Ohio Holstein News March April Issue

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Ohio

HOLSTEIN NEWS MARCH/APRIL 2019

THE OHIO HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION




Ohio

The Board of Directors of the Ohio Holstein Association has adopted the following: “The Mission of the Ohio Holstein Association is to provide services and programs to its members and young people so that they might attain a better living from their involvement with Holsteins.”

HOLSTEIN NEWS Official Publication of the Ohio Holstein Association

Volume 91 Number 2 MARCH/APRIL 2019 Published 5 times per year in February, April, June, October and December by the OHIO HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 479, Wooster, OH 44691 www.ohioholstein.com

Contents A Message From the Executive Director, Tom Thorbahn.............................................................. 5

Subscription price in the U.S. is $30.00 per year ($10 per year for Junior Members). The NEWS subscription list is filed geographically by town and state. When you change your address, please be sure to give us your old address as well as the new one. Advertising rates available upon request. News and advertising forms close one month preceding date of issue.

A Message From the President, Bill Indoe.......................................................................................... 6

Address all mail to the: OHIO NEWS P.O. Box 479 • Wooster, OH 44691 330-264-9088 • Fax 330-263-1653 Email farm.writer@hotmail.com

Annual Meeting Minutes..................................................................................................................20-21

Whiteleather Grain Expands Services...............................................................................................8-9 OHA Annual Meeting Report..........................................................................................................12-14 Convention Sponsor Thank You’s........................................................................................................17 On the National Front..............................................................................................................................19 Ohio Holstein Women.............................................................................................................................28 2021 National Convention Logo Launched.....................................................................................29

Send UPS or Fed Ex to 1375 Heyl Rd., Wooster, OH 44691

OPDA Holds Board Elections.................................................................................................................30

OFFICE STAFF Executive Director.......................................Tom Thorbahn cell 419-366-8135 crimsonswissrus@aol.com Office Secretary...............................................Diana Miley oholstein@sssnet.com Editor.............................................................Melissa Hart cell 517-398-1957 farm.writer@hotmail.com Webmaster......................................................Peter Spike spikeptr@aol.com

In Memoriam..............................................................................................................................................31

OFFICERS President: William Indoe, Lodi.....................330-608-9770 Vice President: Chris Lahmers, _____.......614-306-7194 Secretary: Ethan Steiner, Marshallville........330-466-8961 Treasurer: Kaye Janes, _______..............330-464-4134

BarbWire, All About Holsteins, by Barb Lumley................................................................................41

EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS Paul Haskins, Butler - Past President...........419-618-4028 Joe Cole, Bloomville....................................740-396-0454 Scott Sprunger, Dalton................................330-465-0622

Senior Buckeye Breed Builder...............................................................................................................32 Junior Buckeye Breed Builder...............................................................................................................33 Yesterday’s Cowpath, by Barb Lumley...............................................................................................36 All-National Showcase Program Launched.....................................................................................37 Ohio Convention Sale Report...............................................................................................................38 Holstein Grapevine...................................................................................................................................44 Calendar of Events....................................................................................................................................45 Index to Advertisers.................................................................................................................................45

Just For The Juniors

NATIONAL DIRECTOR Steve Moff, Columbiana .............................330-482-9018

Junior News Update, by Maggie Mathews......................................................................................26

BOARD MEMBERS Dist. 1 Gary Kibler, Warren...........................330-770-8014 Dist. 2 Rod Campbell, Minerva....................330-862-2028 Distr. 3 Steve Specht, Dover.........................330-204-9831 Dist. 4 Open Dist. 5 Dallas Rynd, Ashville........................740-207-5005 Dist. 7 Scott Sprunger, Dalton.....................330-465-0622 Dist. 7 Joe Miley, West Salem......................330-263-7814 Dist. 8 Jeneva Auble, Polk............................419-908-5352 Dist. 9 Joe Cole, Bloomville..........................740-396-0454 Dist. 10 Dan Morlock, Pemberville..............419-265-5771 Dist. 11 Jay Ackley, East Liberty...................937-666-5502 Dist. 12 Kurt Topp, New Breman..................330-464-4960 Dist. 13 Open Dist. 14 Eric Topp, Wapakoneta....................419-953-3427 Dist. 15 Donald Bickel, New Vienna.............937-218-2697

On The Cover

Postmaster: Send address changes to: Ohio News, P.O. Box 479, Wooster, OH 44691 4

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The Queen’s Corner, by Kinley Topp...................................................................................................27

Farm tours, a queen contest, board elections, a first-ever video sale, the 2021 logo reveal, fundraising, the appreciation of one special woman, and a visit from the president all happened at the Ohio Holstein Convention in Warren, Ohio. If you missed it, turn the pages of this magazine and re-live the whole event! As we look forward, the May-June issue will feature the Spring Dairy Expo show results and it will be our annual membership issue. Contact Melissa Hart with your advertising plans by May 5th!

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From the Executive Director By Tom Thorbahn

As I look out my window this morning, the sun is shining and there are two robins in the yard, which means that spring is not far off. Perhaps we can begin to put this winter behind us, and begin to think that warmer days are ahead The Ohio Holstein Association Annual Meeting held in early March was well attended by many Holstein breeders from across the state. A thank you to District One members, and especially District One director, Garry Kibler, for all their efforts in hosting a great weekend. We also thank Hastings Dairy, Rowdy Cow Creamery, and Klingendale Farms for being great hosts and opening their farms for the drive it yourself tours. We had a great Convention Sale, one of the higher averages for many years, $5492. Daniel Brandt and the Sale Committee did a great job with the video sale, a departure from our live sales, but a new idea that will certainly be looked at for future sales. We welcome new officers: President, Bill Indoe, Vice-President, Chris Lahmers, Treasurer, Kaye Janes, and Secretary, Ethan Steiner. We thank retiring President, Paul Haskins and Treasurer, Lisa Magnun for all their many hours devoted to the Ohio Holstein membership. As we look forward to next year’s annual meeting, it will be our 100th Anniversary of the Ohio Holstein Association. The Annual Meeting Committee has been discussing having a couple of different possibilities for our weekend. Once they decide we will let you know the dates and plans. I do want to address the plans for the 2021 National Convention to be hosted by Ohio members. The Steering Committee visited a number of sites two years ago, and the decision 5

of group was to go to Canton and use the brand new convention center at the Pro-Football Hall of Fame. At the time of our decision they were in the process of building and assured us that the facility would be done by 2019. In early February I was contacted by them that their building plans were behind schedule and they would not have the facilities finished by June of 2021. Since that time Julie and I have been working with the other sites we originally visited to make a decision on where to host the Convention in 2021. At our Annual Meeting, we met and if all goes well without meetings, the Convention will be held in Columbus at the Convention Center. As of this writing, we are working with them, but still going over details. We should have things finalized soon. It took some wind out our sails and we had to regroup and start over with many plans. Those of you who are

committee chairs will be updated as soon as we finalize things. Please begin reaching out to your committees in starting your planning process. We will have a great National Holstein Convention in 2021 as we welcome breeders from across the U.S. We did reveal the Convention logo at the Annual Meeting, look for it as we move forward. Have a safe and productive spring. Hope to see you at the Ohio Spring Sale in Wooster.

The ad deadline for the May/June issue of Ohio Holstein News is May 5 OHIO NEWS

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A Message From The President By Bill Indoe

To start with, I want to express my gratitude to District 1 for putting on a great state convention! The farm visits, convention sale, and hotel were fantastic. To Julie Renner and the convention committee for all their hard work--thank you! I would also like to thank Paul Haskins, Lisa Mangun, and the board members who completed their terms. I know the membership appreciates all you have done over your term of service. On April 20, the Ohio Holstein Spring Sale will be in Wooster. The focus will be on show age-heifers. If you or you know someone who is looking for that special show project, be sure to spread the word to all and make sure you look through this issue for consignments to the sale. As summer approaches, the National Holstein Convention will be upon us. If you have concerns or ideas, please let our delegates know and we can take your concerns to the annual meeting. We had a very informative convention meeting with HAUSA Board President Boyd Schaufelberger and HAUSA Vice Presidential candidate, Jonathan Lamb. They heard our concerns and are very receptive to listening. In closing, I hope everyone has a great spring and if there any concerns, please contact myself or any of the other officers.

Bill Indoe 330-608-9770 • richmanfarmsinc@yahoo.com

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Whiteleather Grain Expands Services Eastern Ohio has a new source for all-natural soybean meal: Whiteleather Grain. In 2009, there was a large demand for a grain facility in eastern Ohio and that’s when brothers Jason and Andrew Whiteleather of Minerva, decided to fill the need. “Our area around here has changed greatly, at one time we had several smaller dairies that milked 100 cows and grew their own feed for themselves. Now they’ve sold the cows, are feeding a few beef cows and are grain farming,” Jason explained. Well known Whiteleather Holsteins

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The idea for this soybean processing plant began developing in 2016 while the operation was up and running two years later in the fall of 2018. of Minerva, has been in the family for generations and just across the railroad tracks from the dairy, Whiteleather Grain was established. The grain marketing business grew quickly, and with a vital presence on the internet, buying and selling corn, beans and wheat has been the mainstay at Whiteleather Grain. Branching out into processing beans, making soybean meal and selling oil is the newest venture, “We started operating last fall and are really just getting our feet wet and building our customer base,” Jason stated. But why expand to soybean meal? He explained, “We were trucking several

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hundred loads of beans to an end user. That meant hundreds of truckloads were leaving and if we found 25% of something coming back, that was a good thing. Plus, the other farms around here had to get bean meal from somewhere, so we thought we might as well be an end user.” And with that, the expansion project began. The idea development for this soybean processing plant began in 2016 while the operation was up and running two years later in the fall of 2018. As the beans are processed through an extruder, the meal and oil are separated out. With traditional processing, a chemical called hexane is used to separate the oil and meal. Jason’s wife, Gretl, explained the advantage of the mechanical process of extruding, “There is no hexane residue and there is less moisture.” Additionally, there are more trace minerals in the meal by using a mechanical separation process Summer 2015


as opposed to conventionally processed meal. Andrew’s wife Brooke added, “This is a value-added product and it’s a drier product, so you aren’t trucking or buying any excess water.” Growing a customer base and developing markets, Andrew noted, “Primarily, we are dealing with dairy and beef producers, but we are branching out and looking service hog and poultry producers.” Freight costs are a big advantage when buying from Whiteleather Grain, in addition to the quality of the product. “Our product is different than conventional bean meal and it actually really shines in hogs and chicken diets.” Jason continued, “Because of the oil left in our bean meal, the hogs and chickens really thrive on it.” The Whiteleather dairy herd, managed by their brother Adam, Uncle Law-

rence, Aunt Betty, and dad Glenn have also seen an uptick in the butterfat test while feeding their bean meal, “We’ve gained two to four tenths in the butterfat test since we’ve been feeding this and that really shows up in our milk check,” Jason noted. Because of the trace minerals found in the bean meal, they’ve also been able to pull some of the trace mineral, that they were feeding, out of their ration, and that has improved the bottom

line at the dairy. Consumer demand has had a major influence in the livestock industry and Jason believes that will continue to drive how producers feed their stock. Because their soybean meal is made naturally without any chemical processing, the end-product whether it’s pork, beef or chicken, can use that all-natural marketing piece. “As we grow our customer base, we are excited to serve the eastern Ohio area and look forward to operating to full capacity,” Jason concluded. Andrew and Jason would like to thank their wives and Families for all of their continued help and efforts. For more details on Whiteleather Grain, see their ad on page 18 or www.whiteleathergrain.com or call 330-205-1535.

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Ohio Holstein Convention

Crowns, Videos and Lively Discussion Made the 2019 Ohio Holstein Convention Memorable

By Melissa Hart Warren, Ohio--A highly successful video sale, fabulous farm tours and a standing room only annual meeting topped off with awards and the crowning of the 2019 Ohio Holstein Queen highlighted the Ohio Holstein Associ-

Lisa Mangun was surprised when she heard Barb Lumley call her name as she received the OHA Distinguished Service Award in recognition for her hard work in serving the association.

ation (OHA) annual convention held in Warren, Ohio on March 8-9, 2019. Hosted by the District 1 members in Northeast Ohio, the convention started with the farm tours of Klingendale Holsteins and Hastings Farm. David and Lucille Klingensmith presented their herd in the comfort-stall barn they built on the foundation of the original barn that burned to the ground in 2005. Lad and Brenda Hastings and their sons Garrett and Jack welcomed convention goers to their Rowdy Cow Creamery where they sell milk and dairy products made in their farmstead

OHA Queen Runner Up Lindsay L’Amoreaux and Auctioneer Randall Kiko presented some of the auction items that sold for the OHW Fun Auction.

HAUSA Rep Patrick Twining presented the Progressive Breeder Registry awards and those present were from left: Paul Haskins of Rohaven Holsteins, Hannah Dye of Quality Quest Holsteins, Louie Liming of Lou-Ida Farms, and Rod Campbell of Campbell Brothers. 12

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creamery. For the first time ever, the Ohio Convention sale was a video sale held in the convention center of the hotel. Daniel Brandt of Annville, Pennsylvania, managed the sale that averaged $5,492 on 30 full lots with a $23,000 top seller. A complete sale report can be found on page 38. A spirited annual meeting was held on Saturday, March 9th where the membership conducted the business of the association. Those meeting minutes can be found on page 20. With the Holstein Association, USA (HAUSA) President Boyd Schaufelberger and HAUSA Vice Presidential candidate, Johnathan Lamb from New York, present, the OHA took time to discuss their resolution made to the Board for HAUSA to reduce their registration fees by 50 percent for the period of one year. Schaufelberger said he would communicate the concerns of the association back to the board but remained skeptical that there would be any discount in registrations. “With the passion that is behind the situation and all the dynamics in the dairy industry, it’s good

Kinley Topp (left) of Botkins, was crowned the Ohio Holstein Queen and will spend the next year representing the association at events. Lindsay L’Amoreaux (right) was the first runner up.


Ohio Holstein Convention

The Ohio Holstein Association Board of Directors Front Row from left: Steve Specht (D3), Jeneva Auble (D8), Kaye Janes (D7) -Treasurer, Bill Indoe (D8) – President, Chris Lahmers (D13) – Vice President, Ethan Steiner (D7) – Secretary, Don Bickel (D15), Back Row: Scott Sprunger (D7), Joe Miley (D7), Joe Cole (D9), Dallas Rynd (D5), Dan Morlock (D10), Rod Campbell (D2), Paul Haskins (D7) Gary Kibler (D1).

for us to share our thoughts and positions,” commented Schaufelberger. As a member of the HAUSA audit committee, he has been a part of managing the HAUSA reserve fund. The goal of the reserve fund, that was established in 1902, is to have a reserve set aside that is equal to 95 percent of the yearly expenses. “About $19 million is required as a minimum of a reserve fund.” He continued, “This year we are going to have one of the worse years we’ve had since 2002, we are looking at about a million-dollar loss.”

In 2014, the HAUSA board was tasked with using some of the excess reserve fund, which now totals $25 million, on a special project that would in turn, help the membership. One of the projects is an IT upgrade that is currently underway to help streamline and automate the registration process and in 2017 they funded selected research projects, hoping the results of the research would benefit the membership. In direct response to the OHA proposal, Schaufelberger noted that in the big scheme of things, registrations are

All-Ohio winners were awarded plaques sponsored by Kalmbach Feeds; Those present to receive their award from left: Scott Sprunger, Ben Simpson, Evan Kiko, Kendall Thomas, Colton Thomas, Lindsay L’Amoreaux, Kristy Ackley

not one of the major expenditures on the dairy farm, while from the HAUSA standpoint, “Twenty-three percent of HAUSA income is from registrations, so if we gave up half of that, then we would be giving up eleven percent of our income. Think about that as a trade-off, what the association would be giving up as opposed to what the member would gain.” He also stressed the added value that the registered Holstein holds in comparison to the grade cow. He cited a recent export project in Pennsylvania where they found the animals that were registered had a $93 increase in value in comparison to the non-registered animals. He assured the HAUSA Board of Directors would be discussing the resolution at the next board meeting. Other notable projects the HAUSA is working on are increased exports to move the excess cattle in the U.S., more accurate milk labeling and increased breed promotion. With an impassioned tone, Bill Indoe commented on the motivation behind the proposal remarking that the industry is in unchartered waters and breeders are now choosing between paying their electric bill or registering calves. He emphasized that in times like these people quit registering, classifying, testing and showing which leads to less communication with friends in the industry. He said, “When we sat down

The Junior All-Ohio awards were handed out to the winners. Those present from left: Allison McCummins, Colton Thomas, Kendall Thomas, Hannah Dye, Lindsay L’Amoreaux. OHIO NEWS

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Ohio Holstein Convention

Suzy Lora (front left) was presented with the Ohio Holstein Woman of the Year award. Here with her daughter, Katy and husband John, Suzy will be featured in the May-June issue of the Ohio Holstein News.

to make this proposal it was meant to be a gesture to help others, not to take a lot of money from the HAUSA budget. But if we can keep one dairy from going out of business or get new members, it would be a benefit to the association.” He concluded, “If we don’t do something to help, we won’t have 2-year-olds to classify and we won’t have calves to register. It would be a big help to have this and to have a catch-up period, a couple of times a year for breeders to get their calves caught up on registra-

tions.” OHA Board elections were conducted where Bill Indoe was elected President, Chris Lahmers was elected Vice President, Kaye Janes was installed as the treasurer and Ethan Steiner will remain the secretary. New board members include Jeneva Auble (D3), and Jay Ackley (D11). The Ohio Holstein Women also met for their annual meeting and those proceedings can be found on page 28. The awards luncheon began with

Johnathan Lamb, of Oakfield Corners Dairy in New York attended the convention to visit with HAUSA members and gather feedback as he runs for the Vice President position of the HAUSA.

HAUSA President Boyd Schaufelberger enjoyed the Ohio Holstein Convention and addressed the business meeting, creating a dialog between the HAUSA leadership and its members.

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the crowning of the Ohio Holstein Queen, Kinley Topp, the daughter of Keith and Kindra Topp of Botkins. The first runner up was Lindsay L’Amoreaux, daughter of Nevin and Brenda L’Amoreaux of Louisville. The Ohio Holstein Queen committee of Allison Mangun, Jeneva Auble and Megan Lawson thanked the 2019 OHA Queen, Allison McCummons and judges Cheri Oechsle, Morgan McDonnell and Jaquelyn Sherry for serving. They also thanked the Ohio Holstein Women the OHA and DHI Cooperative, Inc., for their continued financial support of the contest. The High Sale Award went to Pine Tree Dairy for their sale topper from the Ohio Fall Sale. The Farm Tour hosts, the Klingensmiths and the Hastings, were recognized with a plaque for opening their barns for the convention tours. The Progressive Breeders’ Registry (PBR) is given to the top herds that excel at maintaining a balance of production and type performance, with a high percentage of homebred females. Those Ohio herds recognized were Lou-Ida Farms, Plain-Knoll Holsteins, Campbell Brothers, Klingendale Holsteins, Quality Quest Holsteins, Tenpenny Holsteins, Rohaven Holsteins, Springhill Holsteins and Showalter Farms. Jim Ray presented the Buckeye Breed Builder Awards. The Junior award went to Jason Miley of Miley Holsteins, West Salem while the Senior award went to Steve Buschur of Plain-Knoll Holsteins, New Weston. Barb Lumley presented Lisa Mangun with the Distinguished Service Award while Jane Moff of the OHW presented Suzy Lora of Minerva with the Holstein Woman of the Year Award. The Esther Welch Ag Communications Scholarship went to Korey Oechsle and the All Ohio Awards and Junior All Ohio awards were presented. At the conclusion of the luncheon, the Ohio Holstein Women’s Fun Auction was held where they raised $1,990.


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AT PROMISING2019PAIR!! 4-H PROJECTS WO FANCY SHOW AGE CALVES PERFECT FOR YOUR SELLING AT THE OHIO SPRING SALE ON APRIL 20, 2019 WAYNE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

THANK YOU TO ALL OF THE

OHIO HOLSTEIN CONVENTION SPONSORS GOLD LEVEL SPONSORS

Andrews Auctioneers, LLC ABS Global Farmer’s National Bank Prenger’s Inc. DHI Cooperative, Inc. Lyle Printing/Farm and Dairy COBA/Select Sires, Inc.

SILVER LEVEL SPONSORS

Riceton Farms Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. Gerber Feed Service, Inc.

BRONZE LEVEL SPONSORS

Jones Processing, Inc. IBA of Ohio/Terry Vance The Kidron Auction, Inc Harold’s Equipment, Inc. Wellington Implement, Inc. Pearl Valley Cheese, Inc. The Commercial & Savings Bank Cargill Animal Nutrition

DISTRICT 1 CELEBRATION DINNER

Trumbull County Holstein Club

QUEEN CONTEST LUNCHEON DHI Cooperative, Inc.

ALL-OHIO AND JUNIOR ALL-OHIO PLAQUE SPONSOR Kalmbach Feeds, Inc.

DAIRY BAR

American Dairy Assoc. – Mideast Smith Foods, Inc. Guggisberg Cheese, Inc. Holmes Cheese, Inc. Rothenbuhler Cheesemakers

OHIO JUNIOR HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION DINNER SPONSOR: District 1 Holstein Club

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On the National Front I am writing this article just a few days before our Spring National Board Meeting to be held in Brattleboro, Vermont. Many topics will be discussed, not the least of which is the state of the dairy economy and us as Holstein Breeders. It affects all facets of the industry including Holstein USA. I am sure there will be information on how to try to make ends meet as an Association. We are registering and identifying a much higher number and higher percent of the Holstein population than we did fifteen years ago. As has been done for several years now, the Annual Member Update Meeting is videoed and available on YouTube. You can access it directly from the Holstein web page. National Convention is fast approaching, Ohio delegates this year are: Paul Haskins, Ken Janes, Randall Kiko, Joe Miley, Julie Renner, and Matthew Steiner. National nominations

are as follows: President, Corey Geiger, Wisconsin, Vice President, Roy Buessing, Kansas, and Johnathan Lamb, New York, Region 1 incumbent Steve Keene, Maine, Region 4 incumbent Benjamin Newberry, Georgia, Region 6 Spencer Hackett, Minnesota, and Mike Shiller, Minnesota, will run for the position vacated by Mark Kerndt, Iowa, who will be finishing his second term. At large Peter Dueppengiesser will run as the incumbent. Please try to attend The Convention as we will be hosting in 2021. Hope you all had the chance to meet Boyd Schaufelberger at our State Convention in District 1. Thanks to District 1 for fun and well planned convention. Steve Moff HAUSA Director smouric@aol.com or 614-205-7179

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Ohio Holstein Association Annual Meeting Minutes March 9, 2019 • Warren, Ohio

It was standing room only as President Paul Haskins called the meeting to order. Steve Moff opened with prayer. Paul recognized a few guests in attendance: Boyd Schaufenberger, President HAUSA board, Jonathan Lamb, candidate for VP HAUSA board, Melissa Hart Ohio News Editor. Paul asked if there were any corrections to the minutes. A motion was given to approve, seconded, and carried. Lisa Mangun gave the Treasurer’s report. The fiscal year starts 10/1/18. Last year there were some property and CAT taxes, but both should not owe more again. Overall, it was a small loss of approximately $3,000 after depreciation. She pointed out that the Ohio News did extremely well, profiting approximately $12,000. She also pointed out that Dave Gunkleman is no longer the Marketing director, so that budgeted amount will be coming off this year. The Finance and Executive committees met with Jim Spreng, our capital investor, in order to make sure there is money in preparation for National Holstein Convention 2021. Joe Cole motioned to approve the Treasurer’s report, Scott Sprunger seconded. Motion carried. Paul thanked Gary Kibler and his wife for their efforts hosting this convention. Also, he pointed out that the Convention Sale, managed by Daniel Brandt was a good experiment, averaging $5,942 on 30 live lots, with potential profit to the Association of just under $5,000. Paul also thanked the Ohio Holstein officers and employees for serving with him as President, and said he is looking forward to what Bill Indoe will do next. Credentials Committee: Dallas Rynd, Joe Miley and John Hartline. Dallas led the voting process. It was stated that we have a quorum present to make these decisions. (Need 24 delegates, have 41 present). For President, they nominated Bill Indoe. Bill expressed appreciation for everyone’s efforts. He stated that we are 20 20

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all volunteers and friends, and if you have ideas, please let us know. No other nominations were brought to floor. Dallas made a motion to vote by process of acclimation, it was carried unanimously. For Vice President, they nominated Chris Lahmers. Chris expressed that he has been a part of this association ever since he was a Junior. No other nominations were brought to the floor. Dallas made a motion to vote by process of acclimation, it was carried unanimously. For Secretary, they nominated Ethan Steiner. Ethan expressed appreciation for working together with the other board members and stated if anyone else wanted this position they are welcome to it. No other nominations were brought to the floor. Dallas made a motion to vote by process of acclimation, it was carried unanimously. For Treasurer, they nominated Kaye Janes. Kaye expressed that she is looking forward to working with everyone. No other nominations were brought to the floor. Dallas made a motion to vote by process of acclimation, it was carried unanimously. National Association Report: Steve Moff reported it was a good year, basic ID was up with genomic testing. Classification has gone down, and less SET herds. He encouraged folks to explore Holstein Complete as a way to save money. Patrick Twining also reported on the Holstein Marketplace as a way to advertise your Holstein bulls, embryos etc. He also explained the Holstein Marketplace Sires is a way for breeders and members to market their bulls. It is a $20/unit flat rate, and he stated that most of the money goes back to the breeders. He will carry some of that semen with him. ADA Mid-East Report: Scott reported that there is a movement to recapture consumer trust and confidence, and also to partner with existing brands to get more dairy ingredients into their products. Food banks appreciate the

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milk donations, as needy folks stop purchasing milk when they are low on money. Ohio Dairy & Holstein Education Fund: Tom Thorbahn reported that there are three trustees for this board, and the money can be used for the National Convention. Julie Renner, Paul Haskins, and Regina Berg are the current trustees, and Regina’s term is expiring. Kaye Janes was nominated for a 3-year term, and a motion was made, seconded, and carried. Executive Director Comments: Tom thanked the staff for their efforts and extended his sympathy to the Miley family over the loss of their mother. He also thanked Dave Gunkleman for his efforts as Marketing Director. And finally, he thanked Daniel Brandt for his efforts regarding last night’s sale, one of the best convention sales for a while. Nation Holstein Convention 2021: Tom reported that the Football Hall of Fame had promised to have their expansion done in time, but now are not committing to that. He and Julie Renner (co-chairs) met last night, and are leaning towards Columbus, the Convention Center (but are still exploring other options). They would work with COBA & Select Sires for tours and events. He encouraged the committees to start meeting, either in person on via phone conference. The current logo will be revealed during the luncheon, thanks for Cheri Oechsle’s continued efforts with that. Junior Report: A number of the Juniors have expressed interest in going to the 2019 Convention. A question was raised about how the raffle tickets are selling for the trailer raffle. Still slow, and a few folks have tickets here at the Convention. The drawing will be held at the conclusion of Grand Champion, and the winner receives the used of a new cattle trailer for one year, or $1,000. Sales Report: Ken Janes reported on the two sales held in 2018. The Fall sale was a loss, and the ’18 Convention Summer 2015


sale was a slight profit. Last night’s sale was very successful, and he was relieved to not have to fight the cold weather. The next sale will be at the Wooster Fairgrounds April 20th, and it will be a heifer tie-up sale. The place to source some show calves for 2019. The sale committee will decide later about having the summer and fall sales. Membership: Ken Janes reported that membership is down, and no district met “quota.” Encouraged us to sign up new members if someone is interested. Show Report: Steve Moff reported that the show committee had a meeting in December to go over All-Ohio awards. The Expo is coming up, and the National Judges contest will be March 28th in the Cooper Arena. Mark Rueth will be the Expo judge, and Yann Jacobs the State Fair judge. PDCA Report: Steve reported that there is a need for more donations from Ohio Holstein Association. Juniors are given $100 if they participate in all four challenges, and Guernsey donated some money recently. In the re-organization meeting with the board members later on, a motion was made to give $3,000. It was seconded and carried. Ohio News Report: Melissa thanked everyone for the continued support of the magazine and stated that she is open to feedback. She appreciates the “contract advertisers” and noted that they receive a discount, encouraging more folks to consider that. The next Ohio News will be out before the April Sale, so sale consignments can be advertised. Breed Improvement Committee: Paul Haskins reported on a nice Fall event at Simpsons. This year, Sexing Technologies would like to host an event. They are putting in new robots, etc. Annual Meeting Report: Julie Renner thanked the hosts for this convention, and the sale manager, and all the volunteers for their help keeping track of donations, sourcing and cutting the cheese into cubes and hauling a refrigerator here. She read off the Gold, 21

Silver and Bronze level sponsors. Next year’s convention is the 100-year anniversary. They are considering having it at Kalahari in Sandusky and are still brainstorming farm visits and Ohio Holstein history to showcase. Buckeye Breed Builder Committee: Jim Ray acknowledged Duane Logan and COBA’s support for the Ohio Holstein Association. He took over this role from Duane. He explained that this is a two-month process of which past winners and board members nominate and vote on a Buckeye Breed Builder and Junior Buckeye Breed Builder. There was discussion over the age break of 40 years old, and one versus two awards. It was decided to stay the same. Building Committee: An estimate was accepted from Tim Mast to fix the sidewalk. The Emergency Exit door will be re-sealed at some point. Maybe some gutter work to the front door area will be done too, per the renter’s suggestion. Women’s Committee: Lisa Mangun reported that there is around $11,000 in checking, and they are still trying to decide where 2021 Convention could best use that money. Resolutions Committee: John Hartline reported on three resolutions. 1) The first one thanked the host district for preparing for this convention. A motion was made to accept the resolution, seconded, and carried. 2) The second one thanked the Farm tour hosts for their gracious efforts. A motion was made to accept the resolution, seconded, and carried. 3) The third one was a proposal sent by the Board for the Holstein Association USA to reduce their registration fees by 50% for the period of one year. After much discussion with President Boyd Schaufelberger, a motion was made to approve this resolution, seconded, and carried. HAUSA Board President Boyd Schaufelberger thanked everyone for letting him come. He wanted to explain about the Holstein Reserve Fund, that many folks question why it is so big, at $27 million. The Audit committee manages that amount, and a decision

was made a few years ago that 95% of their yearly expenses be in the reserve fund. That is 18-19 million. Also, the board decided that the extra money could not be taken out for operating expenses, but rather for special projects. Currently they are using some for an IT upgrade, and also considering some research projects as well. Suggestions were made to reduce the fees for late registrations (catchups), and to make official pedigrees free (like CDN). A number of comments expressing frustration towards National Association were expressed, as well as concern for small farmers who are considering stopping their classification and registrations. Jonathan Lamb addressed the group. He is a candidate for Vice President, HAUSA board. He identified some common themes he is hearing from this convention and other places: - Low milk prices - Renewing the conversation about the dairy stabilization program - How do we add value to registered cattle? - Classification needs looked at, to identify some way to have more cows evaluated - How does the HAUSA remain relevant? - People are getting more interested in genetics and genomics - Expressed appreciation to Bill Indoe’s speech, expressing frustration with HAUSA’s perceived lack of concern for farmers considering ceasing their registrations and classification - Encouraged anyone to contact him with comments in the future A motion was made to adjourn the meeting, seconded, and carried. The next Ohio Holstein Board meeting will be April 19th @ the Wooster Office, at 11:00, Executive committee at 10:30 am. The Board Re-organization meeting was help, and it was proposed for Scott Sprunger to stay on the executive committee, and Joe Cole to be added. Motion was made, seconded and carried.

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By Maggie Mathews, Ohio Junior Holstein Association Reporter The Juniors had a great turn-out for our Friday evening event at the Ohio Holstein Annual Meeting in Warren, Ohio on March 8, 2019. On Saturday morning, we had our own “Junior� Annual Meeting and accomplished many things. Our 2019 Board of Directors consists of Ava Budny, Cora Gunkelman, Grace Gunkelman, Tim Gunkelman, Colton Hastings, Allison McCommons, Maggie Mathews, Korey Oechsle, Keaton Topp, and Kinley Topp. Our 2019 officers are: President: Keaton Topp Vice President: Kinley Topp Secretary: Allison McComas Treasurer: Korey Oecshle Reporters: Maggie Mathews Grace Gunkelman We selected awards for the Spring Dairy Expo Junior Holstein Shows, as well as ideas for State Fair. If any Juniors have suggestions for unique award ideas, please contact one of the Junior Directors before May 1st so we can include your

ideas in our decision-making. Congratulations to Kinley Topp for being crowned the 2019 Ohio Holstein Queen and all of the award and scholarship winners that were recognized during the Annual Meeting luncheon. We still have plenty of raffle tickets on sale. All proceeds will benefit the National Junior Holstein Convention, which will be hosted by Ohio in 2021. Winners of the raffle will receive the choice of $1000 in cash or a 1-year lease of a 2020 7x24 Black Wilson trailer. To purchase tickets, please see a Junior member or contact the Ohio Holstein Office. Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $20. If you are interested in going to the National Convention in Wisconsin as an Ohio Junior in June 2019, please notify the Ohio Holstein Office as soon as you can. Deadlines to register for Junior Competitions are quickly approaching. For a complete list of Junior competitions and entry deadlines, please visit www.holsteinusa.com and click on the Junior link.

May/June September/October November/December January/February March/April

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June 10 September 25 December 5 February 5 April 5


Queen’s Corner

By Kinley Topp

Hello, my name is Kinley Topp, and I am from District 14. I am the daughter of Keith and Kindra Topp. I’m 17 years old and a junior at Botkins High School where I participate in many activities, such as FFA, soccer, basketball, and 4-H. I was given my first Holstein cow, Paxton, when I turned one. The next year I entered the show ring with my father for PeeWee showmanship. From that moment on I was hooked. Showing has always been a passion but I feel winning showmanship means so much more than winning a class. This helped me learn that hard work pays off in the showring even if your animal isn’t the best. As some of you may already know, I will be serving as your 2019-2020 Ohio Holstein Queen. Congratulations to everyone who participated at the Spring Show. We had a fantastic show with many quality animals. I always enjoy seeing

the hard work of many pay off at such a grand show. Growing up, I have always had a profound love for the Holstein cow, but more importantly, I have learned to love and respect the dairy industry. Ever since I was a little girl, I have wanted to be the Ohio Holstein Queen. Granted, that was just me wanting to wear a pretty dress and crown in the Futurity just like my grandmother. I specifically remember the time my grandma wore a red dress in the futurity and I could not stop staring at her because of how beautiful she was in my eyes. Now I realize being queen means so much more than that. Over the past five years, I have realized that people don’t understand what dairy farmers do for America. Misconceptions have plagued our nation and caused turmoil. During my year as queen, my goal is to spread the truth about our industry. A there is no better way to spread the word than being the face and voice of a wonderful organization. During my journey of being a representative for the breed I look forward to informing people about the breed and industry while meeting new people and catching up with old acquaintances at district, state, and national shows. Good luck to everyone for the upcoming show season and our ventures of educating the public on the benefits of our products.

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We’ll look for the past queen information. Hopefully we can meet during the year to prepare for the 100th anniversary celebration. The meeting was adjourned and Louise led us making a leather flower pin. Good time was had by all. Respectfully submitted, Sara Twining Ohio Holstein Women secretary

Ohio Holstein Women Annual Meeting March 9, 2019

President Louise Harding called the meeting to order. Minutes were read and approved from the March 2018 Annual meeting. Treasurer Lisa Mangun gave her report. Last year we spent $70 for an ad in the Ohio News to advertise our sale items selling some, but not much. We still have about 70100 cookbooks at the office for sale if anyone wants some. We did not purchase anything for the Holstein office this year. An item was purchased to send to the National Convention Women’s sale. Ending checkbook balance is $11,062.19. Becci Hartline moved we accept the Treasurer’s report; second Jane Moff; motion passed. Committees were set up for the year: Woman of the Year committee: Becky McDonnell, Becki Hartline, with Kristy Ackley going on the committee; Queen committee: Megan Lawson, Jeneva Auble, with Julie Harding Grove new on the committee. The Ohio Holstein Board gives $1300 toward the Queen contest. Scholarship committee: Julie Renner. We discussed the 2021 National Convention plans. Jane Moff has attended the national conventions lately. Instead of an exclusively women’s meeting, activity or tour, the trend seems to be Non-delegate activities. We had discussed giving a Welcome to Ohio gift in 2020 for 2021: maybe tote bag with an Ohio Holstein Women cookbook, but that may not fit how things are done 28

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now. We are willing to donate toward a welcome gift or toward the Dairy Bar or toward a non-delegate sight-seeing tour. Julie Renner caught us up on the plans for the 2021 national convention. We voted to keep the same officers for next year: President Louise Harding, Vice-president Becky McDonnell, Treasurer Lisa Mangun, Secretary Sara Twining with the motion made by Jane Moff; seconded by Becci Hartline; unanimous affirmative vote. Jane Moff reported on the Woman of the Year committee. Under new business Louise Harding volunteered to do the sash for the Queen next year. Next year’s Ohio Convention is to be at Kalahari in Sandusky. Since it is the 100th year of the Ohio Holstein Association, we’d like to do something special. We’ll go through to find and invite the past Ohio Holstein Presidents, queens and Women of the year. Another idea was a slide show from the past hundred years to be shown at the state convention and hopefully to be available on our website. We’ll try to work through Pete Spike, Esther Welch and family and the office to get photos and details. Sara Twining moved the Ohio Holstein Women finance this project up to $500; seconded by Becci Hartline; motion passed. Jane Moff had a list of the past Women of the year. Sara Twining will go through the secretary’s books to find the past OHW presidents.

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Ohio Holstein Women’s Auction The Ohio Holstein Women would like to thank everyone for another successful auction. Thank you to all those who donated items or purchased items, we could not do this without your support. There were 24 total items that were donated. We received donations of Wine & Cheese, farming signs, calf supplies, show supplies, maple syrup baskets, Easter baskets, cow prints, bath soaps an outdoor metal flower. Donations were made by District 7, Districts 1 & 2, District 3, District 8, District 5, Paul Harris, Bloomfield Livestock Auction, Mahoning Holstein Club, Toppview Farm, Julie Renner, Lorawae Holsteins, Jim & Donna Beardsley, Ted Renner Family, Sugar Harvest Farm, Denise Rhoads, North East Ohio Holstein Show, Julie Holler, Paul Haskins, Rita Kibler Estate & Alice Jukes Martin. Buyers were Ken Janes, Joe Cole, Jenny Thomas, Nevin and Brenda Lamoreaux, Paul Haskins, Jay and Kristy Ackley, Bill Indoe, Bill and Pauline McCarns, Steve and Jane Moff, Tom Thorbahn, Jim Ray, Judy Wolford, Lad and Brenda Hastings, Laurie Menzie, Mary Lou Topp, Kinley Topp, Barb Lumley, Steve and Michelle Specht, Molly Frey and Ted Renner. The total money raised was $1,990.00.


2021 National Holstein Convention Logo Launched

The 2021 National Holstein Convention Publicity Committee is pleased to present to you the logo for the 2021 convention. The committee is comprised of Co-chairs Bill Indoe and Cheri Oechsle with committee members Annie Specht, Amy Miley, Hannah Dye, Melissa Hart, Kayla Overholt, Robin Alden, Jeneva Auble, Morgan McDonnell and Esther and Karen Welch.

After several meetings at events, conference calls, and lots of mass emails, almost a dozen design samples were developed. The committee wanted to represent the best of Ohio, incorporating the deep heritage, rich culture, outstanding cows and breeders and develop a welcoming brand that would set the stage for a much-anticipated event. Thanks to Annie Specht who spearheaded interpreting the brainstorming sessions of the committee into graphics to present to the board. The committee and board determined that Brookview Tony Charity be a focal point, and that the colors represent the traditional colors of Ohio with Red, grey, black and white. After several board presentations and re-designs, and a change in convention location, several more mass email brainstorm sessions, the Welch gals nailed the slogan with Ohio, Where Opportunities Abound. We look forward to rolling out a Facebook page and other social media sites to begin to present the National Convention plans. A future website, promotional and sponsorship opportunities and more are in the works as we prepare to host this grand event in Ohio, Where Opportunities Abound. --Cheri Oechsle and Bill Indoe Co-Chairs 2021 NHC Promotional Committee

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OPDA Holds Board Elections Columbus -- The Board of Directors for the Ohio Dairy Producers Association recently elected their 2019 officers. Officers are: Chair - Joe Miley of West Salem Vice Chair, Producers - John Douglass of Marshallville Producer Representative - Terry Stammen of New Weston Vice Chair, Organizations - Chuck Moellendick of Pleasantville

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Organization Representative - Rob Bouic of Milford Center The ODPA Board of Directors also approved the 2019 budget and established priorities for the year. ODPA will continue to serve Ohio's dairy farmers by representing their best interest in legislative affairs and regulatory issues, providing producer education opportunities, supporting practical dairy research and promoting a positive dairy

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image. In addition, ODPA will continue to work with the state agencies of Ohio Department of Agriculture, Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, and other state leadership to position itself as a resource in decisions that may impact Ohio's dairy industry.


Jane Miley

In Memoriam

Jane Miley, 87, passed away peacefully early Friday morning, March 8, 2019, at LifeCare Hospice of Wooster. Born May 6, 1931 in Lodi, OH, she was the daughter of Bill and Mary Brubaker Whitmore. She graduated from Burbank High School in 1949. Jane attended Ashland College and received her bachelor’s degree in music education in 1953. A Jane was the 1952 May Queen at Ashland College. She was the first queen in the history of Ashland College to crown her sister Jeanette May Queen the following year. Jane began her teaching career at Norwayne in the fall of 1953. She taught music to all grades in four different schools until 1957. Jane then taught music at the Northwestern elementary and high school levels in 1958 and 1959. She loved teaching music and cared deeply for her students. She would always run into former students and call them all by name. On March 24, 1959, Jane married Jim Miley in Burbank.. They were married for 53 years. Together they established Miley Holstein Farms where Jane raised the calves and maintained the farm books and records. Feeding calves brought her great joy. She always said, “Don’t feel sorry for me because I have to go to the barn, feel sorry for me when I can’t.” Together, she and Jim raised their four children, Joe, Jon, Julie, and Jackie, on the family farm. Many summers Jane and Jim hosted underprivileged children from Cleveland through an organization called Friendly Town. She volunteered with voter registration on many election days. Jane was a member of the Ohio Holstein Association and was named Holstein Woman of the Year in 1994. She was also a member of the District 7 Holstein Club. Jane had many dear friends. She was never in a hurry and always made people feel valued and loved. She was truly a wonderful woman. She had a passion for antiques and especially appreciated their connection to family members of prior generations. She was most recently a member of St. Peter Lutheran Church, but belonged to several churches throughout her life where she served as a soloist, choir director and also sang in the choir. She happily sang at many of her dear friends’ weddings. She was a music director for the Ruritan musicals at Northwestern High School. Jane enjoyed doing the Jumble and holding babies, toads, and frogs. She always made sure her children and grandchildren used proper grammar. Jane was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Miley, on December 17, 2012, her father, C.W. Whitmore in 1973, and her mother, Mary Etta (Brubaker) Whitmore in 1968. Jane is survived by her children, Joe (Diana), Jon (Amy) of West Salem, Julie (Shawn) Miller of Bellevue and Jackie (Wayne) Russell of Sheldon Springs, VT. She dearly loved her grandchildren, Jason (Amy) and Anna Miley, Adam and David Miley, Leah and Hallie Miller, and Shayley and Ben Russell. She is also survived by her sister and brother-in-law, Jeanette and Tom Loy of West Salem; sisters-inlaw, Kathy Purdy of Glen Ellyn, IL, Betty Chavis (Bill) Spicer of Craig, Colorado, and Jean (Phil) Keener of West Salem, along with several nieces and nephews. No one knows for sure who her favorite grandchild is, but we all have our suspicions. Jane often mentioned how much she enjoyed seeing the wonderful people at the Wooster Hospital during her exercise sessions.

The family would like to thank all who cared for her. Memorial gifts may be sent to St. Peter Lutheran Church, 9451 Ashland Road, Wooster. Matteson Funeral Home in West Salem is handling the arrangements.

Peter Kepner

Peter Donald Kepner, 83, of Hartford, passed away Tuesday morning, April 17, 2018, in Sharon Regional Medical Center in Sharon, Pa. He was born Nov. 18, 1934, in Youngstown, the son of Leon and Veda MacCleery Kepner. He was a Hartford High School graduate and a 1956 graduate of The Ohio State University. He was a member of the Army Reserves for six years. He was owner of Kepwood Farm, which was established in 1858. Peter was a member of the Hartford United Methodist Church, the AGS Fraternity at OSU, the Trumbull County Farm Bureau, the National Holstein Association and the Trumbull County Holstein Association, where he was past president and a past secretary for District 1. He was a supervisor for the Trumbull Continued on Page 37

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Ohio Holstein Convention

Senior Buckeye Breed Builder Steve Buschur

The 2019 Senior Buckeye Breed Builder Award was presented to Steve Buschur of Plain-Knoll Holsteins at the recent Ohio Holstein Association Annual meeting in on March 9, 2019. While Steve was not in attendance at the convention, he was humbled to receive the award. “It is quite the honor to receive this award, knowing of all the terrific breeders in this state. It is an award that I never even considered being qualified to receive.” Steve continued, “To be honest, I don’t look at myself as a breeder so much as just a dairy farmer that appreciates all the great things this Holstein breed has to offer. I was taught by my brothers early on that good genetics is always a good investment. I have always thought that one of the great things about our industry is that there are many ways of doing things right. I believe that our philosophy is one of those ways.” Plain-Knoll Holsteins in New Weston is home to approximately 690 milking Registered Holsteins, along with about 100 dry cows, 850 heifers, and 120 bulls, raised on different farms. The 1250 acres they farm provides most of their forage needs for the dairy. The four brothers, Pat, Jake, Jim and Steve Buschur along with their employees and more than two dozen nieces and nephews over the years, keep the dairy running smoothly. Steve’s daughter, Mackenzie Bertke, works with the genetic and IVF business where they are a satellite facility with Trans Ova Genetics. “I would say that for the past 12 years or so, we have tried to focus on profitability traits more than anything else. While we used to use the highest type bulls, milking 125 Durhams at one point, we have learned that it doesn’t 32

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make as much sense to breed that way if we aren’t a show herd,” Steve explained. But he said they still like beautiful cows, “They just aren’t extremely tall and dairy, but rather moderate stature and strong with enough dairy character to give a lot of milk and fat and do it easy. We breed for healthy cows that can breed back fast. We breed for cows that can move freely on good feet and legs and good rump structure. And who doesn’t like milking cows with great udders?” Milking three times per day in a double 20 parallel parlor, the breeding decisions for the herd have been based on the best genetics available. “I select for the highest GTPI and have used almost exclusively genomic young sires for the past several years because they have proven to be superior cattle in our herd due to the more modern genetics.” Steve continued, “I look at production, milk, fat and protein pounds first and try to avoid bulls that aren’t really good on health traits, especially DPR and SCS.” There have been several marquee cow families developed at Plain-Knoll, “The best cow we have bred and probably ever worked with is Plain-Knoll Mogul Mariah.” Steve continued, “She is the dam of King Royal, Advance, Jaguar, and Revolt. We are also working with a number of her daughters and granddaughters now.” Steve summed it up, “Registered Holsteins provide something for everybody, from the most dedicated show herds, to registered breeders, to the commercial dairy farmers. I have wondered how necessary crossbreeding is when we can select for the extreme traits that we want to gain from crossbreeding, but still have our pure Holstein cow.”


Ohio Holstein Convention

Junior Buckeye Breed Builder Jason Miley

Jason Miley is the fourth generation on Miley Holsteins Farm and the third generation to receive the Junior Buckeye Builder award, presented to him and his wife, Amy, at the Ohio Holstein Association Annual Convention in Warren on March 9, 2019. Jason’s father, Joe Miley won it and grandfather Jim, won the coveted award as well. When Jason found out he was going to be honored with this award, he told his grandmother Jane Miley, just days before she passed away from an illness. “Our entire family feels honored that three generations have received this award. My grandma was especially excited about it, that meant a lot to me,” Jason stated. Miley Holsteins consists 250 milking females, 250 heifers and 400 acres. Their herd is 100 percent registered and 99 percent home bred with a herd average of 27,000 pounds of milk, 950 pounds of fat and 750 pounds of protein. The Mileys have worked hard at breeding the best and that has resulted in 35 excellent cows, 100 very good and over 30 Gold Medal Dams and 40 Dams of Merit. They have earned the Progressive Breeder Registry award fourteen times. Jason commented, “We strive to breed functional, high type cows that will produce a high volume of components over multiple lactations.” Their sire selection is focused on balance, “When selecting sires we look at for bulls with balanced proofs that

ley Avalanche Genesse, at the Canadian Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and she is now owned in partnership with Bowen, Conroy and Doeberiener. Mileys began showing red and whites and they are now a significant portion of their breeding program. Jason serves on the Red and White Dairy Cattle Association Board of Directors, serves on the OHA Sale and Show committees and Miley Holsteins show at the county, district and state levels. Jason concluded, “I feel very honored to be recognized. There are many great breeders in Ohio and it’s a privilege to see my name listed among them.”

check as many boxes as possible, not necessarily the most extreme type or production bulls.” Jason continued, “Traits we pay close attention to are PTAT, fat and protein yield, and somatic cell score as well as the pedigree. We use a mix of proven and young bulls and are not afraid to go back to a bull that has worked well, even if he’s not new or ‘hot.’” All Jason has ever known are registered Holsteins since they have been on the farm since the 1950s. In presenting the award, Jim Ray commented that he has watched Jason grow into a great judge and believes he will be “one of the best ones coming up through the ranks.” Jason picked out his first 4-H calf and she ended up being EX-93 with over 50 decedents in the herd. Last year, Miley Holsteins bred the 2018 Best Bred and Owned Senior Calf, MiOHIO NEWS

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The U.S. reclaimed the title of the world’s largest single-country cheese exporter

Suppliers shipped 2.188 million tons of milk powders, cheese, butterfat, whey products and lactose in 2018

The top 5 markets for U.S. exports are Mexico, Southeast Asia, Canada, China and South Korea.

RECORD YEAR FOR EXPORTS U.S. dairy exports reached record-high volumes this year, rising to the equivalent of 15.8% of U.S. milk solids production in 2018.

U.S. dairy exports reached a record-high volume in 2018, increasing 9% over the prior year despite retaliatory tariffs from Mexico and China, weak commodity markets and a fourth-quarter slowdown.

Suppliers shipped 2.188 million tons of milk powders, cheese, butterfat, whey products and lactose in 2018, and total dairy exports added up to 1.993 million tons of total milk solids. The value of U.S. exports was $5.59 billion, 2% more than the prior year. Exports rose to the equivalent of 15.8% of U.S. milk solids production in 2018, the highest percentage ever in a calendar year. Over the previous three years, exports were equivalent to 14.2% of production.

U.S. Dairy Exports - Percent of Production

1996-2018

TOTAL MILK SOLIDS, % OF U.S. PRODUCTION

The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC), funded by the dairy checkoff program, helped exporters achieve the record-high year. USDEC works to increase U.S. dairy exports — not by selling product, but by providing exporters with practical guidance to capitalize on opportunities while minimizing costs and risks.

Source: U.S. Dairy Export Council, U.S. Bureau of Census

U.S. export gains were led by record shipments of dry ingredients: nonfat dry milk/skim milk powder, high-protein whey products and lactose. However, performance was dimmed by a fourth-quarter slump, during which volume declined 11% year-over-year, after posting a 16% increase in the first three quarters. Loss of sales to China — America’s third-largest single-country market — followed mid-year retaliatory tariffs, playing a role in the year-end decline. U.S. sales to China were up 17% in the first half of the year but fell 33% in the second half — a drop of more than 10,400 tons of product per month. Exports to Southeast Asia also faded toward year-end, sliding 18% in November-December, while shipments to Japan were down 10 percent throughout the second half. Mexico and Southeast Asia remained the top two overseas destinations for U.S. dairy products in 2018, accounting for 39% of total export value. Canada, China and South Korea rounded out the top five markets. Among other markets, U.S. suppliers posted increased sales last year to the Middle East/North Africa region and the Caribbean. For more information, visit www.USDEC.org

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Yesterday’s Cowpath Leading up to the 100th Anniversary of the Ohio Holstein Association, Barb Lumley will be writing a special column featuring special points in time for the Ohio Holstein Association. Enjoy your walk down Yesterday’s Cowpath. By Barb Lumley The following is from the Ohio Holstein News Vol. 11 December 1948 No. 10 The color of the cover is red and white, the logo features the head of a Holstein cow with horns centered in a large O. The headline is New National Champion in the Dellinger Herd, Plain City. Beneath her picture it reads --National Fat Champion for 2x milking, 365 days, is the title won by this cow, Bess Ormsby Fobes Creator 1797180, in the Dellinger herd at Plain City, Ohio. Starting at 12 years, 7 months, she produced 23,390 pounds of milk, 969.4of fat, with a 4.1% test. The inside cover is a full page Note of Appreciation from Robert R. Dodez, Fountain Valley Farms, Apple Creek, Ohio, and reads as follows: Our dispersal sale November 3 was a highly successful event, and there is real gratification, at time of retirement, to think that breeders near and far were so interested in securing breeding stock from the herd which was built up over the years. . . We have found Holstein people a grand lot of folks, and we are convinced that Holstein-Friesians are the greatest cows in America. We shall watch development of the breed, and of the herds of friends and neighbors with interest . . . May we wish pleasant Christmas and New Year holidays to our many friends of the Holstein fraternity! On the next three pages you find ads from Fountain Valley Farm, Robert R. Dodez, Apple Creek, Ohio; Sunnydale Farms, Horace Stewart, Jewett, Ohio; H. J. Ringler, Rochester, Ohio and H. B. Rowland, Wellington, Ohio; FleetWing Farms, Sharon Center, Ohio; Walter B. Crahan, Napoleon, Ohio and White star Farms, Harold C. Schmuck, 36

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M.D., Louisville, Ohio. The top selling cow at the October sale at Wooster, Ohio, was Abbekerk Pabst Dewdrop 2915047, a three year old consigned by Elden Gerken of Napoleon. She was purchased for $700 by H. V. Grant for the Frank Hoover herd at North Canton. The average was $435 on 62 head. The November sale sponsored by the state association averaged $452 on 63 animals. Selling for $800 was a daughter of Dunloggin Footprint consigned by M. F. Dellinger, Plain City, and purchased by C. S. Schmelzer, Columbus. Pictured was Dunloggin Footprint, with the following comment, “A proved sire that served the Andreas and Dellinger herds, was sold by the latter to Northern Ohio Breeding Association at Tiffin, privately at $5,000. So far as we know, the highest-priced bull changing hands in Ohio up to December 1.” An article told about Eugene Raber, Sugarcreek, Ohio, who was in charge of the Holstein herd recently started by northern Baptist Mission Board at the Mission School Farm, Barranquitas, Puerto Rico. The foundation herd originating in eastern Pennsylvania is purebred and it is hoped that a seed-stock dispersal center will be established. Natives were astounded when Mr. Raber milked 66 pounds from one member of the herd in a single day. An article titled “Have You An Answer?” asked, “What is your opinion on herd classification? Does it serve its purpose today? Does it need adjustment or revision in anyway?” Answers were written by R. H. Barr, Canton, Ohio and Wm. J. Baldwin, Lexington, Ohio. Mr. Baldwin commented, “And so to the man who has a firm desire to breed better cattle, let him make use of all information and services available through his HolsteinFriesian Association”. A successful tour was taken by the Stark County Holstein Club on October 28th with forty five participants. Herds

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visited were C. L. Isreal, Beloit, the C.T. Shreve herd at Damascus and Trumbull County Experiment Farm, Cortland. Two new Gold Medal sires were announced during the year. Greenwood Dale Ormsby is now owned by the Northern Ohio Breeders Association. USDA proving shows 13 daughters with 23 records which average 13,251 pounds milk and 492 of fat with 3.7% test. Twenty five classified daughters average 82.9. Winterthur Posch Ormsby Fobes is herd sire at Sam Johnson’s Windy Shade Farm near Cincinnati. He has a classification score of 81.1 on 83% of all daughters old enough to classify. His daughters, all in the Johnson herd, have made from 525 to 571 lbs. as two year olds and a three year old did 603, all on 2x milking. A column called “Fourth Estate” was written by HSD (Howard S. Dodge) and told of various breeders and happenings in Ohio. He concluded the column with, “As a finale, this column wishes to say Merry Christmas to all. It has been a great year and we consider that 1949 holds equal promise. If not before, see you at the 1949 Annual State Meeting. In 1948 the Ohio Holstein News was published by The Dodge Publishing Company, Salem, Ohio. Editor was Howard S. Dodge; Associate Editor, Eldon Groves; Field Representatives I. D. Hadley and George Nichols and Secretary, Lena Wells. Officers of the Ohio Holstein-Friesian Association, Inc. were President, Kenneth Indoe, Lodi; Vice-President, R. H. Barr, Canton; Secretary, Dr. Benj. Studer, Orrville; Treasurer, Dr. H. O. Fredrick, Ashtabula. All Club presidents and secretaries were also listed. There were 39 pages in the magazine, with 44 ads, 39 were breeder ads. The back cover was black and featured lighted Christmas decorations and the following message, “May the light burn ever brighter in your homes this holiday season”. S. S. Sprunger and Family


In Memoriam

Continued from Page 31

County Soil and Water District, a consultant for the Brookside Research Lab, a chairman of the Hartford Zoning Commission and had been a 4-H advisor. Peter is survived by his wife, Mary Dye Kepner, whom he married June 16, 1957; a daughter, Valerie (Marleen) Kepner of Oberlin; three sons, Jeoffrey (Dawn) Kepner of London, Ohio, Jonathan Kepner of Hartford and Gregory (Kelly) Kepner of Marysville; three grandchildren, Adrian, Peter and Molly; and four great-grandsons. He was preceded in death by his parents; an infant son; a brother, Dr. Karl Kepner; and a nephew, Kevin Kepner. Friends and relatives may call 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, May 4, at Galloway-Onstott Funeral Home, 3451 state Route 7, Hartford. The funeral service will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 5, at the Hartford United Methodist Church, 6846 state Route 305, Hartford. The Rev. MaryAnn Rufener will officiate. Burial is in Oakwood Cemetery, Sharon, Pa. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be sent to OFSWCD Auxiliary Scholarship, 8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, Ohio 43068, or the person’s favorite charity.

Betty Zimmer

Betty Haessly Zimmer, 84, of Marietta passed away March 17, 2019 at her home surrounded by her family. She was born August 3, 1934 in Chambersburg, Ohio to the late Norman E. and Dorothy Marie (Rang) Haessly, Sr. Betty was a 1952 graduate of the Goshen Union High School, Damascus, OH. After high school she went to Indiana to study as a telephone operator. She moved to Dover, Ohio and worked as an operator until she moved to Marietta in 1956. After moving to

Marietta Betty worked in the family business, Haessly Lumber, where she was a very dedicated worker. On March 12, 1960, she married Paul Zimmer and moved to the family farm where she became an significant member of the Zimmerview Dairy Farm family. He preceded her in death on September 21, 2015. Hospitality was Betty’s gift and she tried to meet every ones needs through food, friendship and caring. She always put others first. Betty had great drive in her life both personal and professional. She was a member Wagner Union Church, where she served in various ministries with Operation Christmas Child being dear to her heart. Surviving are her sons: Brent (Nancy) Zimmer, Dean (Susan) Zimmer, and Bruce (Shari) Zimmer all of Marietta; 6 grandchildren: Lisa (Donny) McNish, Kurt Zimmer, Beth (James) Giffin, Amy Zimmer, Eric (Frankie Grum) Zimmer, Tyler Zimmer and great grandchildren Laiken Giffin and Lexi McNish. Also surviving is her brother Norman “ Jack” E. (Mary) Haessly, Jr. of Marietta. Messages of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.Lankfordfh.com. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate memorial donations Wagner Union Church or Samaritan’s Purse – Operation Christmas Child.

All-National Showcase Program Launched by Holstein USA Brattleboro, VT — Holstein Association USA announces an exciting new award recognizing U.S. Registered Holstein® cows and their owners for exceptional performance at National Holstein Shows. The All-National Showcase Program is designed to add value to Registered Holstein cattle and reward their participation in National Shows. “Having another recognition program for Registered Holsteins is very exciting for us. A lot of sports have points-driven contests throughout the season to determine the overall best of the best, and this program will mirror that,” says Jodi Hoynoski, Executive Director, Holstein Identification & Member Services. To be eligible, animals must be registered in the Holstein Association USA herdbook on or before November 15 in the award year. Animals will be eligible to earn points at each National Holstein Show exhibited at throughout the year. Points are allocated for a top 10 placing in their respective uniform age class, based on the size of the show. Bonus points will be awarded to champions. In each of the uniform show classes, the top 10 animals earning the most points will be recognized on the Holstein Association USA website and will receive a certificate. For the top two animals, the website will feature a picture and pedigree link, and the recognition will be added to the animal's Official Holstein PedigreeTM. All-National results will be posted on the website in December. Full details on the All-National Showcase Program rules and point system can be found at www.holsteinusa. com/showcase. For questions please contact Jodi Hoynoski at 800.952.5200, ext. 4261 or by email. OHIO NEWS

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Ohio Holstein Convention Sale Averages $5492

The first-ever convention video sale provided a relaxing atmosphere where people enjoyed the sale while visiting with others in a warm place on a cold March evening.

By Barb Lumley A large crowd was on hand for the Ohio Holstein Convention sale held Friday evening, March 8, 2019 in the Grand Pavilion at the Avalon Inn, Warren, Ohio. This was the first Ohio Holstein Association consignment sale without the live animals being presented at the sale. Consignments were sold in catalog order. Pine-Tree 7612 Mari 8174-ET, Lot 1, born 10/24/18 and with a +2858 GTPI, sold for $23,000 to Jason Faria, Dumas, Texas. She was consigned by Pine-Tree Dairy, Matthew Steiner and Family, Marshallville, Ohio. She is sired by Progenesis Marius and her dam is by Progenesis Fortune, due to calve June 21, 2019. Her family features 12 generations of Very Good and Excellent dams including Wesswood-HC Rudy Missy, 2014 Global Cow of the Year and OCD Supersire 9882-ET, who sold for $270,000 in the 2016 World Classic Sale. 38

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Lot 2A, BGP SL D26 Rolan 18147-ET, born 1/13/19 and with prelim. genomics +2872 GTPI, sold for $19,000 to BrandtView Farms, Annville, Pennsylvania. Sired by Progenesis Modest Rolan 512, her dam Triple Crown Delta 26-ET is classified Very Good 88, due to be rescored in April and her sire is Mr Mogul Delta 1427-ET. The nine generations of Very Good and Excellent dams include the dam of Monarch and the dam of Robust, Bob, and Punch. She was consigned by Bovine Genomic Partners and Swisslane Farms, Belding, Michigan. Selling for $14,750 was Lot 3, Zimmerview Delta Tess-ET +2839 GTPI consigned by Zimmerview Dairy, Dean Zimmer and Family, Marietta, Ohio and purchased by Jason Faria, Dumas, Texas. Born 7/6/18, she is sired by Mr Mogul Delta 1427-ET and from a daughter of Mr Pre Director 57512-ET, with eight generations of outstanding dams includ-

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ing Snow-N-Denises Dellia EX 95 2E, the dam of Durham and Dundee. Lot 4, BGP SL Hyb Crimson 18148ET born 1/14/19 sold for $17,500 to Curtis Thrush, Milan, Pennsylvania. With +2827 GTPI, she is an early daughter of ABS Crimson-ET and from a daughter of Bacon-Hill Pety Modesty-ET, with 10 generations Very Good and Excellent dams behind her, including Wesswood-HC Rudy Missy. The sale average was $5492.50 on 30 consignments that included live individuals, choices and embryo packages. Auctioneer for the sale was Randall Kiko, Salem, Ohio, with sale manager, Daniel Brandt, Annville, Pennsylvania, reading the pedigrees. The bidding on Cowbuyer was handled by Chad Griffith, Bethel, Ohio. Consignments sold to Texas, Pennsylvania, California, New York, Florida, Wisconsin and Ohio. Refreshments were provided by the District 1 Holstein Club.


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All About Holsteins proud of the accomplishments they have made My love of Holsteins began when my Dad over the years. There is an article on a 60 day bought our first Holstein bull calf and brought reduction in fees ending August 15, 1933. All him home in the trunk of our old Chrysler registrations are 75 cents, all transfers $1.00, coupe. Mom drove and Dad held on! We had and memberships, life or limited, $10.00. cows and calves of all colors but this calf was I have a copy of the catalog for the 1961 our first black and white and I thought he National Convention Sale held Thursday, was beautiful. He gave us our first cross-bred June 8, 1961 at the Berea Fairgrounds near Holsteins and started us on our path to purebred Cleveland, Ohio. There were ninety (90) Holsteins. consignments in the sale. There is no name on Our first purebred Holstein cow came from the catalog however some prices are marked. the dispersal of a herd in our area owned by There are several Ohio consigners, but very few a farmer named Kiko. I don’t remember his of the farms are still active today. first name and have no idea how he might be By Barb Lumley There is a copy of the official catalog and connected to the Kiko family we all know today. My Dad went to get the cow the next day after the sale. He program for the National Dairy Show held October 12 to 19, backed the truck up and dropped the tailgate. The owner 1940 at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Initials on the front cover instructed my Dad to wait a minute and he walked into the are M. S. P. There are five Ohio exhibitors. Does anyone remember the Ohio Holstein Buyers’ barnyard, picked up a rock and placed it under the tailgate. After the cow was loaded he handed the rock to my dad and Guide 1955-1956? It was put out by the Ohio Holstein said, “Place this rock under the tailgate before you unload Association and the editorial page reads, “Greetings From her and she will not be homesick and she will do well for Ohio”. Members of the Ohio Holstein-Friesian Association you”. My Dad did as instructed and those words proved true. are proud to present this “Buckeye Greeting” to members of She was a mid-sized cow, sharp and dairy, with a well-veined the Holstein fraternity all over the world and to welcome to and eye-catching udder. She lasted several years and gave us membership in our own active association all of you “New a really good daughter named Big Kiki and a granddaughter Buyers” of registered Holsteins in Ohio to whom we will named Little Kiki. They were both still in the herd when we be sending the “Buyers’ Guide” during 1955 and 1956.” The publication featured seventy five (75) advertisers. purchased our first registered heifer calves. I can hardly wait to get into the copy of the World’s My oldest son is well aware of my love for Holsteins, so he has been finding old Holstein magazines for me to read Fair National Sale held June 8-9, 1933 at the International and to aid in my writing. How interesting it is to read the old Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois. There are 148 registered Ohio Holsteins News magazines, Holstein-Friesian Worlds, Holstein consignments. The catalog is in mint condition and sale catalogs, etc. from years ago. Once we became involved the pedigrees and records are going to be interesting reading! with registered Holsteins, we subscribed to Holstein-Friesian There is also the catalog for The World Premiere sale held at World and received the Ohio Holstein News. It has always Madison, Wisconsin October 10, 1968. R. H. Hastings name been a happy day for me when I find a Holstein magazine in is written on the front cover, with several notations written the mailbox. I have been writing “Yesterday’s Cowpath” for on the inside of the front cover. Prices are marked. I have several Holstein magazines and publications from the Ohio News and I hope you are enjoying the items I choose for it. There are so many things to select from and I hope they other states including Pennsylvania, Indiana and Michigan, bring up interesting Holstein history and memories for you Holstein-Friesian Worlds, the New England Holstein Bulletin, and more. I recently read that as we age it is very just as they have for me. I recently received a new collection and there will be a important that we read to exercise the brain and keep it lot of interesting things to read about. One is The Holstein- working well. Obviously my brain is going to be well exercised as I Friesian World-- July 29, 1933 Vol. XXX No. 15 published every other Saturday and priced at $1.00 per year. (I wasn’t read all these magazines and publications about my favorite born yet!) Some of the articles are – Concerning Bull Indexes subject. I look forward to sharing information with you and # 3; a story on River Meadows Farms in New York and reminiscing about those “good ole Holstein days”. numerous interesting smaller articles. There are numerous pictures of cows and they definitely look different than the pictures we see today! Holstein breeders should be very OHIO NEWS

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Congratulations to Pine-Tree Dairy (D7) for being featured in the March 2019 issue of Holstein International!

Peter and Jean Spike are back from Florida for the summer season. Welcome home Spikes!

Suzy Lora was named the Ohio Holstein Woman of the Year for 2019. A complete feature will be in the MayJune issue of the magazine. Congratulations Suzy!

The Ohio Holstein Association will turn 100 years old in 2020. A special celebration will happen at the annual convention, please contact Julie Renner with your thoughts and ideas about how to celebrate 100 years of the OHA.

Alahna Lou Topp was born March 6th to parents Tanner and Shannon Topp (D7) of Wooster. Congratulations to the Topp Family! Any Junior interested in attending the National Holstein Convention in Wisconsin is urged to contact Tom Thorbhan for details.

Scott Higgins of The American Dairy Association Mideast provided Undeniably Dairy t-shirts for the OHA Board of Directors at the annual meeting and of course they put them on and posed for promotion!

If you have Grapevine items, please contact Melissa Hart at 517-398-1957 or send an email to farm.writer@hotmail.com 44

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Index of Advertisers ADA Mideast........................................................... 35 Agri-King................................................................... 11 Andrews Auctioneers........................................... 33 Brandt, Daniel......................................................... 25 COBA.......................................................................... 48 Commodity Specialists........................................ 40 Computermixx....................................................... 29 Dairy Agenda Today............................................. 34 Farmers National Bank......................................... 15 Harold’s Equipment.............................................. 25 Jaloda Farm............................................................. 25 Kalmbach Feeds..................................................... 47 Kidron Auction....................................................... 19 Kim R. Davis-Nationwide.................................... 27 Lowe & Young......................................................... 40 Meaden & Moore................................................... 42 Mennonite Mutual................................................ 42 Miley Holsteins....................................................... 17 New Pittsburg Vet Clinic..................................... 11 Ohio Beef Council.................................................. 46 Ohio Spring Sale.................................................... 43 OSU ATI..................................................................... 16

Calendar of Events

PBS Animal Health................................................ 19 Pine Tree Dairy........................................................ 23 Plain-Knoll Holsteins...............................................2 Prenger’s................................................................... 42 Randall Kiko Auctioneer..................................... 30 Ratta Applied Construction............................... 18 Richman Farms....................................................... 16 Rohaven Holsteins................................................ 10 Silent-b Reg. Holsteins/Nor-J Farms..................3 Spike Rentals........................................................... 42 ST Genetics.............................................................. 39 Steel-Lane Holsteins............................................. 24 Stein-Way Dairy.........................................................7 Stein-Way Equipment.......................................... 22 TenPenny Holsteins.................................................6 Trent Insurance...................................................... 31 U-Dean Farms............................................................5 W.G. Dairy Supply, Inc.......................................... 37 Walnut Hill Feeds................................................... 10 Wenger’s Sharpening Service........................... 45 Whiteleather Grain................................................ 19

April 2019 1 2 2 7 11 13 15 17 19 20 27

Dairy Bowl & Dairy Jeopardy entries must be received at HAUSA April Genetic Evaluations released Monthly Individual Genomic Predictions will be available Northeast Spring National Holstein Show, Syracuse, NY Southern Spring National Junior Holstein Show, Stillwater, OK Southern Spring National Holstein Show, Stillwater, OK Application deadline for Robert H. Rumler MBA Scholarship Raber Dairy Farm Dispersal, Louisville, OH Deadline to submit bylaw amendments to the HAUSA Executive Secretary Ohio Spring Sale, Wooster, OH Midwest Spring National & Junior Holstein Show, Madison, WI

May 2019

1 2019 National Convention number of delegates allowed determined for each state 5 Ohio Holstein News ad deadline 7 Monthly Individual Genomic Predictions will be available 16-17 Western Spring National Holstein Show, Richmond, UT 27 Office Closed - Observance of Memorial Day

June 2019 1 4 23-27 27-28

Junior ownership deadline for cows and heifers (including leased heifers) to be exhibited at National Shows. Transfers must be RECEIVED BY the Holstein Association USA office by this date Monthly Individual Genomic Predictions will be available National Holstein Convention, Appleton, WI Mid-East Summer National Holstein Show, Columbus, OH

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