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DAIRY ST R “All dairy, all the time”™

Second Section

Visit us online at www.dairystar.com

March 10, 2018

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Page 2 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

A02755

2013 CIH 315 Magnum, 1250 hrs $175,500 K45964

2016 CIH 280 Magnum, 110 hrs $219,500 F04451

2009 CIH 245 Magnum, 2125 hrs $114,900 A02790

2011 CIH 180 Magnum, 975 hrs $125,500 M11342

2006 CIH MX305, 3140 hrs $137,900 G14381

2012 CIH 170 Puma, 3435 hrs $105,500

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CIH 340 Mag, ‘15, 1040 hrs......$249,500 CIH 340 Mag, ‘13, 2470 hrs......$149,900 CIH 315 Mag, ’14, 2985 hrs......$161,500 CIH 315 Mag, ‘13, 980 hrs........$178,500 CIH 310 Mag, ’15, 430 hrs........$195,000 CIH 310 Mag, ‘14, 625 hrs.......... $182,500 CIH 305 Mag, ’08, 5890 hrs........$98,500 CIH 290 Mag, ‘13, 3695 hrs.......$114,900 CIH 280 Mag, ’16, 655 hrs.........$198,500 CIH 280 Mag, ‘15, 850 hrs........$189,500 CIH 280 Mag, ’14, 935 hrs.........$175,000 CIH 275 Mag, ‘08, 3240 hrs.......$114,500 CIH 260 Mag, ’13, 1330 hrs......$127,500 CIH 245 Mag, ‘10, 2750 hrs......$112,500 CIH 245 Mag, ’09, 2195 hrs........$99,500 CIH 235 Mag, ’11, 2065 hrs.......$125,000 CIH 225 Mag, ‘10, 1445 hrs......$115,000 CIH 215 Mag, ’07, 2035 hrs.......$110,500 CIH 215 Mag, ‘06, 2570 hrs..... $105,500 CIH 190 Mag, ‘11, 2220 hrs.......$111,500 CIH 190 Mag, ’09, 4145 hrs.........$89,500 CIH 180 Mag, ‘15, 400 hrs........$142,500 CIH 180 Mag, ‘13, 1645 hrs......$112,500 CIH 180 Mag, ’12, 3485 hrs........$95,900 CIH 180 Mag, ‘09, 2180 hrs......$103,500 CIH MX285, ‘04, 5610 hrs...........$85,500 CIH MX270, ’01, 5985 hrs...........$65,000 CIH MX255, ‘04, 5505 hrs...........$74,000 CIH MX240, ’02, 2385 hrs...........$67,000 CIH MX220, ’00, 4795 hrs...........$69,500 CIH MX210, ‘05, 4490 hrs...........$74,500 CIH MX200, ’01, 6905 hrs...........$64,500 CIH MX170, ‘98, 6355 hrs...........$47,500 CIH MX120, ’99, 17,975 hrs....... $29,900 CIH 300 Optum, ‘17..................$199,500 CIH 230 Puma, ‘13, 920 hrs.......$139,500 CIH 210 Puma, ‘08, 1185 hrs......$83,900 CIH 180 Puma, ’10, 1895 hrs......$94,500 CIH 140 Max, ‘15, 2345 hrs.........$79,500 CIH 140 Max, ‘13, 2995 hrs.........$79,500 CIH 125 Max, ‘15, 350 hrs..........$88,750 CIH 125 Max, ’13, 850 hrs..........$69,800 CIH 125 Pro, ‘10, 2240 hrs..........$62,500 CIH 105U Farmall, ’13, 1345 hrs.$49,900 CIH 95 Farmall, ‘12, 735 hrs........$42,500 CIH 95 Farmall, ’12, 520 hrs........$42,500 CIH 95 Farmall, ‘08, 1770 hrs.....$34,500 CIH 7140, ‘90, 9925 hrs..............$37,500 Agco DT240A, ‘05, 2600 hrs.......$95,000 JD 8335R, ’12, 930 hrs..............$210,000 JD 8295R, ‘10, 2000 hrs.............$148,500 JD 8270R, ‘10, 3485 hrs............$149,500 JD 7800, ‘94, 2780 hrs................$73,500 JD 4455, ’89, 10,765 hrs.............$41,900 NH T8040, ‘10, 1265 hrs............$129,500 NH T7070, ‘11, 2950 hrs............... $99,500 sĞƌƐĂƟůĞϯϬϱ͕͛ϭϮ͕ϵϱϱŚƌƐ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘$114,500 sĞƌƐĂƟůĞϮϴϬ͕͚ϭϮ͕ϰϴϯϱŚƌƐ͘͘͘͘͘͘͘͘$84,500

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2014 Kinze 4900, 16R30 $112,000 G16008

2015 CIH TM 200, 54.5’ ACS $74,500 M13964

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, February 10, 2018 • Page 3

A farm full of black and white CowCleaner Duo Rotating cow brush

• High-quality polyamide brushes ensure a long service life • Newly developed electronics for fault-free and low-maintenance operation • Flexibly installable control unit in spray and dust-proof casing (IP 56) • Informative display for status information • Variable setting options for brush running time (7.5 - 120 s) • Alternating brush movement direction after each activation (60 s) • Ensures even wear on the bristles • Maximum safety for animals and humans thanks to the fully-enclosed suspended unit • Permanent lubrication throughout the gears’ entire service life • Safety switch-off (torque-dependent) • Plug ready for 230 V socket KRISTA KUZMA/DAIRY STAR

Wayne and Josie Peters hold two of the DalmaƟan puppies they bred and raised to sell as a side business. The Peters family milks 130 cows on their dairy near Lake City, Minn.

Peters family raises Dalmatians as a side business

www.advanceddairy.com

By Krista Kuzma

krista.k@dairystar.com

LAKE CITY, Minn. – When it comes to choosing animals for Wayne and Josie Peters’ farm, it’s all black and white. “Dalmatians are black and white, and we have black and white Holsteins, so it all blends right in,” Wayne said. Along with their 130-cow herd, the Peters family raises and sells dogs under the business name, Cookies and Cream Dalmatians, on their dairy near Lake City, Minn. The couple got into the side gig selling the black and white spotted canines from Josie’s extensive background with the species. Along with working at a boarding and training kennel, she grew up raising dogs with her family. Her parents have been in the business for 30 years. “It has come full circle. When I was really little they started with raising Dalmatians,” Josie said about her parents. Then they moved to smaller breeds such as pugs, puggles and Shih Tzus. Now they focus on springerdoodles. At one point, Josie’s parents had 20 female breeding dogs. Josie and Wayne started looking into raising their own dogs when they purchased the farmsite and surrounding 50 acres from Wayne’s family in November 2016. That’s when they moved into the house on the farm. “That’s when we really started looking at females to buy,” said Wayne, who has been dairy farming since 2006, when he also purchased half the herd. Although Wayne had no experience with Dalmatians, he has always been attracted to their color and striking appearance. Since Josie knew the background of the breed – one that needs

KRISTA KUZMA/DAIRY STAR

The Peters family has found DalmaƟans to be a good t for their farm because they have enough space to accommodate the breed’s high energy.

space and exercise – they decided on Dalmatians for their business. Josie said Dalmatians are high-energy dogs and need the opportunity to run. “Originally, their job was to be a carriage dog. They would follow the train or carriage and warn of danger,” Josie said. “When they were working and doing their job, they would do 30 to 50 miles per day at quite a fast pace. That’s why they t in with the farm.” Wayne agreed. “We have a lot of pasture and woods, so there’s quite a bit of area for the dogs to roam,” Wayne said. They also need special care since the breed has a tendency to have problems with hips, a high rate of being deaf and a higher chance of kidney stones, Josie said. All the puppies born on the Peters family farm go through hearing tests at the University of Minnesota at 7 weeks old and are fed a low protein diet to prevent kidney stones. While Dalmatians are respectful dogs, Josie said they are ones that need a master – someone they answer to Turn to DALMATIONS | Page 7


Page 4 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Dairy in love Weihrouch proposes to Mahoney by clipping question on cow By Krista Kuzma

krista.k@dairystar.com

CANNON FALLS, Minn. – It’s no secret Shelby Mahoney and Jason Weihrouch are passionate about being dairy farmers. Even their love story reects it. Weihrouch proposed to Mahoney on Feb. 15 by clipping, “Will you marry

me?” on the side of a cow. While Weihrouch milks 41 cows on his dairy near Melrose, Wis., Mahoney farms together with her parents, milking 75 cows near Cannon Falls, Minn. “It was such a shock,” Mahoney said of the proposal. “It took me a minute to get it (yes) out. I think I was laughing and giggling and then nally said yea.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF KARISSA LENORE PHOTOGRAPHY

Shelby Mahoney and Jason Weihrouch are planning a wedding this fall aŌer geƫng engaged on Feb. 15. Mahoney farms with her parents, milking 75 cows near Cannon Falls, Minn., while Weihrouch milks 41 cows on his dairy near Melrose, Wis.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Jason Weihrouch clipped, “Will you marry me?” onto the side of a 2-year-old at the Mahoneys’ dairy on Feb. 15. When Shelby Mahoney saw the message, she said yes.

Although the two had been talking about an engagement, Mahoney didn’t know when it would happen. “I had told her it was going to be a surprise. She told me she doesn’t like surprises. I told her it would be a good surprise,” Weihrouch said. But Mahoney almost didn’t see the surprise

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proposal, which happened while Weihrouch was visiting Mahoney for Valentine’s Day. While helping with chores the next day, Weihrouch decided he would pop the question. With his side job as a tter, clipping cows for other people at cow shows, Weihrouch thought it was appropriate to clip the words into the side of one of the Mahoneys’ cows.

“They had classied a couple weeks before so they didn’t have many cows to clip. But there were two 2-year-olds that had just freshened that needed to be shaved off,” Weihrouch said. While Mahoney put hay in the mixer during noon chores, Weihrouch found her dad, asked him for Turn to PROPOSAL | Page 5

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 5

ConĆ&#x;nued from PROPOSAL | Page 4

permission to marry his daughter and then got to work clipping. When Mahoney returned to the barn, she didn’t see what Weihrouch had done. “I noticed on one heifer he had a few swipes taken out of the hair. I thought maybe the blades went dull. I didn’t even look at the whole heifer and just walked by her,â€? Mahoney said. Weihrouch ďƒžnished the clipping the second cow and then returned to the one with the proposal. “He got down on one knee to act like he was going to start clipping her hock, but he told me to come over. He said, ‘Did you not see this?’ And pointed to the heifer. I read it and then he pulled out the ring,â€? Mahoney said. Mahoney and Weihrouch ďƒžrst met each other in 2016 at World Dairy Expo. Weihrouch was working for someone who had animals that were tied in with the Mahoneys. At the time, each was in a relationship with someone else. “But, we deďƒžnitely caught each other’s attention,â€? Mahoney said. However, Weihrouch said he didn’t know if Mahoney appreciated his joking personality at ďƒžrst. “My personality is that I pick on people. I was picking on her, so she didn’t know how to take me at ďƒžrst. By the end of the week it was OK, but at the beginning of the week she was like, ‘Who is this crazy person?’â€? he said. By the 2017 Minnesota State Fair, the two were single. Since Weihrouch could not attend, Mahoney sent him pictures of cow classes. “We just kept talking from there,â€? Weihrouch said. “We went from Facebook to Snapchat to texting.â€? Right before the 2017 World Dairy Expo, the two made their relationship status ofďƒžcial. “We hung out through most of Expo,â€? Weihrouch said. “We could ďƒžgure out if we wanted to make it long term or not in a short amount of time.â€? The two decided to continue to pursue the long-distance relationship. “ We

“I like the love he has for dairy cattle, just like I have.�

PHOTO COURTESY OF KARISSA LENORE PHOTOGRAPHY

AĹŒer geĆŤng married this fall, Weihrouch and Mahoney plan to dairy together on Weihrouch’s farm near Melrose, Wis.

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would switch back and forth. I would go down there and then he would come up here the next time,� Mahoney said of the 2.5-hour drive. Most of their dates consisted of going out to eat and doing chores together. “It’s fun to be able to learn how they react with cows and which cows like them and which cows don’t. You learn that pretty fast,� Weihrouch said. “And if you’re able to work together, it will make your life a lot easier.� Plus, the two could see how much the other enjoys the dairy business. “I like the love he has for dairy cattle, just like I have,� Mahoney said about what draws her to Jason. “Plus, I like how nice he is to me.� Weihrouch also likes Mahoney’s love for her animals. “She really does enjoy working with the cows. There aren’t that many girls around who actually want to help with chores,� he said. Plus, he admires her hard work ethic and her meticulous organization. “I don’t have as much attention to detail, so having someone around to keep me pointed in the right direction helps,� Weihrouch said. The two are planning a fall wedding that will have country accents such as mason jars and having their pictures taken with their cows. Then their plan is to dairy together on Weihrouch’s farm, although they are still working out the details. After that, they are excited to start their happily ever after while doing what they love – dairy farming.

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Page 6 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 7

ConƟnued from DALMATIONS | Page 3 everyday. This requires more training by the owner. “Dalmatians were fairly popular in the 1980s and ‘90s, but then [the Disney movie] ‘101 Dalmatians’ happened and it almost destroyed the breed,” Josie said. “The movie portrays them as the perfect kid dog in an apartment in the city, which is the opposite of what they need.” The Peterses currently have four adult Dalmatians: two females and two males. So far, they have already had two litters on their farm and are expecting their third in the near future. “With our rst litter of puppies, we learned there are people looking for show-type dogs. We didn’t expect that,” Wayne said. Because of that, Josie said they invested in one male that has high quality genetics. While most Dalmatians are black and white in color, there is a recessive gene that emits liver, or brown colored spots.

One of the Peters family’s females is liver colored. When puppies are born, their dew claws are taken off at 2 days old. Then Wayne and Josie are hands off until the young pups reach 3 weeks. “Unless the mom isn’t good at taking care of them. Then we might be bottle feeding pups every two to three hours every day,” Josie said. At 3 weeks, the puppies start to be dewormed on a twoweek schedule and begin vaccination protocols. At 6 weeks old, the pups visit a vet, followed by going through the hearing test at 7 weeks old. Also at 3 weeks, their pen needs to be cleaned out every day. “One of the benets of raising dogs is that [our son] John, who is almost 4, is completely hands on. The cows are so big so he’s pretty much just watching. With the puppies, he can feed, water and put new newspapers down himself,” Josie said. “He’s started to

KRISTA KUZMA/DAIRY STAR

John Peters plays with two of the DalmaƟan puppies his family is raising on their farm.

KRISTA KUZMA/DAIRY STAR

This is one of two female DalmaƟans the Peters family has on their farm. She has liver colored spots rather than black, which is a recessive gene in the breed.

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learn animal husbandry.” Josie and Wayne hope their other two children, Ruth, 2, and Oliver, 7 months, will follow suit in the future. A lot of time must also be dedicated to talking to potential buyers. The Peterses like to make sure the people buying the puppies can handle having a Dalmatian in their home. “Initially, Dalmatians are very stunning so people are excited about their looks; But we need to bring them back to reality that this is a high maintenance dog,” Josie said. They have also spent a lot of time marketing their puppies – on their business Facebook page, through a dog web-

use this business to give back to the community, especially to the re department. For each upcoming litter, the Peters family would like to donate the prots of one puppy to a local re department. In the future, they would also like to help the community in other ways, such as using the prot from one puppy to help a cancer benet or something similar. Simply put, whether the Peterses are producing milk in their herd of cows or breeding puppies, their purpose is black and white. “We want to make a difference,” Wayne said. “We want to help other people.”

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site, with advertisements in newspapers and through word of mouth. Raising dogs is one way the Peters family is diversifying their farm, not relying solely on the milk check for their income. Right now, it is a side business as Josie also works off the farm and Wayne manages the dairy. Eventually, they would like to grow the business to have about four breeding females with the potential to build a kennel with a dog grooming station. “My life would be complete by selling one of our Dalmatians to Budweiser,” Josie said as a goal. They would also like to

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Page 8 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Making a smooth transition Bascom offers insight toward dry, fresh cow management By Brittany Olson

brittany.o@dairystar.com

TURTLE LAKE, Wis. – The three weeks leading up to calving, and the three weeks following calving, are 42 of the most pivotal days in a cow’s life that set the stage not only for her rst lactation but may foretell the rest of her milking career. “Poor transition periods leading to poor reproduction later in the lactation is an issue on a lot of dairies,” said nutritionist Dr. Scott Bascom. “When the dry period goes well, cows calve and clean. They are healthy, eat lots of feed and make milk easily. But when the dry period goes bad, nothing’s going right.” Bascom’s presentation on transition cows, held Feb. 28 in Turtle Lake, Wis., began with a trove of data from the University of WisconsinMadison collected on a large number of dairies across the state. According to the study, 4 percent of those herds’ fresh cows developed a displaced abomasum, 5 percent had

milk fever, 10 percent had retained placentas, 15 percent had metritis and 30 percent had ketosis. Bascom said that a large contributor to transition cow issues was nutrition, particularly cattle carrying too much condition prior to calving. Overconditioned cows have more fat to release after calving, as well as higher levels of non-esteried fatty acids in their blood, which may lower dry matter intake and contribute to a host of diseases such as ketosis, fatty liver and other metabolic issues. Bascom said an ideal body condition score on a scale of 1 to 5 at dryoff is between a 3 to 3.5. “Far off dry cows are typically the most neglected cows [nutritionally]. They are the lowest maintenance animals, but sometimes we go too far,” Bascom said. “During the dry period, we want to minimize changes in condition, and we don’t want cows to gain weight. Their weight is best managed during their lactation.” The goal with close

BRITTANY OLSON/DAIRY STAR

Proper transi�on cow management can make or break a cow’s current lacta�on if she doesn’t get off on the right food. Managing dry ma�er intake, vitamins and minerals, and body condi�on are crucial to making it through the most pivotal days in a cow’s life.

up dry cows, or cows that are three weeks away from giving birth, is to maintain dry matter intake, which should be approximately 1.8 percent of the animal’s body weight, and meeting requirements for vitamins and minerals to prevent milk fever and ketosis. “It’s tough to get low potassium in dry cow rations because we spread manure,

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which contains a lot of potassium,” Bascom said. “Our target potassium in far off and close up rations is less than 1.3 percent, and anything over 4 percent potassium can be problematic down the road in dry cow rations.” One trend in dry cow rations is monitoring DCAD, or dietary cation-anion difference levels, through the use of feeding anionic salts.

Negative DCAD diets are fed to maintain blood calcium levels by promoting synthesis of calcium from the bones and increased absorption from the digestive system. “Cows also increase blood calcium by activating vitamin D, stored in the kidneys, which [boosts] calcium absorption from Turn to BASCOM | Page 9

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the diet,” Bascom said. “However, it is a slow response.” Cows with a negative DCAD balance at calving tend to have fewer problems during the transition period, but cows with too much DCAD may develop milk fever. Bascom recommended that farmers work with their nutritionist, as well as pulling fresh cow blood samples to check the efcacy of DCAD programs. “Our main takeaways on dry cows are to maintain dry matter intake and prevent milk fever,” Bascom said. “Cows with milk fever don’t selfcure.” After calving, calcium must be administered as soon as possible whether it is in the form of a bolus or intravenous drip according to label instructions. However, subclinical milk fever is much costlier both physically and nancially; since it is asymptomatic, it often goes unnoticed and can slowly bleed a farm dry. Low calcium levels are also associated with ketosis, which costs about $125 per case, a displaced abomasum, mastitis, dystocia, uterine prolapse, retained placentas, metritis, reduced fertility and decreased milk production. For example, on a hypothetical 100-cow dairy, clinical milk fever costs the farm $600 per year, but losses in production incurred by subclinical milk fever adds up to approximately $2,438 per year. “It is not uncommon for farms to be in the 60 to 70 percent range for subclinical milk fever,” Bascom said. Low blood calcium can also be exacerbated by heat stress, overcrowding in dry cow pens and moving pens prior to calving. As with other aspects of dry cow care, management is key. “Keep pen changes to a minimum so cows can

“Our main takeaways on dry cows are to maintain dry matter intake and prevent milk fever. Cows with milk fever don’t self-cure.” DR. SCOTT BASCOM, PHIBRO ANIMAL HEALTH

settle into a pecking order,” Bascom said. “Also, avoid moving cows in the seven days before calving. Only move them to the maternity pen when calving is imminent.” To maintain dry matter intakes, cows need 30 inches per head of bunk space to eat well and reduce feed sorting, which is common in controlled energy diets that are prevalent in dry cow feeding programs. “Cows will unbalance their rations based on their preferences,” Bascom said. “Try to chop feed at 1.5 to 2 inches per particle or add water and liquid feeds like molasses to reduce sorting and maintain moisture levels between 48 to 52 percent.” Grouping is also a commonly utilized strategy for dry cow management. While one group is the most logical for smaller herds, single grouping is also becoming more attractive to larger herds switching from a two-group system. Both systems have their place. “Advantages of a single dry cow group include simplied management for both small herds and large herds, fewer diets to mix, reduced pen moves, and cows that calve early are fed a fully acidied diet. However, cows with an extended dry period may become overconditioned and feed costs may be higher,” Bascom said. “In a two-group system, you can target the nutrient content of the diet to the needs of those cows and there’s less competition at the feed bunk for close-up cows. Disadvantages include increased social disruption, overcrowding, more smaller batches of TMR, and cows that calve early may not get a [DCAD] ration long enough.” Transition periods can be tough for both cows and farmers. With proper nutrition, feed management and a watchful eye, the 42 days surrounding calving can help a dairy cow realize her production potential and keep her physiologically sound for future lactations.

Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 9


Page 10 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

The “Mielke” Market Weekly

By Lee Mielke

January MPP margins at $8.11 per cwt.

The Federal order benchmark milk price has dipped further but looks to be at the bottom for the year. The Agriculture Department announced the February Class III price at $13.40 per hundredweight (cwt.), down 60 cents from January, $3.48 below February 2017, and the lowest Class III since June 2016. The price equates to $1.15 per gallon, down from $1.20 in January and $1.45 a year ago. Class III futures late Friday morning portended a March price at $14.08; April, $14.04; May, $14.25; and June at $14.72, with a peak of $15.95 in October. The February Class IV price is $12.87, down 26 cents from January, $2.72 below a year ago, and the lowest Class IV price since April 2016. California’s comparable Class 4b cheese milk price is $13.38 per cwt., up a penny from January, $2.43 below a year ago, and just 2 cents below the Federal order Class III price. That is the lowest differential between the two since November 2016 when the 4b topped the Class III by 69 cents. The February 4a butter-powder price is $12.72, down 21 cents from January and $2.68 below a year ago and the lowest 4a price since May 2016. The Daily Dairy Report’s Sarina Sharp warned in the February 23 Milk Producers Council newsletter that “Continued growth in the milk cow herd will delay the recovery in milk prices. However, processing capacity limitations and nancial pressures are likely to stall further expansion. Auctions around the country are regularly announcing herd dispersal sales, and springer values are slipping.” Preliminary USDA data put January’s 50-State milk production at 18.5 billion pounds, up 1.8 percent from January 2017. The latest Dairy Products report shows where that milk went and pegged January cheese output at 1.08 billion pounds, down 1.0 percent from December but 3.4 percent above January 2017. California produced 216.6 million pounds of that cheese, down 0.4 percent from December but 2.7 percent above a year ago. Wisconsin, at 283.9 million pounds, was down 2.0 percent from December and 2.8 percent above a year ago. Idaho contributed 85.1 million pounds, up 0.4 percent from December and 3.2 percent above a year ago, and Minnesota, at 60.8 million pounds, was down 3.2 percent from December but 6.3 percent above a year ago. New Mexico produced 68.2 million pounds, up 2.3 percent from December and 1.1 percent above a year ago. Italian cheese output totaled 469.6 million pounds, up 0.5 percent from December and 3.4 percent above

a year ago. Mozzarella, at 363.1 million pounds, was up 3.1 percent. American type cheese production totaled 428.9 million pounds, down 1.0 percent from December but 2.7 percent above a year ago. Cheddar output, the kind traded at the CME, totaled 312.4 million pounds, down 1.5 percent from December and just 0.3 percent above a year ago. U.S. churns produced 185.5 million pounds of butter, up 9.0 percent from December and 4.3 percent above a year ago. California butter totaled 53.9 million pounds, up 7.1 percent from December and 4.5 percent above a year ago. Pennsylvania was unchanged from December and was down 5.6 percent from a year ago. Yogurt output, at 368.7 million pounds, was down 1.6 percent from a year ago. Dry whey totaled 87.1 million pounds, up 9.1 percent. Stocks totaled 87.1 million pounds, down 11.7 percent from December but 28.6 percent above a year ago. Nonfat dry milk production totaled 161.7 million pounds, down 1.2 percent from December but 5.4 percent above a year ago. Stocks hit 340.2 million pounds, up 20.1 million or 6.3 percent from December and a hefty 113.4 million pounds or 50.0 percent above a year ago. Skim milk powder production totaled 45.8 million pounds, down 8.3 percent from December and 17.2 percent below a year ago. FC Stone’s Dave Kurzawski wrote in his March 2 Early Morning Update; “Cheese production seems to have shifted a bit back towards mozzarella production.” “While not blatantly bullish, this shift back toward mozzarella production is a positive sign for overall demand and may mean less cheese is available to be sold via the spot market.” He still believes spot prices will “generally move higher going forward based on solid domestic demand at the moment, export interest and, perhaps, less cheddar production than meets the eye,” but he added; “Mild weather and readily available heifer replacements may keep markets cautious. As milk per cow has been running way ahead of last year due to mild weather in most of the US production areas. This increased MPC with stronger average components is helping to soften the blow to US producers in general.” Cash cheese strengthened as February came to a close and traders weighed the Dairy Products report. Block Cheddar closed March 2 at $1.56 per pound, up 6 1/2-cents on the week and 8 cents above a year ago, when it fell 9 1/2-cents. The barrels nished

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at $1.4750, up 1 1/2-cents on the week, 3 3/4-cents above a year ago, and a slightly higher than normal 8 1/2-cents below the blocks. Four cars of block traded hands on the week and 33 of barrel. Midwestern cheesemakers are reporting steady retail and food service demand, according to Dairy Market News. Mozzarella and provolone buyers, some of whom are located in other regions, are expected to add orders ahead of the college basketball tournament season. Spot milk loads were mostly discounted, although there were a few loads above Class. With spring ush ahead, a number of Midwestern cheese producers have suggested that spot milk will only garner their interests if it is “noticeably discounted.” Western cheese makers are “trying to gain clarity of market signals,” says DMN. “Each participant is performing their own exegesis of recent reports to predict what market conditions may take hold. Buyers suggest they are getting plenty of cheese offers throughout the West, seeming to validate the idea that stockpiles are heavy. While some cheese manufacturers report strong demand and a growing opportunity to export cheese, a few say they are competing against low-priced, European cheese in some international markets, such as Mexico. And although cheese contacts report a lot of sales activity, the bump for the Super Bowl did not meet expectations.” DMN adds that the market tone is “unsettled.”Facilities are running near full capacity and, with heavy milk supplies there is concern the coming spring ush could exacerbate dairy market woes. Cash butter saw a Friday end at $2.20 per pound, up 2 3/4-cents on the week and 3 3/4-cents above a year ago, on a whopping 80 sales for the week. DMN says the “New Crop” butter rule which dictates that only butter produced after November 30, 2017 can be traded on the CME after March 1, 2018, “could be affecting the market, as sellers do their best to liquidate older stocks.” Butter microxing is on the rise in the Central region, according to DMN. That’s the process of thawing and cutting 68 pound blocks into consumer ready blocks or sticks. There are numerous reports that cream loads in route to butter plants are becoming more difcult to come by as Class II and III producers are reentering the cream market. Butter demand is solid even as prices are climbing and the butter market tone is somewhat bullish, according to DMN. Butter inventories in the West are hefty. Domestic sales are at to lower but DMN says demand from the export market is picking up “mainly due to a weaker value of the dollar and higher international butter prices.” But, total sales generally continue below current production levels, contributing to further growth of stocks. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed the week a penny lower, at 66 1/4-cents per pound, and 14 1/4-cents below a year ago. Four carloads found new homes on the week at the CME. A sharp drop in the U.S. All Milk price average, plus higher corn and hay prices, pulled the January milk feed price ratio lower again. The Agriculture Department’s latest Ag Prices report puts the January Turn to MIELKE | Page 11

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ConƟnued from MIELKE | Page 10 ratio at 2.19 down from 2.38 in December and 2.71 in January 2017. The index is based on the current milk price in relationship to feed prices for a dairy ration consisting of 51 percent corn, 8 percent soybeans and 41 percent alfalfa hay. In other words, one pound of milk today purchases 2.19 pounds of dairy feed containing that blend. The January Margin Protection Program milkfeed margin was at $8.11 per cwt., lowest level since July 2016 and a drop from December’s $9.36 margin. The U.S. All-Milk price averaged $16.10 per cwt., down $1.10 from December and $2.80 below January 2017. Michigan showed the lowest at $14.90, with California at $15.06, and Wisconsin at $16.30. January corn averaged $3.29 per bushel, up 6 cents from December, after rising 8 cents in December, but is 11 cents per bushel below January 2017. Soybeans averaged $9.30 per bushel, unchanged from December and 41 cents per bushel below a year ago. Alfalfa hay averaged $152 per ton, up $4 from December, and $26 per ton above a year ago. The January cull price for beef and dairy combined averaged $63.30 per cwt., up $1.30 from December but is 70 cents below January 2017 and $8.30 below the 2011 base average of $71.60. Milk cows averaged $1,620.00 per head in 2017, down from $1760 in 2016. They averaged $1600 in California, down from $1750 in 2016 and Wisconsin cows averaged $1680, down from $1850 in 2016. In politics; the U.S. better consider trade policy changes long and hard. A new study by Informa Economics says the current free trade agreement with Mexico is the driving force behind $1.2 billion in U.S. dairy exports to Mexico as well as billions more in economic contributions. A press release from the National Milk Producers Federation states that “Mexico is the No. 1 market for U.S. dairy product exports, accounting for roughly one-fourth of total U.S. exports. In 2016, the most recent year examined by Informa, the U.S. shipped $1.2 billion worth of dairy products to Mexico, up from $201 million in 2002. In 2016, Mexico accounted for 45 percent of total U.S. skim milk powder exports to all destinations, as well as 30 percent of cheese exports, 10 percent of butter exports and 8 percent of whey exports.” The analysis states that “total economic contributions (direct, indirect and induced) created by dairy sales to Mexico show the true importance of these exports to the overall U.S. economy. Including impacts to industries that are linked to U.S. dairy exports to Mexico, the aggregate 2012-2016 output value of $6.7 billion is magnied to $23.3 billion in economic output.” Informa’s analysis found that for every $1 of sales associated with dairy exports to Mexico, an additional $2.50 in output (industry sales) is supported elsewhere in the U.S. economy. U.S. dairy exports to Mexico

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 11

also created 16,492 full-time equivalent jobs while directly generating an aggregate GDP of $8.4 billion over that ve-year period, according to NMPF. “This analysis not only illustrates the importance of preserving existing market access to Mexico under North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), but also demonstrates why we are urgently pursuing new opportunities via U.S. free trade agreements around the globe,” said U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) President and CEO Tom Vilsack. “Virtually every U.S. free trade agreement to date has yielded positive results for dairy, and current negotiations hold great potential for the industry.” Following on the heels of that report, the Trump Administration announced that it will impose a 25 percent steel tariff and 10 percent aluminum tariff on imports. The ramications of that could spill into other trade commodities, including dairy. Speaking of exports; Cooperatives Working

Together (CWT) accepted 15 requests for export assistance the last week of February from Dairy Farmers of America, Michigan Milk Producers Association, Maryland & Virginia Milk Producers Cooperative Association, Northwest Dairy Association (Darigold), Tillamook County Creamery Association and United Dairymen of Arizona who have contracts to sell 1.728 million pounds of Cheddar, Gouda and Monterey Jack cheese and 1.764 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product has been contracted for delivery through May and raised CWT’s 2018 exports to 18.523 million pounds of American-type cheeses and 3.353 million pounds of butter (82 percent milkfat) to 15 countries on four continents. These sales are the equivalent of 246.417 million pounds of milk on a milkfat basis, according to the CWT.


Page 12 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Market Reports

9.70

Almena, WI United Ag Co-op

3.15

9.65

Atwater, MN Atwater Elevator

3.22

9.67

Elrosa, MN Elrosa Grain & Feed

3.11

9.50

Westby, WI Premier Co-op

3.38

9.80

Loyal, WI Northside Elevator

3.32

9.61

Pipestone, MN Cargill

3.37

9.77

Muscoda, WI Riverdale Ag Service

3.42

9.95

GarÀeld Pro-Ag Farmer’s Co-op

3.21

9.58

Monona, IA Innovative Ag

3.37

9.85

Watertown, SD Watertown Co-op Elevator

3.21

9.50

Cottage Grove, WI Landmark Services Co-op

3.44

9.93

Dennison, MN Central Farm Service

3.25

9.78

Durand, WI Countryside Co-op

3.20

9.81

Ot he r

3.48

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Sanborn, MN Sanborn Farmer’s Elevator

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March 7, Grain Markets

Overview

Looking back at 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates an average U.S. all-milk price of $17.65/cwt for all of last year. As context, in terms of the extremes of the past 10 years, this will be $4.85 higher than the average price in 2009 and $6.35 lower than during 2014. It will the third year in a row during which the all-milk price will have averaged less than $18/cwt, the Àrst time that’s happened since 2006 when feed costs began to rise. Taking into account the effects of such costs, the current Margin Protection Program (MPP) margin calculation should average about $9.70 in 2017, which would be the secondhighest annual MPP margin over the past 10 years. It would be $3.60 below the highest, during 2014, and $5.12 above the lowest, during 2009. Monthly milk prices and margins both improved fairly steadily since last April, but federal order prices took a sharp drop at the end of the year, presaging a likely more difÀcult year ahead in 2018. Milk & Dairy Products Production Milk Production Cows (1,000 head) Per Cow (pounds) Total Milk (million pounds)

2.40

Dairy Product and Federal Order Prices W. Wheat 4.07

2.79

S. Wheat 4.33 Wheat 6.00

2.49

S. Wheat 5.93 W. Wheat 5.24

Wheat 4.25

Class Prices for Milk Class I Mover Class III Class IV

Milk and Feed Prices Producer Prices All Milk (per cwt.) Feed Prices Corn (per bushel) Soybean Meal (per ton) Alfalfa Hay (per ton) 2014 Farm Bill Feed Cost (per cwt.) 2014 Farm Bill Margin (per cwt.) Retail Dairy Product Prices Fluid Milk (per gallon) Cheddar Cheese (per pound)

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Sept.-Nov. 2017

Sept.-Nov. 2016

9,398 5,556 52,218

9,336 5,533 51,655

63 23 563

0.7% 0.4% 1.1%

Nov 2017

Dec 2016

2016–2017 Change

Dec 2017

2016-2017 Change

Looking Ahead

Percent Change

(per hundredweight)

$16.88 $15.44 $13.51

$16.41 $16.88 $13.99

$16.88 $17.40 $14.97

$0.00 -$1.96 -$1.46

Nov 2017

Oct 2017

Nov 2016

2016–2017 Change

$18.10

$17.90

$17.60

$0.50

$3.15 $314 $148 $7.71 $10.39

$3.26 $315 $152 $7.90 $10.00

$3.23 $322 $130 $7.62 $9.98

-$0.08 -$9 $18 $0.10 $0.40

$3.150 $5.006

$3.158 $5.028

$3.280 $4.914

-$0.130 $0.092

USDA has steadily reduced its midpoint projections for the 2018 U.S. average all-milk price, from $18.60/cwt in its projection last June to $16.20 in its current outlook. At the same time, the CME futures indicated that the all-milk price would be about $15.95 for 2018, and the MPP margin would average $7.60/cwt during this year. At the same time, USDA has also been steadily dropping its forecast of U.S. milk production during 2018. This has produced a potentially conÁicting picture of steadily improving domestic supply and demand fundamentals, and steadily worsening price and earnings outlooks for U.S. dairy farmers. A continued bleak outlook for world market conditions could square this picture of the domestic dairy market outlook, but it is still hard to escape the nagging feeling that it doesn’t all add up.

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 13

Area Hay Auction Results Fort Atkinson Hay

Ft. Atkinson, Iowa • 563-534-7513

Feb 28, 89 loads

Small Squares 1st Crop $155/ton 2nd Crop $135-185/ton 3rd Crop $130-185/ton Grass/new seeding $120-125/ton

1 2 4 2

load loads loads loads

Large Squares $130-150/ton $125-155/ton $115-165/ton $125/ton $110/ton

5 4 7 1 1

loads loads loads load load

1st crop 2nd crop 3rd crop 4th crop Straw

Rounds 1st Crop Rounds $85-170/ton 2nd Crop Rounds $80-180/ton 3rd Crop Rounds $130-165/ton Grass Rounds $110-155/ton New seeding/oats hay$110/ton Straw Rounds $75/ton Corn Stalk Rounds $30/ton

11 loads 7 loads 3 loads 4 loads 1 load 1 load 1 load

Rock Valley Hay Auction Co.

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Business Directory?

Rock Valley, Iowa • 712-476-5541

March 5, 74 loads

Straw

Small Squares $3.75/bale

3rd crop 4th crop Mixed Straw Corn stalks

Large Squares $122.50/ton $165/ton $122.50/ton $45-110/ton $37.50/ton

1st crop 2nd crop 3rd crop 4th crop Grass Mixed Corn stalks

Large Rounds $127.50/ton $122.50-145/ton $137.50/ton $130-135/ton $90-145/ton $102-125/ton $37.50-45/ton

LOG ON TO: www.dairystar.com TO BE INCLUDED IN THE DAIRY STAR BUSINESS DIRECTORY CALL 320-352-6303

Don’t Fiddle Around With Your Advertising Dollars! 522 Sinclair Lewis Ave. Sauk Centre, MN 56378 (320) 352-6303 • Fax: (320) 352-5647

34412 County Road 10, Albany, MN 56307 800.733.6828 or 320.845.2000 www.centrallivestock.com

Greg Supan, Manager 320.249.5221 • Lonnie Ritter, Assistant Manager 320.293.5311

NEXT DAIRY SALE: FRIDAY, MARCH 16

NEXT FEEDER SALE: WED., MARCH 14 MARCH 1ST SALE BULL CALVES

Melrose Sauk Centre Albany Princeton Albany Albany Bowlus Freeport Sauk Centre Swanville Kimball Albany Avon Grey Eagle Hinckley Little Falls Paynesville Freeport Albany Little Falls Melrose Melrose Melrose Osakis Paynesville Sauk Rapids Alexandria Albany Foley Freeport Freeport Melrose Melrose Stewart Albany Freeport Melrose Albany Freeport Freeport Melrose Little Falls Melrose Sauk Centre Sauk Centre St Stephen

115 130 117 106 108 103 110 95 115 101 120 124 108 115 120 105 105 115 110 105 98 103 113 98 105 120 103 88 100 85 100 100 100 104 97 108 95 95 98 102 103 97 105 100 98 108

1 1 3 16 2 3 2 1 1 4 1 5 2 1 5 2 2 1 2 4 3 2 3 12 2 1 3 3 2 1 1 3 1 4 5 3 1 1 2 5 2 11 2 1 2 2

200.00 200.00 190.00 190.00 185.00 185.00 185.00 185.00 185.00 185.00 180.00 175.00 175.00 175.00 175.00 175.00 175.00 165.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 160.00 155.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 150.00 145.00 145.00 145.00 140.00 140.00 140.00 140.00 135.00 135.00 135.00 135.00 135.00

COLORED FINISHED STEERS/ HEIFERS

Milaca Swanville Cold Spring Bowlus Buffalo Lake Cold Spring Richmond Bowlus Rice Little Falls Foley Hinckley Rice Montrose Foley Buffalo Lake Grove City Grove City Richmond Little Falls Eden Valley Sauk Centre Cold Spring Eden Valley

1,462 1,295 1,450 1,353 1,395 1,380 1,325 1,340 1,405 1,385 1,260 1,225 1,395 1,485 1,437 1,475 1,423 1,233 1,222 1,298 1,380 1,424 1,403 1,475

36 2 1 3 2 1 2 4 1 1 1 3 1 2 7 1 2 5 3 2 1 7 2 1

131.25 130.00 129.50 128.75 128.50 128.50 128.25 127.75 127.75 127.50 127.00 127.00 127.00 126.50 126.25 126.00 125.00 124.75 124.50 124.00 123.75 123.75 123.50 123.50

St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph Rockford St Joseph St Joseph Rockford St Joseph St Joseph Richmond Richmond St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph Brooten Freeport

1,673 1,825 1,545 1,720 1,250 1,565 1,300 1,220 1,255 1,760 1,845 1,975 1,250 1,410 1,545 1,435 1,715 1,170 1,795

2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

72.00 67.50 67.00 66.50 65.00 65.00 65.00 64.00 64.00 63.50 63.00 63.00 63.00 63.00 63.00 63.00 62.50 62.00 62.00

MARCH 6TH SALE SLAUGHTER COWS

Belgrade St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph Freeport Rockford Rockford Rockford St Joseph St Joseph Sartell Albany Albany Rockford St Joseph Albany Freeport Richmond St Joseph St Joseph St Joseph Alexandria Brooten Freeport

1,655 1,000 1,395 1,600 1,555 1,765 960 980 1,145 1,065 1,635 1,650 1,255 1,195 1,420 1,665 1,300 985 1,350 1,255 1,625 1,780 1,400 1,120 1,160

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

61.00 61.00 61.00 61.00 60.50 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 59.00 58.00 58.00 58.00 58.00 57.00 57.00 57.00 57.00 57.00 56.00 55.00 55.00 55.00

Rice Richmond Richmond Albany Rice Albany Rice Richmond Melrose Kimball Paynesville Rice Belgrade Richmond Richmond Melrose Richmond Albany Albany Belgrade

1,571 1,463 1,470 1,490 1,585 1,560 1,550 1,516 1,523 1,565 1,516 1,431 1,455 1,368 1,597 1,525 1,335 1,785 1,715 1,610

6 101.00 2 97.00 2 96.00 1 95.00 1 93.00 1 90.00 3 90.00 11 90.00 2 89.00 9 88.50 6 88.50 9 87.50 6 87.00 2 87.00 5 87.00 3 86.50 2 85.50 3 85.00 2 85.00 1 84.00

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Page 14 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

DAIRYING ACROSS AMERICA

Nevada: Dairyman’s foolproof backdrop Christoph plans to expand acreage, cow numbers By Maria Bichler Staff Writer

FALLON, Nev. – Ted Christoph has plans for the future of his family’s dairy. “The dairy is strictly providing our living,” Christoph said. “Times are changing. We have to adapt and be different than we’ve been before.” The 28-year-old took ownership of Liberty Jersey Farm in 2017 and has his sights set on more acres and more cows. “For me, I want to be farming more acres,” Christoph said. “… I want to see us be able to expand and grow our cow

numbers.” Christoph is a fthgeneration dairyman. Christoph’s father, Bill, began milking cows on the current farmsite in 1988 near Fallon, Nev. Later that year, Bill married Val. Prior, Christoph’s ancestors operated dairy farms in Germany, Wisconsin, Arizona and nally Nevada. “I don’t know that you can nd a better balanced climate without a bunch of people that are already there,” Christoph said of the benet of dairying in Nevada. “Fallon is very balanced. We have pretty unique temperatures with low humidity. It’s not hard to keep cows comfortable (here).” PHOTO SUBMITTED

The Christoph family – (from leŌ) son Ted, daughter Lindsay, Val and Bill – milk 480 Jersey cows near Fallon, Nev.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The cows at Liberty Jersey Farm are milked twice per day in a double-10 herringbone parlor.

The 480 Jersey cows are milked twice per day in a double-10 herringbone parlor and are housed in open lots with headlocks. The corrals have shades in the middle to fend off summer heat. Calves are housed in hutches. The herd has a rolling herd average of 21,000 pounds. Currently, the Jerseys are

producing 63 pounds with 5.3 percent butterfat and 3.9 percent protein. All milk is marketed through Dairy Farmers of America (DFA). Of DFA’s milk pool, 85 percent is used in the Fallon powder plant facility and the rest is bottled in Reno and sold in Nevada. The dairy herd is fed a

TMR comprised of byproducts sourced from across North America: almond hulls from California, beet pulp from Idaho, dry distillers grain from the Midwest, cotton seed from the South, canola from North Dakota and Canada, as well as raised alfalfa, corn silage and

Turn to NEVADA | Page 14

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 15

g n i r p S

ConƟnued from NEVADA | Page 14

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sorghum. Additional forage for feed is purchased locally. The calves are fed fresh milk from the pipeline in bottles for the rst 17 days. Then, calves are fed waste milk in a bucket. “We found that 17 days seemed to work for us,” Christoph said. “We can pasteurize our waste milk, but we found that as long as we don’t include mastitis milk, it is easier to warm (milk) up and give it just how it is.” In addition to the farm’s nine employees, Christoph’s dad mixes one load of milk cow feed every day, and his mom completes the bookkeeping. His sister, Lindsay, is in charge of calf care and inventory. Another sister, Emily, resides in Colorado. A typical day starts at 4 a.m. when the morning employee begins milking. At 6 a.m., more employees commence the work day with various chores. All employees work in 10-hour shifts. Feeding is completed at 5:30 a.m. in the summer and 6:30 a.m. in the winter. Shortly after morning feeding, cows are locked in their headlocks and tail heads are painted for heat detection. If applicable, A.I. is done. Calves are also fed during this time. In the afternoon, the calves are fed again at 3. The milking herd is fed and milked at 4.

“There are times when I look at my friends who are the same age as I am, and they are making more cash dollars than I am. [...] but then I realize this is such a unique business that I am in.” TED CHRISTOPH, DAIRY FARMER

Crop work on the farm’s 200 acres must also be completed. “All our land is ood irrigated, which is why we have to have more labor to get the job done than say New York or Wisconsin where farmers rely on rain,” Christoph said. “The way the ground is here, it is cut into small blocks. Our biggest eld is 40 acres; most are 10and 20-acre pieces, which makes it more difcult labor and crop efciency wise.” Liberty Jersey Farm is located in the northwest near Reno, Nev. The area has 335 days of sun every year and an annual rainfall of ve inches, the driest weather

in all of the United States. “If you really want the sun, this is the place to be,” Christoph said. Summers top out at over 100 degrees F and winters range from 0-30 degrees. At 4,000 feet above sea level, Nevada produces a unique environment for hay production. “Because of our high altitude, the alfalfa forage coming out of mid-state is extremely high quality. Alfalfa hay from Nevada is world renowned for its quality and is shipped globally. In fact, the Kentucky Derby buys Timothy hay out of Nevada.” Christoph said Liberty Jersey Farm is an outlier from the typical Nevada dairy. “We are considered on the small end of spectrum,” he said. “There are three or four Jersey herds, and the rest are Holsteins.” Many herds top out in the thousands for cow numbers and are concentrated in the northern region where Holstein is the dominant breed for the state. Due to the amount of labor required for producing feed stuffs, the cost of purchased feed inputs coupled with soaring land values and a depressed milk market, Christoph said small family farms are fading from Nevada’s dairy landscape. “No small family farm can exist in Nevada if that is their sole source of income,” Christoph said. “Maybe a robot herd milking 100 cows could pull it off with no debt and a more lucrative milk market, but for the small cookie cutter dairy with labor, the current milk market and a standard parlor it is going to be really hard to make money and also have any type of life to be able to spend with family.” Christoph is determined to not let his family farm be yet another statistic in the decline of dairies. He said farming more acres and milking more cows while switching to three times a day milking is not out of the question. “The number of cows that we have here is kind of like a critical math problem,” he said. “Lack of labor is a concern. For us as a business, we have to position ourselves for future acquisition, investing in new technology and the opportunities that come out of that.” Despite the competitive dairy industry, Christoph knows he is doing what he wants, where he wants. “There are times when I look at my friends who are the same age as I am, and they are making more cash dollars than I am. And, they are working less hours, but then I realize this is such a unique business that I am in. … Cows are amazing creatures that take things humans can’t use and create something that humans can readily use that is important in their diet. … Farming is one of the most honest, decent endeavors that you can have someone be involved with.”

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Jersey calves wear jackets with a breast cancer ribbon. Ted began purchasing the jackets aŌer his mom, Val, was diagnosed with lymphoma.

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Page 16 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

A day in the life of the Hintzman family State tournament dictates chore schedule March 2 By Jennifer Coyne jenn@dairystar.com

NEW YORK MILLS, Minn. – As the sun reached over the horizon on Hintzman Jersey Farm March 2, casting a brisk shadow against the barn doors, Trevor and Jessica Hintzman worked hastily inside. It was the rst day of individual competition at the Minnesota State Wrestling Class A Tournament, and the Hintzmans’ son, Toby, was competing. “We couldn’t watch it last year, so we’re excited for him to have made it this far again,”

Jessica said. “I’m a little nervous, though. It’s hard to believe this is his last year.” Toby, 17, is a senior on Sebeka-Menagha’s United North Central Warriors wrestling team, competing at 152 pounds. While Toby prepared for his afternoon match-ups at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn., his parents made their way through morning chores. The Hintzmans milk 55 cows near New York Mills, Minn., in Otter Tail County. “Jessica still works full time in town, but this is my rst year not working part time at

JENNIFER COYNE/DAIRY STAR

Trevor Hintzman lls a boƩle full of waste milk for a calf during morning chores March 2.

JENNIFER COYNE/DAIRY STAR

Jessica and Trevor Hintzman milk 55 cows on their farm, Hintzman Jersey Farm, near New York Mills, Minn. On March 2, the couple split their day between doing chores and watching their son, Toby, compete in the Minnesota State Wrestling Tournament in St. Paul, Minn. another dairy,” Trevor said. Every morning, the couple is in the barn by 7:15. Together, Trevor and Jessica seamlessly make their way through the barn, taking turns prepping the cows, cleaning the stalls and alleyway, and moving milking units from one set of cows to the next. “Milking cows was strange at rst, but not once I got used to it,” said Jessica, who grew up in agriculture but not on a dairy farm. “I’m a farm girl and not afraid of chores – as long as it’s not collecting eggs.” Trevor agreed. Turn to HINTZMANS | Page 18

JENNIFER COYNE/DAIRY STAR

Randy Hintzman clears feed in front of the cows while Trevor and Jessica nish chores on the morning of March 2.

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 17


Page 18 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

ConƟnued from HINTZMANS | Page 16

“This is a family business,” he said. In 2009, Trevor purchased the farm from his parents, Randy and Susan, while continuing to work on a nearby dairy farm. When Trevor took over his family’s herd, it was comprised of Holstein cattle. However, as the milk prices dropped, Trevor transitioned to mostly Jersey cattle for their efciency in producing milk and value of components. “I’m glad I have Jerseys now more than ever. They have a higher conception rate, better feed efciency and it costs less to produce milk,” said Trevor, mentioning the $4 per hundredweight premium he is able to capture with his value-added product. During the winter months, the herd remains in the 40-stall tiestall barn for the majority of the day, with two cows being switched in and out during milking. Over the years, the Hintzmans have incorporated rotational grazing, as well as seasonal calving, into their management practices. “For awhile, we were focused on crossbreeding. But I’m moving away from that and looking into A2 milk. That’s gaining traction,” Trevor said. The morning routine continued as planned with

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Trevor feeding bottle calves and Jessica putting on the last of the milkers. By 8:30 a.m., Jessica quickly checked in with Trevor’s progress before leaving the barn and making her way down to the state tournament with Susan. “This is pretty usual,” Jessica said. “I’m done in the barn by 9 a.m., and then head into town for work.” Class A was scheduled to begin at 1 p.m., with Toby’s rst match within the hour. “[Jessica] is going to send me a text when Toby’s up next,” Trevor JENNIFER COYNE/DAIRY STAR said. “I wish I was go- Trevor Hintzman wipes down the pipeline and listens to the radio as his son, ing.” Toby, competes at the Minnesota State Wrestling Tournament on the aŌernoon As Trevor worked to of March 2. The local radio staƟon broadcasted the tournament throughout the clean up the milkhouse, weekend. Randy scooped feed from the bunks. Refusals are fed daily to the heifschool tournament,” Toby said. “It really bummed ers, while the milking herd receives a fresh batch of me out when my dad and grandpa couldn’t come, feed. but that’s a challenge that comes with farming.” Although Randy sold his dairy herd nearly 10 Both Jessica and Trevor can see their son’s dedyears ago, he and Susan now milk goats and help ication in the barn carry through on the wrestling Trevor whenever needed. mat. Before Trevor went in for breakfast, he fed the “A lot of jobs on the farm last longer than three cows their TMR. The ration is comprised of corn minutes,” Trevor said. “Toby has the stamina from silage and baleage, both of which are grown on the Hintzmans’ 92 acres of land. “We feed twice daily,” Trevor said. “I always mix feed 10 hours ahead of feeding, so I mix in the morning and night.” After nearly three hours in the barn, Trevor headed inside for a quick break. By 1:30, both Jessica and Trevor were focused on Toby’s upcoming performances. Jessica found her way to the stands and watched their son below JESSICA HINTZMAN, DAIRY FARMER on the mat, while Trevor listened to the match over the radio in the barn. As the local radio station covered the high school farming that I think is a big factor in what he is able event, Trevor washed the exterior of the pipeline. to accomplish in wrestling.” “I have an inspection coming up soon, so I For Toby, he owes his success on the mat to thought I might as well get things cleaned up,” Trev- his parents’ unconditional support in the barn and or said. bleachers. Toby won his rst match against Bertha-Hewitt“I could never thank my mom and dad enough Verndale-Parkers Prairie’s Gideon Ervasti by a tech- for all they have done for me,” he said. “From drivnical fall (15-0). “I was very excited to have my mom and othTurn to HINTZMANS | Page 19 er family come watch me wrestle in my last high

“I’m so happy I got to watch [Toby] compete at state his senior year. It was a long day, but it was worth it.”

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DAIRY AUCTION

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MIKE KOSIK/DAIRY STAR

Toby Hintzman (top) wrestles an opponent March 2 during the Minnesota State Class A Wrestling Tournament at the Excel Center in St. Paul, Minn.


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 19

ConƟnued from HINTZMANS | Page 18

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Jessica Hintzman preps a cow while Trevor nishes puƫng a unit on another cow during morning chores March 2. The Hintzmans always work together to complete milkings. ing me to all of my elementary wrestling tournaments to picking up my chores when I am gone so much during the season.” The afternoon continued with two more matches for Toby. In the quarternals, he fell to Goodhue’s Mason Huemann by decision (6-2). Then, in the rst round of consolation, Toby lost to Minneota’s Cole Vanoverbeke by decision (5-4). “We were cheering him on and hoping he would make it to the next

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round,” Jessica said. “But we were bummed to see him bummed about it all.” Back at the dairy, Trevor worked late to complete evening chores by himself, including feeding the youngstock and dry cows. By 1:30 a.m., Jessica and Susan returned from their day trip to the Twin Cities. “I’m so happy I got to watch [Toby] compete at state his senior year,” Jessica said. “It was a long day, but it was worth it.”

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Page 20 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

FIBERGLASS FENCING • GATES • FR

New additive in our paint now prevents & protects against the growth of mold & mildew.

Should have a long life span.”

Fiberglass freestalls offer a heightened level of comfort which can lead to an increase in milk production!

“We have had the freestalls in for about 2 months. We installed them ourselves, they were simple to install. Cows likes the flexibility that the stall has.

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“The stalls are very good, I’ve had the stalls 8 weeks and the cows adjusted to them right away. I see a big savings on bedding since installing the stalls. I recommend anyone who is thinking about building a new freestall to take a look at these stalls.” - Don Buhr, Sumner, IA

Ron & Ellen Hartman Farms, Dubuque, IA FENCING AND FREESTALLS


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 21

REESTALLS • FEED RAIL • FEED LOTS NEW PRODUCTS:

• All Solid Rail Fencing has a 20 year UV coating to prevent slivers, Colors available • Show Fencing & Pasture fencing • Cattle Panels & Continuous Fencing • 1’’ & 1-1/4 Electric Fence Post UV Protected •13% Chrome Post for Head Locks & Feed Rail • Guard Rail and Fiberglass posts. • Lifetime warranty on our fiberglass products from rusting and rotting

Steve Kaiser, Little Falls, MN - FREESTALLS

“We built our new ABS Global Calf Facility in the summer of 2016. This was the first time we utilized anything except steel at one of our facilities and it was a hard sell to the staff. However, after meeting with Travis at TJ’s Fencing in Harpers Ferry, and having him bring a gate home to show the staff, we were sold. We utilize more than 200 different sizes of gates, all purchased from TJ’s Fencing and installed by Cliff’s Incorporated from Friesland, Wis. The gating is holding up very well. We intend to expand our calf facility this summer and will definitely continue utilizing TJ’s Fencing for the gating.” - Jim Meronek, Health Assurance, Production and Supply Chain Director ABS Global, Inc., DeForest, WI

T.J’s Fencing Inc. was started in 1991 by Travis Johanningmeier. At that time, he started using steel pipe and rods to build gates and fencing in a small garage. After several months of being in the business, he wanted to find a product that would be much easier to install, last longer and be of more value to his customers. As we all know steel rusts and is very heavy. Travis found a company that fiberglass rods that had been pulled from oil wells. He began to build his gates and fence posts out of this material and found it to be very flexible, durable and hardy. Farmers have found that even after hitting it with a skid loader, it will still flex back to shape. In 1998 Travis realized he needed a larger workplace, so he purchased land outside the town of Harpers Ferry on Hwy 76 and decided to build a new shop. Here he has expanded his business by designing a freestall system, palpation system, feed rail system and show fence. T.J’s Fencing will build gates and fencing to fit your needs. We have various sizes of pipe and rod and our sales people will help you decide what will work best for you.

“The fencing looks great, is easy to maintain, it lasts forever and the people POST & RAIL HOLDING PEN AREA are great to work with!”

- Stempfle Holsteins, Maynard, IA

FOR CROWD GATES

Travis collaborates with several companies all over the US and Canada that he buys used fiberglass from. Our product has been seen at multiple dairy shows and we feel fiberglass fencing and gates are the way of the future. TJ’s fencing has expanded as far West as Colorado and as far East to New York. We have also sold in parts of Canada and overseas. Not only does this product prove to its durability, it also helps the environment by using recycled materials. Please contact TJ’s fencing for all of your fiberglass fencing needs.

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FAMILY OWNED FOR OVER 30 YEARS!


Page 22 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

ATTENTION DAIRY MEN AND WOMEN

Mid-American Auction Co. Inc. AL WESSEL 320-760-2979

Celebrating 47 years of professional service with proven experience!

KEVIN WINTER 320-760-1593

Mid-American Auction Co. Inc. has several area dairy herds that we will be selling at auction in the next several weeks. These are farm fresh home-raised herds with as much information provided on each animal sold as is available. Several herds will have complete DHIA records as well as complete vaccination and herd health information. We encourage you to phone any of our sellers to set up an on-farm inspection or to phone us today for a catalog including up-to-date breeding, freshening and production information.

SELLERS: If you are selling your herd, we feel it is in the best interest of sellers that our company concentrate all of our efforts and attention on your individual herd on sale day. By providing as much information to potential buyers as is possible and displaying your livestock in their home environment or in a clean livestock auction facility where only your herd will be selling offers both buyers and sellers the best possible scenario to sell or purchase farm fresh herd replacements. We understand the hard work that goes into decades of artificial breeding and DHIA testing and are willing to do the extra work to make sure buyers are made aware of this extra value your dairy herd has.

Remember selling your herd is not like a professional sports team where you may have multiple chances to win. When selling your herd, you have only one chance to get it right. We provide a state-of-the-art sale ring to better display your livestock, specialized mailing lists compiled over many years of successful herd dispersals, social media and traditional advertising to ensure your herd is individually promoted to potential buyers all across the upper midwest.

If you are in need of exceptional farm-fresh herd additions or are considering selling your herd, please phone today to begin planning your next successful dairy cattle purchase or herd dispersal.

Please check our website for these and other exceptional upcoming Mid-American Auctions

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TUESDAY, MARCH 13TH, 2018 - 3BOEZ%BIMIFJNFS PXOFS%BZUPO ./t This herd established in 1942. Selling 225 exceptional home-raised Holstein dairy cattle, 4th generation herd of young high-producing Holsteins that are extremely well uddered and timed perfectly with many just fresh or due soon. Also selling all dairy equipment, 3x3x8 bales of dairy quality hay and select pieces of farm machinery. TUESDAY, MARCH 20TH, 2018 - 3JDIBSEBOE-JOEB3PCBL0BL1BSL'PMFZ ./BSFBt Selling 76 head of fancy official DHIA Holstein cattle. Many first and second lactation. 2x 21,000 milk, exceptional 4.2 % 882 fat, 3.4% 714 protein. SCC 150,000. Many just fresh or due soon. Also selling all dairy & livestock equipment and select pieces of farm machinery. '3*%": "13*-5) $IVDLBOE$BUIZ%FCJM[FOt Outstanding official DHIA third generation herd began in 1948, 168 fancy Holsteins with current records, 2x 24,000 # milk, 3.92% 940 fat, 3.14% 753 protein, (this herd will sell in a special dairy dispersal auction held at the Central Livestock facility at Albany, MN). The Debilzen herd will be the only cattle selling in this special sale. 56&4%": "13*-5) Ĺą/JDL.FSUFOT 4UBQMFT ./t Selling 200 head of hard-working Holsteins under cover. Includes 100 young tie stall cows, 40 bred heifers and 60 fancy open Holstein heifers and calves. Also selling all dairy equipment and nice line of farm machinery.

Dairy kids compete on the mat

Several Minnesota students make it to the state tournament By Krista Kuzma

krista.k@dairystar.com

Dairy Star caught up with dairy farm kids who competed at the state wrestling tournament held March 1-3 in St. Paul, Minn. Here is a round up of how their seasons ended. Three Carlsons compete at state, two claim champion titles Cael Carlson said there are a few ways of describing this year’s wrestling season – unbelievable and unforgettable. The Willmar High School junior was able to compete with his brother, Caden, who is in ninth grade, and his senior cousin, Clay. The three also were part of the Willmar team, which placed fourth in Class AAA. The two older cousins took home matching championship titles for their respective individual weight classes – Clay at 132 pounds and Cael at 138 pounds. “Winning it together was cool because we got to see both of our hard

work pay off,â€? Clay said. Cael agreed. “It’s amazing to do it together. We’ve always been more like brothers. We’re only 10 months apart,â€? he said. “We were inseparable the whole [state tournament] weekend.â€? Each have made state tournament appearances in the past – Clay his junior year when he came in second and his freshman year when he took sixth, and Cael the past two years as runner up in his weight class. Together, the duo decided to create a joint goal to win their respective weight divisions at state and to win every match of the season. They achieved both. Along with their state titles, the two ended their seasons undefeated with a record of 48-0. Caden made his state tournament debut this year at 106 pounds. “It was nerve-racking, but fun to be there for the ďƒžrst time and experience the whole state tournament,â€? he said. “And it was a great experience to be there with Clay and Cael.â€? Although he only had one match at the state tournament, Caden said he was still proud of his season and accomplished a few of his goals. His ďƒžrst Turn to WRESTLING | Page 23

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goal was to only lose ve or less matches during the season. Although his record showed 27-9, only ve of those loses were during the regular season with the other four from the team sections and state tournament. He also had a goal to win the section championship in his weight, which he accomplished. “I felt my season was going in the direction I wanted it go to, and I’m happy with how it went,” Caden said. The grappler is already looking forward to next year with a goal to place at the state tournament. Cael and Caden are the sons of Chad and Kindra Carlson. Clay is the son of Carl and Kellie Carlson, and Leah and Jonathon Kreps. The Carlsons milk 1,700 cows on their dairy near Willmar, Minn. Schefer improves throughout season Owen Schefer, a sophomore at Kenyon-Wanamingo, competed with his team in the 106-pound weight category in Class A. Although the 15-yearold lost his rst of two matches in his state tournament debut, he came back in the second match to pin his opponent from Ottertail Central in 1:30. Since his team lost both matches, Schefer ended his season on a high note. “That was really exciting. I didn’t expect to be able to come out there and do that,” Schefer said. At the beginning of the season, Schefer admits he started out inexperienced. But over the next few months, he took to heart the advice from his coaches, along with reecting on each match and how he could improve. Because of this, Schefer said he started winning more matches towards the end of the season, nishing with a record of 25-19. Schefer is looking forward to next year and how he can improve in order to achieve his goal of improving his record. The physical labor he does on the farm along with his work on conditioning while on the dairy will hopefully help. Schefer is the son of Tony and Maizie Schefer, who milk 180 cows near Zumbrota, Minn. Byer returns for nal year after farming incident Landon Byer’s parents, Marvin and Tammy, call Landon’s return to wrestling for his nal high school season miraculous. That’s because the 18-year-old senior at Frazee High School had his arm stuck in a round baler on Labor Day of 2017 on their 70-cow dairy near Frazee, Minn. “We were happy he could get out and do what he wanted to do,” Marvin said about Landon returning to the mat. The previous year, Byer had wrestled in the tournament as an individual, earning sixth in the 106-pound weight division. This year, Byer wrestled for the team at 120 pounds. While Frazee took second place in Class A, Byer never made it past the rst match in the individual tournament. He ended his season 34-13. “He only weighed 118 pounds, wrestling against guys who were 2 pounds heavier than him. Those two pounds make a difference,” Marvin said. “But it was fun that he was on the team and to watch him. It was remarkable he was even wrestling.” Miller makes it back to state Wabasha-Kellogg junior Tagen Miller returned to state as an individual this year in the 138-pound weight division in Class A. “It was really fun. There were more people from our team to go [individually] this year. The more people there are, the more fun it is,” said the 16-year-old. During last year’s state tournament where he placed fth at 126 pounds, Miller said he was really nervous. This year was different. “I went in really relaxed and focused with a goal in mind,” he said. That goal was to place higher than his fth-place nish last year; however, that did not happen. Miller was eliminated after three matches. During his last two matches, he started experiencing residual side effects from a football injury of a broken rib and punctured lung sustained earlier that fall. But Miller also recognized he was up against tough competitors at the state level. “I felt accomplished when I was done. I was happy with the way I ended my season,” Miller said. His season had started off slow with a few losses. He made a goal to come back and beat those in-

Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 23

dividuals when he faced them towards the end of the season. Miller accomplished that goal and made it to state. Although Miller typically does not do much wrestling during the summer, he might practice a little extra in the off months to prepare for his nal year. He feels this, along with conditioning while on his family’s dairy farm, will help, he said. He frequently helps on the 170-cow dairy his parents, Tom and Kay Miller, own near Kellogg, Minn. “I want to go out with a bang,” Miller said about wrestling during his senior year. Fischer makes it to state for second time as eighth grader For the second year, Blaine Fischer has made it to state for Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa. The eighth grader wrestled at 113 pounds in Class A and placed sixth.

“He was surprised to get there as an eighth grader,” said Fischer’s dad, Boyd, who farms with his wife, Annette, on their 50-cow dairy near Padua, Minn. This is Fischer’s second state appearance after earning a trip last year in the 106-pound weight division. This year, Fischer was seeded second in the section and nished second at the section nals to advance him to state. He nished his season with a 4015 record, which helped him accomplish his goal to reach 50 career wins. Last year, Fischer had a record of 19-16. “He got farther than he thought he would,” Boyd said. His dad said Fischer improved greatly as the season progressed, thanking his coaches for helping him get to where he is now. “He had a good season,” Boyd said.

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ConƟnued from WRESTLING | Page 22


Page 24 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

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‘15 Gehl RT250, JS ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap., C/H/A, 2 spd., full warranty 2 yrs or 2000 hrs., 75 hrs .......................... $48,500 ‘16 Gehl R220, H ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap., C/H, 2 spd., 2198 hrs............................... $26,500 ‘16 Gehl R220, dual T-bar ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap., C/H, 2 spd., 2676 hrs . $27,500 ‘15 Gehl R220, dual T-bar ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap., C&H, 2 spd, 1475 hrs ............... $29,700 ‘15 Gehl R220, T-bar ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap., C&H, 2 spd., 2515 hrs ...................... $26,800 ‘14 Gehl R220, T-bar, H ctrls, D, 2200 lift, C&H, 2 spd., 1230 hrs. ..................... $30,400 ‘15 Gehl R220, H ctrls, D, 2400 lift cap, C/H/A, 2 spd, 1250 hrs................................. $32,000 ‘14 Gehl R220, H ctrls, D, 2500 lift cap, C/H, 2 spd, 1338 hrs ......................... $34,250 ‘13 Gehl R190, T-bar ctrls, D, 2150 lift cap, SS, 2100 hrs ..................................... $24,950 ‘15 Gehl R190, dual T-bar self leveling ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap., C&H, 2 spd., 2300 hrs ........................................... $24,900 ‘14 Gehl R190, dual T-bar ctrls, D, 1900 lift cap., C&H, 2 spd., 1865 hrs. ............. $26,900 ‘13 Gehl R190, T-bar ctrls, D, C&H, 2 spd., 2110 lift cap, 867 hrs. ........... $30,900 ‘14 Gehl R190, hand ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap, C&H, radio, 2 spd, 2190 hrs ...... $26,250 ‘14 Gehl R190, pilot ctrls, D, C&H, 2 spd, 2103 hrs................................. $28,500 ‘16 Gehl R165, JS ctrls, D, 3800 Lift Cap, C&H, 2 spd, 2830 hrs ....................... $25,250 ‘15 Gehl R165, T-bar ctrls, D, 1650 lift cap, C&H, 2 spd., 865 hrs ........................ $28,900 ‘10 Gehl 7810, JS ctrls, D, 3800 lift cap, C/H, 2 spd, 958 hrs ........................... $35,000 ‘11 Gehl 5640E, t-bar H-ctrls, D, 2200 lift cap., SS, 2600 hrs .............. $20,500 ‘04 Gehl 5640, T-bar ctrls, D, 2200 lift cap., SS, 3905 hrs ..................................... $16,500 ‘10 Gehl 5240, JS ctrls, D, 1900 lift cap, C/H/A, 2 spd, 1050 hrs...................... $26,500 ‘12 Gehl 5240 P2, T-bar ctrls, D, 1900 lift cap, C&H, 2 spd., 850 hrs. ................ $27,500 ‘13 Gehl 5240E P2, T-bar ctrls., D, 2100 lift cap., counter wts., SS, 2050 hrs .. $25,900 ‘09 Gehl 5240E T-Bar ctrls, D, 2050 Lift Cap, C&H, 2 spd, 1200 hrs ....................... $25,300

USED SKIDSTEERS ‘12 Gehl 4640E, H ctrls., D, 1700 lift cap., 1996 hrs. .......................................... $18,800 ‘87 Gehl 3310, T-bar ctrls, 750 lift cap., manure & dirt bkt., 2980 hrs............... $5,700 ‘14 Mustang 2600R, H&F ctrls., D, C&H, 2 spd., 2600 lift cap., 850 hrs ........... $35,500 ‘12 Mustang 2100RT, pilot ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap., C/H/A, 400 hrs ............ $43,900 ‘08 Mustang 2076, D, 2400 lift cap., C/H/A, SS, 912 hrs., dual JS ctrls ................ $29,900 ‘06 Mustang 2066, dual lever/ft ctrls, D, 2000 lift cap., C/H, 1174 hrs......... $21,900 ‘06 Mustang 2066, T-Bar ctrls, D, 2000 lift cap,c/h, 2 spd, 3377 hrs ................... $15,500 ‘13 Mustang 2054, Case ctrls., D, 1650 lift cap., SS, counter wt., 722 hrs........... $16,900 ‘08 Mustang 2054 T-bar/F ctrls, D, 1650 lift cap, C/H, SS, 3750 hrs........ $14,700 ‘02 Mustang 2050, DL FT ctrls, D, 1650 lift cap., C&H, 3220 hrs............ $10,900 ‘99 Mustang 2050, T-bar ctrls, 1650 lift cap., D, 4623 hrs., C&H, SS.............. $11,900 ‘13 Mustang 2041, H/F ctrls, 1350 lift cap, D, 4025 hrs ....................................... $13,900 ‘15 Mustang 1900R H/F ctrls, D, 1900 lift cap, C/H, SS, 695 hrs.......... $19,900 ‘15 Mustang 1900R, H/pilot ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap., C/H, 2 spd., 2150 hrs .......... $26,550 ‘15 Mustang 1900R, H&F ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap, C&H, 2 spd., 54 hrs ................... $34,900 ‘16 Mustang 1500R, H/F ctrls, D, 1500 lift cap., C&H, 2550 hrs............ $23,250 ‘15 Mustang 1350R, H/F ctrls, D, C&H, 1450 lift cap., C&H, 1070 hrs............ $27,900 ‘78 Mustang 345, T-bar/foot ctrls, G, 1200 lift cap, SS 879 hrs .................... $4,950 ‘13 JD 318E, L/F ctrls, D, 2100 lift cap., C/H/A, 2 spd., 2615 hrs..................... $25,500 ‘80 JD 125, T-Bar ctrls, G, 1250 Lift Cap, SS, 1644 hrs ....................................... $5,395 ‘07 Case 435, H-ctrls., D, 2300 lift cap., C/H, SS, 2750 hrs ............................. $18,850

TRACTORS ‘45 International H, 26 hp, 540 pto...... $1,995 IH 656, gas, 63 HP ............................... $5,900

USED TMRS/MIXERS

‘13 Penta 6720HD 725 cuft w/rubber ext., at frt conveyor, stainless steel .........$23,900 ‘11 Penta 4420VS stationary mixer, 420 cu. ft., 500 cu. ft. w/ext., (2) 15 hp Leeson 3 phase motors, power door openers, 2 spd. gear box, Digistar scale head ............$16,000 ‘10 Penta 3020 SD, 540 pto, 320 cu. ft., 4’ RH front/side conveyor, 9â€? rubber ext., scale ..........................$19,900 ‘04 Penta 5600, 600 cu. ft., EZ 2000V scale, corner door .............................$16,000 ‘08 Penta 5620HD, 600 cu. ft., 8â€? rubber ext., right corner door .......................$23,500 Knight 3300, 540 PTO, 900X20 tires, new relined .........................................$7,950 Knight 3250, 10 hp elc. single phase motor, 250 cu. ft., EZ 210 Digistar scale ........$8,250 ‘11 Kuhn Knight VTC 1100, LH slide tray, rear commodity door, 2 remote scales, mounted to 2012 Peterbuilt 367 w/40,619 miles, 66,000 GVW, 10 spd., transmission, front mount hyd. drive, 1100 cu. ft. ....................$134,000 ‘05 Kuhn Knight 3130, 300 cu. ft., 615XL Weigh-Tronix scale w/remote, 2 ft., LH disch............................................$12,500 ‘99 Supreme 500, LH dog leg conv ....$13,000 Automatic ATG1800B, 1800 bu./hr., 54â€? blower, 4 cut rolls, load auger ......$8,500

TELEHANDLERS

‘05 Gehl RS6-42, JD dsl., 6600 lift cap., 4WD, 2884 hrs.................................. $35,000 ‘99 Gehl DL6H40, 6000 lift cap., 40’ lift height, 66� frame w/pallet forks, 10,000 lb. rating on pallet forks, rotating carriage, 2053 hrs ........................................... $24,900 ‘00 Genie S-60, 60’ lift height, 6500 hrs .$23,900 ‘12 JCB 541-70AGRI, D, 9000/23’ lift cap., C/H/A, 4 spd., operating wt. 16,670 lbs., 7890 hrs ........................................... $33,800

MANURE HANDLING ‘12 Kuhn Knight 8141, 4100 gal., hyd. lid ............................................... $35,800 ‘99 Knight Mfg. 8024, 500 bu. ............ $12,900 ‘14 Kuhn Knight 8132, 3200 gal., 435 cu. ft............................................ $27,900

MANURE HANDLING ‘10 Kuhn Knight 8132, 3200 gal, 435 cu ft............................................. $27,900 Kuhn-Knight 8132, 3200 gal ................ $18,000 ‘08 Kuhn Knight 8132, frt. & rear splash guards .................................... $22,500 ‘05 Kuhn Knight 8118, 1800 gal., 400 bu., auger ighting good cond. ................. $14,900 Kuhn Knight 8118, 1800 gal. ...............$12,000 Kuhn Knight 8118, 1800 gal., 400 bu................................................$10,900 ‘04 Knight 8018, 400 bu. .....................$10,000 ‘89 New Idea 3739, 540 pto, 390 bu., end gate ............................................... $6,500 ‘91 Balzer manure pump, V6, 8’ pump, 2 pt. hitch, rmt. ďŹ ngertip ctrl ................ $3,450 ‘00 Balzer manure pump, V6, 8’ vert. manure pump ...................................... $4,500 Jamesway manure pump, 6x8, 8’ pump, 2 pt. hitch, double agitation ................. $5,500 Hagedorn 412, 550 bu. ........................ $16,900

HAY & FORAGE Gehl 980, 16’ w/12 ton tandem gear, H&S 6-12 running gear .......................$6,950 Gehl 980 bu., 16’ box, 12 ton tandem, vari-speed drive ...................................$5,500 NH 144 std. conveyor, no ext., ground driven .....................................$3,900 NH 144, ground driven .........................$2,900 ‘04 NH BR780, 5’ x 6’ bales, net wrap/knife kit, extra wide pickup ..........................$9,900 CIH 600, 60â€? blower .............................$5,300 Badger BN2054, 54â€? forage blower .........$895 ‘84 Badger 950, 16’, tandem, 12T MN running gear ...........................$4,150 ‘93 JD 535, 5x6 bales, twine ................$7,750 JD 265, 7’10â€? cut, outside swath roller, tarp, good cond....................................$7,200 ‘12 Kuhn GA300GM, 7’3â€? raking width, 10’6â€? with windrow, 3 pt. rotary rake ..$5,000 Kuhn GMD600, 7’10â€? cut, 6 disc ..........$7,800 ‘15 Kuhn GF222T, 2 rotor, pull-type, 8’6â€? working width ..............................$3,150 ‘16 Kuhn VB2190, up to 4’x6’ bales, 9100 bales, net wrap, twine, VT50 control panel, cut 14 knives, drop oor, secondary drive roll kit .......................................$27,800 ‘14 Kuhn GF222T, 8’6â€? working width ....$2,900

HAY & FORAGE

‘H&S Super 7+4, 16’ box ......................$6,300 ‘11 H&S M9, 9’ pickup, hyd. drive ......$16,000 ‘98 H&S XL59, 16’ box, 12T tandem gear .................................$6,400 ‘13 H&S FBTA20 20’ box, twin auger disch., frt. unload, 416 H&D running gear....$17,500 ‘08 H&S X12 12 wheel rake .................$7,800 ‘03 H&S BF12HC, 12 wheel high cap rake ..............................................$7,950 ‘16 H&S FB16 hyd. drive, 16’ box, elec. speed ctrl ..................................$17,500 ‘09 H&S FB74FR18HDNR 18’ Box, hyd. rear, front and rear discharge....................$15,900 (2) ‘06 Meyer 4220 Forage Box, 20’, X1906 Meyer 6 whl running gear, Hyd Drive ................................... $17,900 ea. ‘90 Meyer 500TSS, 16’ box, 12 ton tandem, bunk ext., pintle chain .........................$6,250 Gehl 800 chopper w/hay head ..............$2,995 Buhler BM2400, ’13, Transports 12-4’ or 8-6’ wide Bales..................................$21,000 Flat Rack/Hay Rack, 7-2/2’x11-1/2’, 6 bolt rims .............................................$695 Tonutti RCS8 8 whl. rake ......................$2,400 ‘17 Roto Grind 760, processes full size bales, load sensor controller, mechanical spout, only used on 60 bales ............$21,500 Bush Hog HM2408, 6 disc, 7’10� cut ....$4,100 MN Bale Wagon 9’ x 18’ bed, 8 Ton MN gear ....................................$1,550 Frontier DM5060, 6 disc, 7’10� cutting width..............................$5,850 Vicon CM2400, 540 pto, 7’0� cut .........$4,700 EZ Flow 300 bu. 15� ext., spring assist hitch...............................$3,500 J&M spring assist gear tongue, 20� ext $4,000

MISCELLANEOUS Berlon BSC, lifts full rd. bales ................ $450 ‘14 Everst 5700 84�, 3 blades, 7 gu. deck, 1-1/2� to 4-1/2� cutting height .......... $1,985 Erskine Grapple, 72� Brush Grapple .. $2,300 ‘08 Erskine snow blower 2010, hyd. drive, 73� width .......................................... $4,300 ‘08 Erskine Snow Blower ES2000, 73�, Hyd Drive .......................................... $4,150 Loftness Snow Blower, 93� width, 2 stage, hyd. swivel .......................................... $1,200


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 25

Mid-American Hay Auction results for March 1, 2018

153.26 185.14 176.74 154.118 154.22 126.57 158.35 171.96 174.31 167.25 147.04 92.65 131.34 99.26 79.77 128.97 135.44 201.32 149.84 90.96 92.55 157.68 124.58 141.78 140.31 151.27 140.15 188.56 119.35 124.57 164.58 129.51 141 143.35 147.26

1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Ld. size 18.53 18.59 19.09 14.96 11.5 10.38 19.51 15.12 13.41 25.47 27.42 25.68 15.59 5.19 26.05 17.63 23.64 23.64 16.59 23.37 10.53 28.73 14.44 16.28 15.92 16.85 19.46 15.43 24.4 17.04 15.6 26.97 21.84 26.34 26.66 5.7 25.72 25.79 22.62 18.6 46 25.75 26.59 28.63 27.01 28 26.34 26.92 27.38 26.81 24.13 26.05 20.41 16.72 29.08 22.19 27.87 27.06 26.98 26.6 21.01 24.92 22.68 18.19 10.11 10.68 22.77 27.06 24.04 23.97 25.3 25.39 24.57 10.2 14.31 27.39

price $110.00 $80.00 $80.00 $50.00 $80.00 $110.00 $77.50 $60.00 $70.00 $70.00 $110.00 $75.00 $80.00 $95.00 $135.00 $110.00 $110.00 $95.00 $110.00 $110.00 $90.00 $140.00 $150.00 $75.00 $60.00 $75.00 $100.00 $125.00 $95.00 $130.00 $135.00 $120.00 $105.00 $125.00 $115.00 $110.00 $130.00 $140.00 $125.00 $100.00 $55.00 $145.00 $150.00 $145.00 $140.00 $135.00 $145.00 $125.00 $135.00 $150.00 $150.00 $125.00 $130.00 $110.00 $110.00 $75.00 $110.00 $110.00 $175.00 $130.00 $105.00 $90.00 $135.00 $120.00 $120.00 $125.00 $130.00 $140.00 $160.00 $120.00 $110.00 $150.00 $120.00 $120.00 $120.00 $115.00

Lot no.

527 531 539 540 544 545 467 504 535 469 510 575 479 494 523 563 566 466 472 476 478 481 485 493 511 533 534 570 573 579 580 501 502 503 507 513 576 577 524

Desc.

Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Small Rounds Large Rounds Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Squares Large Squares Large Rounds Large Rounds Medium Squares

moisture protein

11.13 15.84 8.24 10.12 11.17 15.39 17.51 13.79 16.67 12.08 15.65

RFV

21.98 170.08 22.57 158.72 21.37 154.57 21.83 150.1 21.24 148.88 16.99 121.51 21.59 132.88 23.55 195.57 21.86 142.22 22.95 203.36 20.13 87.87 STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW STRAW CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS CORN STALKS WHEAT STRAW

Birds just love this barn. The webs in these trusses are easy nest areas for birds. They also restrict air flow which leads to poor ventilation and moisture buildup in the building.

Starwood Rafters Uses Pole Sheds • Free Stalls Riding Arenas Pavilion Shelters Machinery Storage

The arched rafters create a more open barn allowing better ventilation. Also since there are no open webs in the trusses, there are no places for birds to nest.

• Spans up to 72 ft. • Up to 12’ spacing depending on the load you desire • Bird nesting control • Better ventilation & visability • No feed alley post obstruction • Additional ceiling height

Starwood Rafters Lam-Ply Truss

ANOTHER QUALITY PRODUCT FROM STARWOOD RAFTERS

STARWOOD RAFTERS, INC. 715-985-3117

W24141 Starwood Ln. • Independence, WI 54747 Website: www.starwoodrafters.com

price

$125.00 $110.00 $125.00 $130.00 $125.00 $110.00 $95.00 $170.00 $135.00 $210.00 $100.00 $37.50 $95.00 $95.00 $25.00 $70.00 $60.00 $30.00 $25.00 $32.50 $32.50 $30.00 $32.50 $32.00 $27.50 $27.50 $25.00 $34.00 $30.00 $32.50 $25.00 $28.00 $29.00 $31.00 $15.00 $17.50 $29.00 $27.00 $25.00

March 15, 2018 April 5, 2018

For more information, contact Kevin Winter 320-352-3803, (c) 320-760-1593 or Al Wessel at 320-547-2206, (c) 320-760-2979

www.boumatic.com

Xcalibur Xcalibur 90LX 90LX SIMPLY S IMPLY SUPERIOR SUPERIOR

Qu

ic k ly

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SIMPLY SUPERIOR PARALLEL P ARALLEL S STALL TALL PARALLEL STALL This legendary parallel stall offers best-in-class cow comfort and cow flow.

A simply superior parallel stall that goes beyond rugged to set the industry standard.

• Improve profitability – Excellent cow traffic and safety resulting in higher milk production • Cow comfort – Stalls enhanced with shoulder bumpers for her well-being • Saves time – Easier and quicker parlor cleanup with no sequence gates to work around

Contact Your BouMatic Dealer Today!

Dairyland Equipment Services, Inc. Montgomery, MN

800-548-2540

Dairyland Services, LLC Woodville, WI

866-467-4717 U. S

A

888-525-5878

Ld. size

29.19 21.93 26.99 27.02 16.82 10.49 11.35 24.19 24.87 28.01 16.7 34 24.83 22.87 27 26.24 8.78 17 24 72 72 72 74 74 57 66 60 79 20 74 48 34 34 34 46 46 34 34 76

Hay sales starts at 12:30 p.m. and are the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of the months of September thru May.

WHICH BARN IS BEST FOR YOUR HERD?

cut.

2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 2

tel y ™

96.66 135.52 116.51 131.14 142.81 210.08 135.5 180.23 66.55 119.06 160.37 164.54 141.79 176.1

cut. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4

p le

RFV 127.01 68.78 75.56 110.74 83.41 129.43 86.24 104.05 71.75 73.53 129.85 81.75 82.62 146.4 108.95 115.97 100.09 92.5 129.1 100.43 121.51 226.19 113.06 73.3

n

y

moisture protein 12.92 18.42 11.27 8.02 14.1 7.81 15.2 22.52 10.73 8.04 16.09 17.89 11.7 6.54 14.81 20.93 17.22 14.05 17.5 4.84 15.1 18.18 15.99 7.07 7.09 10.46 13.65 18.74 12.8 24.42 13.65 18.29 13.95 21.2 14.69 11.44 12.72 19.07 15.21 10.4 17.95 21.65 11.78 23.8 14.22 17.28 8.85 8.87 NO TEST NO TEST 12.94 8.36 15.12 18.6 15.73 20.99 14.35 15.87 13.94 20.35 11.58 22.48 15.27 19.66 16.43 21.4 18.14 21.61 10.58 12.26 16.77 20.4 12.1 20 13.15 23.44 33.1 20.99 GRASS 11.63 18.48 9.74 18.01 10.06 20.79 13.69 23.24 14.96 17.26 12.69 17.75 13.35 19.28 11.58 19.43 14.23 19.52 11.23 19.12 16.61 21.67 11.44 8.85 13.36 20.62 13.08 11.41 12.61 6.13 14.07 17.75 12.6 17.61 13.43 20.58 11.23 19.83 10.29 7.99 10.68 13.35 11.88 18.48 12.88 19.21 12.48 20.54 13.36 21.81 13.82 21.63 14.22 20.449 13.79 25.96 15.25 25.86 11.83 17.98 11.7 19.89 14.4 22.33 11.79 18.47 11.59 18.56 12.79 21.89

ly,

Desc. Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Rounds Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Large Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares Medium Squares

G e nt

Lot no. 484 490 497 516 536 546 555 559 561 562 568 569 574 468 471 480 482 488 489 496 522 542 547 551 552 553 558 567 572 508 538 543 556 557 560 578 492 498 514 565 520 518 529 571 554 473 474 477 486 487 491 500 509 512 525 528 530 532 537 541 548 549 550 564 470 475 483 495 499 505 506 515 517 519 521 526

. Co m p a


Page 26 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Monitoring herd health, while detecting cows in heat...

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• Simply swipe a compatible cell phone over a tag to assign a collar to a cow. • Mobile app with two way communication. • Limitless storage of data - not reliant on your computer. • Increase conception rates by optimal timing of AI. • Identify non-cycling cows before the mating start date. • Identify sick cows earlier and get a better response to treatment. • Access information on any cow anywhere at anytime.

CALL US NOW ON 651-380-2856 Milker Medic 37568 733rd St. Lake City MN 55401

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35335 Green Street | Independence, WI 54747

800-234-5893 | 715-985-3122

CANOLA MEAL CORN GLUTEN FEED CORN DISTILLERS GRAINS CORN STARCH LINSEED MEAL FLAX SEED OAT HULLS RICE HULLS SOYBEAN MEAL SOY BEST SOYBEAN HULLS SOY FLOUR SOY PLUS

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AMINO PLUS SOY ISOLATE WHEAT MIDDS WHEAT GERM MEAL BEET PULP CASEINATES CHEESE SCRAPS SAW DUST FOOD BY-PRODUCTS LACTOSE NONFAT DRY MILK SUGAR/DEXTROSE WHEY PROTEIN POWDER

www.mndhia.com

2017 High 200 Herd Honor Roll Herds are ranked according to dollar value

As usual, you’ll nd herds here that are doing a phenomenal job managing their herds in order to see these production levels and $ Values. 10 years ago there were only 6 herds over 30,000 milk, a couple over 1,200 Fat or 1,000 Protein. $Value formula’s have changed so comparing is difcult, but milk, fat and protein aren’t. There have been marked improvements and MNDHIA would like to say, CONGRATULATIONS to these members. % Milk Current Rolling Average Producer Name City Sold 3X # Cows Brd Milk Fat Prot $Value HYDE-PARK HOLSTEINS ZUMBRO FALLS 100 3X 599 HO 36,527 1,484 1,190 6,848 CLAY VIEW DAIRY GOODHUE 101 3X 1,177 HO 31,526 1,373 1,037 6,114 STELLING FARMS MILLVILLE 100 3X 289 HO 33,390 1,333 1,011 6,079 CARLSON DAIRY LLP PENNOCK 104 3X 1,719 HO 33,463 1,249 1,019 5,891 TWIN SPRUCE FARMS RICHMOND 102 3X 2,013 HO 32,905 1,245 1,016 5,846 J.M.PETERSON FARMS PINE CITY 102 3X 377 HO 33,442 1,196 1,013 5,783 FITSCHEN BROS LAKE CITY 102 3X 311 HO 30,870 1,251 964 5,683 TRAIL SIDE HOLSTEINS FOUNTAIN 100 3X 604 HO 31,645 1,190 990 5,680 REILAND FARMS LEROY 101 3X 423 HO 31,137 1,245 947 5,678 NICK AND TARA MEYER SAUK CENTRE 102 3X 269 HO 32,203 1,179 1,001 5,660 ROERVIEW DAIRY LLC SWANVILLE 101 3X 206 HO 32,065 1,173 990 5,642 HOLLERMANN DAIRY BURTRUM 104 3X 413 HO 32,275 1,190 949 5,620 KLINGSPORN FARMS PINE ISLAND 99 171 HO 29,957 1,185 985 5,599 HEIEIE DAIRY BROOTEN 101 3X 145 HO 30,751 1,213 950 5,587 MIKE-MANDI HOERNEMANN WINSTED 99 267 HO 30,834 1,174 971 5,568 CRAZY DAISY DAIRY KENYON 101 114 HO 31,068 1,155 977 5,555 HERNKES DAIRY CANNON FALLS 101 3X 851 HO 30,721 1,166 970 5,549 H&J POPPLER ROY MARSCHALL WAVERLY 101 3X 290 HO 31,653 1,128 996 5,547 BLUE HORIZON FARM ROCHESTER 103 3X 602 HO 30,916 1,203 941 5,545 GAR-LIN DAIRY FARMS INC. EYOTA 101 3X 1,968 XX 31,755 1,163 955 5,540 WILLIE & KAREN NAATZ MANTORVILLE 101 3X 228 HO 31,374 1,111 999 5,533 CIRCLE DRIVE HOLSTEINS HUTCHINSON 101 19 HO 29,940 1,151 984 5,531 ZABEL BORGSCHATZ DAIRY PLAINVIEW 102 169 HO 29,053 1,240 922 5,506 ANDY AND RACHEL EMMERT HANCOCK 99 3X 77 HO 30,915 1,117 982 5,503 CO-JO DAIRY GROVE CITY 109 3X 883 HO 30,757 1,186 958 5,502 SELKE FARMS DAKOTA 100 224 HO 31,045 1,115 979 5,500 KERNCREST HOLSTEINS ELLENDALE 101 3X 80 HO 31,706 1,144 952 5,499 RIVER CITY DAIRY HASTINGS 99 3X 385 XX 29,629 1,137 984 5,490 SCAPANSKI FARMS LLC SAUK RAPIDS 103 3X 231 HO 30,554 1,159 966 5,482 CURRIER BROTHERS MANTORVILLE 100 106 HO 29,404 1,160 967 5,473 FAITH ACRES DAIRY INC HEWITT 104 3X 138 HO 31,356 1,162 935 5,463 PEDLEY DAIRY OCHEYEDAN 103 3X 309 HO 30,888 1,158 937 5,451 ZEINSTRA DAIRY HOLLAND 100 3X 808 XX 31,520 1,102 990 5,449 BROCKSHUS DAIRY LLC OCHEYDAN 102 3X 580 HO 30,006 1,163 940 5,428 LINDO FARMS CENTER CITY 104 3X 46 HO 31,003 1,140 925 5,418 BRIAN SEYKORA BLOOMING PRAIRE 101 52 HO 29,514 1,147 955 5,414 RUSSELL J WIRT + FAMILY LEWISTON 100 3X 509 HO 29,671 1,166 920 5,402 CLARK FARMS LLC ROLLINGSTONE 103 3X 460 HO 31,278 1,120 940 5,401 DREIER FARMS NORWOOD 102 3X 315 HO 29,236 1,214 895 5,400 VALLEY ACRES DAIRY LEWISTON 104 3X 766 HO 30,669 1,093 966 5,397 ANNEXSTAD DAIRY FARMS INC ST PETER 102 192 HO 29,984 1,154 926 5,393 HOURSCHT DAIRY LITTLE FALLS 99 77 HO 29,321 1,162 936 5,391 WEST RIDGE LLC BELLINGHAM 100 3X 434 HO 31,217 1,096 958 5,385 DAN KREKELBERG FARIBAULT 98 60 HO 30,598 1,103 948 5,378 GARY SCHLAUDERAFF FRAZEE 102 3X 667 HO 29,817 1,157 916 5,375 WOLF CREEK DAIRY DUNDAS 99 3X 444 HO 29,184 1,142 935 5,375 STEVE&JACKIE MOLL FREEPORT 103 95 HO 28,986 1,129 945 5,352 DICKE CENTURY FARM GOODHUE 99 189 HO 29,641 1,109 941 5,347 SCOTT&MICHELLE HERBER UTICA 103 3X 634 HO 30,202 1,133 915 5,344 HOFFMAN NORTH-CREEK CHATFIELD 100 3X 410 HO 30,045 1,124 916 5,338 SANDHILL DAIRY PERHAM 98 3X 338 HO 29,378 1,096 948 5,322 INGVALSON HILLTOP FARMS CALEDONIA 101 3X 448 HO 30,225 1,087 952 5,321 HERITAGE HILLS DAIRY LLC LEWISTON 105 3X 421 HO 28,949 1,136 910 5,298 JOHNSONS ROLLING ACRES PETERSON 101 3X 1,245 HO 30,324 1,099 935 5,294 JAX DAIRY FARM INC. ADAMS 100 3X 1,081 HO 29,181 1,134 924 5,293 SAHRSIDE DAIRY BRICELYN 102 3X 1,395 HO 29,316 1,106 936 5,288 PATER DAIRY INC PIPESTONE 100 3X 1,313 HO 29,018 1,148 912 5,277 D & D DAIRY RUSHFORD 101 3X 1,059 HO 30,481 1,072 940 5,268 PAUL AND TIM KRUEGER JORDAN 99 189 HO 29,010 1,117 918 5,264 KRONEBUSCH FARMS INC ALTURA 103 3X 485 HO 29,687 1,147 876 5,257 DARREN+LYNN JOHNSON WINONA 103 228 HO 28,474 1,139 890 5,256 BONOW FARMS LEWISTON 102 3X 240 HO 29,661 1,099 906 5,246 SCHEFERS BROTHERS PAYNESVILLE 101 78 HO 28,565 1,126 888 5,234 MARK BROSIG ALTURA 102 3X 226 HO 29,165 1,060 933 5,221 BOETTCHER DAIRY MAYER 99 154 HO 28,151 1,113 899 5,219 LINN DAIRY FARM RICHMOND 101 135 HO 29,368 1,115 917 5,218 SASS FARMS CHATFIELD 98 247 HO 28,971 1,102 914 5,214 POPP DAIRY RICE 102 232 HO 30,014 1,065 923 5,211 GLENN CARLSON LINDSTROM 108 3X 56 HO 30,796 1,074 930 5,208 JAMES & GARY SOBECK WINONA 100 3X 269 HO 29,789 1,062 928 5,208 SCHMITY HOLSTEINS OWATONNA 103 182 HO 28,303 1,101 920 5,206 CHRIS & DEANNA EMMERT HANCOCK 99 3X 74 HO 29,471 1,059 932 5,195 MULHERN DAIRY FOUNTAIN 102 3X 656 HO 29,936 1,068 927 5,189 MIKE HULSTEIN EDGERTON 101 3X 504 HO 30,234 1,009 957 5,184 KUBALL DAIRY FARM WATERVILLE 104 3X 216 HO 28,821 1,101 896 5,172 HINCKLEY HOLSTEINS LLC CHATFIELD 97 3X 422 HO 30,484 1,037 937 5,168 FUNKS MIDWAY DAIRY MELROSE 102 3X 685 HO 29,440 1,132 854 5,161 RYAN KNISLEY PAYNESVILLE 103 64 HO 28,612 1,111 865 5,159 TOM AND SUE HOLST LANESBORO 99 182 HO 28,824 1,087 900 5,159 GORDON HUTTUNEN WADENA 102 139 HO 28,134 1,098 914 5,149 WALTER BROS FARM PLUMMER 102 3X 423 HO 29,255 1,065 897 5,139 KOLTES DAIRY LLC ST. CLOUD 100 130 HO 27,799 1,105 880 5,129 HOUDEK DAIRY LLC CALEDONIA 104 3X 451 HO 29,518 1,092 859 5,128 DEVOINE KRUSE CALEDONIA 103 219 HO 28,903 1,061 890 5,119 HEUSINKVELD FARMS SPRING VALLEY 103 3X 449 HO 29,574 1,073 880 5,116 HEINTZ BADGER VALLEY FARM CALEDONIA 102 3X 200 HO 29,263 1,040 912 5,109 LAX DAIRY SLEEPY EYE 104 3X 296 HO 29,369 1,059 904 5,107 MINKOTA HOL. LLCHOWARD LAKE 103 170 HO 28,209 1,093 888 5,099 GROTH FAMILY FARMS HOUSTON 100 59 HO 27,181 1,093 881 5,096 LESTER DONNA BANSE CALEDONIA 102 194 HO 27,435 1,081 884 5,080 BLUMENFELD HOLSTEINS HAWLEY 103 3X 482 HO 28,774 1,051 901 5,080 JOPPS CENTURY FARMS MAYER 100 97 HO 28,036 1,114 844 5,077 SCHMITT DAIRY RICE 102 104 HO 27,999 1,094 856 5,063 RICHARD LAMBRECHT BELLE PLAINE 100 104 HO 28,023 1,044 897 5,060 DALEY FARMS PINE ISLAND 99 3X 1,159 XX 26,074 1,132 857 5,055 WHITE ROCK DAIRY GOODHUE 101 3X 827 HO 29,528 1,030 892 5,051

Turn to DHIA | Page 27


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 27

ConƟnued from DHIA | Page 26

% Milk Producer Name City Sold 3X DAVID & STEPHANIE HALLBERG PENNOCK 104 LEONARD & STEVEN HOEN NORWOOD 100 RAY & JEAN BEUTZ ALBANY 101 BURKE DAIRY INC SEBEKA 104 MCANDREWS DAIRY SAUK CENTRE 106 3X MAYNARD & JEREMY SCHUMACHER PLAINVIEW 101 ED MOLDENHAUER LACRESCENT 100 SCOTT & JACOLYN RICKEMAN HUTCHINSON 106 LLOYD AND JULIE BLOMMEL FREEPORT 102 STONE DAIRY HENNING 101 3X MIKE + JULIE KULZER MELROSE 104 ROBERT AND JEANNETTE SHEEHAN ROCHESTER 102 PETER & GALE SKAJ ST JOSEPH 103 BRIAN AND JUDY HAZEL LANESBORO 100 3X MCNALLAN FARMS KELLOGG 103 3X TURNER DAIRY LLC CENTURIA 105 TWIN SPRUCE ROSE CREEK 98 LUBBEN DAIRY EDGERTON 102 STELTER HOLSTEIN DAIRY WOOD LAKE 101 3X NICOLE GUISEWHITE WACONIA 101 ROHE DAIRY LLC. FREEPORT 101 BROOKSIDE DAIRY CLITHERALL 100 3X MIKE & LINDA MATOUSEK GLENCOE 101 PETER+DAVID BURFEIND GOODHUE 103 THISTLE DEW DAIRY WESTBROOK 99 RANDY AND LUANN WAGNER WEBSTER 98 PETER SEITZER ST PETER 101 HOEFS’ DAIRY NEW PRAGUE 103 B AND C DAIRY FORT RIPLEY 101 DEER BROOK FARM PETERSON 101 ROGER PETERS TYLER 101 KEITH & KAY MAHONEY CANNON FALLS 103 TOM TAMMY&JEREMY MURSU NEW YORK MILLS 101 3X ERNEST MARTIN BROOTEN 98 QUAAL DAIRY UNDERWOOD 101 3X KLEINS COW PALACE LAKE CITY 102 3X MERRYVILLE FARM WAVERLY 101 HAUBENSCHILD FARMS INC PRINCETON 100 3X LOWELL TANGEN WANAMINGO 101 MARK RUEGEMER VILLARD 102 TA LEONARD REG HOLSTEINS YOUNG AMERICA 102 SQUARE DEAL DAIRY RANDOLPH 99 3X VOGT DAIRY LLC SAUK CENTRE 114 SUNSHINE DAIRY LLC ARLINGTON 101 CRYSTAL VIEW FARMS FOUNTAIN 102 3X HERKENHOFF CENTRAL DAIRY FREEPORT 105 PRIGGE FAMILY FARM WINONA 102 JC DAIRY RICHMOND 99 KOLB DAIRY PARTNERSHIP PAYNESVILLE 105 DAVID D. TAUER HANSKA 101 JAMES & JEN MAUS OSAKIS 102 OLMAR FARMS SLEEPY EYE 106 FLOWER-BROOK REG.HOL. HAMBURG 100 PAUL+ANN NIBBE ZUMBROTA 101 DEAN RAUSCH RICHMOND 106 ERIC RYAN GOODHUE 100 LARCREST HOLSTEIN DAIRY ALBERT LEA 103 FRIENDSHUH FARMS LLC CLEAR LAKE 110 3X DON AND SALLY WEISENBECK DURAND 102 3X PORT HAVEN DAIRY SLEEPY EYE 102 JOHN & CARL TRAUT SARTELL 100 SHEA DAIRY VIOLA 101 3X SPEEDLING GRANER FARMSKELLOGG 105 3X MEL & SPENCER HACKETT RICE 102 BRANDON STOMMES ALBANY 100 KALLEMEYN DAIRY LAKE BENTON 101 RICK AND ANN STOCKER JORDAN 101 O + S DAIRY RICE 103 RIVER VALLEY DAIRY LLC SHELL LAKE 102 DAIRYRIDGE LONG PRAIRIE 101 3X METOGGA LAKES DAIRY LLC NEW PRAGUE 101 GROETSCH BROS. DAIRY SAUK CENTRE 102 WAYRA DAIRY TRAIL 102 3X ANDY & DARIENNE FRICKSON DAKOTA 98 PAUL AND CINDY SWENSON NICOLLET 100 3X JIM EVANS PIPESTONE 99 LEUTHOLD DAIRY ELLSWORTH 101 NEWALTA DAIRY PIPESTONE 102 3X HEUER DAIRY FARM NORWOOD 103 KIEFLAND HOLSTEINS LLC UTICA 103 3X MOLDANS HOLSTEINS COMFREY 102 CHAIN O LAKES DAIRY BLUE EARTH 101 LUX-URY HOLSTEINS INC. EDEN VALLEY 101 WENDT DAIRY LLC ST CHARLES 103 SCOTT GATHJE RICHMOND 102 SAINTVILLE DAIRY NORWOOD-Y.A. 105 REIT-WAY INC. SAUK CENTRE 101 RYBERG REG HOLSTEIN FREEPORT 102 LONE WOLF DAIRY ELGIN 104 3X HOSCHEIT FARMS CALEDONIA 104 3X DORRICH DAIRY GLENWOOD 102 RICK MEISCH ALTURA 102 3X CHANLORE FARM INC COKATO 101 KLASSIC HOLSTEIN WASECA 102 CANC ELK RIVER 104 3X JERON NATHE MELROSE 99 ROGER ALDINGER WINONA 100 FOLTZ DAIRY FARM INC. CALLAWAY 103 VALLEY VIEW FARM 1 WINONA 103 CZECH ROADSIDE ACRES FOLEY 103 3X TODD & JEAN POLLEMA BROWERVILLE 107 NOLT FAMILY FARM DODGE CENTER 100 KIDMAN DAIRY BALATON 101 JOHN & JASON SCHROEDER COURTLAND 102

# Cows 54 66 126 194 327 123 313 96 144 466 99 65 101 305 842 205 88 398 271 118 295 466 48 329 119 333 63 285 89 343 257 87 160 256 339 521 304 1,233 143 70 50 497 310 94 475 168 284 142 474 245 97 173 91 34 73 198 186 937 434 273 132 820 353 149 99 146 91 252 115 1,291 432 131 330 97 268 120 142 2,477 138 340 97 267 127 114 76 113 115 35 234 366 465 189 322 40 67 355 92 89 130 464 76 128 141 50

Brd HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO XX HO HO HO HO HO HO HO XX HO XX HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO XX HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO BS HO HO HO HO HO HO XX HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO HO

Current Rolling Average Milk Fat Prot $Value 27,368 1,079 869 5,050 28,365 1,049 901 5,050 27,555 1,069 891 5,048 28,343 1,075 859 5,045 28,899 1,064 874 5,043 26,599 1,080 872 5,033 28,747 1,026 888 5,030 27,439 1,051 903 5,027 26,936 1,091 864 5,022 27,769 1,061 875 5,022 27,839 1,091 859 5,018 27,001 1,089 852 4,999 26,699 1,124 822 4,997 27,782 1,034 880 4,996 29,376 1,005 891 4,995 26,698 1,062 874 4,993 26,969 1,075 855 4,992 26,804 1,053 876 4,987 28,595 1,018 884 4,985 25,819 1,141 815 4,985 28,320 1,032 870 4,980 28,703 1,002 888 4,979 28,115 1,008 903 4,972 26,684 1,020 893 4,971 27,976 1,048 859 4,971 27,780 1,006 899 4,969 27,675 1,059 860 4,968 26,463 1,065 855 4,965 27,512 1,048 869 4,964 28,183 1,024 870 4,964 27,218 1,061 866 4,961 27,145 1,043 876 4,943 28,421 1,009 892 4,938 28,823 1,023 853 4,937 28,750 1,012 872 4,931 27,820 1,037 853 4,931 27,551 1,019 867 4,927 27,273 1,033 878 4,926 26,186 1,103 819 4,918 27,915 1,039 845 4,917 27,744 1,042 849 4,916 26,387 1,071 861 4,915 28,637 1,002 859 4,913 27,801 1,004 870 4,911 27,772 1,028 870 4,910 27,393 1,033 869 4,908 27,906 1,015 860 4,907 26,507 1,016 880 4,906 27,756 1,008 886 4,904 27,804 1,003 869 4,903 26,405 1,028 868 4,896 26,936 1,044 850 4,895 26,428 1,052 853 4,891 26,603 1,025 873 4,890 26,379 1,089 807 4,889 26,789 1,010 870 4,884 25,991 1,058 853 4,879 28,068 1,018 845 4,875 26,223 1,055 829 4,872 25,467 999 914 4,866 27,132 1,027 845 4,863 28,394 1,011 830 4,852 28,998 996 841 4,851 25,930 1,019 868 4,848 26,727 1,047 815 4,844 26,560 1,044 824 4,827 26,130 1,020 837 4,818 27,630 994 857 4,816 25,667 1,037 824 4,811 26,765 1,018 840 4,810 26,968 989 851 4,806 26,632 1,009 848 4,805 27,216 987 854 4,802 26,452 1,003 838 4,801 27,222 988 857 4,800 26,855 1,020 823 4,800 25,803 1,075 795 4,800 27,642 1,002 846 4,799 24,812 1,056 827 4,788 27,519 972 849 4,787 26,142 1,016 834 4,787 25,959 1,049 818 4,787 26,522 1,021 819 4,781 26,048 1,036 827 4,778 26,432 1,000 838 4,777 26,824 997 846 4,776 26,187 1,024 816 4,775 27,093 1,013 816 4,774 27,039 1,002 833 4,773 27,404 1,009 810 4,773 26,560 1,006 833 4,773 27,420 992 834 4,771 26,125 1,030 819 4,768 26,763 996 852 4,766 26,487 1,024 826 4,763 25,311 1,037 810 4,762 27,112 981 833 4,754 26,434 1,006 825 4,754 26,236 1,037 802 4,752 27,268 954 852 4,751 25,007 1,023 823 4,749 24,958 1,013 839 4,746 26,765 997 821 4,743 26,552 1,040 795 4,742

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Page 28 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Manage farms as whole system

Jodarski presents MOSES seminar to encourage holistic herd health By Ron Johnson

ron.j@dairystar.com

LA CROSSE, Wis. – Guy Jodarski urges dairy farmers to manage their farm as a whole system. The veterinarian from Neillsville, Wis., spoke about holistic herd health during the organic university that was part of the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) conference Feb. 22 in La Crosse, Wis. Jodarski is the staff veterinarian for Cooperative Regions of Organic Producer Pools (CROPP) and Organic Valley. He began by discussing organic farming, and what it is and is not. Organic farming is not simply substituting one input for another – garlic instead of penicillin, for example, Jodarski said. Neither is it farming by neglect, such as not adding anything to support crops’ nutrition or the soil’s fertility. Instead, Jodarski said organic farming is a new way of thinking. It involves observing, questioning, experimenting and sharing. He went on to explain that a holistic viewpoint sees an animal’s well-being resulting from interactions that take place among all the parts of a natural system. “Organic agriculture should seek a holistic approach to management. Always consider the whole system and not individual parts in isolation,” Jodarski said. Animal health on organic dairies

should be based on preventing diseases, not on treating animals that already have diseases, he said. Jodarski listed what he considers the three most important factors to which organic dairy farmers should pay attention. First, they should feed a high-forage diet. Second, let the cattle graze when they can. Third, pay attention to the farm’s soil – its mineralization and biology. Doing those three things will make the soil healthy and productive, he said. “[Each farm should have a plan] to try to correct and maintain the mineral balance in the soil,” Jodarski said. He said, good soil is living. That is, it’s lled with organisms, some that can be readily seen and some that are microscopic. Soil organisms include bacteria, fungi, nematodes, arthropods, protozoa and earthworms. The nonliving soil components are important, too. Elements that are important for plant growth and yield, such as sulfur and boron, can move out of the top layer of soil and become unavailable to crops. So Jodarski suggested applying sulfur and boron every year. For the best and highest-yielding alfalfa, he recommended that organic dairy producers make sure the soil in their elds has the right amounts of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, boron and sulfur. As part of his wide-ranging presentation, the veterinarian offered 10

bits of advice gathered during his 26 years of practice. Diversity is one. “Promote farm diversity in crops and rotations, farm enterprises and livestock types. Experiment with new crop varieties; incorporate trees and hedgerows into your farm; encourage wildlife,” he said. Financial is another. Track the protability of all farm enterprises and adjust your practices to build long-term stability and sustainability. Recognize long-term trends and how to tell them apart from atypical misfortune. Grazing is a third bit of advice. “Strive for excellent grazing management. Work to improve your grazing skills. Attend pasture walks, and observe and learn from other graziers,” he said. Other advice is to invest in the future. Be selective and use high-quality genetics for both livestock and crops. A fth piece of advice is to minimize stress. Maximize animal comfort. Pay attention to facilities and shelters. To prevent electromagnetic frequency (stray voltage) issues, use electric power carefully. Pay attention to nutrition. Feed cows a high-forage ration, one that is 80 percent or higher in forage. Work to improve forage quality by testing the feed, using the right supplements, and balancing the ration. Monitor cows’ milk production, the consistency of their manure, their milk urea nitrogen (MUN), body condition and hair coats. Aim for your farm to be selfsufcient in feed. Jodarski suggests to observe directly. “Crawl into your ecosystem and be in touch. Walk the farm regularly,” he said.

Soil is important. Implement a program for soil improvement. Balance the minerals; test the soil; and use practices to increase organic matter. “Soil health is the foundation for all health,” Jodarski said. Water is also important. Check the quality of your farm’s water and how much the animals are drinking. The 10th and nal piece of advice is to properly care for youngstock. “Raise calves with lots of whole milk and grazing from an early age,” he said. Jodarski also talked about key areas of attention. “Share your experiences. Teach and learn from others. Build community,” he said. He also encouraged farmers to embrace change and use it for the betterment of their work and relationships. It’s also important for farmers to work for a greater community that’s dedicated to a higher purpose. “And recognize and honor the spiritual dimension of life,” he said. The veterinarian also talked about happiness. “Successful organic dairies are the ones that provide meaningful work to farm families and their employees,” he said. On successful organic farms, the people are happy. “This is the most readily observable and obvious trait that denes success for me,” he said. “When people are happy, a positive energy permeates the entire farm. There is less stress for all (livestock and people). This positive energy carries through to all parts of the farm on both social and ecological levels.”

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Determining a fair price for pasture rent

A common question I get from farmers and landowners is, “What should I be paying or charging for land rent?” I see two different forms of land rent: cropland rent and pasture rent. Recently, I have been getting more and more questions about pasture rent. Many producers depend on pasture for a large portion of their livestock feed, so cost of rent needs to be considered carefully. With the start of a new year, now is also the time to work on getting agreements in place for the 2018 grazing season. A tricky thing when answering questions about rent is that there is no hard-and-fast number to give, which-I know--would be a lot easier. There are several factors to consider when negotiating pasture rent. These include pasture quality (including type By Emily Wilmes of forage and/or legume), projected U of M Extension grazing value, pasture location, and pasture size. When determining rent, it is also important to consider each party’s stance. The landowner wants to be able to cover the real estate taxes, cost of fence repairs, insurance, and interest on their investment. However, since pastureland typically sells for a higher price than its earnings can support, the landowner may be only able to cover their out-of-pocket expenses. The renter should calculate what they could afford to pay for rent. All the guidelines and estimates I may give are just that--guidelines and estimates. The livestock owner needs to know what price they can protably pay according to their projected budgets and returns. Additionally, be sure to outline what responsibilities fall to each party. Division of responsibilities between the landowner and the livestock owner need to be considered when negotiating rental price. In most cases, the renter is responsible for production activities such as checking the livestock, checking the water supply, and providing y control, salt, and minerals. For fence repair, it is typically the responsibility of the renter to repair fences with the landowner providing the necessary materials. Land-related activities such as weed and brush control and fertilizing and reseeding pastures, are negotiable and should be clearly outlined in the contract. With that said, ensure that both parties fully agree on and understand the terms, pricing, and payment system. Put the entire agreement in a written contract, complete with signatures. While contracts may seem cumbersome and time-consuming, they are best way to ensure agreements are upheld and established guidelines are followed. If any problems arise, contracts provide something to refer back to. If you aren’t sure where to start, AgLease 101 is a great resource. You can nd it at www.AgLease101.org. At the top of the page, go to the Document Library and select the “Pasture Rental Agreements for Your Farm” PDF. It will take you to a document with information, worksheets for both the landlord and livestock owner to determine their cost estimates and share of gain, and a ll-in-the-blank contract. AgLease 101 helps take the guesswork out of drawing up a contract, and allows you to customize their version to your specications. After lling it out, the only thing to do is sign, and AgLease 101 recommends having the document notarized as well. You may also want to consider having your attorney review the agreement. After hearing all this, I’m sure you’re still wondering what a good pasture rental rate is. As I already mentioned, these numbers are simply to be used as a guideline--you need to negotiate with your landlord or renter and come up with a number you both think is fair. Keep in mind that these numbers are ranges and averages from the state of Minnesota. Pasture values tend to follow corn and cattle prices, but Midwestern livestock producers may keep prices higher than the national average because of high demand for land. A nal thought to consider is how rent is charged, which is another thing that will need to be decided. Options include per acre per month, per cow unit per day, or per cow unit per month. In this context, a “cow unit” is a 1,000 pound beef cow. Some recent price ranges are: $12.00-$90.00 per acre per month; $0.20-$0.70 per cow unit per day; and $8.00$21.00 per cow unit per month. The averages from those ranges are: $35.00 per acre per month; $0.40-$0.50 per cow unit per day; and $12.00-$15.00 per cow unit per month. Some county-specic data from the National Agricultural Statistics Service shows 2017 average pasture land rent was $22 per acre for Benton county, $20 per acre for Morrison county and $37 per acre for Stearns county. Again, keep in mind these are just averages and there are several factors that will inuence the nal agreed-upon price. For the per cow unit prices, they can be adjusted for other classes of livestock. A general rule-of-thumb is to multiply by 30 percent for a calf aged 3-6 months, 50 percent for a calf aged 6-12 months, 75 percent for yearlings, 125 percent for a bull or horse, and 20 percent for a ewe. Pasture rent can be a tricky topic, but it doesn’t have to be if the landlord and livestock owner communicate well and reach a fair compromise.

Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 29

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Page 30 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Take a stand against digital dermatitis

How to prevent, treat the infectious hoof disease By Brittany Olson

brittany.o@dairystar.com

TURTLE LAKE, Wis. – With lameness and locomotion being part of the criteria when deciding whether to keep a cow or cull her from the herd, paying attention to controlling hoof diseases is crucial. “Three things cause most of the problems [with feet]: noninfectious diseases such as white line lesions and sole ulcers, or digital dermatitis, which is infectious,” said Floyd Sutton, who presented his seminar, “Controlling Digital Dermatitis,” on Feb. 28 in Turtle Lake, Wis. Digital dermatitis, which was rst found in a beef herd in Italy in the 1970s, is an acute inammation of the horn tissue or hairy skin of the hoof. It is commonly spotted in the palmar or plantar interdigital ridge of the hoof, as well as the interdigital cleft, heel or dorsal aspect of the coronary band and skin-horn border. “Heifers appear to be most susceptible to digital dermatitis infections around puberty, and heifers that have warts have received a life sentence,” Sutton said. “On the other hand, heifers that don’t have warts in the growing period don’t develop them during the rst lactation.” In order to develop and run rampant, digital dermatitis needs bacteria, primarily a spirochetal species of anaerobic bacteria known as

Treponema. It also requires moisture to grow and skin conditioning or a point of entry into the body. “Wart bugs are anaerobic. They hate oxygen,” Sutton said. “The bacteria are very prevalent in all cattle, but for a wart to get started it must enter through the skin. When it causes pain and bleeding, it is deep in the skin.” Manure slurry, in particular, is a good skin conditioner for priming the scene for digital dermatitis to take hold. “As farmers, you are awash in bacteria day in and day out. If a doctor were to take a swab from your noses, they’d nd a lot of stuff, but it doesn’t cause a problem until it gets into the body,” Sutton said. “In cattle, this bacterium has to get through the skin and into the cow to cause problems.” One characteristic of digital dermatitis, particularly in comparison to other hoof diseases and especially in the late stage of the disease, are the hair like laments projecting from the hoof that are composed entirely of skin cells, thus why digital dermatitis is commonly referred to as hairy wart. “Cells are programmed to know what they’re supposed to be,” Sutton said. “The cells in these hairs have left the body and don’t know what they are anymore.” In M1, or the beginning stage of digital dermatitis, the skin begins to form erosive sores less than threequarters of one inch in diameter. The lesions may be red or gray in color and precede the next stage of the disease. The M2 stage is marked by the sores from M1 becoming much larger. Active and acute ulcerative sores are bright red, while granulomatous lesions are reddish-gray; these lesions are mostly found along the coronary band,

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A hoof trimmer trims a dairy cow’s hoof. Proper trimming can help treat and prevent digital dermaƟƟs. dew claws and inside wall cracks. If the disease is caught, with the hoof being cleaned and treated topically with an antibiotic and wrapped, the infection will likely be cured in two days and wraps must be removed promptly. The healing stage, or M3, begins one to two days after topical therapy using either oxytetracycline powder, terramycin powder or related products, as prescribed by a veterinarian. “This point is when the acute lesion has covered itself with a rm, scab-like material,” Sutton said. If the infection is not treated, it becomes chronic during the M4 stage where dyskeratotic tissue is formed and sometimes becomes proliferative, spreading to other members of the herd. This stage of the disease is where those lamentous lesions are commonly found. “Mass proliferation happens in this stage, where the M4 spawns off a bunch of M1s,” Sutton said. “The challenge with M4 is that the lesions pop off to cause disease transfer to other cows.” Hoof trimming can be an effective dog in the ght to contain digital dermatitis infections, as well. Secondary infections with hairy attacks can be managed with proper trimming, as long as damage to the corium is minimized and all infected loose tissue is removed properly. “The quality of hoof trimming is a big deal,” Sutton said. “Modeling the

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interdigital space takes a sharp knife and time.” Foot baths containing copper sulfate are commonly utilized as cows walk to and from the milking parlor, or dairy barn if they are in a tiestall, but Sutton said they must be used daily to have any effect. If a cow takes two steps or less through the foot bath, it is much more likely to be effective, and it means that she is walking well as opposed to stumbling or staggering through the bath. Sutton recommended changing the foot bath mix when bacteria levels reach 100,000 aerobic CFU or 25,000 anaerobic CFU. However, he cautioned that foot baths can either be a solution to the problem or a problem solution. “It has to be mixed properly to work and used daily. It’s like cake in that the ingredients are mixed together so it works,” Sutton said. “Foot baths sting when a cow has warts, and if she doesn’t use it, it’s not going to serve its purpose.” As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Proper hygiene, such as scraping alleys frequently and feeding adequate levels of minerals like zinc, are key to preventing infection. “Poor hygiene drives infection rates, and it drives foot bath use rates and expense. Is your scraper system your foot bath?” Sutton said. “To reduce warts in your herd, reduce the source.”

“OUR SOMATIC CELL COUNT DROPPED WITHIN TWO WEEKS. OUR STALLS ARE CLEANER AND THE MACHINE SAVES US TIME.” - ADAM McCARTHY STONEY SPRINGS FARM APPLETON, WI

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 31

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Page 32 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Monitoring herd health, while detecting cows in heat... Rumination

Cystic

Heat Non Cycling

Embryonic Loss

Feeding

-------Software

F I N D C O W S I N H E AT A N D S I C K C O W S S O O N E R I N K N O W I N G E V E RY C O W ’ S R U M I N AT I O N T I M E , F E E D I N G T I M E , R E S T I N G T I M E A N D A C T I V I TY L E V E L S • • •

• • • • •

Over 3,000 feet of range per antenna, allowing you to have information on your herd in real time. An amazing battery life of up to 10 years. The MooMonitor+ Mobile App allows you to by-pass the PC - Assign/reassign collars - Receive push notifications on cows in heat and sick cows - Examine graphs and update information on each cow such as a new insemination or a treatment 2 way full integration with PC Dart and Dairy Comp –no double entry of data. Access your herd data anytime anywhere from any smart device. Ability to map your DHIA milk yields on the rumination graphs. Monitor treatments of sick cows to see how effective they are. Greatly, improve heat detection and conception rates while allowing you to find cows with fertility problems sooner (cystic/ non-cycling/aborted).

• •

Stuff

News and Dairy Views from across the region

Pregnant

Resting

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Monitor treatments of sick cows to see how effective they are. Greatly, improve heat and conception rates while “Previously ourdetection heat detection allowing you to find cows with fertility problems sooner (cystic/ rate was 55%, since installing the non-cycling/aborted).

MooMonitor+ collars we are at 75% - that’s pp and Dealer: huge! I look at the App when I get cows that show in heat, the AI guy stops in and d breeds them. The system has as significantly reduced labor. Recently I got a health alert on two cows and the vet treated ed them. It was great the system m picked that up.” Brian Barlass ss

To find out more call 608-757-2697 Tri-County Dairy Supply, Inc.

Stationary Unit LP, Natural Gas & Oil fired

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2018 Crow Wing County Dairy Banquet The Crow Wing County Dairy Princess and ambassador contest will be held Saturday, March 17 at the Pierz Ballroom. Dinner will be served from 7 - 8 p.m. with the coronation and dance to follow. Candidates running for junior dairy princess are Arica and Jenna Caughey, daughters of Aric and Jennifer Caughey of Brainerd, Minn. They own JenAric Dairy. Arica is 16 and a sophomore at Brainerd High School. She enjoys Jazz Band and is an FFA and 4-H member. Arica’s favorite dairy product is cheddar cheese. Her sponsors are Jerome Marshik, AMPI, Farmer’s and Merchant’s State Bank, Al Olson Express, LLC and Culver’s of Baxter. Jenna Caughey is 15 and a freshman at Brainerd High School. Her favorite subject is math and favorite dairy product is chocolate milk. Jenna is a member of the Brainerd FFA and Daggett Brook 4-H Club. Her sponsors are Tri-County Livestock Exchange, Athman Dairy, Litke Vet and Crow Wing County Farm Bureau. Candidates for dairy ambassador are Addison Hillman, Alexis Schroer, and Allison Struffert. Addison Hillman, 14, is the daughter of Andy and Connie Hillman of Brainerd, Minn. She is in the 8th grade at Forestview. Addison’s favorite subject is language arts and she is a member of the student council and 4-H. Her favorite dairy product is ice cream. Addison’s sponsors are Midwest Machinery, Pierz Vet, M & K’s Wing’s Cafe and Wally Thesing Tours. Alexis Schroer, 14, is the daughter of Rick and Susan Schroer, Brainerd, Minn. She is in the 8th grade at Forestview and enjoys math. Alexis is a member of the 4-H Horse Drill team, choir, orchestra, speech and Girl Scouts. Her favorite dairy product is chocolate milk. Alexis’ sponsors are Long Prairie Packing Company, Modern Farm Equipment, First District Association and McDonald’s. Allison Struffert, 14, is the daughter of Jess and Kelly Struffert, Brainerd Minn. She is in the 8th grade at Forestview and enjoys geography. She is a 4-H member and enjoys playing the guitar and ukulele. Allison’s favorite dairy product is cream cheese. Her sponsors are Pioneer Lake Mutual Insurance, Segler Tire Sales and Service, Pierz Cooperative Association and Sunrise Ag. Dairy princess candidates must live and work on a dairy farm. Dairy ambassadors do not have to live on a dairy farm but, like the princesses, must have a passion for the dairy industry. All candidates will be called upon to share the nutritional value of dairy products and the commitment dairy farmers have in caring for their animals and the environment. Tickets for the dinner event are $12 for ages 13 and over and $8 for 12 and under if purchased by March 11 or $15 at the door. They can be purchased from the candidates or by calling Rosanne Caughey at 218-828-1998. Farm/ranch parents can use new checklist to keep kids safe Parents want to protect their children and keep them safe, but for parents involved with agriculture this can present challenges. Each farm and ranch is unique, and so is each child. Addressing hazards to children in the agricultural environment requires an individual approach. The new Child/Youth Agricultural Safety Checklist, developed by the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, gives parents a tool to perform customized safety checks. “Protecting our children on farms needs to be a priority. A youth dies in an agricultural incident about every three days in the United States,” said Marsha Salzwedel, M.S., youth agricultural safety specialist at the National Children’s Center, part of the National Farm Medicine Center at Marsheld Clinic Research Institute. “Taking 10 minutes to read this checklist will give parents safety strategies to help ensure that their children reap the many benets of farm life while staying safe.”

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Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 33

ConƟnued from UDDER STUFF | Page 32 The single-sheet Child/Youth Agricultural Safety Checklist is divided into three sections: Non-Working Children, All Children and Youth, and Working Youth. “There are lots of actions parents can take that don’t cost anything, for instance assigning tasks that are appropriate for their age and ability, or not taking young children into the farm worksite when parents are working” Salzwedel said. The checklist, https://www.cultivatesafety.org/resources/, was released Feb. 22 at the North American Agricultural Safety Summit in Scottsdale, Ariz. For additional child ag safety resources, go to www.cultivatesafety.org. Nominations sought through March 14 for Organic Advisory Council The Wisconsin Organic Advisory Council has four openings for individuals interested in shaping the future of organic farming and food in Wisconsin. Nominations will be accepted until March 14, 2018. The four openings include one seat for a representative of each of the following groups: farm, business, consumer, and at-large. Members serve three-year terms, and the council meets quarterly. “Wisconsin’s organic industry is strong and full of opportunities for producers, processors, and consumers,” said Angie Sullivan, DATCP organics, grazing and specialty crops specialist. “The council provides important guidance and is a great way for individuals to support the industry.” The nomination form can be found at https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/ OrganicAdvisoryCouncil.aspx. Applicants should explain why they would be valuable additions to the council and should also include two letters of support. Completed applications should be sent to: Angie Sullivan, WI DATCP, PO Box 8911, Madison, WI 53708 or emailed to Angie.Sullivan@Wisconsin.gov. Call 608-224-5095 with questions. Nominees will be evaluated by a committee and approved by Secretary Sheila Harsdorf and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) Board. The selected nominees will be seated at the July meeting of the council. The Wisconsin Organic Advisory Council’s purpose is to give guidance to the governor, DATCP, the Wisconsin Legislature and other state or federal agencies about actions that could further Wisconsin’s organic agriculture industry. Council members represent the spectrum of Wisconsin’s organic industry and include: 3 certied organic farmers, preferably reecting several types of farms (dairy,

vegetable, etc.). 3 organic business sector representatives. 1 representative of organic consumers. 1 representative of a private, non-prot educational organization involved in organic agriculture. 1 representative of the certication industry. 3 at-large members. The organic advisory council is one of several of DATCP’s standing advisory councils. Learn more at https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/About_Us/Councils.aspx. DCRC seeks nominations for herds with excellent reproductive performance Nominations are open for the Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council (DCRC) 2018 Reproduction Awards program. This program encourages dairy industry professionals, including veterinarians, extension agents, articial insemination and pharmaceutical company representatives, dairy processor and co-op eld staff, and consultants, to nominate herds with reproductive excellence. It recognizes outstanding dairy operations for reproductive efciency and well-implemented procedures. To nominate a herd, go to: www.dcrcouncil.org/awards/nominate-a-herd and complete the required information. From the nominations, which are due April 30, judges evaluate reproductive performance criteria and winnow the nominee pool to a couple dozen nalists. Finalists submit herd management data and judges rank the nalists as Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze. To learn more about past winners, go to: www.dcrcouncil.org/awards/past-reproduction-award-winners. Herds earning Platinum, Gold, Silver or Bronze are invited to attend the DCRC Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for Nov. 14-16, at the Westin in Indianapolis. Watch the DCRC website – www.dcrcouncil.org – for program updates. The Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council is focused on bringing together all sectors of the dairy industry – producers, consultants, academia and allied industry professionals – for improved reproductive performance. DCRC provides an unprecedented opportunity for all groups to work together to take dairy cattle reproduction to the next level.

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MINNESOTA A & C Farm Service, Inc. (TMR Mixer Dealer) Paynesville, MN Fluegge’s Ag, Inc. Mora, MN Gorter’s Clay & Dairy Equip. Pipestone, MN

Hammell Equipment Inc. ChatÀeld, MN Eitzen, MN Harmony, MN Rushford, MN

Midwest Machinery Co. (Full Line) Glencoe, MN Glenwood, MN Howard Lake, MN Princeton, MN

Midwest Machinery Co. Northland Dairy (Forage Boxes Only) Supply Inc. Alexandria, MN Eagle Bend, MN Sauk Centre, MN

United Farmers Coop Lafayette, MN Waconia, MN Winthrop, MN Werner Implement Co., Inc. Vermillion, MN Wingert Sales & Service Plainview, MN IOWA Engel Agri Sales Sac City, IA

WISCONSIN Price Equipment Sales, Inc. Bloomington, WI Ruf’s Farm Service Inc. Darlington, WI Tractor Central Arcadia, WI Cameron, WI Chippewa Falls, WI Durand, WI

Puthhoff Repair Sales & Service, Inc. Salem, SD Westside Implement, Inc. Clark, SD NORTH DAKOTA SOUTH DAKOTA Haugen Sales Pfeifer Implement Co. & Service Sioux Falls, SD Wyndmere, ND Granton, WI Menomonie, WI Mondovi, WI Sheldon, WI West Salem, WI Westby, WI


Page 34 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

The Most Dependable Waterers on the Market!

How to make your cows disappear...

WaterMaster Series

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EcoFount 2 Cattlemaster Series

OmniFount Series

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TM

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TM

the P-One Program

TM

- the

1st Ingredient

TM

EZ OPEN – Hold Wide Tape…Pull Small Tape

For Healthy Cows

®

Contains a source of o live (viable) naturally occurring microorganisms, Amylase which can hydrolyze starch, Protease which can hydrolyze prote proteins, beta-Glucanase which can hydrolyze ß-glucans (a type of non-starch polysaccharide), Hemicellulase

Analysis

Total Propionibact Propionibacteria (minimum) ...........................................................................16 billion cfu/pound (35 million cfu/gram) (Propionibacterium freudenreichii) freud

Total Yeast Y (minim (minimum) ..........................................................................................300 billion cfu/pound (661 million cfu/gram) (Active Dry Yeast Y Saccharomyces Sacch cerevisiae)

Enzyme Activ Activity (minimum)

Bacterial Amylase y ((Bacillus subtilis)................................................................................................................. 118,000 BAU*/lb. *Bacterial amylase BAU = on one bacterial amylase unit (BAU) is the quantity of enzyme that will dextrinize starch at the rate of 1 mg/min at pH 6.6 and 30°C.

Fungal g Amylase y (Aspergillus ((A oryzae)................................................................................................................. 95,250 SKB*/lb. *Fungal amylase SKB = number num of grams of soluble starch dextrinized, in the presence of excess ß-amylase, per hour at pH 5.0 and 400C.

Fungal g Protease ((A (Aspergillus oryzae) ................................................................................................................ 68,000 HUT*/lb. 0

*Fungal protease HUT = the amount of enzyme that produces, in 1 minute at pH 4.7 and 40 C, a hydrolysate whose absorbance at 275 nm is the same as that of a solution containing ml off tyrosine tyrosine in 0.006N 0 1.10 ȝJperr ml hydrochloric acid.

beta-Glucanase ((Tr (Trichoderma longibrachiatum) .....................................................................................................900 BGU*/lb. *Beta Glucanase BGU = the amount of enzyme which, liberates glucose to 1 —mol glucose per minute at pH 6.5 and 40°C.

Hemicellulase (Asp (Aspergillus niger) ............................................................................................................................225 HCU*/lb. *Hemicellulase HCU = one hemicellulase hem unit (HCU) is defined as that activity that will produce a relative fluidity change of 1 over a period of 5 min in a locust bean gum substrate at pH 4.5 and 40°C

Ingredients

Sodium bentonite bentonite, plant protein products, mineral oil, dried Bacillus subtilis fermentation extract, dried Aspergillus fermentation extract, dried Trichoderma longibrachiatum fermentation extract, dried Aspergillus niger oryzae fermentati fermentation extra extract, dried Propionibacterium freudenreichii fermentation product, sodium silico aluminate.

Directions fo for Use

Pre-fresh Cows ((or Lactating Cows): Feed DCP™ at 1 ounce per head per day for 14–21 day period to colonize and act as a lactic acid utilizer. Follow with feeding P-One™ (see P-One™ label for proper use). One group - dry g group, with no close-up group: Feed 1 ounce DCPTM the ¿rst 14 days of each month.

Branded Strains of Smart bacteria: A4000h™ ......................Pediococcus pentosaceus A2020™ ..................................... Lactococcus lactis 2E-1™ ..................................Enterococcus faecium EF141™ ...............................Enterococcus faecium LC222™ .................................... Lactobacillus casei LBR1000™ .............................. Lactobacillus brevis LP100™ ............................ Lactobacillus plantarum Found Only in Priority IAC Products

For optimum syn synergy feed with P-OneTM and TracePac GoldTM Smart Release CrystalsTM (the P-One Program™). Progr

Storage Reco Recommendations Store in a cool dry area out of direct sunlight.

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Net wt. 30 lb. (13.64 kg) FULL WARRANTY/DISCLAIMER INFORMATION AT forhealthycows.com 03130.30.05232017

Smart bacteria Smart microbiome - Stabilize and maintain pH - Optimize energy transport through efficient carbohydrate metabolism

The microbiome in every cow is different, yet all are fed the same TMR and expected to perform the same. The branded strains of Smart bacteria, found only in the P-One Program™, optimize energy transport through efficient carbohydrate metabolism. This stabilizes and maintains rumen pH, making the P-One Program™ - Your First Ingredient.

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DAIRY CALENDAR The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) will offer “Down on the Farm: Supporting Farmers in Stressful Times” trainings in February and March. The professional development workshop will be offered in six different cities across Minnesota; it is designed to help people who work with farmers on a regular basis recognize and respond when they see farmers experiencing stress, anxiety, depression and other challenges. The three-hour workshops are free and will be held at both 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. in these locations: • Wednesday, March 14 - Grand Rapids, Itasca Community College • Thursday, March 15 - Thief River Falls, Northland Community & Technical College The MDA invites agency staff, bankers, veterinarians, crop consultants, clergy, social service and health care professionals, agriculture educators, and others who work with farmers to attend. The main presenter will be Ted Matthews, a psychologist who has worked with farmers and farm families statewide for more than 20 years and has led several state and federal crisis response efforts. Randy Willis from the Minnesota Sheriffs’ Association, Michele Page from the Farm Service Agency in Minnesota, and Meg Moynihan from the MDA (who is also a dairy farmer) will join Matthews to deliver the training. Participants will learn to recognize signs of mental and emotional distress and crisis, use active listening skills, and nd local and regional resources available to farmers, and will improve their condence in delivering difcult information to farmers in stressful situations. Continuing education credits are available. Registration is now open at www.mdadownonthefarm.eventbrite.com. For more information, including a printable workshop brochure, visit www.mda.state. mn.us/protecting/farmsafety.aspx or call 651-201-6012. Leading with professionalism is critical to one’s success in today’s fast-changing dairy industry. The PDPW Cornerstone Dairy Academy™, presented by the Professional Dairy Producers (PDPW), brings leading experts to focus on communications, leadership and people-development skills. The target of this in-depth training, gives participants a strong foundation for their future growth. The training will provide dairy farmers and industry professionals with the tools they need to lead with heightened purpose, character and integrity. The two-day program will be held March 13-14, 2018, starting at 9:30 a.m., at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, Wis. Three learning pillars will be held simultaneously on Day One (March 13). Participants select one: Pillar 1: Inuential Leaders facilitated by Trevina Broussard, Talent Solutions Consultant and Trainer at Frontline Success Training and Consulting; Susan Richardson, Founder of Etiquette Essentials, LLC; and, Hank Wagner, founder of Wagner Leadership Training. Pillar 2: Visionary Leaders facilitated by Dr. Richard Kyte, Endowed Professor at Viterbo University, and Dr. David Kohl, Professor Emeritus at Virginia Tech. Pillar 3: Servant Leaders facilitated by Tom Thibodeau, Distinguished Professor of Servant Leadership at Viterbo University. On Day Two (March 14), participants will put their newly-honed skills to work at the PDPW Business Conference, with opportunities to network with key industry inuencers and experts, explore latest technologies and learn about newest dairy industry research alongside fellow dairy professionals. The PDPW Cornerstone Dairy Academy training is application-based to preserve the quality and level of interaction. Applications are due by Jan. 15, at pdpw.org/ cornerstone.php. Contact PDPW at 1-800-947-7379 with questions. Central Wisconsin Forage Council Farm Tour and Educational meeting is March 15 at 10 a.m. at Malm’s Rolling Acres, W4234 153rd, Loyal, Wis. The Turn to CALENDAR | Page 35


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 35

ConƟnued from CALENDAR | Page 34

day will begin with a tour of a robot mixer/feeder on Malm’s Rolling Acres at 10 a.m. At 11:30, the group will travel to Loyal City Hall for lunch and afternoon meeting. Topics include: Q&A with robot manufacturer; Fermentation impact in starch digestion in dairy ration, Bernie Ford, Purina Mills; Recycling ag plastics, Price Murphy, Revolution Plastics representative; Farming in difcult times, Melissa Kono, UWEX Clark County CNRED agent; Midwest Forage Association, MFA representative. Noon lunch is $5 with balance covered by CWFC. Farmers and agriculture professionals are welcome. For more information or to register, call the Clark County UWEX at 715-743-5121. The Wisconsin Dairy & Beef Well Being Conference, slated for March 20 and 21, will be held at Tundra Lodge Conference Center in Green Bay. It will feature industry-leading professionals addressing animal handling and well-being topics. This conference promises to offer exciting opportunities for farmers, agriculture professionals, and farm workers. New for 2018 is a pre-conference geared specically toward dairy workers. Presented simultaneously in both English and Spanish, attendees will learn how everyday tasks can inuence animal well-being. This is an excellent learning opportunity for farm workers who handle cattle on a daily basis. Dairy Worker Pre-Conference: Tuesday, March 20: Focused on the dairy worker – provided in both English and Spanish attendees will cover topics including residue prevention, pain management of dehorning, lameness, and carcass quality related to animal handling Wisconsin Dairy and Beef Well Being Conference: Wednesday, March 21: Will feature presenters: • Kay Johnson-Smith, President & CEO, Animal Agriculture Alliance • Aerica Bjurstrom, Agriculture Agent, UW-Extension Kewaunee County • Robert Hagevoort, Associate Professor & Extension Dairy Specialist, New Mexico State University’s Agriculture Science Center at Clovis • Casey Davis, Cattle Procurement Manager, JBS Green Bay • Christopher Jacobs, Market Manager – Bonduel, Equity Cooperative Livestock Sales Association • Sheila Harsdorf, Wisconsin State Secretary of Agriculture The conference will be at Tundra Lodge Conference Center Green Bay, 865 Lombardi Ave, Green Bay, WI 54304. Registration deadline is March 9th; one day registration is $50 per person, discounted rate of $75 per person for both days. Veterinarian CEU credits have been applied for and will be an additional fee of $30. Registrations received after March 9 will be charged a $20 late fee. The conference is National FARM Program endorsed and qualies for two Beef Quality Assurance recertication credits. Please visit http://fyi.uwex.edu/animalhusbandryconference/ for the program agenda and registration information. The program is presented by UW-Extension. Gold sponsors include: Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board, Equity Cooperative Livestock Sales Association, and Dairy Business Association. The Wisconsin Holstein Association invites all members and area dairy farmers to 2018 Barn Meetings. This year the meetings will focus on new technologies such robotic milking, automatic calf feeding as well as other technological advancements. Meetings will be hosted on March 22 at Village View Farm, Argyle and March 27 at Alfalawn Farm, Menomonie, Wis. Both meetings will run from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will include lunch. If you are considering adding a robotic milking system, automatic calf feeders, or any other technological advancement, we encourage you to attend one of these barn meetings and learn rst-hand how it can help you achieve your goals. All barn meetings are open to any interested Holstein breeder. For more information, visit www.wisholsteins.com or contact the Wisconsin Holstein Association ofce at 608-356-2114.

SPECIAL DAIRY SALE Wednesday, March 21 • 9 a.m.

Results from our February 21 Dairy Sale:

CLASSIFIED

TOP SPRINGER $1,575

TOP 10% SPRINGERS .............. $1,480 TOP 20% SPRINGERS .............. $1,425 TOP 30% SPRINGERS .............. $1,375 TOP 40% SPRINGERS .............. $1,340

DOESN’T ALWAYS MEAN TOP SECRET! It’s no secret that a Dairy Star classied ad can help you eliminate those unwanted items!

SPECIAL HOLSTEIN STEER SALE

Friday, March 23 11 a.m.

Tri-State Livestock Sioux Center, IA • 712-722-0681

Call 320-352-6303 or e-mail nancy.p@dairystar.com

www.tristatelivestock.com

NOTE: Our “Special Dairy Sale” is now on the 3rd Wednesday of each month. Dairy Cattle can also be sold the first Friday of every month at noon.

HEALTH (HLTH$)

5 Sub-indexes Enable You to Narrow Your Genetic Emphasis MILKING ABILITY (MABL$)

FERTILITY AND FITNESS (FYFT$)

PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY (PREF$)

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Page 36 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Complete Auction Results at SteffesGroup.com

45240 County Road 80 E • PERHAM MN 56573

218-346-3415

SALES EVERY MONDAY AT 10:30 A.M.

PerhamStockyards.com • CattleUSA.com Mitch Barthel Owner/Auctioneer 218-639-5228

Open Sundays Noon-8pm to Receive Stock • Complimentary Hay & Water Pens Provided

MARKET REPORT FOR MONDAY, FEB. 26TH SALE

For more info contact Randy Kath, Auctioneer, 701.429.8894

CURRENT MARKET CONDITIONS 150+RFV Dairy Hay Med Squares $130-$160/ton

Rounds $90-$120/ton

Beef & Heifer Hay Med Squares $80-$125/ton

Bedding

Wheat Straw, Med. Sq. $27-$32/bale

Rounds $70-$110/ton Corn/Bean Straw, Rd. $18-$28/bale

ING AUCTION S UPCOM Tue. Mar. 13 Tue. Apr 24 Tue. Mar. 27 Tue. May 8 Tue. Apr. 10 Tue. May 22 We do Price Quoting right on your farm! Order Buying Available. Transportation Services Available. /RRNLQJIRUQHZFRQVLJQRUVWRÀOORXU expanding market!

All Hay & Straw MUST be on site by 10AM Sale Day!

24400 MN Hwy 22 S | Litchfield, MN 55355

320.693.9371 | SteffesGroup.com

THINK, WORK, LIVE

OUTSIDE

THE BAG

Contact your local Dealers to learn more about the Producers Hybrids yield advantage. DJ MUELLER St Charles 507.273.3972

MIKE NOVAK New Prague 612.328.8267

LOUIS HEIM St Charles 507.261.1004

BRIAN RISTOW Alma WI 651.764.4456

JAMES LARSON Winona 507.450.4828

BILL GADIENT Goodhue Plainview 651.301.2133 507.251.6897

JAMES EARLEY Wykoff 507.259.6969

producershybrids.com

PARK RAPIDS MN MENAGHA MN WADENA MN FERGUS FALLS MN WADENA MN FRAZEE MN NEW YORK MILLS MN MENAGHA MN PARK RAPIDS MN ALEXANDRIA MN WADENA MN MENAGHA MN FRAZEE MN FRAZEE MN PERHAM MN MENAGHA MN FRAZEE MN FRAZEE MN MENAGHA MN WADENA MN STAPLES MN PERHAM MN PERHAM MN ALEXANDRIA MN WADENA MN FRAZEE MN FRAZEE MN WADENA MN HENNING MN HENNING MN BEJOU MN NEW YORK MILLS MN FRAZEE MN NEW YORK MILLS MN ALEXANDRIA MN MIDDLE RIVER MN MIDDLE RIVER MN HENNING MN MIDDLE RIVER MN HENNING MN NEW YORK MILLS MN INVERGROVE MN MIDDLE RIVER MN ALEXANDRIA MN BEJOU MN OGEMA MN PERHAM MN BEJOU MN MIDDLE RIVER MN OGEMA MN HENNING MN BEJOU MN MIDDLE RIVER MN GARY MN OGEMA MN BARRETT MN NEW YORK MILLS MN WADENA MN MIDDLE RIVER MN HENNING MN WAUBUN MN WAUBUN MN WAUBUN MN

BULL CALVES 5 Hol Bull Calves 2 Hol Bull Calves 1 Mix Bull Calves 2 R/W Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 2 Blk Bull Calves 3 Hol Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 1 Mix Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 1 Blk Bull Calves 1 Swss Bull Calves 3 Hol Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 3 Hol Bull Calves 2 Hol Bull Calves 2 Herf Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 1 Swss Bull Calves 1 Mix Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 2 Hol Bull Calves 1 Blk Bull Calves 1 Jer Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 1 Hol Bull Calves 2 Hol Bull Calves 1 R/W Bull Calves HEIFERS 1 BWF Beef Heifer 1 BWF Beef Heifer 2 Blk Beef Heifer 1 Blk Beef Heifer 1 Red Beef Heifer 1 Blk Beef Heifer 1 RWF Beef Heifer 1 Blk Beef Heifer 9 Blk Beef Heifer 6 Blk Beef Heifer 1 Char Beef Heifer 1 Blk Beef Heifer 2 Blk Beef Heifer 5 Blk Beef Heifer 8 Blk Beef Heifer STEERS 1 Blk Beef Steer 1 Blk Beef Steer 1 Blk Beef Steer 3 Red Beef Steer 1 Blk Beef Steer 3 Blk Beef Steer 5 Red Beef Steer 3 Blk Beef Steer 6 Blk Beef Steer 7 Blk Beef Steer 2 Blk Beef Steer 7 Red Beef Steer 8 Red Beef Steer 1 Blk Beef Steer 3 Blk Beef Steer 4 Blk Beef Steer 1 Blk Beef Steer HOL STEERS 1 Mix Hol Steers 58 Hol Hol Steers 19 Hol Hol Steers

198 265 190 227 230 135 206 180 110 195 185 150 151 155 130 135 80 125 105 100 110 105 85 190 105 100 125 110

320.00 H 280.00 H 270.00 H 260.00 H 250.00 H 250.00 H 250.00 H 230.00 H 210.00 H 190.00 H 190.00 H 185.00 H 160.00 H 160.00 H 160.00 H 155.00 H 140.00 H 140.00 H 130.00 H 105.00 H 105.00 H 105.00 H 100.00 H 100.00 H 95.00 H 95.00 H 90.00 H 90.00 H

330 395 480 430 350 485 350 520 733 655 700 590 642 787 821

178.00 C 167.00 C 164.00 C 163.00 C 162.50 C 162.00 C 160.00 C 154.00 C 146.00 C 145.00 C 142.00 C 141.00 C 140.00 C 130.50 C 130.50 C

345 360 415 381 505 576 547 528 633 665 372 690 707 680 655 771 765

191.00 C 190.00 C 185.00 C 180.00 C 176.00 C 175.00 C 173.00 C 171.00 C 170.00 C 164.00 C 156.00 C 155.00 C 153.00 C 147.00 C 141.00 C 141.00 C 140.00 C

345 470 374

123.00 C 112.00 C 110.50 C

CLITHERALL MN WADENA MN CLITHERALL MN CLITHERALL MN CLITHERALL MN WAUBUN MN SISSETON SD SEBEKA MN PERHAM MN DENT MN SISSETON SD FRAZEE MN HAWLEY MN WADENA MN SEBEKA MN VERNDALE MN FRAZEE MN HAWLEY MN FRAZEE MN SEBEKA MN FERTILE MN HAWLEY MN

8 HolX Hol Steers 351 1 Hol Hol Steers 280 3 Hol Hol Steers 310 2 Hol Hol Steers 365 6 Hol Hol Steers 436 1 Hol Hol Steers 380 6 Hol Hol Steers 668 6 Hol Hol Steers 546 5 Hol Hol Steers 707 11 Hol Hol Steers 721 14 Hol Hol Steers 813 2 Hol Hol Steers 575 7 Hol Hol Steers 690 3 Jer Hol Steers 385 6 Hol Hol Steers 509 4 Hol Hol Steers 943 5 Hol Hol Steers 758 16 Hol Hol Steers 851 2 Hol Hol Steers 760 3 Hol Hol Steers 648 3 Hol Hol Steers 893 9 Hol Hol Steers 1066 SLAUGHTER COWS TAMARACK MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1350 PERHAM MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1675 PERHAM MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1680 WADENA MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1740 PERHAM MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1380 PERHAM MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1470 NEW YORK MILLS MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1500 TAMARACK MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1400 WADENA MN 1 BWF Slaughter Cows 2010 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1750 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1740 TAMARACK MN 1 BWF Slaughter Cows 1435 TAMARACK MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1405 MENAHGA MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1510 NEW YORK MILLS MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1455 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1570 LAKE PARK MN 1 Red Slaughter Cows 1410 TOWNER ND 3 Hol Slaughter Cows 1638 TOWNER ND 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1345 WRIGHT MN 1 Red Slaughter Cows 1070 TOWNER ND 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 940 FRAZEE MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1365 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1330 TAMARACK MN 1 Red Slaughter Cows 1475 MAHNOMEN MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1460 STAPLES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1750 TOWNER ND 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1425 TOWNER ND 4 Hol Slaughter Cows 1666 ULEN MN 1 RWF Slaughter Cows 1400 MAHNOMEN MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1485 NEW YORK MILLS MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1405 STAPLES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1880 PERHAM MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1290 TAMARACK MN 1 Red Slaughter Cows 1420 FREEPORT MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1580 NEW YORK MILLS MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1280 OAKES ND 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1470 FRAZEE MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1415 FREEPORT MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1085 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1355 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1430 TOWNER ND 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1625 DETROIT LAKES MN 1 Blk Slaughter Cows 1795 CALLAWAY MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1305 HAWLEY MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1525 HAWLEY MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1340 PERHAM MN 1 Hol Slaughter Cows 1215

• March 12th Special Feeder Sale

108.00 C 107.00 C 106.00 C 106.00 C 104.00 C 100.00 H 92.00 C 89.00 C 88.00 C 88.00 C 86.50 C 86.00 C 86.00 C 85.00 C 83.00 C 81.50 C 81.00 C 80.00 C 80.00 C 80.00 C 80.00 C 78.50 C 70.00 C 70.00 C 70.00 C 70.00 C 69.50 C 69.50 C 68.50 C 68.50 C 68.00 C 67.50 C 67.50 C 67.50 C 67.00 C 67.00 C 66.50 C 66.00 C 66.00 C 66.00 C 66.00 C 66.00 C 65.00 C 65.00 C 64.50 C 64.50 C 64.00 C 63.50 C 63.50 C 63.50 C 63.00 C 63.00 C 63.00 C 63.00 C 62.50 C 62.50 C 62.00 C 62.00 C 62.00 C 61.50 C 61.50 C 61.00 C 60.50 C 60.50 C 60.00 C 60.00 C 60.00 C 60.00 C 59.50 C

Deer Creek - 90 Beef Feeders (70S, 20H) 450-650lbs W, V NI Vergas - 65 Fancy Red & Blk Steers & Heifers (45-S, 20-H) 750-850 lbs., W, V, HR, DF Karlstad - 60 Beef Steers & Heifers, 600-700 lbs., W, V, HR, KC Warroad - 50 Blk & Red Bulls, 450-500 lbs., (few yearlings 750-850lbs) W, HR, DF Perham - 35 Beef Steers & Heifer, 400-800 lbs., W-50 days, V, B, Bunk broke Park Rapids - 30 Beef Steers & Heifers, 600 lbs., W, V Swanville - 25 Beef Feeders, 700-800 lbs., W, V, HR Verndale - 15 Fancy Red & Blk Steers, 600-650 lbs., W, V, HR, KC, DF Wadena - 15 Fancy Steers & Heifers, 675-800 lbs., W, HR, P, DF Fergus Falls - 14 Beef Steers, 700-750 lbs., W, V, HR, DF Wadena - 12 Fancy Blk Steers & Heifers, W, HR, DF Detroit Lakes - 12 Bulls & Heifers, 600-700 lbs., W, V, P, HR, DF Sauk Center - 12 Beef Feeders, 550-650 lbs. NYM’s - 1 Morgan Gelding, 5yr old, broke to ride and drive Wadean - 1 Bay Gelding Quarter HorseX, 15 yr. old, Broke to ride and drive

• March 19th All Class Sale Hog, Goat, Sheep Special Bagley - 25 Boer Doelings 1yr olds Clarissa - 19 Weathers 60 lbs., (4 Boers, rest DairyX) NYMs - 1 Mini Jack Donkey

• March 26th Feeder Sale Featuring Hol Steer Special Perham-240 Hol Steers, 700-900 lbs., V, DH, P Underwood-26 Hol Steers, 300-400 lbs., V, W, P, KC Fergus Falls-22 Hol Steers, 650 lbs., V, DH Sebeka-21 Hol Steers, 500-600 lbs., V, DF, P Park Rapids-14 Hol/HolX Steers, 300-350 lbs. Wadena-12 Hol Steers, 700-800 lbs., V, DH Fergus Falls-8 Hol Steers

• Thursday, March 29th Jacobson Red Angus Bull Sale 1pm - AT THE RANCH • 701-361-3189 Gary

• Friday, March 30th Bred Cow/Heifer, Pair, Dairy, & Slaughter Cattle


Easter morning brunch When the kids were younger and wanted to skip out on nishing morning chores, they would have to make breakfast for the rest of us. Michael’s specialty was wafes. I think he enjoyed the challenge of separating the egg yolks and whites. It was such a treat to walk into the house and nd breakfast ready to eat. We soon discovered we could freeze the extra wafes for those rushed mornings which were sure to come. I later found the breakfast casserole calling for frozen wafes, and now I use my extra stash for Easter brunch. Of course, there is nothing like homemade bread for Easter morning. I found this Cinnamon-Raisin bread recipe from a Benedictine nun. If there is any bread left over, it is the perfect bread to use to make French toast. Enjoy! Wafes 1 3/4 cup our 2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt 3 eggs, separated 2-7 Tbsps. melted butter (If you want really crispy wafes use less, if fuller avored use the full amount) 1 1/2 cup milk Sift dry ingredients together. Beat egg yolks. Add butter and milk. Make a hole in the center of the sifted ingredients. Pour in liquid ingredients. Combine them with a few swift strokes. Doesn’t have to be smooth. Beat egg whites until stiff but not dry. Fold them into the batter

Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 37

1 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 6 large eggs 1 1/4 cup milk 1/4 cup maple syrup 1/4 tsp. salt Pinch ground black pepper

Food columnist, Natalie Schmitt until they are barely blended. Ready to pour into hot wafe maker. I will sometimes make a double batch to freeze for rushed mornings. Cool completely. Place paper towel or wax paper between wafes and seal up in gallon size freezer bags. When you need breakfast on the run, grab and throw in the microwave for soft wafes or in the toaster for crispy. Also work great in the breakfast casserole recipe. Maple sausage and wafe casserole by Cook’s Country 6-8 frozen wafes (1/2 inch thick) 12 ounces maple breakfast sausage, crumbled

Your Cow Comfort and Barn Equipment Specialists

Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees F. Arrange wafes in single layer on a baking sheet. Bake until crisp, about 10 minutes per side. Brown sausage in skillet. Drain on paper-towel-lined plate. Butter an 8-inch baking dish. Add half of wafes in single layer. Add half of sausage and 1/2 cup cheese. Repeat layering of wafes, sausage and ½ cup cheese. Whisk eggs, milk, maple syrup, salt and pepper in medium bowl until combined. Pour egg mixture evenly over casserole. Cover baking dish with plastic wrap. Place another dish on top of plastic and put canned goods in empty pan to hold in place. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or overnight. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Let casserole stand at room temperature for 20 minutes. Uncover casserole and sprinkle remaining ½ cup cheese over top. Bake until edges and center are puffed, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool 5 minutes. Cut into pieces and serve. I have more maple syrup on the table to top it off. To double this recipe, use a 9- by 13-inch baking dish and increase baking time by an additional 30 to 40 minutes.

Cinnamon raisin bread by Sister Geraldine 3 cups milk, warmed 3 Tbsp. butter 1 1/2 cup raisins 2 Tbsp. dry yeast 6-7 cups our 3 Tbsp. water, divided 1/4 cup sugar 2 tsp. cinnamon Warm milk and butter. Pour in a large bowl. Add salt and yeast. Beat until smooth. Add our 1 cup at a time. Mix in raisins with second cup of our. Knead 8 to 10 minutes. Rest and rise, about 1 hour. Punch down. Divide dough into three balls. Roll each ball of dough into a rectangle. Sprinkle with 1 Tbsp. water and the sugar/cinnamon mixture. Roll up into a loaf. Place in greased loaf pan. Let rise 1 hour. Bake 375 degrees F for 35-40 minutes. Natalie, Mark and his brother, Al, Schmitt farm together near Rice, Minn. They milk 100 registered Holsteins under the RALMA prex. Their four children are great help around the farm and are pushing Natalie out of several jobs. Therefore she is thankful to have something else to do. For questions or comments please e-mail Natalie at mnschmitt@jetup.net.

SINCE2003

Stop and visit with us at one of these upcoming shows: + Agri News Farm Show - Rochester, MN March 13 & 14 + North American Farm & Power Show Owatonna, MN - March 15 - 17 + Central Plains Dairy Expo Sioux Falls, SD - March 27 - 29

www.dccwaterbeds.com


Page 38 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

Monahan

HOOF TRIMMING Since 1997

Trimming commercial and show cattle

From the kitchen of Amy Saehr, Pierz, Minn.

We use a hydraulic upright chute for less stress.

Pizza hot dish

“Our two man crew allows us to complete the job in a timely manner with less disruption of your herd’s daily routine.”

One box rigatoni pasta 1.5 lbs. ground beef One small onion, chopped 4 cups shredded Mozzarella cheese

Call Dan at

507-272-3447 Oslin Lumber Company

Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, cook beef and onion until meat is no longer pink; drain. Drain pasta; place in a 5-quart slow cooker. Stir in the beef mixture, cheese, pizza sauce, soup and pepperoni. Cover and cook on low for two hours or until heated through.

Let’s Build Together This Spring

Hwy. 23 East, Mora

2 cans pizza sauce 1 can cream of mushroom soup 1 package sliced pepperoni

320-679-1181

Fruit slab 2 boxed pie crusts 2 packages cream cheese 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1 Tbsp. milk 3 cups fresh fruit

CO N CRETE Innovation, Quality and Service Since 1965

Thaw both pie crusts and roll onto a jelly roll pan. Prick the crust with a fork in a few places to help eliminate bubbles while baking. Bake at 450 degrees F for 10-12 minutes or until slightly brown; cool. Cream together both cream cheeses, sugar and milk. Spread over cooled crust and top with sliced fresh fruit.

Maximize Your Harvest Nutrition

Candied cereal mix

5 Heights to choose from:

1 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup butter 1/4 cup corn syrup 1 tsp. baking soda 6 cups Rice Chex 6 cups Corn Chex 1 tsp. vanilla

6’ to 16’

Melt together brown sugar, butter and corn syrup until bubbly, stirring frequently. Stir in vanilla and baking soda. Continue to heat until mixture begins to foam. In large bowl, mix cereals and syrup mixture, toss and stir to coat. Transfer to two greased baking sheets. Bake uncovered at 300 degrees F for 24 minutes stirring every 12 minutes. Remove from baking sheets and place on parchment paper, allowing to cool. Once cooled, store in air-tight container.

VERSATILE, MOVABLE, RELIABLE PRECAST BUNKER SILO WALLS!

Call today for your custom bunker plan designed to fit your needs and budget! 1-800-325-8456 Visit us on the web:

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2013 Used Kuhn Knight 8141

2014 Kuhn Knight 8124 1,000 PTO, New hammers, gone thru shop, very good shape $21,000

1,000 PTO, Very good condition, Call for details - $38,000

W.H. Lien Inc.

N8974 Pole Grove Rd. • Hixton, WI

715-963-4211

Sales & Service of New & Used Farm Machine ry

We BUY, SELL, TRADE used dairy equipment and milk tanks WE SPECIALIZE IN USED DAIRY EQUIPMENT.

Milking machine equipment, bulk milk tanks and cooling equipment. Give us a call, we will be glad to help you with any of your milking machine or bulk tank needs.

We also BUY your used equipment and milk tanks.

SALVAGE HOUSE

424 Third Street, Fullerton, NE 68638 • 800-844-5427


Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018 • Page 39

From the kitchen of Traci Klostermann, New Vienna, Iowa

CLIP AND SAVE

NEXT DAIRY SALE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2018

Refrigerator cheesecake Crust: 30 graham crackers 1/4 stick melted butter 2 tsp. sugar

DAIRY SALE RESULTS

FROM FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Filling: 1 package lemon Jell-O 1 cup boiling water 1 cup sugar 8 ounces cream cheese 1 tsp. vanilla 1 cup evaporated milk or Cool Whip

Cook Jell-O, water and sugar until evaporated. Add cream cheese, whip together. Add vanilla and evaporated milk or Cool Whip to cooled mixture. Pour over crust. Refrigerate until set.

356 head sold

Top Springing Hol. Heifer - $1,600.00 OUR COMMISSION IS ONLY 2.5%!

SALE SCHEDULE

EVERY TUESDAY: 9 a.m. Slaughter Hogs • 11 a.m. Hay - Straw 12 noon Slaughter Cattle 1ST & 3RD WEDNESDAYS: 1 p.m. all classes sheep & goats 2ND & 4TH THURSDAYS:11 a.m. Stock cows Baby & Started calves • Feeder Cattle

3RD THURSDAY: 9 a.m. Dairy Sale • Springers, Bred & Open Heifers • Breeding Bulls • Herd Dispersals

Pipestone Livestock Auction Market, Inc. PIPESTONE, MN

For more information phone: Ofce 507-825-3306 www.pipestonelivestock.com

Cheez Whiz 4 tsp. butter 1 tsp. salt 1 1/2 tsp. mustard 13 ounces evaporated milk 1 pound cheese, cut

Spring Ahead with Great Buys!

Put in top of double broiler. Melt over hot water, stirring until smooth. Can be put into jars and canned for later use.

Tractors

Versatile 485 2009, Nice .......................................................... $148,000 J Versatile 936 1988 12sp. 4Hdy. 3pt. Consignment ................. $30,000 J MF 4608 2013 Cab, MFWD, Loader ......................................... $39,000 W Ford 1700 1983, Turf Tires .......................................................... $3,700 W Yanmar 324 2015 R-4 Tires, 60” Mower, NEW ........................$12,900 W MF 596 2WD Cab 983 Hours .....................................................$20,500 W JD 5075E MFWD Loader 502 Hours ........................................$31,900 W McCormick CX105 2007 Cab MFWD 2500 Hours ................ $33,900 NEW Massey Ferguson Tractors at Great Prices! J

Hay and Forage

JD 3950 Forage Harvester 2-30 Green Corn Head Yellow Hay P.O .... ............................................................................................................. $5,900 L H&S 12 Wheel Rake ...................................................................... $6,500 L H&S 10 Wheel Rake ...................................................................... $2,900 J CIH SC412 Mower Conditioner ...................................... $7,750 $7,000 W NH BR 7090 Round Baler 4600 Bales .......................................$28,500 W H&S Bifold Rake 8 Wheel ............................................................ $3,500 W Kuhn Tedder 6 Rotor ..................................................................... $8,900 W Vermeer R2800 Rake ..................................................................$17,900 W NH BR7060 Cutter, Wrap, Wide Pickup ................................... $29,900 W NH 460 2015 Wrap .....................................................................$29,900 W H&S FB7416 20ft Forage Box 16 Ton ...................... $15,700 $13,500 W

Scalloped potatoes and ham Peel and slice six large potatoes. Cut up and slice ham into bite-sized pieces. Place intermingled in heavy saucepan and cover with milk. For added taste, cut up a small onion and add to mixture. Cook over medium heat on top of stove until potatoes are done. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve with garlic bread and a lettuce salad.

An authorized dealer for

Call today to increase your bottom line! Treat your water to increase your herd’s water consumption and boost milk production.

Field Cultivators

JD 980 44 ½ ft. 3-Bar ................................................... $17,500 $11,500 L JD 200 Crumbler 45ft .................................................... $10,500 $8,650 L JD 985 49 ½ 3-Bar ...................................................... $16,900 $12,650 J JD 985 ........................................................................... $17,500 $10,900 CIH Tigermate II 54 ½ ft. 4-Bar, Rear Hitch ................. $29,900 $22,900 H NEW Great Plains 8336 Field Cultivator Floating Hitch ............... Call J Great Plains 7560 Field Cultivator 60ft, 3-Bar with Basket ............. Call L Wil-Rich 13 Qx2 60ft. Rolling Basket .......................... $49,900 $47,900 L Wil-Rich Quad 5 32ft. 4-Bar ........................................................$11,900 J Wil-Rich Qx2 45ft. Rolling Basket ............................... $33,900 $31,900 J Wil-Rich XL 37ft 4-Bar ..................................................................$19,900 L Krause 5635 34ft. 3-Bar with Basket 2012 ................................$32,700 L

Disks

CIH RMX 370 .................................................................................$28,900 L CIH RMX 370 28ft. ........................................................ $31,900 $25,900 J JD 215 16ft. ..................................................................................... $3,250 H Salford 4124 24ft. ........................................................................$46,000 J

Planters

JD 7200 8-30 Dry Fert, Insecticide, Vac, Low Acres and Sharp .............. ...........................................................................................................$14,900 J 8824 White 24-30 Central Fill, Never Been in the Field ..........$95,000 J 8824 White 24-30 Central Fill ..................................... $70,900 $59,000 J White 8186 16-30 (2 Units to Choose from) .............................$19,900 J White 8222 12-30 Liq. Fert Row Clutches .................................$44,900 L White 6100 8-30 Dry Fert, Folding, 1994 .................................... $6,900 J NEW 4 White Planters in Stock ...........................................................Call J

Skidsteers

We Know Water from the Bottom to the Tap

Well Drilling Testing and Treatment Sprinkler Systems 24 Hour Emergency Service Pump Service and Repair Commercial and Residential

320-251-5090 or 800-728-5091 141 28th Avenue South, Waite Park

trautcompanies.com

Gehl 4240 2013 .............................................................................$16,500 Gehl 5240 2012 2040 Cab Hours ................................................$24,900 Gehl 5240E 2012 1053 Cab Hours, Pilot Control ......................$26,900 Gehl 5240 2010 1350 Cab Hours ................................................$20,900 Gehl 5640 2011 4929 Hours ........................................................$34,000 Bobcat S185 2960 Hours 2sp .......................................................$18,500 Bobcat S590 (5 Units to Choose From) ............................... Call for Price Bobcat S740 2016 Cab .................................................................$34,500 Bobcat S750 2015 Cab .................................................................$35,950 Bobcat S850 Cab Joystick .......................................... $49,000 $40,900 H = Hamburg | J = Judson | L = Lafayette | W = Waconia

We have more units! Please call any of the locations listed below or check out our online inventory at: www.UFCmn.com/Equipment/Inventory Hamburg

16401 State Hwy 5/25 Hamburg, MN 55339 952-467-3111

Judson

110 Judson Fort Rd W Lake Crystal, MN 56055 507-947-3644

Lafayette

840 Pioneer Ave Lafayette, MN 56054 507-228-8224

Waconia

801 South Highway 284 Waconia, MN 55387 952-442-2126


Page 40 • Dairy Star • Second Section • Saturday, March 10, 2018

ENGINE GENERATOR SETS We are the authorized distributor for Kohler, MTU and Blue Star generators.

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