well it wouldn’t print so I kept clicking it,” Williams whis- coffee drinker fell significantly. It also meant much more work for each student on individual sections. The five “Journ. pered, hugging the dolphin tighter. Nerds” struggled to put out a yearbook with more “How many?” Foster snapped back, voice people in the school, and fewer people enrolled echoing off the walls of the room. in journalism. “It was a challenge, but it would “Maybe seven,” Williams replied uncertainly have been a lot easier if we’d had more people,” as Adleta squeaked the dolphin some more. said Adleta. Meanwhile, as the unrelenting printer spewed “It was great though, getting to know a bunch out page after page of Williams’s copy, Foster of people really well by spending lots of time “calmly” collected each additional printout and down in the journ. room together,” added Foster, slowly brought them up under his face, teeth “and you get to be a published author.” bared in a farcical snarl. Jubilee Adleta and Meanwhile, in the back room, the printer Tara-Lynn Kennedy swiveled their chairs to started up again. get a better view of the action. Foster advanced on Williams who shrank back behind the dol- LOOKING intently at an old yearbook, Jubilee “Tell me you didn’t print that page again,” Adleta and Liesl Williams scan the pages for inphin even more. At that moment, the printer teresting ideas. Journalism students occasionally Foster said, struggling to maintain control. stopped. looked through past yearbooks for inspiration on Williams swiftly reached for the dolphin. —By Jonathan Dyck “The dolphin is my protection from Chris layouts and designs.

We take joy in who

God has created you to be and who you are becoming. We rejoice that you are our son, our brother, and our friend. You bring us great joy.

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“He guides me in the paths of righteousness for His name’s sake.”

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Psalms 23:3

We love you,

Dad and Mom,

and Joseph

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James,

jonathan dyck

When He Calls, I’ll...

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Mr. & Mrs. Lai

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r. Sandman Country Boys & Girls

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Miss Julia Bieling

dents grabbed spoons and others just simply dug in with their hands. “I went through and tried to dig out the worms from each trough,” said Caleb Caldwell. On the benches lay saddles for people to sit for photos. And Aunt “Woah look at the horsey!” Amanda Hansen yelled. As the carriage Julia Bieling had painted a mock American Gothic with the faces cut from Tanjong Bungah Country Club pulled up onto camps, the chil- out for people to stick their heads through for yet another pose. dren ran towards it. Waiting in line for their turn to ride around cam- Uncle Jason Phillips decided to go all out for a farmer’s look by wearing a curly, completely unkempt wig and plaid shirt with overalls. pus, they watched the red carriage pulled by a small brown horse. The Barn Party took place in the gym on 5 November at 6:00 p.m. As he entered the gym, everyone chuckled and pointed fingers. Although the dorm staff organized the party, they opened it to other “I couldn’t even recognize him at first,” said Josh Manfred. “It was like, who’s that weird guy.” non-dorm students as well. Most did not follow his lead, however, Marie Giezendanner and Sarah Cairnand went for a quieter, more traditional cross led a large group of students in line country look by wearing overalls, boots, dancing across the gym floor. pigtails, bandanas, and cowboy hats. “I hadn’t done line dancing for After supper, the dorm parents revealed years,” Cairncross said, “but did my their master plan, a living game of “Pit.” best to help lead.” Participants received a card designating The staff had prepared chili and corn them as wheat, coffee, corn, barley, oats, bread for the main meal. Though they soybeans or some other commodity in had planned to have a chili cook-off the actual game. Then designated farmers between dorms, they decided to serve traded them in groups until each farmer cafeteria chili instead to minimize confuhad a monopoly on all of one kind of sion and chaos. commodity. After dinner, the dorm parents scooped Finally, after a few rounds, Hansen out chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry iceand her friends jumped onto the seats of cream into huge troughs for dessert and covered it in chocolate and strawberry AMERICAN Gothic comes to life as Aunt Vi and Uncle Tim Stein- the carriage and enjoyed the ride back to pose for a picture in the backdrop. Posing in a painting proved gym. Turning back, she quickly smiled, sauce, and peanuts. Along the bottom of ert only one of many activities planned by the dorm staff for the Barn “Let’s do that again!” the troughs lay gummy worms, ready for Party, an evening of food, games, and even line dancing. —By Maria Miner unsuspecting students to find. Some stu-

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“Gentlemen, go ask a lady to dance,” Mr. Gerry Steiert announced to his dance class of 25 students. Nervously, the guys glanced at the girls sitting on the bench. A few brave souls shuffled over and held out their hands. “Jubilee [Adleta], may I have this dance?” Jonny Kue asked. Every Monday, a select group of high school students made their way to the gym for a relaxing 40 minutes of dancing. The dances ranged from the jive to line dances to the waltz to square dancing. “It’s a very interesting class because we get to learn all different kinds of dances that I thought I would never have the guts to attempt. I really enjoy the variety though,” Katy Otanez commented. Some students joined just for fun; some, to improve their dance skills; and some because their friends made them sign up. “I really enjoy the dance class, but I already have all the moves and skills that I will ever need. It’s funny to watch all those who are less talented, UP on her toes, Jubilee Adleta though,” Zack Lindsay bragged. mimics the local instructor in “I was forced to join this class. learning the “square dance.” Some of the girls in my class stole my High school Dance P-period provided an extra aerobic work- paper at the P-period Fair and signed out for students during the me up. It has been fun, though, because school day. I get to hang out with my friends and make a complete fool of myself with them,” Paul Sawatzky said, laughing. As the partners are changed after each song, this time has proved a great way for students to step out of their comfort zone and get to know others. “I’ve enjoyed dancing with all the girls, but they always sweat so much around me. I mean, I’m sorry I can’t help that I’m so attractive,” Josh Manfred calmly added, winking. High school dance provided an easy, fun way to relax; get to know others; and improve dancing skills. A huge smile spread across Adleta’s face as she took Kue’s hand. “I would love to dance with you,” Adleta said. The couple walked out onto the gym floor and began to move smoothly as light swing music filled the room. —By Allison McClary High Power Electrical

High Power Electrical Engineering Sdn. Bhd. (50055-T)

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Dalat Staff

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r. Sandman Not So-ho-ho-ho Fast

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tables won unexpected prizes. One table won a brand new outhouse; and another snatched up a trip to the tropical Bikini Atoll, used by the U.S.A. for nuclear testing and now home to radioactive beaches. “WOW!” repeated Manfred after every win. Then came the interview with Santa Klaus. Christmas: a time for laughter, joy, peace, and… “Forget all that capitalist propaganda. This year, all good children Apparently a communist at heart, Santa had implemented a series get lumps of coal with which to power the factories of the beneficent of five-year plans and transformed the North Pole from a capitalist socialist society. And reindeer, well the reindeer got eaten due to food free market into a socialist society. shortages at the North Pole; and Santa has a new form of transporta- With the reindeer eaten and the elves oppressed, the audience watched in horror as Santa “executed” an elf, played by Kyle Ladner, tion: a shiny new soviet tank.” who protested for democracy. Then the evil St. Nick “What’s that old song? ‘You better watch out, you unveiled his masterpiece, a trailer for a propagandabetter not cry...Santa Klaus is coming tonight,’” defilled movie about a young boy named Sven, played clared a strangely communistic Santa at the Student by Caleb Caldwell, who grew up asking about how to Council Christmas Banquet. follow Santa. He finally died defending his country “But what about the bad boys and girls?” asked from evil capitalist invaders. an incredulous Joshua Manfred about the fate of the “It was a very touching story—so sad, yet inspiranaughty children. tional,” said Klaus, a tear in his eye. “Well, they’d better be good,” came the sinister reply. When all seemed lost, the real Santa, played by Luke On 26 November, the high school population Wilson, appeared with Rudolph, played by Kaz Hayashi. crowded into the chapel for an evening of skits; con “Not so-ho-ho-ho fast,” Wilson exclaimed as tests; and, of course, a chicken dinner. Hayashi took the evil Santa down with a flying tackle. Manfred handled much of the evening’s entertain“Sic him, Rudolph!” ment. Acting as the host of “The Early Late Night With Santa Klaus overthrown, the banquet proShow: Christmas Special,” he took the audience gressed smoothly as Christmas returned to normal. As through a bizarre set of interviews and videos in a FIXING a rose to her blouse, Aunt the evening ended, and the last members of the audiparody of late night talk shows. From a car chase involving a toy car to stuffing an Julia Bieling helps Carolyn Whit- ence slipped out of the chapel and up the stairs, Manget ready for the Christmas fred paused to think about the events of the night. entire bag of Twisties in his mouth, Manfred kept the ing Banquet. Along with the JSB, this “We ad-libbed pretty much the entire skit,” he said audience laughing from start to finish. banquet provided an opportunity with a grin. Part of the program involved a contest in which for students to dress up. —By Jonathan Dyck

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~ Psalm 84:5, 7 ~ Blessed are those whose strength is in you, who have set their hearts on the pilgrimage. They go from strength to strength till each appears before God in Zion.

r. Sandman Scouts Honour!

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-Love Mom, Dad, and Sissy-

Mrs. Jacki steinkamp

Congratulations Bubba!

ing habits. “One time I ate too many chocolate muffins,” said Rachel Hurlbut, “and I got sick.” Earning these badges exposed the young girls to new hobbies, life skills, and fun activities. Upcoming badges that the Brownie girls will Never before has Dalat International School offered an after-school earn focus on future careers and use of computers. club involving Girl Scouts. Starting in early February 2006, Dalat As for the Juniors, Mrs. Steinkamp had the aid of Mrs. Marsha sponsored the first Girl Scouts Overseas Program for two age levels: Matanick, one of the troop moms, along with several mothers who Brownies, girls within the ages of 6-8 (kindergarten through grade came in to do presentations. Mrs. Matanick, who came every week, two), and Junior Girl Scouts, girls between the ages of 8-11 (grades organized activities and arranges the snacks for the girls. The Junior Girl Scouts covered three main units: Girl Scouting three to six). These two groups of 21 scouts formed a part of a worldwide as- Around the World, Create and Invent, and “It’s Great to Be a Girl.” sociation that has members in more than 100 countries. Once a week “I got to make head scarves and necklaces to finish my badge,” for an hour in the late afternoon, these enthusiastic young girls meet Elisabeth Brokaw reported. During these units, the girls collected many badges and happily put them on their green together for recreation and learning. uniform sashes. Future badges for these girls Mrs. Lori D’Cruz acted as the troop include painting, theater, and a small fieldtrip leader of the Brownies, and Mrs. Jacki to one of the mother’s homes where they will Steinkamp coordinated the Juniors for this complete another badge. creative club. They both met in separate These girls had a sister Girl Scout troop, rooms, going over different activities and the Peace Pipe Council, in Minnesota, earning merit badges on a weekly basis. U.S.A., with whom they exchanged letters, One mother in particular, Mrs. Khoonpictures, and badges. Aik Woo, assisted Mrs. D’Cruz in facilitat This first-time scouting program sparked ing weekly activities; and a ninth grade an interest in both girls as well as adult sponstudent, Abby Thompson also helped out. sors. Mrs. D’Cruz said, “When I was their Brownies must acquire various badges age, others invested time in Scouting for throughout the school year and place them on a brown uniform sash that they wear to WORKING on her “Creative Solutions” badge, Nicole me. So I wanted to give an opportunity for Phillips tries to solve a Chinese puzzle called a “tangram.” these girls to have a rewarding experience as their meetings. Junior Scouts also painted; worked with graphics, yarn, Since February, the Brownies have earned and fabric; and made their own jewelry as part of this well.” —By Olivia D’Cruz several “Try-Its” badges in areas such as unit. safety, Girl Scout ways, art, and healthy eat-

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With a slightly perplexed look, Peach mimicked with a rather thick French accent: “I woood like too fend fooor sponseurs.” Not impressed, Herring repeated her line. Peace replied, with an even thicker accent. At 5:30 p.m. on 22 April, the day of the Junior-Senior banquet, all the “Why don’t we just take a break?” Herring suggested at one point. staff, sophomores, juniors, and the honored seniors met down in the “No!” Peace exclaimed in response. “We keep going untel we get et!” chapel. All chatted amongst themselves, excited about the grandest Sighing from lack of patience, Herring recited her line two more times; and each time Peace’s reply actually worsened. evening of the year; and everyone compliHerring finally gave up and called for the lights mented the other on his or her formal attire. to dim. Guys bewilderingly tried to attach corsages on Seconds later, sophomore class president their lapels; and girls clutched an assortment Joy Li emerged from the curtains declaring, of objects including flowers, teddy bears, and “The sophomore class would like to introduce boxes of chocolate. their new sponsors, the Stendlunds and the Before too long, a voice sounded over the Steinkamps!” speaker system asking the audience to quiet Applause rang out from the audience as the down for the sophomore class. The loud chattwo named couples made their way onto the ter died to whispers, and all eyes focused on stage. Smiling broadly, Mr. Greg Stenlund borthe closed stage curtains, anticipating the rowed the microphone from Li, giving their ofannouncement of the Class of 2008’s class ficial acceptance as sophomore class sponsors. sponsors. “I know we have some fun and busy times The curtains drew back, revealing Tamara ahead, and pretty soon it will be us putting on Herring and Joshua Peace in their JSB outfits. the JSB!” said Mr. Stenlund to cheers from the When the lights lit up, and all attention be34 sophomores. came fixed to the pair; Herring spoke calmly into the microphone: “I would like to find WITH determination, Tamara Herring tries to coach After another round of applause, the sefour sponsors,” she said with determined Joshua Peace into speaking in an English accent by niors lined up in pairs with their dates and losing his French accent. The sophomore skit’s hommoved toward upper campus, where a line articulation. age to “The Pink Panther” movie helped to create Giggles rippled through the audience as an atmosphere of good humor and ironically served of buses waited to take them to the longthey all recognized the obvious homage to the as a starter for the juniors’ JSB theme of the board anticipated JSB at the E&O Hotel. game “Clue.” —By Chris Foster hit movie, “The Pink Panther.”

AUSSIE & NEW ZEALAND GOODS,

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Breads, Ice Cream, Drinks, Candy

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Mrs. Janet Phillips

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Mr. & Mrs. Gaddis

Mr. & Mrs. Castleberry

Congrats on your big achievement, Bro! We are so proud of what you have done and where you are going. Love, Peace, and Video Games! Tita and Chris

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r. Sandman

of music and entertainment.. To begin with, the orchestra played background music to a strange North American Indian story, “Haiwatha’s Wedding Feast,” as a choir sang. After about half an hour, however, they burst into full orchestra “Did you check how we could get there?” Helen Kim called to Kael melodies. Steinert as she ran into her room to change into a nice skirt for the “‘Haiwatha’s Wedding Feast’” was kind of hilarious because the pictures that they projected on a screen were supposed to illustrate evening. “Yeah, my dad can drive,” he called back, examining his own tattered the story, but they didn’t match the narration,” said Dyck. “But the narrator was a very expressive guy who used innovative sound effects jeans thoughtfully. As dorm Thanksgivings wrapped up around campus, a variety of that left us all speechless.” When the orchestra’s guest pianist took the stage students threw on a nice outfit and ran out to vans playing Tchaikovsky’s “Romeo and Juliette: Fantasy on their way to the Penang Symphony Orchestra’s Overture” and Rachmaninov’s “Piano Concerto No. final concert for 2005 at Dewan Sri Penang. 2,” students gasped in awe as they watched the reflec Earlier in the week, one of the student performers, tion of his fingers flying across the keys. Christa DeVette, had carried a stash of tickets to sell “He was amazing,” Williams said. “He did the to everyone interested. whole entire thing from memory!” At the concert hall, the group of students from “It’s crazy!” Scott Poulter exclaimed. “I didn’t know Jaffray Dorm met up with those who had found seats fingers could move that fast!” earlier. As the evening came to a close, the students ran to “Here, we saved you a few chairs,” Liesl Williams the stage, congratulating DeVette and Hokyo on their whispered as Jonathan Dyck handed out the extra performance, then filing outside to catch a ride home. programs he had collected. “Do you think if Jeff ’s mom gave us a ride, we At that moment, the orchestra began to tune and could go to McDonald’s?” asked Steinert as they left warm up with rich scales. Peering around others’ the air-conditioned theater. heads, Michelle Nagel finally spotted DeVette on her viola. Focused on moving her fingers “We better not. Look, the van’s already here,” Kim Meanwhile, Steinert and Kim had taken up the precisely on her viola, Christa DeVette answered as they rounded the corner onto the street. as part of the Penang Symphony “Besides, I’m tired. But it was fun. You guys are really search to find Jeff Hokyo amidst the rows of violin plays Orchestra. Months of practice showed players. Once they had found their friends, the stu- clearly through the orchestra’s per- good!” she called after Hokyo and DeVette as they parted. dents settled back into their seats to enjoy an evening formance. —By Marie Giezendanner

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Tokihito Shioya

A Grand Symphony

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Mr. & Mrs. Sun

Mr. & Mrs. Toyama

G: God’s R: Redemption A: Abundance C: Chara E: Eucharista

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r. Sandman The Joys of Disney

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Denise Chiles

ing lines, and learning new words all have become part of the Tuesday afternoon P-period. Even throughout the week, students remember funny lines or sings bits of the Disney songs they hear The bell rings at 2:50 p.m. on a regular Tuesday, and the minds of the on Tuesday. many students walking down towards the chapel resound with, “Yes! “I love singing along with all the childish songs and learning new words like ’dirty darn’ and ’oh geez’ from the ‘Parent Trap,’” said AlTime for Disney 101! Wonder what movie we are watching today?” A new P-period offered by Ms. Cathye Riley on Tuesdays, Disney lison McClary. 101 provides a time that sophomores, juniors, and seniors can gather Rivka Matanick also enjoyed the singing. “Tuesdays are so fun because after study hall, I get to watch movies together and watch old and new classics with my friends. We sing along with the from Walt Disney. ‘Lion King’ songs to cheer ourselves up. It’s Originally, Ms.Riley planned to have a perfect ending to my school day.” the class watch movies and play Disney Andrew McClary enjoyed the clasTrivia games; however, the surprising sic lines more than the singing. “I like popularity of the P-period created a class to quote all the ‘Finding Nemo’ lines too big to play the game. With around like ‘P. Sherman, 42 Wallaby Way, 45 students in the class, Ms. Riley deSydney.’” cided the game would not work. Instead, Some enjoy, however, just the simple the students get just to sit back, relax, opportunity to forget about the pressures and watch movies. and stresses of school and remember their Ms. Riley said, “Disney 101 is a fun carefree childhood days. “I like feeling like way to unwind at the end of the day and a kid again,” Howard Kao stated. watch movies that remind you of being As the students rushed down to the a kid.” chapel to see what movie they would Matt Hansen agreed; he said, “It’s watch at 2:55 p.m., they relaxed and slowly a great break in all the hard work of let the pressures of life fade away as they school.” 101 members Kaz and Jonathan Hayashi and their friend slipped back into the childhood dream Students not only watch the mov- DISNEY Bruce Mak give a thumbs up to the “Disney on Ice” performance. ies; they also interact with the films. Other members of the class gleefully donned “magic crowns” for world of Disney 101. —By Lindsay Parks Singing along with the songs, quot- sale at the performance.

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Mr. & Mrs. Hsiang

Mr. & Mrs. Dyck

From the time you were born, we knew you were special. As you were getting to know us, those intense eyes told us you were special. Your consistent love for your sister made you special in her eyes. As you were getting to know the world of white-throated sparrows, kinnikinnick, Red pines, and wild strawberries, we knew you were special. When you started to read and read and read—Solzhenitsyn, Tolstoy, the Bible through and through, we knew you were special. Jonathan... We’ve seen your rock-hard stance for things you believe in. We’ve seen your quiet humility that speaks passionately when sparked by something of substance. We’ve seen you grow into a formidable size, but... From the time you were born, we knew you were special. We can’t wait to see what you’ll grow into next. We’re convinced that God has some special plans for you, Jonathan. Congratulations and God bless you! Love, Mom & Dad & Marigan

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r. Sandman Girls Will Be Girls

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liesl williams

They “awwwwed” when the girl and the guy had their first kiss, and they wiped the tears away when things just wouldn’t work out. “It was funny,” said Allison McClary, “because I’ve seen those movies at least two times each, but they still brought tears to my eyes at “Girls, girls, listen up,” said Ms. Cathye Riley over a sea of voices. “I the sad parts. And, I laughed at the jokes I had already heard more than once.” want you to split up into four groups of four or Nail polish everywhere described station five. Then each week you will either go to the two. Monay Ng supervised as the girls chatmake-up, hair, nails, or chick-flick station.” ted and had fun painting each other’s nails The girls quickly rushed to their friends. funky colors. The Girls Only P-period took place every At the third station, Yumi Yamauchi and Friday and involved girls from tenth to twelfth Stella Park did what they did best and what they grade. At the very end of a busy week, it gave had a blast doing: other people’s make-up. They the girls a chance to relax, have fun, and cater made the girls look stunning and feel extra good to their girlie side. about themselves. McClary had the job of hair Lindsay Parks said, “Doing girlie stuff is a specialist. “I’m in charge of doing the girls’ hair. great way to relax after a hard week. It’s nice My goal is fulfilled when I see them get excited when it’s just girls because then boys aren’t when I finish their hairstyle,” said McClary. around to make fun of us. I’ve done things The girls have fun no matter what they that I wouldn’t usually do, like straightening do in Girls Only because they get to spend my hair or painting my nails bright glittery time with their best friends and not have male red.” interference. And that’s exactly what the girls did every In fact, some of the guys wished that they week. They couldn’t believe that this class could have a class like this. “I don’t think it’s actually counted as a school class. fair that the girls get a P-period for them only,” In station one, the girls watched chick flicks like “13 Going on 30,” “The Prince and Me,” CONCENTRATING on the task at hand, Allison said Matt Hansen. “We should have a P-period and “50 First Dates.” They sat next to their McClary straightens Marie Giezendanner’s hair as for all the manly things we do.” watches “The Prince and Me.” In the Girl’s Only As the bell rings, the girls mosey out of Girls best friends and sang along to “Why Can’t I she P-period, sophomore, junior, and senior girls had a Breathe Whenever I Think About You” and blast spending time with their friends and catering Only, all powered up to have a great weekend. —By Rivka Matanick danced to such songs as “The Thriller.” to their feminine side.

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Mrs. Weng

The C&MA – International Ministries

Jonathan Kue

Class of 2006 and our Graduate

The Christian & Missionary Alliance International Ministries www.cmalliance.org

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BUSINESS HOURS MONDAY ~ SUNDAY 11a.m. - 7p.m. WEDNESDAY OFF

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r. Sandman Deep Dives

new boyfriend or girlfriend each week. And in this study, we looked at how to date with God in the center of a relationship,” said Marie Giezendanner. “Questions,” a group led by Mr. Chris and Mrs. Carolyn Butler, After first semester’s Spiritual Emphasis Week theme of “To be contin- met at their house and worked through some of the big questions in ued,” Chaplain Ryan Tuck decided to offer small groups for students life, such as “Is God real?” Mr. Butler hit on that topic in their first to get plugged into and to go deeper continuously with the Lord and meeting and told of how God had revealed Himself to him and how he had eventually given his life to God. with each other. “Going deeper is a great way to connect with students and to grow “We mostly just wanted to open our home to the students we have together in our walk with God through friendship and accountability,” come to love and provide a safe place [for them] to ask questions and said Aunt Julia Bieling, who with Ms. Wendi Maze led a group of high let them know that it’s OK for Christians to ask questions. Christianschool girls in spiritual development. Their group specifically focused ity is not just a set of rules we have to live by,” explained Mrs. Butler. on prayer, solitude, and fasting—as well as Ms. Maze’s favorite— “We value being real with each other and helping each other through this spiritual journey.” journaling. Other groups such as Aunt Val Weidemann’s “I’ve learned journaling is a great therapy. called “God, Art, and Girls” helped middle It’s a nice way to get my thoughts in order when school girls. By watching the movie “The SisterI’m frustrated or get my emotions out when hood of the Traveling Pants,” the girls learned I’m sad. It’s also a easy way to talk to God,” about friendships, how to deal properly in a difsaid Maria Miner. ficult situation, and how to be truly comfortable Both day and dorm students signed up for with who they are and how God made them. one of the six groups they would wanted to “Aunt Val helped us relate to God through art get involved with. A group led by Aunt Debprojects—kind of like how God molds and bie Cairncross and Aunt Melinda Hill called “Don’t Date Naked” encouraged girls to put ’ADVENTURES with God” members Ben Weide- shapes you just as you mold and shape a piece on the armor of God before entering a dating mann, Jordan Strong, Jared Williams, Bryan of art work,” Beth Nguyen said. Cairncross, Nathan Danneker, and Tyler Cairncross Whether students chatted at the Butlers relationship. “Aunt Debbie and Aunt Melinda really enjoy a drink at Subaidahs after their meeting. This or journaled hard with Aunt Julia and Ms. group traveled around the island visiting the Maze, God used these times of “Diving opened up a godly and balanced perspective of small Air Hitam Dam, the old Japanese bunkers on Pearl dating. So often dating is seen as one extreme Hill, and the beach, Uncle Brian Weidemann leading Deeper” in students’ lives. of totally shunning it or the other of having a them in devotionals at those places. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

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Mr. & Mrs. Tsai

Palace d’ India

There’s nothing quite like lobster, Tiger prawns, Crabs and a whole fish exquisitely prepared Indian-style. Close your eyes and think; fragrant delicacy and oooh, so nicely juicy. Naturally, these go beautifully with servings of “Naan” bread which also happens to match “Tandoori Chicken” or “Sheek (Lamb) Kabab” very nicely.

Tandoori Chicken

Of course, for a complete meal, might we also suggest some vegetable dishes in the form of “Pancer Mattar,” “Dal Tadka,” or “Aloo Gobi”? And, do remember that “Kulfi” ice-cream invariably adds a sweet ending to any evening.

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Sandman Ar.Day in the Life...

a couple more M&Ms. Although juggling between guidance counselor, which she enjoyed a little more, and AP Psych. teacher, which involved lots of preparation work, could become overwhelming at times; Miss Strong considered Walking into her office early Monday morning to drop off her stuff herself blessed to have a good class and lots of support. Most of the before heading off to “P.D.” or Professionals Development, Miss Ruth time Miss Strong tried to keep her time at school free. She would stay up late at home in the evenings and prepare for Strong ran into a giant fake tree strategically her classes so that she would be more available to placed in the center of her doorway. For the past talk and see students during school hours. week, this tree had traveled from office to office “Ms. Strong has been a great psych teacher. I and had finally made its way to hers. Chuckling have learned a lot from her; and because of her, I to herself, she dropped off her stuff and thought just might pass the AP psych exam,” Howard Kao about whom she would like to get next with the said. tree as she walked off to her meeting. Because of her position at the school, Miss Miss Strong’s job had many perks, one of them Strong’s job entitled her to stay for a long period including performing pranks on her coworkers. of time and build really strong relationships with Not only did she get to counsel students, somethe students. thing she really loved; but she also taught AP “I cannot believe you all are juniors,” Miss Psychology. Strong exclaimed to Allison McClary one after Each morning while preparing for her classes, noon in her office. “When I first came here, you Miss Strong would wait for those kids who had guys were in eighth grade; and now you’re putting first period study hall to come and tell her they on the JSB [Junior Senior Banquet]!” had arrived. It may not have seemed exciting to “Ahhh,” Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp exclaimed the other people, but Miss Strong loved to use this next morning as she attempted to walk into her time to check in with students. She would also encourage the students with loving words as well TUCKED in a corner of the counseling office, office but instead walked into a giant fake tree. Ms. Ruth Strong shares a conversation with Miss Strong chuckled to herself in her own office as in their walk with the Lord. McClary. Students felt welcomed in Ms. and continued to check her e-mails as she listened “The best part about my job is getting to talk Allison Strong’s office—and they all looked forward to the students all the time and having my door to the day they could write their name on her to Mrs. Steinkamp, who struggled to get her stuff open for them to come in, chat, and eat!” said wall, meaning they’d been accepted into a col- into her office as well as move the tree from her doorway. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy Miss Strong as she and Jubilee Adleta reached for lege or university

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“‘I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you; plans to give you hope and a future.’” Jeremiah 29:11 Heather, you are a blessing to us. We love you so much, Mom, Dad and Amber Katy Parks

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“I got it,” Paul Sawatzky cried. “Heads up,” David Robertson called as he heaved another Pepsi into the air. “Come on, guys; those are my Pepsis,” Ms. Wendi Maze exclaimed. “Well, welcome to Dalat,” Allison McClary said laughingly to new student teacher Ms. Hannah Smith, who had just moved in with Ms. Maze. Only arriving in Penang the day before, nothing could prepare Miss Smith for the pack of high school students that invaded her new house, stole Pepsis from her fridge, and proceeded to play catch with them in the front yard. “At Toccoa [Falls College], every education major must complete 12 weeks of student teaching. When I came to Toccoa after transferring out of East Carolina University, I was interested in teaching TEACHING a unit on overseas; so I applied for my student measuring, Ms. Hannah teaching overseas. And I chose Dalat Smith observes Seung Ju Jin and Cade Ernsberger’s because I wasn’t really familiar with any work. Ms. Smith did her other international schools other than practice teaching in Mrs. those that are or had been affiliated with Barb Case’s class. the Christian and Missionary Alliance. Also, Mrs. Barb Case was the first person to agree to take me; so here I am!” Miss Smith said. Ms. Smith worked with Mrs. Case’s class on a daily basis. She taught math and science and supervised “show and tell” and lunch. Ms. Smith returned to the States on 18 April to finish the last three weeks of her classes; she graduated from TFC on 13 May. “I have been looking for teaching jobs near my hometown of Cary, North Carolina. I hope someday to teach in a rural, southern elementary school so that I can work with low-income children. I have also considered getting my master’s in library science and maybe someday being a elementary school librarian,” she shared. “All right, I gotta get home; here are your Pepsis, Wendi,” Robertson said as he handed Ms. Maze her two Pepsis. “You might want to wait awhile before trying to open them,” Sawatzky added while walking away. “Night, guys; see you next week at school,” Ms. Maze called as the group of students disappeared down the street. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy CG Computers

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“What did the mermaid say to the other?” Josh Manfred asked Scott Poulter in the StuCo video that was shown in chapel the day before the big Missions Emphasis Week beach party. On 14 April, music, laughs, and happy screams echoed from the school’s ampitheater. Dinner of hot dogs, potato salad, and watermelon preceeded beach games, free jet skiing, and banana boating. “I thought the beach party was a great idea,” said May Yamauchi. “I especially loved riding the jet skies and banana boat for free.” “The free banana boat ride was fun except the driver wouldn’t speed up, and we weren’t aloud to push others off because of all the jellyfish,” David Robertson said. “As our banana boat pulled into the ocean, a breath-taking sunset filled the sky. I was THRILL-SEEKERS Kendall Stenlund, Josiah Steinkamp, Jordan Nagel, Justin Strong, Bryan very impressed! Penang Cairncross, Jordan Strong, and Kaden Stenlund sunsets are much better hold on for “dear life.” Banana boat rides topped than Canadian ones,” the fun for most at the beach party. Paul Sawatzky said. Despite the free water sports, some felt more comfortable staying on the beach. “I built a sandcastle as my friends went on the banana boat,” Jubilee Adleta said with giggle. “Steven [Ong] laughed at my sand castle, though, before he destroyed it.” Most felt the night a huge success—except for a few who had been stung by jellyfish. As the sunset started to fade on the horizon, students and staff slowly made their way off the beach and back into their busy lives. “StuCo did a fantastic job of pulling together an awesome party that the whole school enjoyed. They did good!” Michelle Nagel said with a smile as she thought back to the announcement in chapel... “BEACH PARTY!!!!” Poulter screamed to Manfred in the video as the two of them skipped across the beach in their matching Tshirts. Laughter filled the air as the lights in the chapel came back on, and students got up to leave for their next class. —By Allison McClary

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Mr. & Mrs. McClary

May the God of peace equip you, Andrew, with all you need for doing his will. May He produce in you, through the power of Jesus Christ, all that is pleasing to Him. (Hebrews 13:20-21)

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International Sports Arena together. The show even impressed the boys, who came a bit skeptical at first. “They skated so well!” Harry Mak admitted as he and his friends left. Joel Babcock had already launched over the guard rail“Oh my goodness, I didn’t know that was possible!” Maria Miner ing, running through the empty seats in hopes of meeting one of cried as Prince Eric spun Ariel above his head and landed her grace- the princesses. fully back onto the ice. Jaffray, Eckman, and Jackson Dorms along As the students left after the show, souvenir vendors pounced on with a few other friends spent the evening of Easter Sunday watching them; Miss Denise Chiles had to buy cotton candy in order to get a free plastic crown with Minnie Mouse ears. Girls passed around the Disney on Ice in Penang. The dorms left early to make sure they would have time to eat be- crowns while the guys snitched pieces of cotton candy. fore the performance. Pulling down the tailgate, Jaffray kids swarmed Uncle Scott and Aunt Debbie Cairncross treated their Jackson kids around the ham ’n’ cheese sandwiches and cookies the cafeteria had sent to cotton candy and popcorn to share; Jaffray saved their surprise treat for a stop at McDonald’s after the performance. with them, while Jackson Dorm grabbed their food “We should buy cute little cups for our sno-cones and sat on the stairs in front of the entrance. and charge 20 ringgit at school,” junior fund-raiser When the students entered, a giant Zamboni Uncle Tim Steinert joked as the vendors walked appeared to have broken down in the middle of around with bright colored balls of shaved ice peaking the ice. Mickey and Minnie Mouse came out to out of Woody and Buzz-Lightyear’s’ heads. inspect it and found an old lamp that began the After becoming genies, green toys, and characters epic of Disney stories. from around the world, the various ice performers Delight spread over the students faces as their changed back into princess, animal, and superhero favorite characters came out to spin on the ice. costumes and came out to circle the arena one last “Pocahontas has always been my favorite,” Liesl time before posing for pictures. Williams whispered as the ice dancer spun across “It would be so fun to be able to do that,” Wilthe ice to “The Colors of the Wind.” liams sighed as music soared, and Pocahontas flew “The princesses’ part was the best!” Beth Nguyen gushed as she walked out beside Sarah ADDING a special treat to an already over John Smith’s shoulders, gliding to a stop. Ice Cairncross, who proudly sported a pink Disney spectacular evening, Uncle Scott Cairn- glowed as the crowd cheered and then stood up to distributes popcorn to his dorm head back home after an experience of a lifetime. princess T-shirt. After each princess had a moment cross students. Despite the sky-high prices, in the spotlight dancing with her Prince Charming, students looked for affordable souvenirs Imagine. Disney. On Ice. In Penang! —By Marie Giezendanner the entire cast of royal characters circled the Penang to take home.

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MERIDIAN DENTAL SURGERY

Baptisms on Easter weekend have remained a tradition on campus for a long time. This April, the tradition changed a little; the ceremonies occurred in the late afternoon as opposed to the evening, and five people had asked to show their faith by wading out into the ocean to have themselves drenched in both sea water and Christ’s forgiveness. Students Lachlan Modrzynski, Jonathan Kue, Naomi Tami, Sydney McKenzie, and Uplands student Peta Edmonds all met on stage in the campus chapel on Good Friday, 14 April, to give their testimonies of faith. “I grew up in a Christian home, but I didn’t know what it really meant to be saved until much later,” said Tami, with her visiting parents watching her in the audience. After each had given his or her testimony, friends or family members stepped up to join them and give them loving words of encouragement. “I’m proud of Lachlan and am happy to know we will be together at the feet of Jesus one day,” said Mr. Karl Steinkamp. Once all five had a chance to share, Penang International Church pastor Rev. Craig McKenzie prayed and then invited the audience to come with him out to the beach where he would lower each into the waters of baptism. “It was nice to share my faith with others and take a new step in my life,” said Kue. Cameras clicked; and people cheered AFTER sharing a verse from scripture, Bethany Weide- as they saw their friends and family commann embraces Sydney McK- ing up from under the water, their noses enzie in a hug. Friends and held shut by their hands. Dripping but family quoted Scripture to smiling, each wandered out of the water validate God’s love for them. to meet hugs and towels on the beach. While the baptizees continued to dry off, some members of the audience remained on lower campus to encourage the five with words and hugs; and they shared refreshments together as the sun dipped down into the sea in a late afternoon glow. “It’s encouraging to see so many people eager to demonstrate their faith by taking this step in their lives,” said Pastor McKenzie afterwards. And as God continued working on and around campus, the tradition of Easter baptisms would continue for years to come. —By Chris Foster

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Junior Girls

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In–Better Than Out?

Jubilee Adleta

“True friends are hard to find, difficult to leave, and impossible to forget.”

Our Dearest Michelle, As you embark on the next chapter in your life, we pray that you will not forget the ones you are leaving now; but don’t be afraid of the new amazing friends that you will meet. We hope you have a great time and want you to know that you will always be with us in our hearts. “But these things I plan won’t happen right away. Slowly, steadily, surely the time approaches when the vision will be fulfilled. If it seems slow, do not despair; for these things will surely come to pass. Just be patient! They will not be overdue a single day.” -Habakkuk 2:3 We love you and we’re gonna miss you lots! God Bless! Love always, The Junior Girls

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“No matter how serious life gets, you always need those few people that you can be completely stupid with.”

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At the beginning of the second semester, Mrs. Lyn Holden sent out an e-mail to all high school girls and staff adults informing them of an opportunity to play indoor soccer. On Mondays and Wednesdays, girls met together to show off their skills without the interference of the guys. Every Friday night, girls arrived at school to watch the boys play indoor soccer, some staff and a few brave girls joining in as well. Everyone could play in these games, but many felt intimidated and jumped at the chance to play in an all girls league. “In outdoor soccer, I have to work harder and more as a team; but in indoor, I could easily take everyone on!” said Allison McClary, who played on the varsity girls’ soccer team as well. Indoor soccer differed from outdoor in the constant motion of the ball, flying from anywhere on the court and hitting anything in its path. With no boundaries or referees, players had the freedom to experiment with different TRYING to steal the ball from Maria strategies in an attempt to win. Miner, Mrs. Tara Stenlund attempts to take the lead by scoring a goal. The few basic rules made it easy Later, Mrs. Stenlund’s “Green” team for newcomers to understand. won the game. Mrs. Holden divided the girls into four equal teams containing both students and staff. At the end of the semester, the staff challenged the students in one final game for anyone interested in playing. After a close game, the staff scored the winning goal and ended the game. The girls can recount some hilarious memories of the times when someone got tackled or tripped or even flipped as their teammates rushed to the ball. “The funniest thing for me to see was Maria Miner or Grace Sun playing goalie. Whenever someone kicked the ball in their general direction, they closed their eyes and would let out a high pitched scream,” Amanda Hansen recalled laughing. Indoor also gave an excellent workout since the players spent most of the time sprinting after the ball from one side of the court to the other. The girls sustained injuries and bruises—from lost toenails to sprained ankles—but nothing could keep them from playing because of their love for the game. —By Angela Stevens Telesonic Business Communication

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Michelle, We’re Gonna Miss you!!!

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Mr. & Mrs. Park

ESL Department

Congratulations, Stella!

Congratulations ESL Graduates Paul Im Patty Tsai Grace Sun Grace Kim Shinobu Toyama Hiro Kawabata From surviving . . . to thriving . . . and now graduating! We are proud of you!

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Sandman Ar.Cool, Keen Day

and I thought a chance for the kids to step back in time would be a fun activity,” Ms. Riley said. “Some of the outfits the students were able to pull together were very creative. It was fun to see them looking, speaking, and trying to act like a fifties’ teenager.” “Let’s go check out the paper shakers at the game before the parents Other than dressing up, the classes brought snacks such as cookies, use the horn to call the heat!” Robbie Mangham screamed to the class, chips, and Coca-Cola, which many teenagers ate and drank in the ’50’s. Ms. Riley also encouraged her class to use lingo that she had taught trying to use as much ’50’s lingo as he could. “Huh??” Zack Lindsay replied, looking very confused. “Robbie, her class the week before. “It was strange using the words teenagers in the fifties used. We laugh what in the world are you trying to say?” On a Monday afternoon, students from Ms. Cathye Riley’s U.S. at how stupid the words were, but look at it the other way around. Teenagers from the fifties would probably History class slipped out of their school laugh just as hard at the words we use today,” uniforms and displayed their fifties’ attire Liesl Williams remarked thoughtfully. borrowed from friends or the drama closet. “I thought it was really cool to see how The girls dressed in button down shirts, the words for ‘cool’ and other things have poodle skirts, white tennis shoes, and changed so much. The funniest thing was folded ankle socks; and they tied back their that all the girls kept calling cheerleaders straight hair in a ponytail with a ribbon. pepper shakers instead of paper shakers,” Boys on the other hand did not have Brian Colfax said, laughing. as much variety but came dressed in jeans Overall, most found the afternoon both cuffed at the bottom; white button-down relaxing and educational. shirts; and greased, combed-back hair. “Gosh, Zack! Didn’t you listen to any “I loved the clothes that teenagers wore thing that Ms. Riley taught us?” Mangham back in the fifties, and being able to dress sarcastically said. “It means: lets go check up like them was not only fun but helped out the cheerleaders before the parents call me learn as well,” Marie Giezendanner the police! How did you not know that?” commented. “Having a fifties party was a good EAGER to model their ’50’s fashion for the photographer, Smiling, Lindsay replied, “What are you DeVette, Elaine Ang, Olivia D’Cruz, Brian Colfax, talking about? Of course I listened! I was, chance for the students to relax and eat Christa Allison McClary, and Tara-Lynn Kennedy strike a relaxed snacks—but also learn at the same time. pose. Students enjoyed dressing up and using old-fashioned um, just testing you.” —By Allison McClary Many of my students are visual learners, “lingo” for this class event.

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Miss Cathye Riley

We would like to thank the Lord for giving us Stella as a gift to this world—and thank you Stella for coming to our family. We wish you can share the love we’ve given you, and that you will live your life altruistically and wisely. Fulfill your dreams as you go out to the world. We love you unconditionally! Nosotros te amamos muchisimo! Espero que tenga suerte con todos! —Dad, Mom and tu hermano favorito-

“‘I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.’” Jeremiah 29:11

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Mr. & Mrs. Kawabata

C&MA Cambodia

Congratulations, Hiroyuki We are proud of you! Have fun in college. I will miss you! Miho

Congratulations Trust in the Lord with all your heart; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight.

Class of 2006 and our

Cambodian MKs

Jared Williams Liesl Williams Josh Manfred Linnea Williams

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SandmanSituation Ar.Hairless

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“Where have you been, ladies? I wish I had met you earlier, but I feel lucky to have you all in my life.”

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AIYO! Noooo

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Gracie Linz Pa Stellrie Yum Yum

Gurney, our second home!

ways treasure every moment I had with y’all, the good & bad.

Miss Julia Bieling

I’m so thankful that I came to this school Ballphobic, mosquito-worshipped Korean and found you guyz. My life would have never been the same without your guyz. I couldn’t have made it S without you guys. I’ll al- tuC Go Luv ya from the bottom of my heart.

out haircutting and practice until someone’s new cut by me turned out nice,” said Giezendanner. Although most of the cutting took place in Jaffray, some seniors decided to cut their hair at home. “When I came to school the next day, “Hey Jonny [Kue], have you gone to Jaffray to get you hair done?” I was wearing one of my dad’s wigs to hide my lack of hair!” exclaimed James Hawthorne, stunned at the appearance of his asked Joel Babcock. near-bald pate. “Yeah, I’m going to try and find some other Though a great deal of the seniors decided to guys who want to do it first,” replied Kue. buzz their heads, some decided to keep their hair Not three weeks into the first semester on uncut. “I love my hair too much. I can’t bear cut29 August, a group of high schoolers hatched ting it short. It’s a big part of me,” explained Ben an idea for the senior boys to have their hair cut DeVette. extremely short. To keep things interesting and When it came time for his turn, Chris Foster consistent among their friends, peer pressure bolted out of the dorm and ran across campus pushed as many senior boys as possible to do with Josh Manfred in hot pursuit. “I loved the the deed. idea of seeing Chris running around with me Jaffray Dorm became the unofficial center for trying to catch him. It was exhilarating,” said the senior boys to go and have their locks buzzed Manfred. down to half an inch in length. The next day, more than a few students and Along with most of the senior boys, some staff gave surprised expressions as they saw the lack younger boys, including Kyle Ladner and Caleb of hair among the boys. “I thought it looked good Caldwell, agreed to have their hair cut down to size because I could see their handsome faces,” said Mr. too. “A lot of people were doing it, and I figured Karl Steinkamp. that my hair was already too long. But best of all, Running his fingers through his newly shortened it was a cheap cut!” said Ladner happily about his WITH strands falling down onto his shoul- fuzz, Kue gazed into the mirror, admiring his new new buzz. Even though much of the hair fell to the ground ders, Jonathan Dyck allows Maria Miner to look. Though he thought it looked good, he still out his hair, making each bit of hair missed his curly locks that had nearly reached his by the hands of other boys, Maria Miner, Sarah level equal in length. Though the majority of the Cairncross, Marie Giezendanner, and Joan Lin ten senior boys wanted two or more boys to shoulders. Still, as the wind blew by, tickling his also took turns with the electric clippers. “I figure clip their hair, others still wanted their hair scalp, it put a smile on his face. —By Chris Foster there’s room for new talents, so I decided to try clipped by just one person.

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disgusting, especially when we had to take it out and shape it with our hands; but it was still fun because it was creative,” said Rivka Matanick. The day continued with an assortment of games, skits, and video On 23 February, the seniors skipped out on school to attend the Senior clips from movies like “Hook” or “Castaway” to draw metaphors and Transition Seminar hosted by Ms. Ruth Strong and Ms. Cathye Riley. analogies to how life would change for all and what they could expect Held at Paradise Sandy Bay Hotel, the teachers simply had to wait for from it when they returned to their home countries. Towards the end of the day, Mr. Karl Steinkamp arrived on the the seniors to arrive. To start off the seminar, each student received a booklet that dis- scene to help seniors discover their most valued attributes. Starting cussed the advantages and disadvantages of living the life of a Third with 10 values, Mr. Steinkamp challenged the now moaning seniors Culture Kid (TCK), what friends would mean to students both now to narrow the choices to their top six and finally their top three values. and in the future, and what it means to have good relationships and “I had a hard time deciding which values to eliminate; but when it came down to the last few, I was sure that I had a positive outlook on life. chosen my best values,” said John Kim with an “I thought the retreat was interesting. There air of confidence. was a lot of useful information about the real When the seminar adjourned in the late afterity of going away to college, and it was nice to noon, a group of girls, together with Ms. Strong, hear about the good and bad things related with Ms. Riley, Mr. Andreas Gross, and Mr. Michael change,” said Malaina Gaddis. and Mrs. Lyn Holden enjoyed an elating time by The acronym RAFT (Reconciliation, Afpara-sailing just outside Paradise and eating dinner firmation, Fare wells, and Thinking about your at Mario’s restaurant. “The water sports were really destination) took center stage in Ms. Strong’s fun, especially because they were free. But the best message to the seniors. With pieces of colored part was dinner with Ms. Strong and Ms. Riley paper, the class constructed “rafts” made up of and talking with them,” said Shinobu Toyama. four parts, each containing one of their duties At the end of the day, when all the laughs and to fulfill before leaving for college. To further her point about making rafts and WAVING a napkin around, Matt Hansen give his idle chat had passed; a couple of individuals knew “sailing to a new destination in life,” Ms. Strong idea for a humorous skit to Po Lai, Rivka Ma- that their time in high school would end soon. and the rest of his table. The Transition and Ms. Riley had everyone chew two packs of tanick, Seminar focused on improving communication Yet, a refreshing feeling of positive change came bubble gum and use the chewy candy to make methods between people of different nationali- over the class and gave them hope for the months to come. small, but realistic-looking boats. “The gum was ties and walks of life. —By Chris Foster

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allowed to wear such low dresses to banquets,” Charis To whispered; “that dress is scary and definitely against the dress code!” As the evening passed, Uncle Scott led the students through a Powerpoint scavenger hunt through Penang, looking for a place he “Wait just a minute; then you can come in,” Aunt Val Weideman told could take “Maia” on a date. the eager dorm students waiting for the chapel to open so that they When they went to the movies, they watched the “Numa Numa” could start the annual Dorm Valentine’s Banquet. As they waited, music video and invited students to join along. Josh Manfred rushed up to the stage with Nathan Danneker at his heels. Jordan and Justin Maria Miner spun Liesl Williams around to admire her curly hair. “Do you realize that it would take any other girl hours to make Strong quickly followed; and soon they all stood in front of their dorm brothers and sisters, shaking their arms her hair do this?” Miner asked. “I’m so jealwildly. ous!” Gradually, the music faded away; and Williams rolled her eyes and saw Laura dorm parents began calling out to their kids Danneker descending the stairs in a dark to gather in different areas of the room. green traditional Thai dress. “The Valentine’s Banquet gave us a chance “I love it, except there are a lot of pins!” to get pictures of our whole dorms nicely Danneker told her friends, “And it’s kind of dressed up,” Aunt Cathy Bieling said after the hard to move around in.” evening ended. Roommates and dorm siblings Finally, the doors swung open; and stualso rushed to different photo-ops to capture dents entered the room full of pink and red priceless moments with each other. hearts. As they found their seats, Uncle Scott As students began to leave, rain poured Cairncross came onto stage with taped glasses from the sky, making them pick up their skirts and one pant-leg rolled up and tucked into and pull jackets over their head as they ran up a high white sock. the stairs. “Maia! Maia!” He called, then looked out “Thank you so much for this evening!” to the audience. “I can’t find my date! Where MOUTHS full, but eyes glued on the stage, Kris Brink Linnea Williams told Aunt Val Weidemann do you think she is? Maia!” The crowd gasped as Uncle Jason Phillips and Ben Unruh stare at the unlikely “couple” on the as she gave her a hug. “It was so special!” Students enjoyed a dinner of baked chicken fol- “You’re very welcome, Linnea,” Aunt Val relumbered out from behind the curtain wear- stage. lowed by a dessert of iced cupcakes as they watched the ing a half-zipped teal banquet dress. antics of Uncle Jason Phillips and Uncle Scott Cairncross sponded with a smile. “It was our pleasure!” —By Marie Giezendanner “I don’t know if dorm parents should be on a “date.”

Dorm Love

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CHRISTIAN WEBSITES

WEDDING & MARRIAGE SERIES

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PENGUINSPOT.COM - Chill Out. It’s Really Cool PONGOPYGMAEUS.COM - Orangutan :: Man of the Forest BUGSIES.COM & BUGYOU.COM - Upcoming Insect Websites ZEBRA-CROSSING.COM - Quit Horsing Around And Trot Over To The ZEBRACROSSING.COM PARAKEETS.US - Birds of A Feather Get Flogged Together WOLFDOWN.COM - Wolfing Down The Info in Mega Byte Sizes BEARINGPAINS.COM - The Plight of Bears in the Wild DOGGONLINE.COM - Doggone Dog Gone Online FELINEGREAT.COM - Cats Take On The World NZSHEEP.COM - We’re Baaack! We’re Sheepish! Ewe Know It Don’tcha? SQUIRRELING.COM - How do you catch a squirrel? Climb up the trea and act like a nut.

Mrs. Kathy Bieling

ANIMAL KINGDOM

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Mr. & Mrs. Yamauchi

Advance Ribbon Technology

Airborne Sdn. Bhd.

With Best Compliments

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more and more antsy to have their boyfriends ask them. “I told Joel [Babcock] if he didn’t ask me at least two days before JSB, I wouldn’t go with him,” said Audrey Ang, “And he cut it pretty close!” “Come on, she’s right there!” Paul Wang poked Jun-Ho Choi, who Even though it might have taken a while, the boys planned out turned around to start walking, then spun back to his friends, laugh- their invitations to make them worth the wait. ing nervously. Meanwhile, Regina Hong’s friends kept her looking “I was beginning to wonder if Robbie [Mangham] would ever get around to asking me,” Tara-Lynn Kennedy admitted, “but it was so the other direction. “What’s going on?” she asked as they giggled around her. Finally, amazing when Scott [Poulter] got me to go up on his balcony, and I Choi approached the group of girls; and as Hong turned around, he saw him up in the sky parasailing in a suit with a big ‘JSB?’ banner behind him!” bent on one knee, holding up the bouquet of purple roses. For girls, an invitation to the Junior-Senior Banquet sometimes “Hoon [Kang] got everyone in my dorm to hold one letter to spell overshadowed the actual evening itself in creating a special memory. out the invitation and then stood in the middle with flowers,” said For guys, an invitation could cause sleepless nights of planning, Charis To. Unlike in past years, many guys planned ways to get the girls’ worrying, and calling in friends as accomplices. Around campus, news of impending invitations spread speedily families involved, too. Kao found out when Lindsay Parks’ basketball through the underground gossip grapevine. As Sarah game got out and planned his invitation for when she Cairncross made her way back to her dorm one got out of the shower. He lit candles leading down to afternoon, she kept looking back curiously at the the end of her sidewalk, where he stood nicely dressed straggling group of followers she had collected just in holding flowers. walking from Jaffray to Jackson Dorms. Howard Kao “For all the work we juniors put into it, people’s dropped his tennis racket and bounded up behind favorite part of JSB is still the invitations,” junior class her while a group of students chatted quietly in the president Christa DeVette said as her friends admired patio beside her. the roses Terry Hsiang had met her with at her home “I had no idea what was going on!” she exclaimed after David Lee had bent on one knee, asking her to STUDENTS on the school lorry hold before taking her out to breakfast. accompany him to JSB. “But it sure seemed like the papers with words “Will you go to the “Yeah, the look on people’s faces is priceless,” JSB with me?”—Mr. Andreas Gross’s rest of the world did!” invitation to his date Ms. Cathye Riley. Josh Manfred added. “I mean, who needs JSB after As friends coupled themselves for the upcoming Creative invitations kept guys up at some of these invitations?” —By Marie Giezendanner evening, those girls with “significant others” became night preparing.

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Chris Foster

JSB with Me?

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My son, preserve sound judgment and discernment, do not let them out of your sight; they will be life for you, an ornament to grace your neck. Prov. 3:21-22

This index lists everyone named or pictured. Names preceded by an asterisk (*) are advertisers. Boldfaced words are topics covered.

A Abraham, Rachel 79, 108 Aceh Tsunami Relief 99 Adleta, Honour 45, 46, 50, 51, 67, 81, 112, 146, 148, 150, 151 Adleta, Jubilee 3, 18, 21, 36, 63, 81, 91, 93, 103, 107, 123, 127, 133, 147, 148 *Advanced Ribbon Technology 143 *Adventist Hospital 88 Agamrom, Tamilselvi 83 *Airborne Travel 143 Allen, James 79 Allison, McClary 63 Aloyius, Patrick 83 Aloysius, Mary (Penny) 83 Ambassadors 34, 152 Ang, Adeline 83 Ang, Audrey 16, 21, 56, 58, 143, 149 Ang, Elaine 53, 63, 133, 135, 151 Ariyasantichai, Banaphol 54, 63 Arokiadass, Indrani 83, 85 Art 16 Arts & Crafts Club 28 Arulandoo, Jeston (John) 83 *Avion Holidays 97

B

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We Love You! Pa, Mommy, Josh, Gao Foua, Gaonou

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Babcock, Joel 18, 24, 37, 56, 57, 60, 89, 129, 137, 143, 147 Badminton Club 152 Banana Boats 127 Band 20 Band, High School 147 Band, Middle School Intermediate 146 Band, Seventh & Eighth Beginning 146 Band, Sixth Grade 145 Baptisms 131 *Baptist Convention 105 Barn Party 105 Basketball, JV Boys’ 46, 148 Basketball, JV Girls’ 46, 148

HIGH SCHOOL DRAMA FIRST SEMESTER: FRONT ROW: Nathan Danneker, Kirsten Gamble, Laura Danneker, Allison Rice, Catherine Foster; BACK ROW: Mrs. Barb Case, James Hawthorne, Nathan Rice, Jonathan Dyck, Chris Foster, Ms. Susan Taylor; NOT PICTURED: Monay Ng

HIGH SCHOOL DRAMA SECOND SEMESTER: FRONT ROW: Kirsten Gamble, Laura Danneker, Catherine Foster, Naomi Tami;SECOND ROW: Mrs. Barb Case, Maria Miner, Brian Colfax, Allison Rice, Ms. Susan Taylor; BACK ROW: Kaz Hayashi, Michael Whiting, James Hawthorne, Jonathan Dyck, Nathan Rice, Chris Foster; NOT PICTURED: Monay Ng, Amanda Hansen, Tamara Herring

C *C&MA Cambodia 137 *C&MA Canada 109 *C&MA International Ministries 121 *C&MA Thailand 89 Cairncross, Bryan 30, 69, 70, 71, 121, 127, 145, 151 Cairncross, Debbie 78, 79, 82, 108, 121, 129 Cairncross, Sarah 18, 21, 23, 24, 32, 34, 45, 54, 62, 63, 74, 105, 129, 133, 137, 143, 147, 149, 153 Cairncross, Scott 3, 69, 79, 108, 129, 141 Cairncross, Tyler 8, 75, 121, 155 Calculus 18 Caldwell, Caleb 42, 64, 69, 105, 109, 137, 151 Canadian History 16 Canadian Thanksgiving 76 Carey-Realmo, Fidel 63 Case, Barb 26, 27, 28, 29, 79, 108, 125, 145 Case, Earl 79, 108

FORENSICS: FRONT ROW: Marie Giezendanner, Kirsten Gamble, Naomi Matanick; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Barb Case, Liesl Williams, Laura Danneker, Allison Rice; BACK ROW: James Hawthorne, Nathan Rice, Jonathan Dyck, Tokihito Shioya

SIXTH GRADE BAND: FRONT ROW: Jirawat Keeratitharakul, Kaden Stenlund, Nathan Danneker, Andy Cho, Jeffrey Hsiao, Chi-Yuan Lo, Joseph Kim, Jae-Hyun Chung; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Valeri Brokaw, Alex Gimson, Bryan Cairncross, Jordan Strong, Hung Ching Song, Jordan Nagel, Roc Wu, Lucas Samuel, Benjamin Unruh; BACK ROW: Jared Williams, Emily Brokaw, Eric Han, Se Ra Hwang, Juliet DeVette, Moses Park, Katya Brink, Brian Song

Index (Abraham — Case)

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Congrats, Jonny!!

Index

Basketball, Varsity Boys’ 48 Basketball, Varsity Girls’ 48, 148 Beach Party (MEW) 127 Bear Cubs 153 Behind the Scenes 85 Bible 16 Bieling, Julia 79, 105, 108, 109, 121 Bieling, Kathy 79, 108, 141 Bieling, Larry 79, 108 Bin, Seon 8 Biology 18 Bobcats 89 Boucher, Robbey 8, 75 Brink, Katya 71, 145, 146 Brink, Kirsten 64, 151 Brink, Kris 36, 69, 72, 73, 141 Brokaw, Elisabeth 43, 75, 111, 146, 152, 153, 155 Brokaw, Emily 12, 71, 145, 146, 153 Brokaw, Jonathan 67, 146, 148 Brokaw, Valeri 34, 77, 79, 108, 145, 146, 152 Brownies 111, 153 Buntain, Brendon 53, 64 Butler, Carolyn 16, 58, 79, 108, 121 Butler, Chris 58, 121

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Chong, Daniel 68 Chong, David 44, 71 Christmas 76, 77 Christmas Banquet 66, 109 Chung, Angel 28, 72 Chung, Ian 67, 146 Chung, Jae-Hyun 13, 71, 145 Colfax, Brian 63, 65, 74, 135, 145, 147, 151 Colfax, Christopher 68, 146,

150 College Acceptance 60 Combrink, Bernard 8, 9, 76 Combrink, Charlotte 11, 75, 146, 149, 153 Combrink, Danielle 75, 153 Combrink, Lucia 11, 72, 146, 149, 152, 153 Computer Production Technology 18 Cooking Club 28 Cub Scouts 89

D

MIDDLE SCHOOL INTERMEDIATE BAND: FRONT ROW: Rachel Leung, Khalie Mahoney, Theresa Phan, Joshua Wong, Frances Wong, Andy Jung, Edwin Tan, Josh Strong, Beth Nguyen, Lakshmi Meyyappan; SECOND ROW: Mr. Kerry Mahoney, Akshay Krishnamani, Breanna Roberts, Christina Gaddis, Benny Kim, Bill Kang, Rolland Leung, Harry Mak, Tiffany Hsiang, Joycelyn Woo, Hannah Jones; BACK ROW: Miranda Steinert, May Yamauchi, Sydney McKenzie, Vivian Lee, Joseph Lee, Elmo Lin, Jonathan Brokaw, Axel Loehden, Luke Dalton, Angela Steiert, Bethany Weidemann, Linnea Williams

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH BEGINNING BAND: FRONT ROW: Santi Niramitvijit, Keith Kamono, Kevin Huang, SeChan Hwang, Frank Cheng, Victor Ho, Young-Moung Kim, Jamie Kim; SECOND ROW: Anna Fu, Bona Kim, Margaret Stebbins, Honour Adleta, Hee-Eun Song, Esther Park, Chan-Mi Kin, Ji-Hyun Park, Jennifer Kim, Maaya Yamauchi; BACK ROW: Sophie Shin, Esther Joo, Andrew Chee, Peter Choi, Jennifer Lee, Kyung-Keun Chee, Ian Chung, Jet Song, Terry Law, Chris Colfax, Mrs. Valeri Brokaw

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ELEMENTARY/INTERMEDIATE MUSICAL CAST: FRONT ROW: Reagan Mahoney, Shelina Hsieh, Hank Wong, Ben Weidemann, Nathan Danneker, Juliet DeVette, Emily Brokaw, Katya Brink, Noriah Matanick; SECOND ROW: Joshua Watson, Mark Watson, Jeremy Lupinacci, Charlotte Combrink, Kassy Steinkamp, Stephanie Jones, Licky Lee, Kenya Gimson, Tim Phan, Angelene Woo, Kiernan Sullivan, Mrs. Valeri Brokaw; BACK ROW: Joyce Lee, Elisabeth Brokaw, Lucia Combrink, Marianna Moss, Josiah Steinkamp, Ashtyn McKenzie, John Cotton Watson, Joseph Hawthorne, Daniel Hebard, Nicole Phillips

Index (Castleberry)

D’Cruz, Lori 79, 108, 111, 153 D’Cruz, Olivia 19, 40, 55, 63, 65, 93, 97, 133, 135, 148, 149, 150 *Dalat Chapel 92 *Dalat Staff 108 Dalton, Luke 68, 146 Dancing 107 Danneker, Laura 7, 26, 27, 64, 141, 145, 147, 149, 152 Danneker, Nathan 12, 17, 26, 27, 36, 43, 70, 71, 86, 121, 141, 145, 146 Dass, Erin 72 Dass, Ezra 67, 150 Day Students 81 de Leeuw, Barbara 79 de Leeuw, Jake 79, 82 de Leeuw, Trix 79 Debate 26 Debatin, Melanie 64, 151 DeBello, Daniel 76 Deou, Raymond 49, 63, 150 DeVette, Ben 32, 44, 46, 56, 57, 101, 137, 147, 154 DeVette, Christa 2, 18, 21, 35, 40, 54, 63, 66, 81, 114, 133, 135, 143, 147, 148, 150, 153 DeVette, Juliet 13, 71, 145, 146, 153 Dewey, Evan 79, 108 Dewey, Kirsten 54 Dewey, Lori 54, 79, 108 Diago, Estefania 39, 67, 150 Disney 101 117 Disney on Ice 129 Diving Deeper Small Groups 65, 121 Dobbie, Amber 64 Dobbie, William 67 *Domain Loh 120 Doraisamy, Muniandy (Raja) 83

Doraisamy, Nagamal (Rose) 83 Doraisamy, Naranyanasamy 82, 83 Dorm Council 32, 147 Dorm Life 69 Dorm Staff 79, 80 Dorm Trips 69 Drama Club 26, 145 Dyck, Jonathan 26, 32, 56, 57, 58, 69, 103, 114, 119, 137, 145, 147, 149, 152, 153 Dyck, Marigan 4, 53, 64, 69, 119 *Dyck, Mr. & Mrs. 119

E *E&O Property 98 Early Church History 16 Easter 65, 77, 131 Edmonds, Peta 131 Eighth Grade 14, 67, 68 *ejrs.com 106, 140 Elementary Activities 73 Elementary Clubs 28 Elementary Football 149 Elementary Musical 34 Elementary Playground 42 Elementary Student Council 152 Elementary/Intermediate Musical Cast 146 Ernsberger, Cade 73, 75, 125, 147, 149 *ESL Department 135 *Evangelism Explosion 94 Excoms 32 Expats 79, 80

*Forever Travel 131 Foster, Catherine 22, 27, 65, 67, 69, 76, 110, 145, 152 Foster, Chris 6, 24, 25, 26, 56, 90, 103, 110, 137, 145 *Foster, Mr. & Mrs. 110 Four-square 28, 42, 70 Fourth Grade 10, 72 French 20 Freshmen 64, 67 Friesen, Nancy 79, 108 Fu, Anna 14, 68, 146 Fund-raising, Junior Class 62 Fung, Ted 56, 59, 81, 147, 149, 150, 153

G Gaddis, Christina 50, 68, 146, 151 Gaddis, Malaina 16, 56, 60, 113, 139 *Gaddis, Mr. & Mrs. 114 Gamble, Kirsten 26, 64, 97, 145, 147, 154 Ganapathy, Palany 83, 85 Geography 16 Giezendanner, Marie 17, 21, 25, 26, 34, 53, 55, 62, 63, 65, 66, 74, 105, 119, 121, 133, 135,

137, 145, 149, 151, 153 Gimson, Alex 12, 71, 145 Gimson, Kenya 11, 72, 146 Gimson, Nicholas 72 Girls Only P-Period 22, 119 Globe Missionary Evangelism 91 Golf 91, 147 Gouws, Deon 67, 150 Govinda, Ramasami 83 Gregory, Henry 83, 85 Gross, Andreas 79, 108, 139, 143 Gross, Vicki 79 Gurney Plaza 74

TIGER CUBS: FRONT ROW: Garrison Schaller, Shione Stengele; BACK ROW: Andrew Kim, Christopher Phillips, Jackson McKenzie, Mrs. Carol Schaller

DORM COUNCIL: FRONT ROW: Heather Hill, Sarah Cairncross, Kirsten Gamble; BACK ROW: Mr. Brian Weidemann, Jonathan Dyck, Michael Whiting; NOT PICTURED: Jonathan Kue, Joel Babcock

WOLF CUBS: FRONT ROW: Mark Watson, Peter Kim, Kristian Stenlund; BACK ROW: Mr. Greg Stenlund, Chardin Stengele, Cade Ernsberger, John Cotton Watson, Jeremy Lupinacci, Joel Babcock

MSSPP GOLF: FRONT ROW: Mrs. Carla Loehden, Roc Wu, Jeffrey Hsiao, Jubilee Adleta; SECOND ROW: Willis Stebbins, Jason Hsiao; NOT PICTURED: Barret Loehden, Drew Steiert

F Faculty 79, 80 Fan, Andrew 68 Fashion 66 Fifth Grade 12, 72 Fifties Day 135 First Grade 8, 75 Fitness 22 Floorball 30, 151 Foo, Serena 79, 108 Football, Elementary 149 Football, JV Boys’ 150 Football, JV Girls’ 150 Football, Varsity Boys’ 150 Football, Varsity Girls’ 150 Foreign Language 20 Forensics 26, 145

HIGH SCHOOL BAND: FRONT ROW: Christa DeVette, Joel Babcock, Po Lai, Terry Hsiang, Ted Fung, Howard Kao, Andrew McClary, Ben DeVette, John Kim; SECOND ROW: Mr. Kerry Mahoney, Paul Sawatzky, Heather Hill, Rivka Matanick, Michelle Nagel, Carolyn Whiting, Sophia To, Joy Li, Paul Wang, Jonathan Kue, Charis To; THIRD ROW: Drew Steiert, Riley Mahoney, Miho Kawabata, Tamara Herring, Katherine Kang, Min-Ji Kang, Susheela Meyyappan, Cindy Hsieh, Grace Kim, Laura Danneker, Tokihito Shioya; BACK ROW: Kenny Kim, Matt Mah, Robbie Mangham, David Lee, Grace Sun, Brian Colfax, Stella Park, Lindsay Parks, Michael Whiting, Yi Chen

Index (Gurney Plaza)

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*Cheow Guan 138 Chiao, Boch 64, 148 Chihama, Fumina 63 Chiles, Denise 79, 85, 129 Chillax Gaming Center 73, 74 Cho, Andy 71, 145 Choi, Jun-Ho 64, 143 Choi, Maria 72 Choi, Peter 67, 146, 150 Choir 20, 149

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*Castleberry, Mr. & Mrs. 115 *CG Computers 125 Chang, Jassy 71 Chang, Tako 64 Chee, Andrew 67, 146 Chee, Kyung-Keun 68, 146 Chemistry 18 Chen, Yen-Han 75 Chen, Yi 64, 147 Cheng, Frank 67, 146, 148

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MSSPP TRACK AND FIELD: FRONT ROW: Khalie Mahoney, Olivia D’Cruz, Lakshmi Meyyappan; SECOND ROW: Honour Adleta, Amanda Hansen, Angela Steiert, Frances Wong, Mr. Gerry Steiert; BACK ROW: Josh Manfred, David Thompson, Howard Kao, Drew Steiert

VARSITY GIRLS’ BASKETBALL: FRONT ROW: Sophia To, Charis To, Maria Miner, Carolyn Whiting, Olivia D’Cruz; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Donna Hansen, Jubilee Adleta, Yumi Yamauchi, Cindy Hsieh, Allison McClary, Breanne Hansen; BACK ROW: Amanda Hansen, Christa DeVette, Angela Stevens, Grace Sun, Lindsay Parks

JV GIRLS’ BASKETBALL: FRONT ROW: Maaya Yamauchi, Chan-Mi Kim, Linnea Williams, Hannah Jones, Khalie Mahoney, Beth Nguyen; SECOND ROW: Miranda Steinert, Catherine Rice, May Yamauchi, Sydney McKenzie, Frances Wong, Mr. Gerry Steiert; BACK ROW: Theresa Phan, Ji-Hyun Park, Honour Adleta, Angela Steiert, Tiffany Hsiang, Joycelyn Woo

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JV BOYS’ BASKETBALL: FRONT ROW: Mr. Jimmy Um, Hung Yi Song, Boch Chiao, Young-Moung Kim, Harry Mak, Andy Jung; BACK ROW: Elmo Lin, Frank Cheng, Gilbert Weng, Jonathan Brokaw, Victor Ho, Jason Hsiao

Index (Haircuts)

108, 150 Hansen, Donna 13, 15, 28, 49, 79, 108, 148, 150 Hansen, Matt 16, 18, 40, 41, 44, 56, 57, 58, 117, 119, 139, 150 *Hansen, Mr. & Mrs. 93 Harvest Festival 101 Hawthorne, Colleen 153 Hawthorne, James 5, 7, 26, 27, 31, 37, 56, 57, 59, 60, 65, 91, 95, 99, 102, 114, 137, 145, 152, 154 Hawthorne, Joseph 29, 43, 72, 73, 89, 114, 146, 152, 153 *Hawthorne, Mr. & Mrs. 102 Hayashi, Jonathan 67, 117, 149, 152 Hayashi, Kaz 23, 35, 45, 63, 95, 109, 117, 145, 149, 151, 152 Health 22 Hebard, Daniel 29, 72, 146 Hebard, Michelle 29, 75 Henderson, Keith 65 Heng, Scott 76 Heng, Shannon 8, 76 Herring, Tamara 53, 64, 113, 145, 147, 149, 150, 151 Hidajat, Pam 18, 33, 45, 62, 63, 132, 133, 152, 153 *High Power Electrical Engineering 107 High School Band 147 High School Choir 149 High School Drama 145 High School Student Council 152 Hill, Heather 21, 32, 56, 57, 60, 81, 97, 101, 105, 124, 147, 149, 152, 153 Hill, Mark 79, 108 Hill, Melinda 79, 108, 121 *Hill, Mr. & Mrs. 124 Ho, An Khang 83 Ho, Victor 46, 67, 146, 148 Hock, Goh Seng 83 Hokyo, Jeff 42, 43, 64, 114, 149, 151, 152 Holden, Charlyn 79 Holden, Lyn 18, 39, 50, 108, 132, 133, 139, 150, 151, 152 Holden, Michael 79, 108, 132, 139, 150, 152 Holidays 76 Hong, Bo-Suk 67 Hong, Regina 53, 64, 143, 151 Hsiang, Terry 7, 56, 74, 118, 143, 147

Hsiang, Tiffany 42, 45, 67, 146, 148 *Hsiang, Mr. & Mrs. 118 Hsiao, Jason 67, 91, 147, 148 Hsiao, Jeffrey 71, 91, 145, 147 Hsieh, Cindy 62, 64, 147, 148 Hsieh, Shelina 72, 146 Huang, Chanel 12, 44, 72 Huang, Kevin 68, 146 Huang, Maureen 75 Huang, Morris 75 Hurlbut, Brittany 153 Hurlbut, Rachel 111, 153 Hurlbut, Rick 6, 79, 108 Hwang, Se Ra 71, 145 Hwang, Se-Chan 15, 68, 86, 146, 150

I Im, David 64, 150 Im, Paul 41, 56, 61, 135 Impromptu 26 Indoor Soccer 42, 133 Information Processing 18

J Jang, John 67 Jazz Band 149 Jin, Seung Ju 75, 125, 149, 152 Jin, Seung Wie 75 Jo, Andrew 64, 149, 150, 151 Jones, Hannah 14, 68, 146, 148 Jones, Stephanie 11, 72, 146, 153 Joo, Esther 68, 146 Joo, Paul 72 Joung, Yoo-Sun 7, 72 Journalism Class 103 JSB Dates 143 Jung, Andy 15, 42, 46, 68, 146, 148, 151 Junior Class Activities 93 Junior Class Jail 101 Junior Fund-raising 62 Junior Girl Scouts 111, 153 *Junior Girls 133 Junior-Senior Banquet Dates 143 Juniors 62 JV Basketball 46 JV Boys’ Basketball 148 JV Boys’ Football 38, 150 JV Girls’ Basketball 148 JV Girls’ Football 38, 150

JV Girls’ Volleyball JV Volleyball 50

151

K Kamono, Keith 68, 146 *Kampong Restaurant 101 Kanasamy, Francis 83 Kang, Bill 68, 77, 146, 150 Kang, Hoon 63, 143, 151 Kang, Katherine 67, 77, 97, 147, 149, 152 Kang, Min-Ji 67, 147, 152 Kang, Sung-In 64 Kao, Howard 7, 19, 48, 49, 56, 57, 117, 123, 143, 147, 148, 152, 154 Karpaya, Valliammah 82, 83 Karuppiah, Samarasan 83 *Katy Parks 124 Kawabata, Hiro 37, 56, 58, 61, 74, 135, 136 Kawabata, Miho 64, 147 *Kawabata, Mr. & Mrs. 136 Keeratitharakul, Jirawat 29, 71, 145 Kennedy, Gary 42, 64, 99 Kennedy, Lois 31 Kennedy, Tara-Lynn 3, 62, 63, 93, 99, 103, 133, 135, 143 Keyboarding Club 28 Khao Lak Tsunami Relief 95 Khoo, Amy 82, 83 Kick-boxing 30 Kiehl, Norman 4, 23, 39, 67, 77 Kim, Andrew 5, 29, 75, 147, 149 Kim, Benny 15, 68, 146 Kim, Bona 68, 146 Kim, Chan-Mi 46, 68, 148 Kim, Chris 64, 150 Kim, Daniel 75 Kim, Eun-Hae 43, 70, 72 Kim, Gia 9, 76 Kim, Grace 56, 76, 135, 147, 152, 153 Kim, Han-Vit 75 Kim, Helen 67, 114 Kim, Jamie 68, 146 Kim, Jennifer 68, 146 Kim, Jenny 76 Kim, John 21, 33, 37, 56, 58, 132, 139, 147, 149, 152, 153 Kim, Joseph 13, 71, 145 Kim, Kenny 18, 35, 36, 63, 147, 149, 151, 152 Kim, Lisa 23, 63, 133 Kim, Peter 75, 147

Kim, Roy 73, 75, 149 Kim, Sung-Bum 67, 151 Kim, Sunny 75 Kim, Ye-Na 7, 72 Kim, Young-Moung 15, 68, 146, 148, 150 Kin, Chan-Mi 146 Kindergarden 8, 75, 76 *Kingdom Photo 91 Klassen, Nathanael 16, 76, 79, 108 Koethler, Nellie 79, 108 Koo, Steven 83, 152 Krishnamani, Akshay 45, 68, 146 Krishnamani, Tanya 39, 67, 150 Kue, Jonathan 40, 57, 58, 61, 66, 77, 89, 107, 121, 131, 137, 144, 147, 149, 150, 151 *Kue, Mr. & Mrs. 144 Kuppusamy, Mani 83 Kuppusamy, Parkinathan 83

L Ladner, Kyle 23, 43, 67, 109, 132, 137, 150, 152 Lai, Po 57, 61, 81, 104, 139, 147, 150 *Lai, Mr. & Mrs. 104 Lau, Sin-Yian 64 Law, Terry 68, 146 Lee, Daniel 63 Lee, David 18, 63, 143, 147, 150, 151 Lee, Jennifer 68, 146 Lee, Ji-Soo 67 Lee, Joseph 68, 146, 150, 152 Lee, Joyce 11, 72, 146, 153 Lee, Licky 75, 146, 149 Lee, Peter 75, 149 Lee, Rami 16, 67, 149, 150 Lee, Vincent 72, 152 Lee, Vivian 15, 68, 146

HIGH SCHOOL CHOIR: FRONT ROW: Marie Giezendanner, Joan Lin, Monay Ng, Rivka Matanick, Olivia D’Cruz, Audrey Ang, Heather Hill, Naomi Matanick, Sarah Cairncross, Rami Lee; BACK ROW: Jonathan Dyck, Andrew McClary, Paul Sawatzky, Jonathan Kue, Josh Manfred, Robbie Mangham, Mr. Kerry Mahoney

JAZZ BAND: FRONT ROW: Mr. Kerry Mahoney, Jeff Hokyo, Jonathan Hayashi, Kaz Hayashi, Tokihito Shioya, Robbie Mangham, Laura Danneker, Tamara Herring, Katherine Kang; BACK ROW: Matt Mah, Michael Whiting, Andrew Jo, John Kim, Kenny Kim, Andrew McClary, Drew Steiert, Sin-Myung Park, Ted Fung

ELEMENTARY FOOTBALL: FRONT ROW: John Cotton Watson, Chardin Stengele, Andrew Kim, Cade Ernsberger, Jay Wood-Singh, Peter Lee, Hung Jie Song, Tim Phan, Roy Kim; BACK ROW: Kristian Stenlund, Seung-Hun Pyee, Justin Strong, Lucia Combrink, Seung Ju Jin, Charlotte Combrink, Kassy Steinkamp, Licky Lee, Mark Watson, Mrs. Carla Loehden

*Lee Tong Hai 131 Leow, Ah Mooi 83 Letchmi, Thana 83 Leung, Rachel 68, 146 Leung, Rolland 68, 146 Li, Joy 64, 76, 97, 113, 132, 147, 150, 152 Lim, Ah Chai 83 Lin, Elmo 49, 68, 146, 148, 152 Lin, Joan 20, 63, 77, 133, 137, 149 Lin, Kyle 64 Lindsay, Zack 17, 42, 63, 66, 107, 135, 150, 151 Line Dancing 22 Liss, Steve 49, 57, 58, 60, 79, 95, 108, 150 *Liss, Steve Mr. 95 Lo, Chi-Yuan 71, 145 Loehden, Axel 15, 68, 146, 150 Loehden, Barret 33, 63, 91, 147, 153 Loehden, Carla 28, 30, 50, 79, 91, 108, 147, 149, 151 Loh, Boon Leng 82, 83, 85 *Looi, Eric Dr. 113 Lupinacci, Jennifer 8, 75, 153 Lupinacci, Jeremy 75, 146, 147, 152

M *Made in Korea 103 Mah, Matthew 18, 36, 63, 147, 149, 152 Mahoney, Kerry 6, 21, 53, 54, 76, 78, 79, 108, 146, 147, 149, 151 Mahoney, Khalie 14, 68, 146, 148, 150 Mahoney, Reagan 12, 13, 36, 72, 146, 151 Mahoney, Riley 21, 30, 67, 77, 147, 150, 151 Mahoney, Robin 8, 76, 79, 108 Mak, Bruce 39, 67, 117, 150 Mak, Harry 14, 39, 45, 68, 70, 129, 146, 148, 150 Mandarin 20 Manfred, Josh 2, 21, 22, 34, 35, 37, 40, 49, 54, 55, 62, 63, 74, 93, 101, 105, 107, 109, 127, 132, 137, 141, 143, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153 Mangham, Barb 95, 99 Mangham, Robbie 21, 63, 95, 99, 135, 143, 147, 149, 150 Mangham, Thomas 94

Index (Mangham)

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Haircuts 137 Han, Eric 7, 45, 71, 145

Hansen, Amanda 22, 64, 105, 133, 145, 148, 150, 151 Hansen, Breanne 52, 67, 148, 150, 151 Hansen, Carlo 18, 78, 79, 82,

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H

149


JV GIRLS’ FOOTBALL: FRONT ROW: Khalie Mahoney, Beth Nguyen, JiHyun Park, Lakshmi Meyyappan; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Lyn Holden, Naomi Matanick, Estefania Diago, Rami Lee, May Yamauchi, Mrs. Shelly Tuck; BACK ROW: Tanya Krishnamani, Susheela Meyyappan, Carolyn Whiting, Linnea Williams, Angela Steiert, Miranda Steinert, Honour Adleta, Frances Wong

JV BOYS’ FOOTBALL: FRONT ROW: Josh Strong, Matthew Nguyen, Hung Yi Song, Joshua Wong, Christopher Colfax; SECOND ROW: Mr. Wayne Sawatzky, Harry Mak, Young-Moung Kim, Joseph Lee, Peter Choi, Ezra Dass, Mr. Ryan Tuck; BACK ROW: Bruce Mak, Deon Gouws, Se-Chan Hwang, Kyle Ladner, Bill Kang, Axel Loehden, Riley Mahoney

VARSITY GIRLS’ FOOTBALL: FRONT ROW: Mrs. Donna Hansen, Joy Li, Olivia D’Cruz, Charis To, Yumi Yamauchi, Allison McClary, Mr. Steve Liss; BACK ROW: Sophia To, Maria Miner, Amanda Hansen, Christa DeVette, Grace Sun, Breanne Hansen, Tamara Herring, Jacqui Steiert

119, 123, 125, 133, 135, 148, 150, 153 McClary, Andrew 3, 34, 35, 49, 53, 57, 61, 65, 95, 99, 101, 117, 128, 147, 149, 150, 151, 152 McClary, Dean 80, 108 McClary, Kathaleen 78, 80, 82, 108 *McClary, Mr. & Mrs. 128 McKenzie, Ashtyn 72, 77, 146, 152, 153 McKenzie, Craig 131 McKenzie, Jackson 8, 76, 147 McKenzie, Jodi 11 McKenzie, Sydney 14, 36, 68, 131, 146, 148 *Meridian Dental 131 Merkle, Mariah 153 MEW 65 MEW Beach Party 127 Meyyappan, Lakshmi 14, 71, 146, 148, 150 Meyyappan, Susheela 40, 67, 147, 150 Middle School Activities 70 Middle School Intermediate Band 146 Miner, Maria 20, 40, 42, 44, 64, 65, 121, 129, 133, 137, 141, 145, 148, 150 Miss Strong’s Counseling 123 Missions Emphasis Week 65 Modrzynski, Lachlan 58, 61, 78, 131 Mohr, Annelie 76 Moon, Ji-Woo 75 Moses, Ravi 83 Moss, Clay 37, 49, 58, 80 Moss, Margaret 8, 9, 76 Moss, Marianna 11, 72, 73, 146, 152, 153 *MSL Travel 107 MSSPP Golf 91, 147 MSSPP Track & Field 148 Music 20 Music Groups 34 Myles, Carrie 50, 53, 151

N

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150

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VARSITY BOYS’ FOOTBALL: FRONT ROW: Josh Peace, Jonathan Kue, Raymond Deou, Robbie Mangham, Josh Manfred, Mr. Michael Holden; SECOND ROW: Mr. Carlo Hansen, Ted Fung, Matt Hansen, Drew Steiert, David Lee, Zack Lindsay; BACK ROW: Po Lai, Scott Poulter, Nathan Rice, Andrew McClary, David Thompson, Chris Kim, David Im, Andrew Jo

Index (Manikam)

Nagel, Jordan 45, 71, 89, 127, 145, 151, 153 Nagel, Michelle 18, 23, 30, 33, 63, 81, 114, 127, 133, 147, 153 Nam, Ashley 64 Nam, Seung-Yoon 67 National Honor Society 32,

153 National Staff 82, 84 Navaseelam, Sarasvathi (Joyce) 83 Ng, Monay 16, 26, 34, 54, 62, 63, 76, 119, 133, 145, 149 Nguyen, Beth 38, 70, 71, 121, 129, 146, 148, 150 Nguyen, Matthew 15, 30, 31, 68, 70, 150 NHS 32, 153 Niramitvijit, Santi 71, 146 *Nissi Quality Foods 129 *Nyack College 99

O Off-Campus Living 81 Oh, Seok Kyo 72, 153 Oh, Seon Bin 76, 153 Okazaki, Risako 67 Ong, Robin 76 Ong, Steven 19, 54, 63, 127 Ooi, Huey Fern (Lilian) 83 Ooi, Tian 8, 73, 76 Oral Interpretation 26 Origami 28 Otanez, Katy 63, 107

P *Palace of India 122 *Paradise Sandy Beach Hotel 126 Park, Esther 15, 68, 146 Park, Han-na 68 Park, Hannah 64 Park, Hye-Jin 75 Park, Ji-Hyun 71, 146, 148, 150 Park, Moses 28, 71, 145 Park, Sin-Myung 4, 23, 34, 64, 149 Park, Soo Jin 72 Park, Stella 60, 61, 66, 77, 97, 119, 132, 134, 136, 147, 152 *Park, Mr. & Mrs. 134 *Parks, Katy 124 Parks, Lindsay 7, 24, 25, 32, 56, 57, 58, 59, 61, 95, 97, 100, 101, 119, 124, 132, 136, 143, 147, 148, 152, 153 *Parks, Mr. & Mrs. 100 P.E. 22 Peace, Josh 32, 64, 86, 113, 132, 150, 151, 152 *Pen Ads 139 *Penang Stationary 129

Penang Symphony Orchestra 115 P-Periods 22 Perumal, Balu 5, 82, 84 Phan, Theresa 71, 146, 148 Phan, Tim 5, 29, 72, 146, 149, 153 Phillips, Alaina 76 Phillips, Christopher 75, 147 Phillips, Janet 78, 80, 108 Phillips, Jason 3, 4, 69, 77, 80, 86, 90, 105, 108, 141 Phillips, Nicole 10, 11, 72, 111, 146, 153 *Phoenix Press 130 Physical Education 22 Physics 18 Pillai, Raj 58, 84 Pohl, Jason 35 Poulter, Scott 16, 36, 37, 40, 45, 63, 93, 114, 127, 143, 150, 151 Prayer Meeting 65 Pre-3 8, 76 Pre-4 8, 76 Precalculus 18 Psychology 16 Pyee, Kevin 29 Pyee, Seung-Hun 72, 149 Pyee, Yu-Min 72

R Rajiah, Lily 84 Ramasamy, Muniandy 84 Ramasamy, Sundram 84 Ramu Thaver, Sangaran (Susu) 84 Rangasamy, Sundaraj 84 Redang Island 58 *Regent Furnishings 125 Rice, Allison 27, 64, 96, 145 Rice, Austin 28, 70, 72, 96 Rice, Catherine 70, 71, 96, 148 Rice, Nathan 24, 26, 27, 31, 32, 36, 60, 61, 74, 96, 145, 150, 153 *Rice, Mr. & Mrs. 96 Riley, Cathye 80, 108, 117, 119, 135, 139, 143 Roberts, Breanna 68, 146 Roberts, Joel 64, 152 Roberts, Lydia 80 Robertson, David 17, 19, 36, 40, 62, 63, 86, 93, 99, 125, 127 Robertson, John 80, 108 Robertson, Karen 28, 80, 108 Rogers, Corinne 18, 80, 108

Rogers, Dan 10, 72 Rogers, Kasey 8, 28, 75 Rogers, Patrick 80, 82, 108 *Roof Top Kafe 111

S Sabastian, Catherine 84 Sabastian, Margaret 84 *Sam’s Batik 90 Samuel, Lucas 45, 71, 145, 151 Sankaran, Shama 84 Sawatzky, Bonnie 80 Sawatzky, Paul 21, 23, 30, 49, 52, 53, 63, 87, 93, 107, 125, 127, 147, 149 Sawatzky, Wayne 80, 108, 150, 151 Schaller, Carol 5, 147 Schaller, Devin 9, 76 Schaller, Garrison 75, 147 Science 18 Scouts 89, 111 Second Grade 10, 75 Security 85 Sellasamy, Steven 84 Selvanayagam, Jason 30, 49, 80, 108, 151 Senior Class Meetings 60 Senior Shirts 60 Senior Sneak 58 Senior Socializing 57 Senior Transition Retreat 139 Senior Transport 57 Senior Trip 58 Seniors 56 Seong, Erik 72 Seong, Jennifer 5, 73, 75 Serve-athon 62 Seventh & Eighth Beginning Band 146 Seventh Grade 14, 68, 71 SEW 65 Sheddan, Mary 12, 80 Shee, Mei-Xian 67 Shimizu, Kohei 64, 151 Shin, Sophie 68, 146 Shinohara, Haruki 63 Shioya, Tokihito 7, 63, 145, 147, 149, 152 Simeon, Jacob 84 *Simpson University 141 *Sin Chuan Books 113 *Sing Guang Hing Furnishings 97 *Siow Seong Photo Studio 128 Sixth Grade 12, 71 Sixth Grade Band 145

Skateboarding 42 Smit, Ivana 28, 75 Smith, Hannah 125 Soccer 40 Soccer Club 28 Social Science 16 Solo Acting 26 Song, Brian 29, 45, 71, 145

Song, Hee-Eun 7, 68, 146 Song, Hung Ching 31, 45, 71, 145, 151 Song, Hung Jie 11, 72, 149, 152, 153 Song, Hung Yi 39, 46, 67, 148, 151 Song, Jet 71, 146

FLOORBALL: FRONT ROW: Hung Ching Song, Jordan Nagel, Reagan Mahoney, Bryan Cairncross, Jordan Strong, Lucas Samuel; SECOND ROW: Ben Weidemann, Josh Strong, Hung Yi Song, Riley Mahoney, Josh Peace, Hoon Kang, Andy Jung, Jared Williams; BACK ROW: Brian Colfax, Michael Whiting, Sung-Bum Kim, Kaz Hayashi, Kenny Kim, Scott Poulter, Jason Selvanayagam, David Lee

JV GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL: FRONT ROW: Maaya Yamauchi, Carolyn Whiting, Melanie Debatin, Frances Wong, Mrs. Lyn Holden; BACK ROW: Ms. Carrie Myles, Angela Steiert, Honour Adleta, May Yamauchi, Christina Gaddis, Kirsten Brink, Mrs. Carla Loehden

VARSITY GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL: FRONT ROW: Mr. Kerry Mahoney, Regina Hong, Elaine Ang, Yumi Yamauchi, Ms. Carrie Myles; BACK ROW: Angela Stevens, Tamara Herring, Amanda Hansen, Breanne Hansen, Marie Giezendanner

VARSITY BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL: FRONT ROW: Mr. Wayne Sawatzky, Josh Manfred, Michael Whiting, Josh Peace, Jeff Hokyo, Caleb Caldwell; BACK ROW: Kohei Shimizu, Andrew Jo, Drew Steiert, Andrew McClary, Zack Lindsay, Jonathan Kue

Index (Song)

lity

Matanick, Rivka 18, 32, 33, 56, 57, 58, 61, 81, 95, 117, 139, 147, 149, 153 Math 18 Maze, Wendi 7, 80, 108, 121, 125 McClary, Allison 18, 21, 33, 40, 42, 49, 57, 62, 66, 117,

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Manikam, Bascaran Raja 84 Mareemuttoo, Kumar 5, 83 Mareemuttoo, Rajeen 83, 85 Matanick, Marsha 111, 153 Matanick, Naomi 25, 26, 39, 65, 67, 145, 149, 150 Matanick, Noriah 12, 72, 146, 153

151


BADMINTON CLUB: FRONT ROW: Min-Ji Kang, Katherine Kang, Joseph Lee, Shinobu Toyama, Mr. Steven Koo; BACK ROW: Elmo Lin, Matthew Mah, Howard Kao, Kenny Kim, Grace Kim

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152

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AMBASSADORS: FRONT ROW: Jeff Hokyo, Catherine Foster, Heather Hill; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Valeri Brokaw, Tokihito Shioya, Laura Danneker, Joel Roberts, Jonathan Hayashi; BACK ROW: Michael Whiting, Andrew McClary, Jonathan Dyck, James Hawthorne, Kaz Hayashi

Index (Song)

T Tae Kwon Do 30 Takahashi, Kazuki 63 Takehiro, Toyama 63 Tami, Naomi 20, 64, 131, 145 Tan, Edwin 15, 71, 146 *Tan Pharmacy 127 *Tanjung Bunga Hardware 101 Taylor, Susan 95 Teachers 79, 80 *Telesonic 133 Teo, Ronnie 30, 31 Teoh, Eunice 80, 108 Third Grade 10, 72, 75 Thompson, Abigail 67, 111, 153 Thompson, David 55, 63, 74, 148, 150 Tiger Cubs 147 To, Charis 16, 33, 62, 63, 81, 133, 141, 143, 147, 148, 150, 153 To, Sophia 7, 67, 132, 147, 148, 150, 152 Toews, Rob 35, 65 Tompkins, John “Tommy” 21, 55, 80, 101, 103, 108 Tovell, Esther 28, 80, 108, 152 Toyama, Shinobu 61, 117, 135, 139, 152

Toyama, Takehiro 35 *Toyama, Mr. & Mrs. 117 Track & Field 16, 44, 67 Track & Field—MSSPP Team 148 Tsai, Chia-Wen 63, 77, 133 Tsai, Patty 61, 135 Tsai, Richard 64, 152 *Tsai, Mr. & Mrs. 123 Tsunami Relief, Aceh 99 Tsunami Relief, Khao Lak 95 Tuck, Ryan 65, 80, 93, 108, 150 Tuck, Shelly 80, 108, 150 Tung, Seok Yeng 84 Tyack, Marie-Hélène 20, 21, 80 Tyas, Dennis 12, 80, 108, 153 Tyas, Gayle 80, 108

U U.S. History 16 Um, David 76 Um, Jena 75 Um, Jimmy 28, 46, 83, 108, 148 Um, Mina 28, 75 Unruh, Ben 69, 71, 141, 145

V Valentine’s Banquet 141 Varsity Basketball 48 Varsity Boys’ Football 40, 150 Varsity Boys’ Volleyball 151 Varsity Football 40 Varsity Girls’ Basketball 148 Varsity Girls’ Football 40, 150 Varsity Girls’ Volleyball 151 Varsity Volleyball 52 *VC Ventures 127 Velloo, Khatijah (Mimi) 84 Volleyball, JV Girls’ 50, 151 Volleyball, Varsity Boys’ 52, 151 Volleyball, Varsity Girls’ 52, 151 Voon, Wei Ming 84

W Wang, Bertha 72 Wang, Paul 64, 87, 143, 147 Watson, John Cotton 29, 75, 146, 147, 149 Watson, Joshua 72, 146, 153 Watson, Mark 29, 75, 89, 146, 147, 149

Webelos 153 Weekends 74 Weidemann, Ben 12, 69, 72, 78, 121, 146, 151 Weidemann, Bethany 34, 71, 78, 131, 146 Weidemann, Brian 27, 32, 82, 83, 85, 108, 121, 147 Weidemann, Valerie 32, 78, 83, 108, 121, 141 Weng, Gilbert 46, 47, 67, 148 Weng, Sandy 120 *Weng, Mrs. 120 Whiting, Carolyn 7, 50, 67, 76, 109, 147, 148, 150, 151 Whiting, Michael 30, 64, 74, 145, 147, 149, 151, 152 Who Is God? 16 Williams, Jared 17, 36, 44, 71, 86, 121, 137, 145, 151 Williams, Liesl 26, 44, 62, 64, 86, 90, 103, 114, 129, 133, 135, 137, 141, 145, 153 Williams, Linnea 15, 38, 68, 86, 137, 141, 146, 148, 150 Wilson, Barbara 83, 108 Wilson, David 83, 108 Wilson, Luke 64, 109 Wiphatprasit, Thirawut 72 Wolf Cubs 89, 147 Wong, Frances 38, 46, 51, 70, 71, 81, 146, 148, 150, 151 Wong, Hank 13, 28, 72, 146 Wong, Joshua 15, 68, 146, 150 Wong, Karen 7 Woo, Angelene 75, 146, 153 Woo, Joycelyn 15, 68, 146, 148 Woo, K.A. 153 Woo, Khoon-Aik 111 Wood-Singh, Jasmine 5, 28, 75, 152 Wood-Singh, Jay 75, 149 World Events 16 Worship Team 34 Wu, Roc 71, 91, 145, 147

*Yamauchi, Mr. & Mrs. 142 Yow, Lindsey 30, 44, 64 Yu-Shin, Park 67

*Yumi, Stella, Grace, & Lindsay 136 Yun, Yeo Rin 75

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY: FRONT ROW: Michelle Nagel, Sarah Cairncross, Heather Hill, Rivka Matanick, Charis To, Pam Hidajat; SECOND ROW: Yumi Yamauchi, Lindsay Parks, Grace Sun, Christa DeVette, Allison McClary, Marie Giezendanner, Liesl Williams; BACK ROW: Ted Fung, John Kim, Nathan Rice, Jonathan Dyck, Barret Loehden, Drew Steiert, Josh Manfred; NOT PICTURED: Grace Kim

BROWNIES: FRONT ROW: Mrs. K.A. Woo, Jennifer Lupinacci, Mariah Merkle, Rachel Hurlbut, Seon Bin Oh, Danielle Combrink; BACK ROW: Abigail Thompson, Charlotte Combrink, Elisabeth Brokaw, Kassy Steinkamp, Angelene Woo, Mrs. Lori D’Cruz

BEAR CUBS/WEBELOS: FRONT ROW: Mrs. Colleen Hawthorne, Tim Phan, Hung Jie Song, Daniel Sullivan, Jamie Sullivan, Kendall Stenlund, Mr. Dennis Tyas; BACK ROW: Joseph Hawthorne, Seok Kyo Oh, Jordan Nagel, Josiah Steinkamp, Joshua Watson

Y

Yamauchi, Maaya 46, 50, 51, 70, 71, 146, 148, 151 Yamauchi, May 38, 50, 51, 68, 81, 127, 146, 148, 150, 151 Yamauchi, Yumi 16, 18, 22, 33, 52, 58, 59, 61, 66, 74, 95, 97, 119, 132, 136, 142, 148, 150, 151, 152, 153

JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS: FRONT ROW: Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp, Stephanie Jones, Brittany Hurlbut, Joyce Lee, Nicole Phillips, Kiernan Sullivan, Mrs. Marsha Matanick; BACK ROW: Lucia Combrink, Ashtyn McKenzie, Juliet DeVette, Emily Brokaw, Noriah Matanick, Marianna Moss

Index (Yun)

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ELEMENTARY STUDENT COUNCIL: FRONT ROW: Vincent Lee, Josiah Steinkamp, Ashtyn McKenzie, Marianna Moss; SECOND ROW: Richard Tsai, Mrs. Jacki Steinkamp, Seung Ju Jin, Jeremy Lupinacci, Kristian Stenlund, Jasmine Wood-Singh, Kendall Stenlund, Ms. Esther Tovell; BACK ROW: Kassy Steinkamp, Justin Strong, Lucia Combrink, Joseph Hawthorne, Elisabeth Brokaw, Hung Jie Song

Strong, Justin 11, 73, 75, 127, 141, 149, 152 Strong, Ruth 16, 60, 78, 80, 108, 123, 139 *Student Council 132 Student Council, Elementary 28, 32, 152 Student Council, High School 32, 132, 152 Student Council, Middle School 32 Student Teacher 125 Subramaniam, Muru 84 Suh, Tony 12, 29, 72 Sullivan, Daniel 72, 153 Sullivan, Jamie 72, 153 Sullivan, Kiernan 10, 11, 75, 146, 153 Sun, Grace 32, 49, 56, 59, 60, 61, 95, 97, 116, 120, 132, 133, 135, 136, 147, 148, 150, 152, 153 *Sun, Mr. & Mrs. 116 Sunsets 1, 156 Supamaniam, Saroja 84 Swimming Club 28

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HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT COUNCIL: FRONT ROW: Josh Manfred, Grace Sun, John Kim, Lindsay Parks; SECOND ROW: Mrs. Lyn Holden, Sophia To, Yumi Yamauchi, Joy Li, Pamela Hidajat; BACK ROW: Mr. Michael Holden, Josh Peace, Kyle Ladner, Stella Park

Song, Yong-Won 44 Sophomore Sponsors 113 Sophomores 64 *Southern Baptist Convention 105 Spanish 20 Spiritual Emphasis Week 65 Staff 79, 80 Staff-National Staff Interaction 82 Staff-Student Relationships 78 Stebbins, Margaret 71, 146 Stebbins, Willis 67, 91, 147 Steiert, Angela 46, 47, 50, 51, 71, 146, 148, 150, 151 Steiert, Beth 80, 108 Steiert, Drew 19, 33, 40, 41, 48, 53, 63, 91, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 153 Steiert, Gerry 6, 22, 46, 80, 107, 108, 148 Steiert, Jacqui 80, 150 Steinert, Kael 42, 64, 114 Steinert, Miranda 14, 70, 71, 146, 148, 150 Steinert, Tim 32, 42, 80, 93, 105, 108, 129 Steinert, Vi 80, 93, 105 Steinkamp, Jacki 28, 80, 108, 111, 123, 152, 153 Steinkamp, Josiah 5, 72, 89, 127, 146, 152, 153 Steinkamp, Karl 6, 55, 80, 101, 108, 131, 139 Steinkamp, Kassy 75, 146, 149, 152, 153 Steinkamp, Mikaela 8, 9, 76 Stengele, Chardin 75, 147, 149, 155 Stengele, David 80, 108 Stengele, Shione 76, 147 Stenlund, Greg 18, 78, 80, 89, 108, 113, 147 Stenlund, Kaden 71, 127, 145 Stenlund, Kendall 72, 73, 89, 127, 152, 153 Stenlund, Kenlee 8, 76 Stenlund, Kristian 75, 89, 147, 149, 152 Stenlund, Tara 20, 80, 108, 133 Stevens, Angela 49, 53, 63, 66, 133, 148, 151 Stevens, Katie 71 *Straits Mini-Market 112 Strong, Jordan 17, 71, 121, 127, 141, 145, 151 Strong, Josh 30, 39, 71, 146, 150, 151

153


JONATHAN DYCK

Fascinated by the enchantment of flight and pyrotechnics, Chardin Stengele, Tyler Cairncross, and Elisabeth Brokaw survey model rockets displayed by the ninth grade science class. Ninth graders launched the rockets on 7 April to commemorate the Apollo 13 mission in an event that blended science with a healthy dose of history.

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154

Closing

you had now entered the last stretch of the year. Signs of the end appeared all around you. The senior class gradually signed the wall in Ms. Ruth Strong’s office as they gained acceptance to the various colleges they had applied to. Classes began discussing final exams and how to prepare for them. Only two short, busy months lay between you and the summer. And you knew that the end of the school year always meant good-byes. Whether you or your friends left, it still meant parting ways. You masked it over, joked about it, or even denied it altogether; but deep inside, you knew the truth. The end of the year

meant change. In all honesty, you might never see your friends again once you or they left Penang. You almost blamed God. He had brought you here, so why did He take you away now? You had time for one last Reality Check. God had given you Dalat and your friends and experiences and life here. But God’s plan included far more for your life and for your friend’s lives than just Penang. The good-byes represented not only a taking away, but also an opportunity for a future. And now, as the future opened itself up to you, you began the journey through the rest of the year—and you thanked God for the trip. —By Jonathan Dyck

Closing

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Taking in the moment, Ben DeVette and Howard Kao watch senior memories flash across the screen in slide-show form at the Junior-Senior Banquet. The board game “Clue” inspired the theme for the banquet, which centered on a murder mystery that kept students and staff alike guessing until its rather jarring conclusion.

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At times it seemed that the year stretched on forever. You worked, played, and rested in a schedule broken only by the thrums of the occasional special event or long weekend. The days and weeks sped by, one month flowing into the next. They barely registered in your mind. In this way, the fourth quarter crept up on you. JSB, graduation, and college-talk seeped slowly into your conversations until, before you knew it, the teachers had finalized your third quarter grades on PowerSchool. The year that had seemed so long now shortened considerably. During third quarter, you had thought you had all the time in the world. Reality Check:

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Eyes locked, James Hawthorne stares in disbelief as his home made trebuchet unexpectedly launches a whiffle ball straight up in the air instead of at the intendedpaper castle. Hawthorne built the medieval siege weapon as part of his Advanced Merit Diploma presentation. Kirsten Gamble stood by and untangled a length of string.

JONATHAN DYCK

LIESL WILLIAMS

One Last Check

155


Another day ends in pastels over the Pe nang Strait; and you pause, taking it in one last time. Sometimes, you worried as, like the sun, the semester sank away; but faith in God gave you hope for another sunrise. And now, looking over the beginning of the end, you realized that sometimes the end held just as much beauty as the beginning.

Nic at night “I can’t believe they did this play again; that’s so cool. I remember when we did it. I was the lead!” Andrew McClary stated, referring to the elementary musical “Nic at Night” performed on 18 May Parents, students, faculty, and staff filed into the chapel to view Mrs. Valeri Brokaw’s latest production. Always finding the students a joy to work with, Mrs. Brokaw secretly wished they could just do music all year long. Based on the character found in John 3, Nathan Danneker played the lead role of Nicodemus. Though originally an Easter play, Mrs. Brokaw added a theme of Jesus’ wanting to come and transform people’s hearts. “Most of the lead parts are MKs [missionary kids]; their children are here because their parents were called by God to either this country or

another to tell others about Him. I believe this is a great opportunity for the kids to be witness as well,” she explained. With nearly 49 group solos, students kept going on and off the stage; but Mrs. Brokaw wouldn’t have it any other way. “The best scene had to be when the Pharisees were trying to get rid of Jesus; I know that’s horrible, but it was so hilarious!” McClary said as the proud actors and actresses took one last curtain call. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

Eyes focused straight ahead,

Hands out and two fingers

LIESL WILLIAMS

While Ben Weidemann said his perfectly memorized line with a strong “Roman soldier” voice, Jamie Sullivan watched from the back. The students had the opportunity for some exciting parts in this play.

LIESL WILLIAMS

Elementary Musical

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up for the motions to the song “Acts 1, 2, and 3,” Christopher Phillips and Ivana Smit join their friends in singing. The musical included students from kindergarten to grade six.

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Tyler Cairncross and Seon Bin Oh work hard to remember the words to the song. Boys and girls where able to dress in “Bible times” clothes for the full effect of their play.

LIESL WILLIAMS

Glue this senior supplement in the 2006 Reflector, right after page 156.

Again...Just as Great!

157


Finishing Strong

Basketball

Varsity boys take gold

JV GIRLS TSSS Union Alice Smith MKIS GIS ISKL ISKL STSSS Union

38-6 18-47 10-38 24-30 23-4 15-30 25-22 36-2 16-53

“Oh man I hope it stops raining before our boys play,” Elaine Ang said to Tara Kennedy as she stepped off the bus. “Yeah, I know; look that girl just slipped. Ow! That had to hurt,” Kennedy said. On 5 May the final game of the MSSPP state tournament for the varsity boys began. After playing and beating Chung Hwa for the gold trophy at the Island Tournament the week before, the boys had determined to beat them again for state. With the stakes high, the boys traveled to the Berapit court. Once the previous game had finished, the boys went onto the court and began to warm up. A few minutes and

Dalat Tournament: 3rd Place

JV BOYS 53-27 19-32

CTSP MKIS

VARSITY GIRLS 27-48 33-40 74-2 53-63 39-43 29-37

PCGHS Heng Ee STSSS Heng Ee Union ISKL

AREFULLY setting the ball, Gilbert Weng scores an other two points. The JV boys played against the Chinese Taiwanese School of Penang (CTSP), to start the Under-15 Tournament; they won 53-27.

C

VARSITY BOYS Hutchings Air Itam Penang Free Sg. Ara Jelutong Chung Ling Chung Hwa Kg. Kastan Chung Hwa

ITH all his strength, Andrew McClary drib bles towards the basket for a layup. The varsity boys took on Chung Hwa in this final match, winning State Championship 40-37.

W

Yet another tournament on 12-13 May had the Under-18 girls bettering six teams. In the competition with Heng Ee, this year’s states champions, the Dalat squad forced them into a double over time before Heng Ee finally surged ahead and won. In the Under-15 boys’ Dalat Tournament, the boys only played two games. They won the first game against CTPS. Afterwards, they lost the game against Mont Kiara, the JV boys walked off the court and prepared their minds for the next game, but rain forced an early end and kept Dalat’s team from further competition. Nevertheless, the boys kept their heads up and reminisced on their previous matches. “Yea!” Ang joined the crowd screaming as the buzzer went off. “WE WON STATE!!!!!!!” Kennedy screamed as she jumped up and ran onto the court. —By Jubilee Adleta

JUBILEE ADLETA

72-13 56-19 55-30 71-37 72-19 51-46 40-37 45-24 50-43

some laps around the court later, the five seniors—Howard Kao, Matt Hansen, Andrew McClary, Joel Babcock, Ben DeVette— worked hard against Chung Hwa’s defense. In the last quarter, the boys’ moved ahead, winning the game 50-43. The Under-15 Girls’ Dalat Tournament took place on 5-6 May on the Dalat court. With eight teams from all over the state, campus became a buzz of activities while the girls worked on their skills. The JV girls fought hard till the end and overcame their challengers, TSSS, ISKL, and Garden International School, winning the silver medal, only losing to Union.

JUBILEE ADLETA

MSSPP Island: 1st Place MSSPP State: 1st Place

VARSITY BOYS’ BASKETBALL: FRONT ROW: Coach Greg Stenlund, Matthew Hansen, Andrew McClary, Joel Babcock, Howard Kao, Robbie Mangham, Drew Steiert; BACK ROW: Coach Karl Steinkamp, David Robertson, Barret Loehden, Gilbert Weng, David Thompson, Ben DeVette, Steven Ong, Coach Clay Moss

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TARA-LYNN KENNEDY

ICKING up speed, Christa DeVette charges down the court for a fast break. The girls kept the score close until Union took the lead in the last quarter, Dalat lost 39-43, taking fourth for the Dalat Invitational Tournament.

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Eyes focused straight ahead Pamela Hidajat gives her vice presidency speech. Students used speeches as well as videos to get people to vote for them. They also put posters up before the actual voting day on 31 May.

Excellence Reigns...

Junior Honor Society recognized several seventh and eighth grade students for their achievements. The “old” NJHS students put on a skit to introduce the five characteristics necessary to qualify: scholarship, service, leadership, character, and citizenship. They used the plot line from “Chicken Little” as their theme. Matt Nguyen played the character Fishy Out of Water; Linnea Williams played Runt, a fat pig; and Joycelyn Woo, Ugly Duckling. Seven new girls, Hannah Jones, Khalie Mahoney, Theresa Phan, Sydney McKenzie, Lakshmi Meyyappan, Angela Steiert, and Bethany Weidemann—took the

pledge promising to “uphold the rules of the school.” Dorm parents and teachers presented other awards to students in the final school assembly on 7 June (See box below). Late in the evening of 31 May, six students received phone calls to tell them they had won the StuCo position they had chosen to run for. Next year’s new officers include Christa DeVette as president, Pamela Hidajat as vice president, Kim as business manager, Stevens as administrative assistant, Josh Manfred as pep chairman, and Lindsay as public relations manager. —By Tara-Lynn Kennedy

“Character is just one of

Head down, Matt Nguyen

the qualities our new leader has to have,” said Ugly Duckling Joycelyn Woo. Last year’s NJHSer’s skit emphasized the many fine qualities all new inductees had to meet.

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“So today for my speech I would like to sing you all a song I wrote myself,” Kenny Kim said as he and his fellow band members came on the stage. On 31 May, students from grades 8 to 12 met in the chapel to hear speeches of the candidates running for various Student Council positions. Kim, running for business manager, had students up in front of the stage, head banging with his original song. Angela Stevens, however, who ran for administrative assistant, had the student body laughing as she contrasted what she wanted her StuCo position to become and her last girls’ basketball season. Zack Lindsay got the crowd involved as he asked them what they really wanted next year. After all the speeches and videos, the students separated into classes and voted for those they thought would make it the best in each position. In middle school, the National

Throughout Campus

Guitar in his hands and mouth in front of the microphone, Kenny Kim belts out the lyrics to his speech song. “Wow he’s really good. I didn’t know Kenny could sing” Jubilee Adleta commented afterwards.

looks for his next line as Linnea Williams sits patiently next to him. Although they did not have a professional play, the actors kept the audience laughing during the NJHS assembly. LIESL WILLIAMS

Awards All Around

Lindsay Parks Academics Grace Kim Fine Arts Laura Danneker Sports

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Grace Kim

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Service

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Drew Steiert Olivia D’Cruz

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CHRIS FOSTER

a clue-filled night

Cards in hand, a group of

All smiles, Kazuyuki Hayashi takes a sip of his orange punch. The E&O Hotel provided a smorgasbord of foods ranging from Chinese and Japanese to Western and Italian as well as plenty of light refreshments.

CHRIS FOSTER

med by the junior class. As the night progressed, laughter followed moments of the skit (which revealed that Mr. Raj Pillai—a senior class sponsor—as the guilty one). Tears fell during tributes from the juniors, and “ohs” and “ahs” followed baby pictures. And to end on a high note, the entire junior class met up on stage and sang a rewritten version of “Save Tonight” for the seniors; they then presented each senor with a special gift. Promptly at 11:30, the buses lined up once again, this time to take the sleep-ready students and staff back to campus. After a few more group photos, everyone exited the ballroom, exhausted but satisfied after such an intriguing night that would remain in his or her memory for years to come. —By Chris Foster

CHRIS FOSTER

Lips to mouthpieces, Daniel Lee, Allison McClary, Drew Steiert, and Michelle Nagel proceed to play “The Pink Panther.“ During a break, a group of juniors used their musical talents to set a calm atmosphere.

JONATHAN DYCK

After the first photo opportunities and formal welcome had passed, the juniors introduced their skit. Taking place the day after graduation, the plot involved all the seniors, who had gathered together at Clue mansion to solve the “murder” of Mr. Boon Leng Loh, Dalat’s friendly security guard. After breaking into groups, the “seniors” searched for clues, often running into traps, secret passage ways, and the occasional track gun fire, accompanied by runners. “Josh [Manfred] was right on as Stella [Park], what with his high voice and short shorts,” said Jonny Kue with a laugh after seeing his roommate running on stage. In scene after scene, the juniors continued to dazzle the audience with their uncanny representations of the seniors. “I enjoyed the way that David Thompson presented me. He was very stoic and at the same time still expressive,” said Nathan Rice. After the first four scenes everyone enjoyed a special double treat with the dessert table open for all and with a series of musical numbers, including “The Pink Panther” courtesy of a band for-

“I continue to encourage you onward towards keeping God as your focus point,” said Josh Manfred with Liesl Williams in their tribute to Chris Foster. The juniors focussed on sharing memories and encouraging the seniors before they left.

group of junior girls sing a personalized version of “Save Tonight.“ The juniors used the song as a casual way of bidding the seniors farewell and to encourage them to enjoy the time they still had in Penang.

Who Shot Mr. Loh? In the chapel on the afternoon of 22 April, all the staff and the sophomore, junior, and senior classes chatted back and forth; everyone anticipated the longawaited night that would soon begin. Promptly at 6:30, all made haste to the front gates where three large, white buses awaited to transport the group to the annual Junior-Senior banquet. After driving for nearly half an hour through town, the band of buses came to a stop at the Eastern and Oriental Hotel, where refreshments waited. Once the juniors had made final, last-minute preparations, the seniors strode into the banquet hall, greeted by applause. Set up for all to see, the huge central ballroom of the hotel had temporarily transformed into a miniature Clue Mansion. In keeping with the popular board game, the upstairs portion around the ballroom contained the six “murder rooms,” all prime photo opportunities for couples and singles. “It was really stressful toward the end, but I’m glad we pulled it off like we did,” said junior class president Christa DeVette.

sharing microphones, a

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junior boys proceed to play a quick game of poker. The skit by the juniors included references to each of the seniors’ own talents or interests as well as a few inside jokes.

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Face full of righteous indigna-

Shakespeare... ...Isn’t Wicked or Disgusting Meanwhile, Laura Danneker, had costume troubles of her own. “My dress was really hard to get into; it was really stiff and oldfashioned,” she said. But it took more than makeup and costumes to get into character, and sometimes acting the part proved quite a challenge. “Shakespeare’s poetry should have died with him,” said Naomi Tami who needed to memorize lengthy soliloquies from Shakespeare’s plays for her part. “I loved drinking the herb tonic and pretending to die though.” At last, on opening night, the cast members took their places for the first scene. Quick, nervous looks followed by nods of affirmation darted from face to face as actors and actresses exchanged backstage whispers of encouragement. Slowly, with a bit of a creak, the curtains parted, the players inhaled sharply, the audience fell silent, and the performance began. —By Jonathan Dyck

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Ready to grimace, Naomi

Drama Club

Tami prepares to drink herb tonic. Tami recited a few lines from “Romeo and Juliet“ before choking the tonic down and melodramatically coughing and hacking her way offstage.

Listening attentively, Allison Rice takes “hints” from Maria Miner and Amanda Hansen that her sons should spend more time with them. Actors learned to look convincingly real while saying their lines.

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Making his move, Chris Foster shyly woos a hard-to-get Monay Ng. James Hawthorne and Foster fought for the affections of Ng until she finally dumped them both and ran off with a football player.

worst kind of makeup because it feels like they’re trying to prod your eyeball out.” “I liked watching the guys trying to put makeup on,” said Allison Rice, “especially the eyeliner and mascara!” Snippets of sporadic, lastminute memorization floated around the room as cast members struggled with particularly difficult sections of script. Between bouts with foundation and eye-liner, actors ran through scenes and practiced their southern accents one last time. “I always have my lines in front of me two seconds before I go on. I’m looking at them, throw them down, and go on stage,” said Rice with a smile. As the minutes to performance ticked away, cast members ducked in and out of room 28, changing bit-by-bit into their character’s costumes. “The most fun part of drama are the ugly dresses,” said Kirsten Gamble, who wore an old wedding dress for her part.

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First came auditions and then casting and after that a few weeks of introduction to the play. Next came practice upon practice of repetition and blocking and reading lines from scripts. Finally, on 30 May, memorized or not, the curtains opened on Aylene Porter’s “Papa Was a Preacher.” Preparation for actual performance began hours before the show. Backstage, actors and actresses began by putting on layers and layers of stage makeup to look their parts as well as play them. “The only time I wear makeup is twice a year for drama. I find it rather irritating, but I think it does improve my appearance on stage,” said Chris Foster. “Eyeliner is the

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tion, Laura Danneker cuts off Jonathan Dyck to declare, “We all know what theater is: the Devil’s workshop.” Danneker’s rapid-fire arguments made short work of Dyck’s protests.

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“This little light of mine,”

Words of wisdom

sang Nathan Danneker and Josh Manfred with Nathan Rice, James Hawthorne, Chris Foster, and Jonathan Dyck. Underclassmen joined the seniors as they ended the night in song.

From the Mouths of Youth

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Laying out the tablecloths and setting out cups, Drew Steiert and Scott Poulter bantered between themselves about how much food they would get when they cleaned up after the Senior Tea. Juniors began the day by preparing the chapel for a deluge of memories and laughter over a “tea,” especially prepared by the staff for the occasion. At 10 o’clock, a steady stream of seniors entered the chapel, followed by their parents. The level of chatter grew to a clamor as students introduced their parents to their friends and teachers. Over food and desserts, parents told stories of the seniors, remembering the times before their son or daughter entered high school and laughing over the embarrassment this caused their children. A slide show added to the

merriment as pictures of younger seniors flashed on the screen. Mr. Ryan Tuck and Mr. Karl Steinkamp handed each senior a Bible, encouraging the class to delve deeper into God’s Word even as they finished the year and especially as they moved on to the next chapter of their lives. All good things must come to an end, however, and soon the trail of seniors began again, stretching across the campus and finally dissipating into the awaiting cars. A feeling of joyful contentment followed them home though, bringing closure to the year and readying them for the days ahead. To bring closure to the rest of the student body, however, the seniors prepared a chapel for the purpose of passing on their knowledge to the awaiting underclassmen. On 6 June, students poured into

Paper in hand, Chris Foster waits for Lindsay Parks to finish her piece of advice. Seniors used their Senior Chapel to pass on important tips about how to survive in Mr. Karl Steinkamp’s World Affairs class.

waiting to go to the buffet line, Jonathan Kue tells his mother, Pang Her, and sister, Gou Nou, of the graduation events to follow. Senior activities filled the last week of school and often involved parents and friends.

the chapel, filling it yet again with chatter, this time in anticipation of what the seniors would reveal. They didn’t have to wait for long, however, before the stage lights dimmed and seven seniors stepped up to the microphones to begin the night. A senior worship team led the students, staff, and parents in thanking the Lord for the year He had provided. After a song sung by James Hawthorne, Yumi Yamauchi and Matthew Hansen told their testimonies, challenging students to search for the truth. “I didn’t want to come here in the beginning, but I realized that it wasn’t nearly as bad as I imagined. I found close friends who led me to see that Christianity wasn’t what had thought it was,” explained Yamauchi. Advice now given and received, Heather Hill and Lindsay Parks put chairs back in order and pick up papers from the floor. Another night had come to a close, but only as a reminder that the next day would bring about an even bigger change—graduation. —By Liesl Williams

CHRIS FOSTER

CHRIS FOSTER

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Between testimonies and

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skits, Yumi Yamauchi and Stella Park led in worshiping and thanking God. Multiple senior worship teams performed worship songs during the senior chapel on 6 June.

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Ready to step in, Grace Kim stands with her parents while her brother, John, introduces their parents to his class and teachers. The senior tea provided time for parents to meet their children’s teachers and friends.

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Leading the school in worship, Heather Hill and James Hawthorne sing “Prince of Peace” for the Baccalaureate service. Seniors held special practices to prepare for this last chance to sing for their peers. LIESL WILLIAMS

In perfect time with their class president, Heather Hill, Ben DeVette, Jonathan Dyck, and Chris Foster, according to tradition, turn their tassels. This signified their graduation and ended the lengthy ceremony.

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Walking slowly, James Hawthorne reflected on the previous 12 years of his life, thinking back to the last time he had bought an iced Milo at the stalls or run back to campus after lunch before the final bell pronounced him “late.” Before Commencement, staff and parents took advantage of the last Sunday of the year to impart their wisdom to the graduating class before Mr. John DeVette summed up their words saying, “Don’t be like my tree that died. Remember God’s truths, and the termites that you’ll face later won’t be able to eat away at your life.” A senior worship team led the school in thanking the Lord for the impact both staff and students had made on them. Closing the ceremony, Grace Sun presented a song with her mother, Mrs. Sharon Sun, before the seniors walked down the aisle—but not for the last time.

And Moving On

Names written clearly on the wall in Ms. Ruth Strong’s office, the class of ’06 prepared to leave the safety of the campus for the “real world.” The reminders of their impending departure grew in number as they put on their gowns, received their tassels, and donned their caps, all prepared weeks in advance. Walking up the aisle, they looked at the faces that met them with a mixture of proud smiles and tearful grins. Following the opening prayer, Mr. Greg Stenlund, Miss Strong, and Mr. Rick Hurlbut explained the part each graduating senior had played as a part of the senior class, congratulated each for his or her achievements, and thanked all of them for their contributions to the school. Mr. Kent Parks spoke to the seniors about living to the fullest instead of just surviving, trying

Commencement

to ready them for the changes ahead. After what seemed like an eternity, Mr. Karl Steinkamp began handing them their diplomas, giving each senior his or her own ticket to freedom. With a nod of her head, class president Heather Hill led her classmates in their final act together as seniors, the turning of their tassels. Catching them before they began their hurried departure, Mr. Steinkamp announced to the excited class of 2006, “You are now officially Dalat alumni.” Making his way down the aisle for the last time, Hawthorne thought of all the things he wanted to do after pulling out of Dalat’s grasp; but as the first step he would take as an alumni, he would change out of his scratchy cap and gown and run up to the stalls for yet another iced Milo.

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Rose in hand, Lindsay Parks walks slowly down the aisle. Parents, staff, and students showed their respect by standing while the seniors made their entrance into the ballroom for the Commencement Exercises.


Reality Check

Colophon Dalat International School is an elementary and high school serving missionaries and expatriates in Southeast Asia. The school is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and by the association of Christian Schools International (ACSI). The Reflector is published annually; copies may be ordered by sending u.s.$30.00 to Dalat International School, Tanjung Bunga, 11200 Penang, Malaysia. Four-hundred and fifty copies of the 2006 Reflector, Volume 44, were printed by Phoenix Press of Penang, Malaysia. Body type throughout the book is a 10-point Adobe Garamond; theme copy is in 12-point Adobe Garamond. Division page headlines are in Curlz MT; division page captions are in Present Bold. People’s Lives headlines and caption headlines are in Bermuda LP Solid and Khaki 1; captions are in Khaki 2. Groups headlines are in Sand and Comic Sans MS; captions are in Techno. Academics headlines are in Sand and Tekton Oblique; captions are in Tekton and Tekton Bold. Sports headlines are in Polo Semi Script and Serif Gothic Light; scoreboards are in Addled and Gill Sans Condensed Bold; captions are in Typewriter Regular and Addled. All copy was written by the high school journalism staff. The computer programs used were Microsoft Word 2001, Adobe PageMaker 7.0.1, and Adobe Photoshop 7.0.1. The staff used seven iMacs, one Power Macintosh G3, and one Power Macintosh G5. The staff printed rough drafts on HP LaserJet 4 and 4MV printers. Advertisements were scanned using a LaCie Silverscan II. Senior portraits were furnished by Siow Seong Studio, 338 Penang Road, George Town. All student, staff, and group portraits were taken with Nikon 990 Coolpix and Nikon D50 digital cameras. All candids, underclassmen, and staff portraits (except those noted by photo credits) were taken by Reflector staff photographers. The staff shot over 60 rolls of Konica Monochrome VX 400 film and 10 rolls of Konica Centuria Super color film. Special thanks for Lindsay Parks for the final proofreading. The Reflector is a June-delivery book: the last deadline is in early May. A supplement will be mailed to seniors in the fall, completing the year and including, awards, Junior-Senior Banquet, MSSPP competition, Dalat Invitational Tournaments, Student Council elections, drama, and graduation activities.

Reflector 2006 Staff: Jonathan Dyck, Editor; Liesl Williams, Academics; Jubilee Adleta, Sports; Tara-Lynn Kennedy, Groups; Chris Foster, People’s Lives; Mr. John “Tommy” Tompkins, Adviser


Reflector 2006