Ohio Holstein News Nov/Dec issue

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Ohio

HOLSTEIN NEWS NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

THE OHIO HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION




Ohio

HOLSTEIN NEWS Official Publication of the Ohio Holstein Association

Volume 90 Number 5 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

Published 5 times per year in February, April, June, October and December by the OHIO HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION P.O. Box 479, Wooster, OH 44691 www.ohioholstein.com Subscription price in the U.S. is $30.00 per year ($10 per year for Junior Members). The NEWS subscription list is filed geographically by town and state. When you change your address, please be sure to give us your old address as well as the new one. Advertising rates available upon request. News and advertising forms close one month preceding date of issue. Address all mail to the: OHIO NEWS P.O. Box 479 • Wooster, OH 44691 330-264-9088 • Fax 330-263-1653 Email farm.writer@hotmail.com Send UPS or Fed Ex to 1375 Heyl Rd., Wooster, OH 44691 OFFICE STAFF Executive Director.......................................Tom Thorbahn cell 419-366-8135 crimsonswissrus@aol.com Office Secretary...............................................Diana Miley oholstein@sssnet.com Director, Marketing & Member Services. . David Gunkelman cell 330-464-3259 drgunkelman@yahoo.com Editor.............................................................Melissa Hart cell 517-398-1957 farm.writer@hotmail.com Webmaster......................................................Peter Spike spikeptr@aol.com OFFICERS President: Paul Haskins, Butler....................419-618-4028 Vice President: William Indoe, Lodi.............330-608-9770 Secretary: Ethan Steiner, Marshallville........330-466-8961 Treasurer: Lisa Mangun, Burbank................330-435-6520 EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS Randall Kiko, Salem - Past President...........330-831-0174 Scott Sprunger, Dalton................................330-465-0622 Ryan Welch, Polk.........................................419-651-5281 NATIONAL DIRECTOR Steve Moff, Columbiana .............................330-482-9018 BOARD MEMBERS Dist. 1 Gary Kibler, Warren...........................330-770-8014 Dist. 2 Rod Campbell, Minerva....................330-862-2028 Distr. 3 Steve Specht, Dover.........................330-343-1158 Dist. 4 Open Dist. 5 Dallas Rynd, Ashville........................740-207-5005 Dist. 7 Scott Sprunger, Dalton.....................330-465-0622 Dist. 7 Joe Miley, West Salem......................330-263-7814 Dist. 8 Ryan Welch, Polk..............................419-651-5281 Dist. 9 Joe Cole, Bloomville..........................740-396-0454 Dist. 10 Dan Morlock, Pemberville..............419-265-5771 Dist. 11 Kristy Ackley, East Liberty...............937-666-5502 Dist. 12 Kurt Topp, New Breman..................330-464-4960 Dist. 13 Open Dist. 14 Eric Topp, Wapakoneta....................419-953-3427 Dist. 15 Donald Bickel, New Vienna.............937-218-2697 Postmaster: Send address changes to: Ohio News, P.O. Box 479, Wooster, OH 44691

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The Board of Directors of the Ohio Holstein Association has adopted the following: “The Mission of the Ohio Holstein Association is to provide services and programs to its members and young people so that they might attain a better living from their involvement with Holsteins.”

Contents A Message From the Executive Director, Tom Thorbahn.............................................................. 5 A Message From the President, Paul Haskins.................................................................................... 6 Fall Tour Fun at Plainfield Farms............................................................................................................. 8 Holstein USA Holds Annual Meeting.................................................................................................10 District 1 to Host 2019 OHA Convention..........................................................................................10 Ohio Holstein Fall Elite Sale Report.....................................................................................................12 Ohio Holstein Marketing Buzz..............................................................................................................15 News from HAUSA - Patrick Twining..................................................................................................15 Where Do Your Checkoff Dollars Go?.................................................................................................17 On the National Front..............................................................................................................................18 BarbWire, Do Consumers Know Real Milk?, by Barb Lumley........................................................24 Ohio Holstein Women.............................................................................................................................27 Holstein Grapevine...................................................................................................................................33 Yesterday’s Cowpath, by Barb Lumley...............................................................................................36 In Memoriam..............................................................................................................................................37 District 12 Show Results..........................................................................................................................38 District 13-14 Show Results...................................................................................................................38 Calendar of Events....................................................................................................................................41 Index to Advertisers.................................................................................................................................41

Just For The Juniors Junior News Update, by Maggie Mathews......................................................................................25 The Queen’s Corner, by Allison McCumons.....................................................................................26 Queen Contest Rules................................................................................................................................26

On The Cover

Brenda Hastings is the feature for the Ohio Holstein Women’s page. Lad and Brenda Hastings own Hastings Dairy where they milk over 600 head of Holsteins. In 2015, they diversified and started their own on-farm creamery called Rowdy Cow Creamery. They will be one of the stops on the farm tours during the OHA convention in March. Lad and Brenda have two sons who round out the cover photo of the Hastings family. From left: Jack, Garrett, Brenda and Lad Hastings.

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From the Executive Director By Tom Thorbahn

As I prepare my thoughts, the snow is falling, and it’s only November; seems as though we just had record highs, and were still wearing shorts and tee shirts, but that’s Ohio weather! Hopefully you all had a safe and productive fall, here in the northern part of the state there is still corn to shell and even a few fields of beans. Congratulations to all the Ohio breeders who participated in the fall shows. Ohio can be proud of the fine quality of the Holstein cattle exhibited at these shows. Thank you to the Don Simpson family, Plainfield Holsteins, for hosting our Fall Tour. It was a great opportunity to see their fine progressive herd and to visit with fellow breeders. Thanks to Patrick Twining, Holstein USA Area Rep, for speaking and providing updates on Holstein Association, USA. We also want to thank all the sponsors for their generous support. Fall is the time for our annual Ohio Holstein membership drive. Diana has mailed out all the renewal forms. If you have neighbors that would benefit from being Ohio Holstein members, make sure they get a membership application. Looking ahead to next year, the Ohio Holstein Association Annual Meeting is March 8th and 9th in Warren, at the Avalon Inn & Country Club. The District 1 members are planning a great weekend. Mark your calendars if you haven’t already. It’s another opportunity to socialize with breeders from across the state and discuss the business of your association. This year is rapidly coming to a close and I would like to thank the officers, board of directors, all committee members, and staff for all their commitment to the Ohio Holstein Association. The old saying ‘many hands makes light work’ certainly applies. You, the members, are the backbone of our organi5

zation; thanks to each one of you for making the Ohio Holstein Association a great association. As the snow falls, I’m reminded that the holidays are not far away, cherish those moments and memories with family and friends. May you and yours have a blessed Christmas, filled with His love and peace, and a safe and prosperous New Year.

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A Message From The President By Paul Haskins

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorns have roses.” --Alphonse Karr Sometimes I unfortunately hear the remark that “registration papers aren’t worth anything anymore,” usually during times like this when most sources of farm revenue are low and input costs are high. I would hazard a guess that even in good economic times, and despite Barb Lumley and her granddaughter Jenn Fisher’s best efforts to transfer papers from all animals sold at our sales, at least some of those papers are probably not continued. I do think that this comment is a slight overreaction and see the glass as half full, not half empty. It is just a theory, but I think that many in this group do see value in these registered animals, but for whatever reason choose against con-

tinuing their registration. They see the value in their performance, hence why they are repeat buyers at our sales and at your farms for replacements or herd sires. They know that you have invested time and effort in making these breeding decisions while recording parentage and performance information to create desirable seedstock, and they are reaping the benefits of those efforts but not yet fully reinvesting. Hopefully at some point some of these repeat buyers will convert, take the next step, and begin registering animals themselves, and we should be on the watch to promote this! With today’s continued emphasis on national ID and traceability, I think the environment lends itself to registration. It is unfortunate that we are not always receiving quite as much of a premium for our registered animals versus the going rate for grade animals, but I do see promise even in the current buying environment and do believe that despite what comments might occasionally be heard, there is and will continue to be value in the performance of registered animals.

Paul Haskins 419-618-4028 • phaskins17199@hotmail.com

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The ad deadline for the January/February issue of Ohio Holstein News is January 15 Summer 2015


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Fall Tour Fun at

Plainfield Farms

The Simpsons built a new facility in 2012 which included a double eight parallel parlor, a 120 cow freestall barn, and a boxstall barn where show cows and donor dams are housed. By Paul Haskins

Don Simpson introduced his family and crew, and the crowd enjoyed viewing the outstanding facility and cows. Newly constructed in 2012, the barn features 120 freestalls

It was a sunny, but windy and chilly day; sixty strong braved the elements and congregated at Plainfield Farms for food and fellowship. A tent had been erected for the event but was wisely scrapped, and tables and chairs were relocated to the cozy confines of the utility room and milking parlor areas of the dairy facility. Louise and Edna Harding catered a delicious meal. Patrick Twining, our new Holstein Association USA (HAUSA) representative, was our guest speaker and filled us in on Holstein Marketplace, the new classified section for buying and selling Holstein cattle on the HAUSA website. He also reinforced the savings available through the Holstein Complete program and filled us in on some new programNew Ohio Rep for HAUSA, Patrick Twining, gave an update on the news from ming available for production rethe Holstein Association. cording in robot herds. 8 | 8

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with a drive through feed alley and a double-8 parallel parlor. A boxstall barn was added last year to house the extra special ones, and currently that includes three EX-94 cows! To top the day off, attendees enjoyed watching the Ohio

State Buckeyes beat the Michigan State Spartans with some occasional friendly banter with Spartan fan and Ohio Holstein News editor Melissa Hart! A big thanks to COBA/Select Sires for helping sponsor the event and Broughton’s Dairy for providing the milk. And a special thanks to the Simpson family for the hard work they put into hosting this year’s fall tour.

Below: The Simpsons set up a TV in the parlor so diehard Big 10 football fans could watch the OSU vs. MSU football game.

The new facility included a boxstall barn that currently houses three EX-94 point cows.

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Holstein Association USA Board Holds Fall Meeting BRATTLEBORO, VT – The Holstein Association USA, Inc. (HAUSA) board of directors were in Atlanta, Georgia for the fall meeting November 13-14. President Boyd Schaufelberger led the proceedings. The board approved the 2019 Management-by-Objective Business Plan and associated budget, as presented by management. Optimism for the future remains as the 2019 Business Plan forecasts growth in Holstein Association USA’s core products and services. Update on 2018 Business Plan Management reported registrations through November 3, 2018 totaled 307,812. Members continue to recognize the excellent value which the Holstein COMPLETE® program provides. Enrollment through October 2018 stood at 355,171 animals. Holstein COMPLETE® offers dairy farmers the best value for their money by incorporating registration, mating information, classification, pedigrees, genetic reports, and production records into one convenient package. Those who participate in Holstein COMPLETE receive a 5% discount on all genomic tests ordered from Holstein Association USA. General Manager Bill VerBoort of AgriTech Analytics (ATA), reported the highest enrollment at ATA in the past two years, and at the end of October stood at 964,137 cows in 542 herds. This is up 8,815 since the first of the year and is Continued on Page 11

Save the Date!

District One to Host 2019 OHA Convention

Plans are progressing for the 2019 Ohio Holstein Association Annual Convention to be held in Warren, Ohio, on March 8-9th, hosted by District 1. While there are several great farms for touring possiblities, the planning committee has narrowed it down to three herds: Klingendale Farm owned by Dave and Lucille Klingensmith, Rowdy Cow Creamery owned by Lad and Brenda Hastings and Ridge-Dell Holsteins, LLC., owned by Glenn Brugler and family. The convention sale will be held on Friday, March 8th, followed by the self-guided tours of the farms and the annual meeting will be on Saturday, March 9th at the Avalon Inn and Country Club. A block of rooms has been reserved at the Avalon Inn and Country Club for convention attendees. Find hotel details at avaloninnandresort. com. More convention information will follow in the January-February issue of the Ohio Holstein News. 10 10

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Continued from Page 10 13,308 more records when compared to October 2017. Other Business In 2014, the Holstein Association USA board approved that a portion of up to two and one-half percent of the reserve fund could be allocated for breed improvement and research. Last year, the board approved funding for a genetics research project, which is being led by Dr. Christian Maltecca of North Carolina State University. Results from the project, anticipated in the first half of next year, are expected to help members and Holstein breeders make better breeding decisions through a more thorough understanding of inbreeding. The board approved moving forward with a three-year genetics research project which was submitted by Dr. Anna C. Denicol of the University of California-Davis. Dr. Denicol’s research focuses on breeding Holstein cows for heat tolerance using the SLICK gene. Funding for the research, over the three-year period, will be withdrawn from the reserve fund. Recommendations from the Show Committee which the board approved include: • Designation of twelve (12) 2019 National Holstein Shows; and • 2019 Judges Lists which include 45 individuals on the National List and 71 on the Qualified List; both lists will be

published on the Association’s website. The 2019 Judges Conference will be held during the Mideast Spring National Holstein Show on March 28th, in Columbus, Ohio. Details can be found at www.holsteinusa. com. Each year since 2009, the board allows the release, for reuse by others, of a prefix after 20 years of non-use. This policy makes it easier for new members to acquire prefixes for their herds. At the meeting, the board approved the release of 1,590 prefixes, effective December 31, 2018. The list of prefixes to be released will be posted on the Holstein Association’s website to give notice to membership. If someone wants to permanently retire his or her prefix prior to the release date, they may contact Customer Service at 800.952.5200 and request to do so for a $100 fee. Upcoming Meetings The next board meetings are: • Spring board meeting – March 21-22, 2019, in New England. • Summer board meeting – June 23-24, 2019, in conjunction with the 134th Annual Meeting in Wisconsin. For more information about any of the Association’s programs and services, visit www.holsteinusa.com, or call Customer Service at 800.952.5200. For more information about ATA’s products and services, visit www.agritech.com.

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hio Holstein Fall Elite Sale Report

The high seller was Lot 3, Pine-Tree 7014 Achiev 7898, a winter calf with a +2817GTPI and was purchased by Cookiecutter Holsteins. From left: Ted Renner, Steve Andrews, Ken Janes, Randall Kiko, Adam Slutz, Dave Gunkelman and Ben Simpson. By Barb Lumley The Ohio Holstein Association served up not only an outstanding group of consignments but also pancakes and sausages to Holstein breeders, their families and friends at the Ohio Holstein Fall Elite Sale held on Saturday, 12

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October 27, 2018 at the Wayne County Fairgrounds, Wooster, Ohio. The barn crew delivered a menu of well-prepared registered Holsteins to the sale ring for the buyers to select from. The average on 50 live lots was $1740. Topping the sale at $17,250 was Lot

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3, Pine-Tree 7014 Achiev 7898, a winter calf with a +2817G, sired by ABS Achiever-ET and from a two year old dam milking over 100 pounds a day, making a top record and sired by S-S-I Partyrock Profit-ET. She is from eleven generations of Excellent and Very


Good dams, including Rudy Missy. She sold with a 5-embryo contract to Gen Elite. The buyer was Cookiecutter Holsteins, Denise Dickinson and Kyle and Luke Getty, Hudson Falls, New York. She was consigned by Matthew Steiner, Marshallville, Ohio. Lot 1, MAJR 228 Dynasty 399-ET, a spring calf with +2818G sold for $5100 to Jason Saria, Dumas, Texas. Sired by MR Rubicon Dynasty-ET, her dam is sired by Woodcrest Mogul Yoder-ET and has seven generations Very Good and Excellent dams in the pedigree including MS Kingstead Chief Adeen-ET EX 94 2E GMD. She was consigned by Ramsier’s Willow Spring Farm LLC, Rittman, Ohio. Selling for $3600 was Lot 48, Oakfield Solomon Tatum-ET, a fresh two year old milking 105 pounds a day. Sired by Walnutlawn Solomon-ET her dam is an Excellent 94 2E Damion and has five Excellent dams in her pedigree. She was purchased by Ross Russell, Russell Springs, Kentucky, and consigned by Matthew Steiner, Marshallville, Ohio. Lot 6, Pine-Tree 9882 Prof 7014ET, a two year old classified Very Good 85, with +2622G, a record at 1-11 3x 194 19702 2.7% 525 3.0% 586 inc., still milking over 100 pounds a day and rebred to Cherry-Lily Zip Luster-P-ET,

she sold for $3500 to Ryan Musser, Rittman, Ohio. She was consigned by Matthew Steiner, Marshallville, Ohio. Selling for $3000 was Lot 4, PineTree 6543 Jedi 7079-ET, a Very Good two year old sired by S-S-I Montross Jedi-ET and from a GP 83 two year old dam with nine generations classified Very Good and Excellent. With a +2679G, she was milking 122 pounds and rebred to Seesaw with a +2817G. Purchased by Ross Russell, Russell Springs, Kentucky, she was consigned by Matthew Steiner. The Polchin Farms Holstein Sale was held following the Ohio Holstein Fall Elite Sale. John, Ruth, and Tony Polchin, Dorset, Ohio, long time members of the Ohio Holstein Association, have milked registered Holstein cows for 60 years. The sale consisted of 28 live lots selling for an average of $864. Selling for $1500 was Lot P-4, MS Visiongen Aspen Rally-ET. An 8 year old, she is classified EX 93 2E with 17 generations of Excellent cows in her pedigree, including several Pinehurst bred cows and going back to Audrey Posch EX 93 GMD as the 17th Excellent. She is due to calve in January bred to Gold Chip. She was purchased by Don Bickel, New Vienna, Ohio. Lot P-15 sold for $1125 to David Yoder, Dundee, Ohio. A bred heifer,

Polchin Ladd P AX Abbey-Red was due sale time to Gold Chip, her dam is an Excellent 90 Rainyridge Persueus daughter and the next dam is EX 90 3E. Lot P-31, Polchin Supersire Randi Rea, a fresh two year old sold for $1100 and was purchased by Jack Burke, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. She goes back to C Glenridge Citation Roxy EX 97 4E GMD. Lot P-20 sold for $1075 to Kevin Spreng, Shreve, Ohio. Polchin Mogul Gail Gem was milking and rebred to Mayflower, sired by Supersire and with several generations of outstanding production and butterfat test. Lot 21 Scarlet-Maple Gold Ember is, a GP 84 three year old Goldwyn daughter from eight generations of Excellent dams. Bred to Gold Chip she sold for $1000 with Ken Janes representing the buyer. Auctioneer for the sale was Steve Andrews, Wooster, Ohio with Ted Renner, Dalton, Ohio reading the pedigrees. Ringmen were Randall Kiko, Ken Janes, Phillip Topp and Lynn Neunenschwander. Curtis Bickel handled the bidding on Cowbuyer. Ben Simpson was in charge of cattle preparation. The Ohio Holstein Women hosted a free pancake and sausage breakfast during the sale with Lisa Mangun and Louise Harding in charge. The sale was managed by Dave Gunkelman and the Ohio Holstein Association.

SAVE THE DATE!!

2019 Ohio Holstein Convention hosted by District 1

March 8-9 • Avalon Inn & Country Club • Warren, OH Sale to be held at the Geauga County Fairgrounds

Look for details of the 2019 Ohio Holstein Convention in this issue! OHIO NEWS

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Ohio Holstein Marketing Buzz by Dave Gunkelman, OHA Marketing and Sales Manager Thanks to everyone who participated in our Fall Sale. Whether you consigned or purchased, we are very appreciative of everyone’s involvement. And I want to give a special shout out to the Ohio Holstein Women who provided the hot breakfast on a very chilly sale day. The Ohio Convention sale will be hosted by District 1 on March 8, 2019. While it seems a long way off, it will be here before we know it. This sale has a long history of featuring outstanding genetics from Ohio Holstein breeders and we would like to continue that tradition. If you have any individuals that would further the genetic progress of other breeders that you would like us to consider for the convention sale, give me a call. The All-Ohio awards will be out soon and if you receive one of these special awards, consider advertising in the news. The first rule in marketing is making yourself known. While

you are working hard on your farms to develop desirable genetics, your marketing plan will fall flat if no one knows about you. Putting your brand in front of people on a consistent basis will reap great rewards and the Ohio Holstein News is one of the best places to promote your genetics and your brand. Finally, with the recent passing of my mom, Joan Gunkelman, I want to take time to thank the Ohio Holstein Association and all my Holstein friends for the phone calls, texts, cards and kind words. It meant a lot to me and my family to have your support. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Dave Gunkelman Director of Marketing & Member Services 330-464-3259 • drgunkelman@yahoo.com

News from HAUSA As we approach the end of 2018, I just want to take time to highlight a few programs from HAUSA. Holstein Marketplace Holstein Association USA is offering an opportunity for breeders to advertise Registered Holsteins® for sale via a page on the Holstein Association USA website. The new Holstein Marketplace provides easy, affordable advertising to help Registered Holstein breeders optimize their investment. Advertisements of up to 100 words will cost $25 per month. If the text is 101 words or more, the cost is $25 plus an additional 10 cents per word. For added value, breeders have the option of linking their advertisements to a genomic prediction or pedigree for $5 per animal. Links to a website or Facebook page can also be included in the ad. Advertisements will be invoiced to your Holstein Association USA account. Classified ads may be submitted by using the form found on the Holstein Marketplace website, www.holsteinusa.com/marketplace. Complete the form and email the information to marketplace@holstein.com. TriStarSM Holstein Association USA is excited to announce a new program for producers with robotic milking systems who no longer are participating in traditional milk recording programs but still wish to have their production information published on Official Holstein Pedigrees™. Known as TriStar AMR, the goal of the program is to allow producers with robotic milking systems that are recording both milk weights and component data to have the information collected by those systems flow into the Holstein herdbook database. This

program is an extension of HAUSA’s TriStar program, a longstanding service for administering production records, cow and herd genetic performance reports, and recognition. The fees to participate in TriStar AMR are a $17 per month herd fee, plus $2 per completed 305-day lactation recorded that is loaded for Registered Holstein® cows, which covers data collection and processing by ATA, and loading into the HAUSA herdbook system. TriStar AMR is not included in Holstein COMPLETE™, and at this time, AMR records are not eligible for recognition programs. To enroll in TriStar AMR or get more information about this new program, call Holstein Association USA customer service at 800.952.5200. 2019 Annual Meeting Delegate Election Holstein Association USA’s delegate election process is currently underway. Ballots must be received by Holstein Association USA on January 2, 2019. With questions about the Holstein Association USA delegate process, contact Jodi Hoynoski at 800.952.5200, ext. 4261 or jhoynoski@holstein. com. I’m happy to be the new HAUSA Rep for Ohio and I look forward to serving our area. If there is any way I can assist you, please don’t hesitate to let me know. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Patrick Twining Ohio HAUSA Representative 440-529-9159

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Where Do Your Checkoff Dollars Go? By Diana Miley Have you ever wondered where the dairy checkoff money goes and if it is doing anything to help the dairy industry? I know I did and then, in the past couple months, I was shown, personally! My husband, Joe Miley, is a member of both the Ohio Dairy Producers Association and the American Dairy Association Mideast board of directors, and we were invited to attend the Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP60) Academy at First Energy Stadium, home of the Cleveland Browns, recently. ADA Mideast partners with the Cleveland Browns to help today’s youth lead healthier lives. In addition to touring the Browns facility, we met Chomps and Cleveland Browns linebacker Christian Kirksey who serves as a FUTP60 Ambassador. We witnessed the enthusiasm of eighty-four FUTP60 Program Advisors and Student Ambassadors, representing twenty-two school districts from Ohio and West Virginia, as they shared their ideas to promote healthy lifestyles in their schools incorporating dairy foods and physical activity. Many of the schools represented were from urban areas where their knowledge of dairy farming is limited. The FUTP60 program promotes leadership, as well as

making healthier food choices including dairy foods and being active for 60 minutes a day. Advisors and Student Ambassadors can participate in national and local FUTP60 summits, similar to the National Junior Holstein Conventions, where they develop solutions for challenges facing their schools and learn how to present their ideas. I confess to being impressed by their enthusiasm. The National FUTP60 Summit will be hosted in Cleveland in 2019. If your school is not currently enrolled in FUTP60, contact ADA Mideast to find out how you can become involved. The second event we attended was the joint annual meeting of the United Dairy Industry Association, National Dairy Promotion and Research Board, and National Milk Producers Federation in Phoenix, Arizona. This event allowed us the opportunity to learn how our national dairy checkoff program partners with McDonald’s, Domino’s, Pizza Hut and Taco Bell to utilize more dairy in their menus. Former US Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, who is now the CEO of US Dairy Export Council, was on hand to discuss dairy exports, stating that exports through the first six months of 2018 represented about 16 percent of production – the largest percentage in history for the first half of the year. Continued on Page 18

e h c n a l a v A e e s s e n e G

5TH SENIOR CALF ROYAL WINTER FAIR 8TH FALL CALF WORLD DAIRY EXPO 2ND FALL CALF MIDEAST SUMMER NATIONAL 1ST FALL CALF & RESERVE JR. CHAMPION OHIO STATE FAIR JR. SHOW D: MILEY ADVENT GEM-RED EX-93 OWNED WITH DOEBERIENER, BOWEN & CONROY

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On the National Front Winter is here in Ohio and I thought Atlanta would be a good place to go in November for warmer weather. NOT! Our HAUSA “fall” Board meeting and National Show Committee met and it was 30s and wet in Georgia. The Show Committee met Monday morning. One of the things discussed at the show committee meeting was to change the format of premier breeder and exhibitor. We did not change anything but if anyone has ideas for improvement, we will consider them for next year. National shows are planning to implement a check list or receipt for transfers at shows. A few wording changes will be made to the National Show Program to become more current. The National Judges list will be on the web site in early December. The National Judges Conference will be held at the Spring Dairy Expo in Columbus on March 28, 2019. The Board meeting was the next 2 days with 100 percent attendance. Our new board members Bill Genasci and Bob Webb jumped right in and had good input and questions. Overall, Holstein is lagging behind last year’s great performance in registrations and transfers. However, the Complete program is increasing in popularity and numbers. This is a great way to save money for any size herd. Good discussion was had on ways to try to help our struggling industry. The legislative affairs committee is working hard at the Dairy Pride Act and will move on from there to try to help make improvements. After our meeting ended, we traveled to The University of Georgia campus. We met with Professor Ignacy Mistal and his students to discuss “Animal Breeding- Complexity, Sim-

plicity and Reality.” Ballots are out for delegates for the National Convention to be held in Wisconsin in 2019. I encourage you to vote for your representative to the convention. If you have any questions, just give me a call and any problems can be taken care of by our new National Field Representative Patrick Twining. Steve Moff HAUSA Director smouric@aol.com or 614-205-7179

Where Do Your Checkoff Dollars Go? Continued from Page 17 We also learned about the Undeniably Dairy campaign which is working to build trust and relevance with consumers by showcasing dairy’s stories around responsibly produced, locally driven, nutrient rich and real enjoyment. The campaign is helping shift the perception of dairy and has decreased purchase intent for dairy alternatives by fourteen percent. It has been a challenging couple of years for the dairy industry (and farming in general), but dairy has an important part to play in keeping both people and the economy healthy. We all need to work together to promote our product.

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          More EYES on YOUR ad when YOUR ad is on DAIRY AGENDA TODAY!

Contact one of our sales associates for more information: EDITOR Melissa Hart | 517-398-1957 farm.writer@hotmail.com | Michigan SALES STAFF Ron Schaap | 608-334-2348 ronschaap@hotmail.com | Wisconsin Chad Griffith | 513-543-2315 xavier12146@yahoo.com | Ohio Mary Angelo | 417-880-5732 angelo@1791.com |Missouri MANAGER David Jons | 913-634-3526 david.jons@att.net | Kansas

Visit www.dairyagendatoday.com

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Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a prosperous 2019. Summer 2015


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Do Consumers Know Real Milk? stores. The word “milk” on the container is As I stood before the dairy products display in definitely misleading. Many of these plant milks my local grocery store, I was very much aware of are in colorful, eye-catching containers and the the “plant milk” displayed in the same section. Out advertising is done in the same way, drawing the of curiosity I picked up a couple containers and attention of consumers. Dairy products and milk looked closer at them. There were different brands, are generally packaged and promoted in the same some were very well known, others, I had never way it has been done for years. Those of you who heard of. The word milk was on most containers. show or sell cows know how important the eye It is my understanding that there is a bill to prohibit appeal of the cow in the show ring or sale ring use of the word “milk” in advertising these “plant can be. We need dairy products with eye appeal milks.” Obviously, it has either not passed or the to draw the consumer’s attention and make them companies are not complying with it. want to buy and try them. I could not help but wonder how much Plant milks and the many other beverages consumers really know about the “fake milks” that are on the market. Are dairy farmers aware of the By Barb Lumley available to consumers are not going to go away. Dairy producers must find the ways to make the many plant milks that compete with their wholesome product? So, it was off to the computer to do some research. The people want their products more. We already have some new following are the types of plant milk that I found---almond milk, ideas for dairy products that have created more interest and peanut milk, pea milk, macadamia milk, banana milk, tigernut their sales are increasing. We need more! Over the years dairy milk, soy milk, cashew milk, oat milk, coconut milk, rice milk, farmers have faced many problems and, by working together, hemp milk, hazelnut milk, flax milk and yeast milk. Yes, they are they came up with the ideas and changes that were needed to all called milk and available to consumers. People for the Ethical make their lives better. Let’s work together and do it again! Treatment of Animals (PETA) has a very attractive site on the internet recommending several types of plant-based milks. Plant-based milks are made by grinding a nut or bean, then adding water, flavors, vitamins, and minerals. The nutrients and amount of sugar in plant-based milk varies considerably based on how it has been produced and what has been added. Carrageenan is an additive derived from seaweed and is used as a stabilizer and thickener in plant-based beverages, as well as in many other products, including infant’s formula and in products recommended for seniors. It is believed that it can cause health problems. Its use was reapproved by the United States Department of Agriculture in April 2018. The National Organic Standards Board voted to remove it from the organic ingredient list. Milk from cows contains protein, calcium, riboflavin, and potassium. Milk has eight times more protein than almond milk, however 73% of customers interviewed believed almond milk had just as much. The English and Oxford dictionaries define milk as an opaque white fluid rich in fat and protein, secreted by female mammals for the nourishment of their young. Merrian-Webster defines mammal as any of a class of warm-blooded higher vertebrates that nourish their young with milk secreted by mammary glands and having the skin more or less covered with hair, and include humans. As I traveled this summer, I saw beautiful cows with beautiful udders that produced lots of real milk. I have yet to see an udder in my bag of almonds! There is no doubt in my mind that many consumers of plant milk actually believe it is milk. It is my opinion that plant-based drinks should not be presented in the dairy section of grocery 24

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By Maggie Mathews, Ohio Junior Holstein Association Reporter Happy Holidays fellow Juniors! By now, everyone should be recovered from a very busy show season and looking forward to Christmas and winter break. If you need some stocking stuffers, the Juniors are selling raffle tickets to win a choice of $1000 cash (donated by Becks) or a 1-year lease on a 2020 7x24 Black Wilson Ranch Hand trailer. Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $25. All the raffle proceeds will help fund Junior Activities held during the 2021 National Convention hosted by Ohio. For those Juniors who have attended previous National Conventions, you remember how many fun events there were, and that takes a lot of planning and financial resources. You can contact Diana at the Ohio Holstein office for more information on selling or purchasing tickets. Speaking of National Conventions, the 2019 convention is being held in Appleton, WI, June 24-27. If you think you may be interested in attending, please contact Tom Thorbahn or Paul Haskins. Deadlines to enter Junior competitions can be found on Holstein USA’s website at www.holsteinusa.com under the Junior link, as well as complete descriptions of the different contests that are open to Juniors.

For those of you who are active members in the Junior program, I encourage you to “recruit” a new member and bring to an upcoming meeting. We have a lot of fun as a group, and with the National Convention right around the corner for Ohio, we will need as many Juniors as possible to participate in the planning! Please keep an eye out for future meeting dates posted on our Facebook page and sent out in group emails. Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy Moo Year!

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Queen’s Corner

By Allison McCumons

Season’s Greetings! I hope everyone had a wonderful Thanksgiving and if you’re into Black Friday shopping, hopefully it was successful. As we are in the middle of the holiday seasons and are almost at the end of the 2018, it’s easy to get caught up in the commotion that the holidays bring. It can get stressful at times and maybe you just want to give up. For us college students, this usually comes around finals. Whatever happens, just breathe and think about why you are do-

ing what you are doing. “When you feel like quitting, think about why you started.” It’s easy to forget about the journey we are on and why we are even on it, but if you just think about why you started, the journey seems less stressful and more willing. As we enter into the Christmas season, let’s not forget the true meaning. It is a time to be with family and friends; to enjoy each other’s company; and to reminisce about the past year. Most importantly, it is time to give thanks and praise God for blessing us with the birth of HIS son Jesus. Let us all look back on this year, reflect on what has happened, learn from the past, live in the present, and plan for the future. “May God bless your plans with success, your dreams with fulfillment, and your heart with peace throughout a happy future.” Until next time, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

With the new year, comes a new Ohio Holstein Queen. Selection of the queen will be held at the OHA Annual Convention on March 8-9, 2019, at the Avalon Inn and Country Club in Warren, Ohio. If you are interested in competing in the OHA Queen contest, contact Allison Mangun for complete details and information at acmangun@gmail.com or call or text at 330-749-9036.

The 2019 Ohio Holstein Queen Contest Rules Eligibility and Expectations: 1. Contestants must be at least 16 years old on January 1, 2019 2. Contestants must be (single) not married throughout their reign 3. Contestants must be members of the Ohio Junior Holstein Association, unless contestant is ineligible to be a junior member, in which case she should be a member of the Ohio Holstein Association. 4. Contestants must be able to attend the 2019 Ohio Holstein Convention, 2019 Ohio Spring Dairy Expo, 2019 Ohio State Fair Holstein shows and District Holstein shows. 5. During the pageant portion of the contest, taking place at convention, the applicants will be expected to be in formal dress and have an escort (often a male family member). 6. The Queen will be required to dress in professional manner at all Ohio Holstein functions. 7. The Queen must submit an article to the Ohio Holstein News for each edition throughout the reign. 8. Applications must be postmarked or emailed by Friday, March 1, 2019 9. The contest will be held at the Ohio Holstein Convention. Interviews of applicants will begin at 9:00 a.m.

Contestants will be judged on: Dairy Knowledge | Personal Appearance and Pose | Public Speaking To Apply: Visit www.ohioholstein.com for the 2019 Ohio Holstein Queen application, email applications to acmangun@gmail.com or mail them to Ohio Holstein Association, PO BOX 479, Wooster, Ohio 44691 Contact: Any questions can be answered by contacting any member of the Queen’s Committee: Allison Mangun - acmangun@gmail.com 330-749-9036 Jeneva Auble Megan Lawson 26

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Brenda Hastings

Hello everyone, I’m Brenda Hastings. My husband, Lad, and I operate Hastings Dairy in Burton (Geauga County). We have two sons; Garrett (16) and Jack (13). Lad and I started this dairy in 2004 with 500 milk cows. We currently milk over 600 cows, raise all our own replacement heifers, and farm about 700 acres. I grew up on a dairy farm in Tulare, California and come from several generations of dairy farmers. I graduated from California State University, Fresno with an Ag Business degree and received a Master’s degree from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. After college, I worked for World-Wide Sires in advertising and public relations, then for

the University of California-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in an administrative role. My work brought me to World Dairy Expo where I met Lad in 1995. We were married in 1997. Our dairy facility is unique because it has a large meeting room area with a wall of windows that allow visitors to watch the cows milking. Many people are curious about what happens on a dairy farm and have questions about animal care. So in 2011, we added agritourism to our farm offering tours and providing an event venue for parties. We host several “Milk from Cow to Bottle” tours open to the public and offer private tours for groups of all ages. Our farm

Brenda Hastings in Rowdy Cow Creamery is located 45 minutes east of Cleveland so we draw visitors from surrounding metropolitan areas who are interested in learning about dairy and having a fun family experience. In 2015, we diversified our farm by adding a small on-farm creamery; Rowdy Cow Creamery. We bottle whole milk in white, chocolate and a variety of flavors. In 2018, Continued on Page 28

Lisa Mangun and Louise Harding of the Ohio Holstein Women provided a complimentary breakfast the morning of the OHA Fall Sale in Wooster. Everyone enjoyed the warm breakfast on that cool fall morning. Thanks to all who made the breakfast possible! OHIO NEWS

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Continued from Page 27 we started making Fromage Blanc cheese to expand our offerings. We deliver these products to local stores and restaurants. Our sons are involved in football, basketball, track and baseball. They are also active in 4-H showing dairy cattle and poultry. We provide animals to the members of the Geauga Dairymen 4-H club, so our farm is busy with 4-H members working with their animals throughout the summer. I have fond memories of participating in 4-H and FFA and am glad my sons have the opportunity to be in 4-H. I believe it’s important to do my part in the community and dairy industry. I’ve served on the American Dairy Association Mideast Board, Ohio Dairy Producers Board, Leadership Geauga Board, am past President of the Geauga County Farm Bureau Board, past President of Burton Elementary PTO, past President of Geauga County Panhellenic, a member of the Geauga County Tourism Council, Geauga County Agricultural Society and Geauga County Historical Society. Lad and I value raising our sons on a

farm because it demonstrates a strong work ethic, commitment, accountability, and provides many life lessons. Our farm, creamery and active boys keep us busy. This dairy life has its rewards and challenges. We work each day to provide the best for our cows, family, staff and community. We’re optimistic about the future of dairy farming and strive to sustain what we’ve created in order to provide opportunities for future generations. To learn more about our farm, check out www.hastingsdairy.com.

This is one of my favorite recipes from Paula Deen. It’s easy and delicious!

Sour Cream Muffins

2 cups self-rising flour 2 sticks butter, melted ½ pint sour cream Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients and spoon into un-greased muffin tins. Bake for 20-30 minutes.

This rich treat is simple to make. Tasty and dairy-friendly!

Chocolate & Peanut Butter Bars

1 stick butter 1 1/2 cups graham cracker crumbs (about 10 crackers) 1 can (14oz) sweetened condensed milk 1 cup peanut butter chips 1 cup chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350°F. Place butter in 13x9 baking dish and place in oven to melt. Remove baking dish from oven and sprinkle graham cracker crumbs over butter. Pour sweetened condensed milk over crumbs, top with peanut butter chips and chocolate chips. Return to oven and bake for 2025 minutes. Cool, cut into bars.

ATTENTION OHIO HOLSTEIN MEN AND CHILDREN! Are you having a hard time thinking of what to get that indispensable woman in your life for Christmas? Give her what all the hard-working Holstein women in Ohio would really appreciate - a heartfelt thanks!

Please consider nominating your wife, mother, daughter, sister, aunt - you know, the one who does the little and big things on and off the farm that make things run smoothly! Please submit the following by Feb. 9, 2019 to jmouric@aol.com or to the Ohio Holstein office. Name of nominee: _________________________________________________________________ Name and phone number of person nominating: ______________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Name of farm, operation, or business, if applicable: ____________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ Please write a brief description of the nominee's involvement with Holsteins at the family operation, county, district and/or state level. The Woman of the Year will be recognized at the Ohio Convention on March 9th, 2019. 28

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who’s a leader in the dairy industry. Ohio State ATI can help you make a difference! Excellent Programs:

• A.A.S. in Dairy Cattle Production & Management • A.S. (transfer degree) in Animal Sciences - Dairy • Dairy Club, Judging Team and Dairy Challenge • Paid industry internships throughout the U.S. and abroad; on- and off-campus employment • Applied instruction in milking, reproductive, health, genetic, and nutritional management

Excellent Holstein Herd and Facilities: • 15 years Progressive Genetics Herd Award • Cows on the Top 10,000 TPI List • +2057 CTPI +2266 PTPI 102.6 BAA 299 NM$ • RHA: 53 cows 26925 4.4% 1177 3.1% 834 2X • 115-cow free-stall barn with EasyFix mattresses • Smart Dairy double-8 parallel parlor • CowManager herd monitoring system • TMR Tracker feeding system

Dairy Challenge OSU-ATI Moonboy Bambi 1430

A.I. School & Certification

Agricultural Technical Institute 1328 Dover Road Wooster, OH 44691 330-287-1327 • ati.osu.edu 3 2ohio| holstein O H Inov O dec N E2018.indd WS |

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11/5/18 9:58 AM


Robert Jentes, (D7) appeared on the front page of the November 15th issue of Farm & Dairy as the recipient of the Conservation Cooperator Award in Wayne County. Congratulations! The Kiko family has gone international! R & P Kiko Family Farms (D2) will be featured in the December issue of Holstein International magazine, noting their expanding herd with exciting genetics. David Evans, Minerva, (D3), was inducted into the 2018 Farm Bureau Hall of Fame. Dave began working on his grandfather’s farm in 1952 and took ownership of the farm in 1961, where he raises registered Holsteins. The herd prefix is Klami, the initials of his wife and four children. He married his

wife, Kay, in 1953 and they will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary in December. Congrats to the Evans family! Tanner Topp, Smithville, (D7) Toppglen Farms, was united in marriage to Shannon Akers on October 13th. Best wishes to the newlyweds! Steve and Jane Moff, Columbiana, Ouric Holsteins, (D2) welcomed grandbaby number six to the family. Emilie Kay Moff was born on October 11th to Brian and Karen Moff. The deadline to enter the Ohio Holstein Queen Contest is March 1st. Contact Allison Mangun for details and/or see the feature on the Queen’s Corner for more information.

OHIO NEWS

Loren and Tana Elsass Wapakoneta, (D12), Quietcove, welcomed a grandson to the family on September 12th. Aiden Michael Herbst, son of Tim and Julie (Elsass) Herbst, has won the hearts of his entire family. Aunts and uncles are Jeremy and Lori Elsass and Jonathon and Chris Elsass. His cousins are Colton, Nathan, Lilly, Trapper, Braxton, Finley, and Greyson and they think he’s “adorable.” Congrats to the entire Elsass Crew! Next issue we feature All-Ohio winners. Make sure you get your space reserved to advertise your winner! Contact Melissa Hart at farm.writer@hotmail.com or 517398-1957. If you have any items for the Grapevine, please send them to Melissa Hart at farm.writer@hotmail.com.

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January/February March/April May/June September/October November/December

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January 15 March 15 May 5 September 1 November 1

February 5 April 5 June 10 September 25 December 5


Dairy Farmer-Funded Grants

Are Making A Difference in Schools On behalf of Ohio and West Virginia's dairy farmers, ADA Mideast has provided $2.75 million in Fuel Up to Play 60 grants to nearly 1,250 schools since the program began in 2009. More children are choosing to eat breakfast at school - breakfast participation numbers have climbed to more than 86% for Ohio and West Virginia schools receiving a Fuel Up to Play 60 grant!

These grants help schools add new dairy-friendly items to their menus and purchase equipment, such as mobile serving carts, smoothie stations and breakfast bars, to drive dairy consumption in schools. Why promote school breakfast? It’s simple! Every breakfast served at school includes one to three servings of dairy. This alone provides an opportunity for additional sales of 1.5 billion single-serve units of fluid milk nationally. In fact, Ohio and West Virginia schools that received dairy farmer-funded grants for the 2017-18 school year reported increases in yogurt sales, above the national average! Yogurt sales in these schools increased by 28.2%.

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Yesterday’s Cowpath Leading up to the 100th Anniversary of the Ohio Holstein Association, Barb Lumley will be writing a special column featuring special points in time for the Ohio Holstein Association. Enjoy your walk down Yesterday’s Cowpath. By Barb Lumley From the Ohio Breeders Fall Quality Sale Catalog and November-December 1971 Ohio Holstein News The Ohio Breeders Fall Quality Sale was held October 18, 1971 at 7:30 p.m. at the Wayne County Fairgrounds, Wooster, Ohio. The sale averaged $696.10 on 44 head. Lot 1 and Lot 2 were service age males consigned by Cottonwood-Vale, Leroy Leininger, Fayette, Ohio. A No-Na-Me Fond Matt son from a Good Plus dam sold for $475 and a Thonya Stylemaster son from an Excellent dam sold for $510. Baby heifer calves averaged $152. Lot 4, Behart Citation Sara, topped the sale at $3800. A recently fresh twoyear-old sired by Paclamar Citation M, she was consigned by Leonard Beery, Seville, Ohio and purchased by Richard Soldner, Springfield, Ohio. Her dam was a Very Good Ormsby Burke Pontiac Mose daughter with a record at 6-11 340d 182250 3.3% 602. Lot 3, Logil Citation Boots sold for $1250. Consigned by Logil Farm, L. O. Gilmore and Family, Wooster, Ohio she sold to Loy Smith and Son, Croton, Ohio. Classified Very Good at 3 years, she had a record at 2-7 311d 2x 15990 553, was a daughter of Paclamar Citation M, and her dam was a VG daughter of Tidy Burke Elevation with a record at 5-11 317d 21940 3.5% 759. Selling for $1200 was an added consignment from James Kemp, Jerusalem, Ohio. A fresh two-year-old daughter of Rosafe Caliban, she sold to George Passmore, Warnock, Ohio. Lot 20, Arlosy Citation Lisa, consigned by Arthur Loschky, Milford Center, Ohio sold for $1100 to Robert E. Schaeffer, Sandusky, Ohio. Just 36

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classified Very Good at 3 years, her sire was Paclamar Citation M and the dam a GP-82 Shady Meadow Ideal EX daughter. Sale personnel were J. O. Fenstermaker, Homeworth, Ohio; Don Bradley, Mechanicsburg, Ohio and Merlin Woodruff, Urbana, Ohio. Cal Wilcox, Executive Secretary of the Ohio Holstein Association read the pedigrees. Robert Albrecht, Mansfield, Ohio was National Fieldman for the Holstein Association of America. The first place Senior Get of Sire at the Central National Show sired by Ideal Fury Reflector E-94 GM graced the cover of the November-December 1971 Ohio Holstein News. They were Easthaven Quintillion Fury EX-92 owned by A. B. Baker, Canton, Ohio; Gem-Hill Fury Sunshine EX owned by Richman Farms, Lodi, Ohio; TudyLu Cherry Prince Fury EX owned by James Hanna, Ashland, Ohio and Gene Acres Felicia May Fury EX-94 owned by Allen Hetts, Ft. Atkinson, Wisconsin. Cal Wilcox announced plans for the two heifer sales in 1972, as well as the Classic Sale to be held on Saturday, June 24, 1972. The Western Heifer Sale will be held March 11, 1972 at Strang’s Auction Barn at Piqua, Ohio. The Eastern Heifer Sale will be held Saturday, April 1, 1972 at Wooster. The Western Heifer Sale held in March 1971 averaged $598.26. Four head sold over $1000, top was $1525. The Eastern Heifer Sale held in April 1971 averaged $646.00, top seller was $2300. The July Classic Sale averaged $1382 with a top of $5000. Ohio State Fair Senior and Grand Champion Bull was Le-Maples Melody Marquis shown by Weston Payne and sons, Clyde, Ohio. Junior Champion Bull was Koneta Proud Eagle shown by Ferd Brown, Wapakoneta, Ohio. Junior Champion Female was Gray View Carioca IR bred and shown by GrayView Farms, Union Grove, Wisconsin. Senior and Grand Champion Female was Gem-Hill Fury Sunshine shown by Richman Farms, Lodi, Ohio. Reserve

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Champion was the first Four-Year-Old, Caldhaven Burke Boss shown by Lewis and Sons, Hamilton, Ohio. Easthaven Quintillion Fury won the Futurity Class for A. B. Baker, Canton, Ohio. Premier Breeder and Exhibitor was won by Lewis and Sons, Hamilton, Ohio. 380 head were shown. Judge was Harold Kaesar, Ohio State University. In the Ohio State Fair Junior Show, Grand Champion was Rick Ideal April, Rick Brill, Wellington, Ohio. Reserve Grand Champion was Brianlea Kate Polly, Robert Siddall, West Salem, Ohio. Junior Champion was Ir-Ma-Vale Bird Posch, Bill Levering, Fredricktown, Ohio. Junior Showmanship was won by Tom Indoe, Lodi, Ohio. Senior Showmanship was won by Terry Weiker, Republic, Ohio. There were 180 head shown and the judge was John W. McKitrick, Columbus, Ohio. The Ohio Holstein Homemakers had two pages, including an interesting column written by Jean Timmons asking, “Just what is a cow”? There was news from the Ladies Auxiliary about their plans for the National Convention in ’77. A change in the executive board was announced. Each district will be asked to choose a lady to serve on the board, in hopes of involving more ladies in our activities. The following recipe for PINK WITCH was shared by Mrs. Dale Rausch, R # 1, Plain City. 1 quart ice cold milk; 1 can (6 oz.) frozen lemonade, thawed; 1 pint strawberry ice cream, softened; 1 quart ice cold gingerale. Beat the first three ingredients together. Blend in gingerale and serve. It yields 20 half cups and is ideal for Christmas parties. This was served at the 85th National Holstein Convention in Boston Massachusetts at the clam bake. The Holstein Association of America had 67 new members from Ohio. Ohio breeders sold 28 head of registered Holsteins to Spain in October 1971. The Nov.-Dec. 1971 issue consisted of 62 pages with a total of 54 ads, 43 of those were breeder ads. The results from numerous Holstein shows were featured.


Joan Marie Gunkelman

In Memoriam

Joan Marie Gunkelman, 67, of Medina, passed away peacefully Wednesday, October 31, 2018. Joan was born March 9, 1951 in Berea, to the late Maynard and Dorothy (nee King) Wilkinson. She was a 1969 graduate of Berea High School. Soon after graduation, Joan married her farmer sweetheart, Richard Gunkelman, after meeting him at a tractor pull held at the former Abbeyville Ball Field. Joan was a proud farmer’s wife, mother and grandmother. She was a faithful and dedicated member of Zion Lutheran Church, Valley City, where she was a member of the Choir, Altar Guild, Women’s Bible Study and enjoyed helping with Vacation Bible School. She had done babysitting in her home as her own children were growing up. After her kids where in school full time, she went to work for the Buckeye Local School System from 1982-2009 where she first worked as a cafeteria worker and lastly retired as school bus driver. Joan loved her bus kids. Her greatest joy was spending time with her four grandchildren. Joan will be greatly missed by her husband of 49 years, Richard; children, Sue (Jim) Alley, Karen Gunkelman, David Gunkelman and Deb Gunkelman; grandchildren, Faith and Lauren Alley, Tim and Grace Gunkelman; grand-dog, Lola; sisters, Sheryl (Doug) Thompson and twin sister, Jean (Joe) Molnar; numerous nieces, nephews and a host of friends. Special thanks to the wonderful doctors, nurses and caregivers who treated our mom like their own when she was entrusted to their care, especially to Tara Calame and the staff of Kindred Hospice for their compassion and support in Mom’s final days. Also, a special thank you to the Zion Care Team and others that visited, sent cards and offered prayers of support and encouragement throughout. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorials may be made to Zion Choir Fund or to the Zion Youth Luther League.

Mary M. West

Mary M. West 1928-2018 of Dalton, age 89, passed away on January 20, 2018. Born on May 2, 1928 in Columbia, Ohio to the late Guy R. and Christena (Yackey) Harding, she was a 1946 graduate of Dover High School and resident of Dalton since 1954. Mary had been a waitress at the Town and Country restaurant in Kidron for many years and

a farmer’s wife until 1989. She was a member of Orrville Christian and Missionary Alliance and was an avid booster for the Dalton Bulldogs. Preceded in death by her brothers, Donald, Gene, and Warren Harding; sisters, Ruth Harding, June Specht, Martha Harstine, and Doris Stuckey; she is survived by her husband of 69 years, James C.; children, Donald (Pamela) West of Kidron, Terry (Lynn) West of Creston, Patricia (Charles) Rohr of Dalton, Christina “Kay” (Greg) Goddess of Marshallville, James (Amber) West of Marysville, OH, Richard (Brenda) West of Marshallville, Nancy West (Pius) of Mogadore; 15 grandchildren; 18 great grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, other family and friends. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the church or Life Care Hospice, 1900 Akron Rd., Wooster, OH, 44691.

James C. West

James C. West 1926-2018, of Dalton, age 92, passed away on September 28, 2018. Born on June 7, 1926 in Gnadenhutten, Ohio to the late Harry and Cora (Frank) West, he was a graduate of New Philadelphia High School and resident of Dalton since 1954. A veteran of WWII serving in the U.S. Army, James ran the family farm (Ja-Ma Farms) from 1954 until retiring in 1989. He was a member of Orrville Christian and Missionary Alliance Church, and was a past member of both the Dalton Local School Board and the Reiter Dairy Board. James was an avid booster for the Dalton Bulldogs. Preceded in death by his wife, Mary who passed away in January of this year; brother, Robert West; sisters, Helen Humrickhouse, Freda West, Marge Hobart; daughter in-law, Lynn West; he is survived by children, Donald (Pamela) West of Kidron, Terry West of Creston, Patricia (Charles) Rohr of Dalton, Christina “Kay” (Greg) Goddess of Marshallville, James (Amber) West of Marysville, Ohio, Richard (Brenda) West of Marshallville, Nancy West (Pius) of Mogadore; 15 grandchildren; 19 great grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, other family and friends. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the church or Life Care Hospice, 1900 Akron Rd., Wooster, OH, 44691. Online obituary and guest registry are available at www.zakmonbarrenfh.com.

OHIO NEWS

Ivo H. Osterloh

Ivo H. Osterloh age 84, of Minster, Ohio, died at 7:35 AM on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at JTDM Hospital, St. Marys, Ohio. He was born July 22, 1934 in Ohio the son of the late Aloysius (Aloys) and Blanche (Meier) Osterloh. He married Barbara Bulcher on June 4, 1958 at Holy Family Church in Frenchtown, Ohio and she survives. He is also survived children: David (Tracy) Osterloh, Maria Stein, Carolyn (David) Stein, Lima, Donna (Paul) Pohlman, Delphos, Sandra Freer, Powell, Kevin (Rena) Osterloh, Corvalis, Oregon and Lori (Jason) Hagaman, Minster; 18 grandchildren; 8 great grandchildren; 2 great-grandchildren on the way; siblings and in-laws, Jerome Osterloh, New Bremen, Linus (Yolanda) Osterloh, Canal Winchester, Alberta (Jack) Rethman, North Star, Irvin (Norma) Osterloh, Arkdale, Wisconsin, Janice (Tom) Weitzel, Powell, Jovita Osterloh, St. Henry, Marilyn (David) Pax, Celina, Rose Bulcher, Rossburg and Tom Dirksen, Minster. He is preceded in death by a grandson Anton Osterloh; siblings and in-laws, Alma (Ed) Puthoff, Rita (Norbert) Eilerman, Othmar Osterloh, Laura Osterloh, Ed Bulcher and Judy Dirksen. He was a 1952 graduate of Minster High School where he was active in FFA and earned his State Farmer Degree. He was a member of St. Joseph Catholic Church, Egypt Community Club, American Legion Post 387, and VFW Post 6432. He served with the US Army in Korea. He was a life-long dairy farmer active in many organizations which included a member of the board and president of Minster Farmers Co-Op. He was a breeder of Holstein Cattle and served on the board of directors and as president of the State Holstein Breeders Association. Mass of Christian Burial will be held 10:30 AM on Saturday, December 1, 2018 at St. Joseph Church. Burial with full military honors by Minster Honor Guard to follow in St. Joseph Cemetery. Friends may call at the Hogenkamp Funeral Home, Minster from 2 PM to 8 PM on Friday, November 30, and Saturday from 9:30 to 10 AM. In Lieu of Flowers the family requests donations be made St. Joseph’s Catholic Church. Condolences may be left at www.hogenkampfh.com.

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Show Results Spring Heifer Calf 1. Toppglen Wilson Martini exhibited by Toppglen, 2. Toppglen Atwood Wazinga exhibited by Toppglen 3. Wakefield McCutchen Daphne exhibited by Reid Klopfenstein 4. ZEB Slater Miss Me exhibited by Etgen-Way 5. Mapl-Valle King Tut Kupie exhibited by Luke Steinke

Winter Heifer Calf 1. Quietcove Foxys Baffle Me exhibited by Quietcove 2. Quietcove First Class exhibited by Lilly Elsass 3. Toppglen Jordy Wow RC exhibited by Toppglen 4. Quietcove Doorman Goodnight Kiss exhibited by Taylor Klopfenstein 5. Maple-Tree Loveman Liberty exhibited by Marvin Steinke Fall Heifer 1. Etgen-Way Beemer Sulantra exhibited by Etgen-Way 2. MD-Maple-Lawn DM-ET exhibited by Silent-b Holsteins 3. Quietcove Fa La La La exhibited by Amelia Sammetinger 4. Brookview Solo Exclusive exhibited by Carter Liette 5. ZEB Defiant Marissa exhibited by Etgen-Way Summer Yearling 1. Oakfield Blake Luxurious-ET exhibited by Carter Liette 2. Ms Avant Garde D Chassy exhibited by Lilly Elsass 3. Toppglen Defiant Win-ET exhibited by Toppglen 4. Quietcove Starstruck exhibited by Lilly Elsass 5. Steinway Pickle Juice exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy Spring Yearling 1. Ms Sid Rachel exhibited by Steve Bowen 2. Etgen-Way Rocken the Range exhibited by Etgen-Way 3. Maple-Tree McCutchen Laurn exhibited by Marvin Steinke 4. Topp-View Atwood Raquel exhibited by Abigail Sniegowski 5. Homan Spur 575 exhibited by Lauren Homan

Winter Yearling 1. Quietcove Foxy Winning Ways exhibited by Quietcove 2. Mapl-Valle Kingboy Milk exhibited by Steinke Family 3. Golden Touch KB Trumpet exhibited by Tyler Lammers 4. Quietcove Sirwood Fawas-ET exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy Fall Yearling 1. Quietcove Doorman Flicker exhibited by Lilly Elsass 2. Borderview Luchesse exhibited by Amelia Sammetinger Junior Champion of the Junior Show - Quietcove First Class exhibited by Lilly Elsass Reserve Junior Champion of the Junior Show - Oakfield Blake Luxurious-ET exhibited by Carter Liette Junior Champion – Open Show - Quietcove Foxys Baffle Me exhibited by Quietcove Reserve Junior Champion – Open Show - Quietcove First Class exhibited by Lilly Elsass Junior Best Three 1. Quietcove 2. Toppglen Junior Two Year Old 1. Quietcove Foxys Lollipop exhibited by Quietcove 2. Mapletree Dback Lapros exhibited by Steinke Senior Two Year Old 1. Oakfield Soloman Lullaby-ET exhibited by Silent-b Holsteins 2. Wakefield McCutchen Frenchy exhibited by Carter Liette Junior Three Year Old 1. Butlerview Bnick Aquarious-ET exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy

Show Results

OPEN SHOW CHAMPIONS Grand Champion MS Doorman Gil-ET, Cole Pond Reserve Grand Champion – Marste Gold Chip Cher, Taylor Birkemeier Senior Champion - Marste Gold Chip Cher, Taylor Birkemeier Reserve Senior Champion Balmoral Lars Aurianna-Red, Madelyn Topp Intermediate Champion – MS Doorman Gil-ET, Cole Pond Junior Champion Larcrest High Octane, Triple T Holsteins Reserve Junior Champion – Ren Bow Corvette, Lillian Finke

JUNIOR SHOW CHAMPIONS Grand Champion - MS Doorman Gil-ET, Cole Pond Reserve Grand Champion- Marste Gold Chip Cher, Taylor Birkemeier Senior Champion - Marste Gold Chip Cher, Taylor Birkemeier Reserve Senior Champion- Balmoral Lars Aurianna-Red, Madelyn Topp Intermediate Champion - MS Doorman Gil-ET, Cole Pond Reserve Intermediate Champion – Oakvale Goldchip Bella, Olivia Finke Junior Champion – Ren Bow Corvette, Lillian Finke Reserve Junior Champion – Borderview Byway Sophia, Lillian Finke Spring Heifer Calf 1. (JR)T-Triple-T Prime Suspect, Colton Thomas 2. Prestige-Gen Addiction Monica, Seven Gable Farm 3. Express SMD Black Label, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins 4. Wabash-Way Aplanch Twilight, Wabash-Way Holsteins 5. (JR)Toppview Addiction Ariel, Madelyn Topp Winter Heifer Calf 1. (JR)Ren-Bow Corvette Lollipop, Lillian Finke 2. Miss Dorrman Promise, Seven Gables Farm 38

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District 12 Holstein Show • July 30, 2018 Wapakoneta, OH • Judge: Jordan Siemers

Four Year Old 1. Mapl-Valle Aftershock Khloe exhibited by Luke Steinke 2. Quietcove Fever Whitney exhibited by Lilly Elsass Five Year Old 1. Express-SMD Brick Blazin exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy Aged Cow 1. Quietcove French Kiss exhibited by Quietcove Grand Champion – Junior Show - Mapl-Valle Goldchip Kit Kat exhibited by Luke Steinke Reserve Grand – Junior Show - Wakefield McCutchen Frenchy exhibited by Carter Liette Grand Champion – Open - Bertke GC Bentley exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy and Quietcove Reserve Grand – Open - Quietcove Foxys Lollipop exhibited by Quietcove Best Three Females 1. Quietcove Dam and Daughter 1. Stein-Way Dairy Produce of Dam 1. Stein-Way Dairy

District 13-14 Holstein Show • June 9, 2018 Judge: Jack Lomeo, Jr. • 59 Head Shown

3. (JR)Topp-View Sid Kamikazi, Aiden Topp 4. (JR)T-Triple-T Dayton, Colton Thomas 5. Wabash Way ApprenAnna Red, Wabash-Way Holsteins Fall Heifer Calf 1. Luncrest High Octane, T-Triple-T Holsteins 2. (JR)Borderview Byway Sophie, Lillian Finke 3. (JR) Kuk-Lan Dempsey Chrysler, Taylor Baker 4. Kuk-Lan Lotus Jacquelyn, Seven Gables 5. Zeb Defiant Marissa, Derek Baumer Summer Yearling 1. Wabash-Way Dback Attie, Wabash-Way Holsteins 2. Express-SMD Brazzle Hayden, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins 3. Spring-Hill OH Cara-TW, Wabash Way Holsteins 4. Ordc Did, Joe Drake 5. Penick Dempsey Halestorm, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins Spring Yearling 1. Stan-Mar-Dale Union Avery, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins 2. T-Triple-T Ent Door Prize, Triple-T Holsteins 3. Price-View Peal Cinder Pine, Seven Gables Farm 4. (JR) Oakvale Sid Costa Cabbie, Olivia Finke 5. Muss Sid Rachel, Ruth Baumer Winter Yearling 1. (JR)Borderview Bedazzle, Brook Sims 2. (JR) Toppview Arlift Dolly, Madelyn Topp 3. Quietcove Sirwood Famous, Stein-Way Dairy 4. Bevin Creek Mongomery, Luke Jackson 5. (JR)Lah Dale Special Red, Alaina Lahmers

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018

Senior Three Year Old 1. Bertke GC Bentley exhibited by Stein-Way Dairy and Quietcove 2. Mapl-Valle Goldchip Kit Kat exhibited by Luke Steinke 3. Mapl-Valle Mcnuggets Maple exhibited by Steinke Family

Fall Yearling 1. (JR)Hodgons Clark Pearl, Madelyn Topp Senior Two Year Old 1. (JR)MS Doorman Gil-ET, Cole Pond 2. Arolene Goldwyn Emma, Seven Gables Farm 3. Stan-Mar-Dale Dillon Vespa, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins Junior Three Year Old 1. Express-SMD Nay Nay P Red-ET, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins 2. MS Wabash Way Armani Mara-Red, Wabash Way 3. (JR) Oakvale Goldchip Bella, Olivia Finke 4. (JR) Oakvale Armani, Ella Jackson Senior Three year Old 1. Kuk-Lan Atwood Danina-ET, Seven Gables 2. Toppview Sanchez Rebecca, Toppview Farms Four Year Old 1. (JR)Marste Goldchip Cher, Taylor Birkemeier Five Year Old 1. (JR)Toppview GS Eye Candy, Abby Topp 2. (JR) Diamond Oak Butze Flora, Madelyn Topp 3. (JR) Ray Jo Hero Ellen, Madelyn Topp Aged Cow 1. (JR)Balmoral Lars Aurianna-Red, Madelyn Topp 2. Stan-Mar-Dale Maxwell Quinn, Stan-Mar-Dale/Express Holsteins Best Three Females 1. Toppview



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Index of Advertisers ADA............................................................35

Mennonite Mutual................................33

TenPenny Holsteins..............................10

Agri-King...................................................11

Miley Holsteins.......................................17

Trent Insurance-Nationwide................ 6

Andrews Auctioneers............................. 5

New Pittsburg Vet Clinic.....................34

U-Dean Farms........................................... 5

Bayer..........................................................16

Ohio Beef Council..................................42

Walnut Hill Feeds..................................... 9

Brookview Farms...................................29

OSU ATI.....................................................32

Wenger’s Sharpening Service...........41

COBA/Select Sires..................................44

PBS Animal Health................................18

WG Dairy...................................................25

Commodity Specialists........................19

Pine Tree Dairy........................................14

Computermixx.......................................23

Plainfield Farms......................................40

Dairy Agenda Today.............................22

Plain-Knoll Holsteins.............................. 2

Daniel Brandt Marketing....................24

Prenger’s, Inc...........................................23

Farmers National Bank.........................30

R&P Kiko Farms.......................................20

Harold’s Equipment..............................25

Rohaven Holsteins................................21

Kalmbach Feeds ....................................43

Shearer Equipment................................. 7

Kidron Auction......................................... 6

Silent-b Registered Holsteins.............. 3

Kim R. Davis-Nationwide....................32

Spike Rentals...........................................33

Lowe & Young.........................................19

ST Genetics..............................................39

Meaden & Moore...................................33

Stein-Way.................................................31

Calendar of Events January 2019 2 10

Monthly Individual Genomic Predictionswill be available Ohio Holstein News Ad Deadline

February 2019 1 6 28

Junior Production Award Entries Due to the OHA office Monthly Individual Genomic Predictions will be available Holstein Association USA Award Application Deadlines

March 2019

1 Distinguished Junior Member (DJM) & Young Distinguished Junior Member (YDJM) entry books must be received by the HAUSA 6 Monthly Individual Genomic Predictions will be available 8 Ohio Holstein Convention Sale, 11 am, Geauga County Fairgrounds, Burton, OH 8-9 Ohio Holstein Association Convention, Warren, OH 9 Ohio Holstein Annual Convention Meeting, Avalon Inn & Country Club, Warren, OH. Hosted by District 1. 15 Ohio Holstein News Ad Deadline 30-31 Mid-East Spring National & Junior Holstein Show, Columbus, OH OHIO NEWS

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The Ohio Beef Council connected over 15,500 runners at the Ohio State 4-Miler with cattle rancher and American Ninja Warrior, Lance Pekus

YOUR $2 CHECKOFF SHOWS RUNNERS AND FAMILIES BEEF

IS WHAT’S FOR DINNER

IT IS EVERY CATTLEMAN’S RESPONSIBILITY TO REMIT THEIR $2 PER HEAD BEEF CHECKOFF. LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR CHECKOFF AT WWW.OHIOBEEF.ORG.

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