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PORTLAND STATE VANGUARD

VOLUME 74 • ISSUE 2 • AUGUST 13, 2019

DEANTE STRICKLAND

1997–2019

N U M

N I TI Y

M CO

G N I N R

U O M

LANE MARTIN

1987–2019

NEWS DON'T SHOOT PDX HOSTS PLENARY HONORING MIKE BROWN • INTERNATIONAL ETHIOPIA SETS TREE-PLANTING WORLD RECORD OPINION STOP ROMANTICIZING POVERTY


CRIME BLOTTER

Aug. 5–9

DYLAN JEFFERIES AUG. 5 Fire Alarm CPSO and the Portland Fire Bureau responded to a fire alarm in the Richard and Maureen Neuberger Center at around 7:13 a.m. There was no smoke or flames. AUG. 6 Vandalism Four non-students reported their window had been broken at the University Place Hotel at around 1:54 a.m.

AUG. 6 Motor Vehicle Theft A PSU employees vehicle was stolen from Parking Structure 1 between 9:30 a.m. and 6:44 p.m. AUG. 9 Trespass Two non-students were issued trespass warnings for repeatedly being in a closed area of Shattuck Hall at around 4:15 p.m.

CONTENTS COVER DESIGN BY BRANDON PAHNISH

NEWS HILL TO HALL

INTERNATIONAL THIS WEEK AROUND THE WORLD

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LOCAL ACTIVISTS CALL FOR COMPLETE NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT P. 4 LECTURE SHEDS LIGHT ON PORTRAYAL OF BLACK PEOPLE IN PHOTOGRAPHS P. 5

ETHIOPIA PLANTS 350 MILLION TREES IN ONE DAY

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ECUADORIAN WOMEN FIGHT FOR SAFE ABORTIONS

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INTERNATIONAL PUERTO RICO CONSIDERING FOURTH NEW GOVERNOR IN ONE WEEK

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‘UNPRECEDENTED’ FIRES SPREAD THROUGH THE ARCTIC

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OPINION GENTRIFIED POVERTY CANCEL CULTURE: ONE STRIKE, YOU’RE OUT!

UN CALLS FOR CEASEFIRE AS LIBYAN DEATH TOLL REACHES 1,000

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COVER PSU COMMUNITY MOURNS DEATHS OF DEANTE STRICKLAND AND LANE MARTIN

ARTS & CULTURE PORTLAND THEATER ROUNDUP

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P. 8–9

COMICS

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EVENTS CALENDAR

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STAFF EDIT ORI A L EDITOR IN CHIEF Nada Sewidan MANAGING EDITOR Marta Yousif NEWS EDITORS Dylan Jefferies Anamika Vaughan INTERNATIONAL EDITOR Madison Cecil ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Cervanté Pope OPINION EDITOR Taylar Rivers

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ONLINE EDITOR Sangi Lama COPY CHIEF Hannah Welbourn CONTRIBUTORS Maggie Lombard Emily Price PRODUC TION & DE SIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR John Rojas LEAD DESIGNER Dana Townsend DESIGNERS Brandon Pahnish

DIS T RIBU TION & M A R K E TING DISTRIBUTION & MARKETING MANAGER Dylan Jefferies T ECHNOL OGY & W EB SIT E STUDENT MEDIA TECHNOLOGY ADVISOR Corrine Nightingale TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANTS Annie Ton

A DV ISING & ACCOUN TING COORDINATOR OF STUDENT MEDIA Reaz Mahmood STUDENT MEDIA ACCOUNTANT Sheri Pitcher To contact Portland State Vanguard, email info@psuvanguard.com

MIS SION S TAT EMEN T Vanguard’s mission is to serve the Portland State community with timely, accurate, comprehensive and critical content while upholding high journalistic standards. In the process, we aim to enrich our staff with quality, hands-on journalism education and a number of skills highly valued in today’s job market.

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A BOU T Vanguard, established in 1946, is published weekly as an independent student newspaper governed by the PSU Student Media Board. Views and editorial content expressed herein are those of the staff, contributors and readers and do not necessarily represent the PSU student body, faculty, staff or administration. Find us in print Tuesdays and online 24/7 at psuvanguard.com Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @psuvanguard for multimedia content and breaking news.


NEWS DYLAN JEFFERIES

AUG. 7: LAWSUIT BLAMES RANCHER FOR WILDFIRE THAT BURNED OREGON NATIVE AMERICAN RESERVATION

The Nena fire, a wildfire that burned for over two weeks and consumed roughly 106 square miles near Douglas County has been blamed on a rancher, workers and John Deere farm equipment in a lawsuit filed by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs on Aug. 5, according to the Associated Press. The tribal group hopes to secure $12.25 million in damages for lost resources on its reservation. According to the lawsuit, John Deere made faulty equipment that sent sparks and fires into natural debris. The rancher stated that while his equipment sparked the fire, the cause was accidental, according to AP.

AUG. 7–9

AUG. 8: OREGON JUDGE RULES IN FAVOR OF CONSERVATIONIST GROUPS LOOKING TO PROTECT OREGON SEABIRD

An Oregon judge ruled in favor of conservationist groups who wish to grant the marbled murrelet—a seabird that nests in old-growth forests—endangered species status on Aug. 1 at a ruling in Eugene,

according to Associated Press. In 2016, multiple conservationist groups petitioned the wildlife commission to increase protections for the small sea bird, and in 2018, the commission granted those extra protections given that the bird would likely go extinct in the near future. But the commission quickly reversed its decision without explanation later that year after a change in membership. The judge has ruled that the commission needed an explanation for that reversal, according to AP. According to the National Audubon Society, the marbled murrelet is a “strange, mysterious little seabird,” whose population has suffered greatly due to logging of old growth forests in the Pacific Northwest.

AUG. 9: PUBLIC EMPLOYEES SUE STATE OF OREGON OVER NEW PENSION LAW

Nine Oregon public employees filed a lawsuit on Aug. 9 contesting Senate Bill 1049, which was signed into law by Gov. Kate Brown this year. SB 1049 seeks to rein in Oregon’s nearly $27 billion in unfunded pension liability tied to the Public Employees Retirement System. The lawsuit claims that SB 1049 is a breach of

contract between employers and employees, as it reduces retirement benefits for employees, according to Statesman Journal. According to the lawsuit, every employee’s individual retirement account will be reduced by anywhere from 5% to 14% under the new law.

AUG. 9: GOV. BROWN APPROVES MEASURE TO OFFER PAID FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE

Gov. Brown signed a measure that calls for a 100% wage replacement for minimumwage workers during a medical- or familyrelated leave of absence from work, making Oregon the first state in the country to do so. According to OregonLive, advocates are calling it one of the most progressive paid family and medical leave measures in the country. The law—which will offer 12 weeks of paid time off for new parents, those who have become ill or need to take care of an ill family member and victims of domestic violence—will begin paying out benefits in 2023. The measure will also cover workers who are in the country illegally as well as part-time workers who work at least 1,000 hours a year, according to OregonLive.

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

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NEWS

LOCAL ACTIVISTS CALL FOR COMPLETE NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT

ANAMIKA VAUGHAN

Community members gathered on Aug. 6 to remember the two atomic bombs dropped on Japan 74 years ago and to shed light on the unequal effects of nuclear weapons on women, children and indigenous communities. The event took place at the Japanese American Historical Plaza and was hosted by Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility. The nonprofit helped pass Senate Joint Memorial 5—a resolution stating that Oregonians want to support all treaties for nuclear prohibition and for nuclear non-proliferation—during the most recent legislative session. Oregon is the second state after California to pass a resolution of this nature. Oregon PSR also encouraged those at the event to sign a petition calling on Portland City Council to support the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, adopted by the United Nations in 2017. The treaty prohibits participating nations from developing, testing, possessing, using or threatening to use nuclear weapons. The United States has yet to join the 70 other countries that have signed the treaty. “There are some lessons I think have not yet been learned,” Congressman Earl Blumenauer said. “[The U.S.] is investing $25 billion a year on weapons that [it] really can’t afford and [it] can’t afford to use.” Blumenauer gave a brief history of nuclear armament in the U.S., explaining that during the Reagan administration, the country was in possession of 25,000 nuclear weapons, but it has since reduced that number to 1,700 weapons after the public demanded a reduction. Michiko Kornhauser was growing up in Japan when the bombs were dropped. She and her classmates had fled the dangers of the war to the countryside outside of Hiroshima, taking refuge in a temple. “One day in August, we the children were playing outside of the temple,” Kornhauser said. “The sky was blue and clear. Suddenly we noticed that something was flying over us and before we knew it we were seeing something falling all over us. Soon we were covered in grey ash.” “That night the teacher told us that a huge bomb fell over Hiroshima and the entire city was wiped out,” she continued. “We then knew where the ash came from.” She later reunited with her mother and her baby brother. Food was scarce, and her brother died of malnourishment. Another teenage boy who was separated from his family was staying with them. The boy decided to go to Hiroshima to find his brother, and the exposure to the remaining radiation poisoned him to death. “He never saw the bomb explode—he only walked around the city looking for his brother,” she said. “Now this entire family was gone. I began to wonder about the ash that fell all over us on the temple ground. It must have been radioactive.” The event also explored the health effects of nuclear production. Hanford, Wash. is a decommissioned nuclear production complex and home to the world’s first plutonium production reactor. The plutonium produced at the Hanford site was used in the atomic bomb that was dropped over Nagasaki. Patricia Hoover also spoke at the event. Hoover grew up in Hermiston, Ore. is considered a “downwinder” and was exposed to Hanford’s nuclear radiation as a child. Patricia Hoover also spoke at the event. Hoover grew up in Hermiston, Ore. is considered a “downwinder” and was exposed to Hanford’s nuclear radiation as a child. She talked about the health effects on women including spontaneous abortions, miscarriages and birth defects. “I have so many stories of women who carried five children to term, and they all died,” said Hoover. “One of my best friends in Walla Walla had seven babies brought to term. One, the brains were on the outside of the skull, one had no limbs, one had a stroke as soon as it came out of the birth canal. The stories of these women’s terrible birth outcomes are a product of our nuclear weapons production.” “My family ends when my sister and I die,” Hoover said, as she and her sister were unable to have children. Hanford is now considered the most contaminated nuclear site in North America. Blumenauer said today, 80% of the American public believes the U.S. needs to reduce its nuclear weapons.

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PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13 , 2019 • psuvanguard.com

BRANDON PAHNISH


NEWS

LECTURE SHEDS LIGHT ON PORTRAYAL OF BLACK PEOPLE IN PHOTOGRAPHS

ANAMIKA VAUGHAN La Tanya S. Autry, a Ph.D candidate in art history spoke on the history of how Black people have been portrayed in photographic media since the early 20th century at the Portland Art Museum on Aug. 8. The lecture was part of a series of events over the weekend run by Don’t Shoot Portland to remember the fifth anniversary of the fatal shooting of Michael Brown. In August 2014, 18-year old Brown was shot dead by police officer Darren Wilson. Brown was unarmed at the time, and his death sparked 11 days of protest in Ferguson, Mo., where the incident occurred. A grand jury decided not to indict Wilson in November 2014. Don’t Shoot Portland also held panel discussions on community education, political activism, criminal justice, poverty, gangs and housing on Aug. 9 and a school supply drive on Aug. 10. The lecture also functioned as a part of the ongoing Museums Are Not Neutral movement, started by Autry and her colleagues Teressa Raiford and Mike Murawski in 2017. The movement seeks to decolonize museums—institutions which Autry says are generally white spaces. “More often, the curator for African art is a white person in most museums,” said Autry.

DON’T SHOOT PORTLAND’S FIRST EVENT OF ITS THREE-DAY PLENARY HONORING MIKE BROWN WAS HELD AT THE PORTLAND ART MUSEUM, AUG. 8. COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS. A major theme of Autry’s talk was the way in which Black people have historically been portrayed in photographs and how those portrayals influence how the viewer receives them. Historically, the photographer’s aim is to humanize Black people for a white audience, according to Autry. Autry began by examining photographs from W.E.B DuBois’s “The American Negro” exhibit at the 1900 Paris exhibition. “[DuBois] is existing in this time where there is this idea of science of people taking photographs of people, particularly of African Americans,” Autry said. “The eugenics movement is considered actual science, and photography really becomes a part of creating ideas about race and suggesting that some people are of a different species.” “What’s interesting is that DuBois...is actually trying to work against a lot of those ideas, but in his project, actually employs some of those strategies,” Autry said. Using examples from early photojournalism, Autry then examined the effect photographs can have on the viewer. In 1955, 14-year old Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi after being accused of offending a white woman. Till’s mother allowed photographs of her son’s dead body to be published so others might see the truth of what was done to him.

“Those photographs were extremely important for a lot of people, for young people,” Autry said, going on to explain how this event impacted the next wave of the civil rights movement in the ‘60s. “After Emmett Till, there was a feeling [among young people] that something else had to happen. There needed to be stronger kind of change. There needed to be people more unapologetic about their Blackness.” Autry finished her lecture by bringing it back to the death of Brown and how the media portrayed him: particularly how the media gave equal attention to both Brown and to the officer who killed him. She highlighted the street art of Alexandra Bell, whereby Bell pasted up these images all over New York City of The New York Times coverage of the Brown shooting, reframing it to portray Brown simply as “a teenager with promise.” “[Bell’s] focus wasn’t to appeal to The New York Times per se, to get them to change their strategies,” Autry said. “[Bell is saying] we get this this was a person, he had a life, he was important. She’s creating a moment of care for Mike Brown, for Mike Brown’s family, for other Black people.”

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

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INTERNATIONAL

PUERTO RICO CONSIDERING FOURTH NEW GOVERNOR IN ONE WEEK MADISON CECIL After days of protests, Puerto Rican Governor Ricardo Rosselló resigned on Aug. 2, but now the United States territory has had a total of three different governors in less than a week, and is considering a fourth. Rosselló stepped down as governor after 800 pages of texts between him and several other high-ranking officials were leaked to the public, revealing homophobic, sexist and profane comments. He was replaced by Pedro Pierluisi, whose appointment was called “unethical and illegal” by Senate President Thomas Rivera Schatz. Pierluisi faced significant criticism from many people who argued he had been hand-picked to take over by Rosselló. The Supreme Court removed Pierluisi from the position with a unanimous vote just five days after the beginning of his term since his position was never confirmed by the Senate. “It is concluded that the swearing in as governor by Hon. Pedro R. Pierluisi Urrutia, named secretary of state in recess, is unconstitutional,” the court’s statement read according to France 24. The latest in the string of Puerto Rican governors is former Justice Secretary Wanda Vásquez, who admitted that she had no interest in taking the job, but would do her best to “take a step forward with no interest other than serving the people as [she] has done [her] whole life,” according to a televised speech the new governor made on Aug. 7. Vásquez was next in line for the governor position—according to Puerto Rico’s Constitution—since the former secretary of state had previously resigned due to the same text scandal that brought down Rosselló. The secretary of state had yet to be replaced, so the responsibility fell to Vásquez instead. According to BBC, the new governor claimed to take office “with the greatest respect and determination to serve my people and push Puerto Rico forward.” “I will continue to focus on helping our people regain their way in an orderly and peaceful fashion,” Vásquez said upon her inauguration, according to France 24. Less than 24 hours after Vásquez was formally sworn into office on Aug. 7, however, members of her own New Progressive Party were discussing a fourth option—Resident Commissioner Jenniffer González. González is Puerto Rico’s non-voting representative in the U.S. Congress, and according to TIME, a majority of the New Progressive Party supports her becoming governor. A total of 66 New Progressive Party members, including Senate President Schatz, several mayors and senators as well as González herself, met for four hours on the morning of Aug. 8 to discuss how to proceed. “If [González] is good

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PUERTO RICO HAS HAD THREE DIFFERENT GOVERNORS OVER THE COURSE OF ONE WEEK FOLLOWING THE RESIGNATION OF FORMER GOV. RICARDO ROSSELLÓ ON AUG. 2. COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS. over [in the U.S.], she would be even better here,” Schatz told AP News. “The leadership…basically agrees that Jenniffer should be the governor,” Senator José Meléndez of the New Progressive Party told PBS News. “It is a matter that must be treated bit by bit because we do not know what is in the mind of Wanda Vásquez. Jenniffer is the consensus person. This should happen quickly, but it depends on what the governor says… The key to breaking the bottleneck lies with Wanda Vásquez.” In order for González to become the new governor, she would need to be appointed to the open secretary of state position by Vásquez

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

before being confirmed by both the Puerto Rican House of Representatives and the Senate. Vásquez would then need to resign as governor, something she has publicly said she has no intention of doing. According to AP News, González has agreed to become the new governor if the New Progressive Party members, including Governor Vásquez, reach a consensus on how to proceed. “If I got that privilege, I would be a great governor,” González told AP News. “... My experience has proven results.”González has not been quiet about how she would proceed if she were to take over for Vásquez, voicing her opinions and how she would

approach governing to several news agencies and officials in Puerto Rico. “There must be fundamental changes in the entire structure of the government in all cabinet officials and in all contracts that the governments of Puerto Rico has,” González told AP News. “It’s time that the people and not politicians become the priority.” González has also expressed a desire for Puerto Rico to become an official U.S. state but has acknowledged the mainland U.S. has doubts about the territory’s stability, especially after the recent changes in governorship. “[The U.S. government] doesn’t trust Puerto Rico’s institutions or its officials,” González said.


INTERNATIONAL

‘UNPRECEDENTED’ FIRES SPREAD THROUGH THE ARCTIC

RUSSIAN PRESIDENT VLADIMIR PUTIN HOLDS A MEETING ON THE FIRES IN THE TRANS-BAIKAL TERRITORY. COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS. EMILY PRICE Wildfires are spreading through parts of the Arctic, including Siberia, Alaska, Greenland and Canada at “unprecedented levels,” according to wildfire expert Mark Parrington from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service. According to BBC, the increasing number of wildfires affects air quality as well as conditions on the ground. Fires release toxic pollutants and gases into the atmosphere, which can be harmful to people, animals and plants. The smoke from the fires in Russia has now traveled as far as the west coast of Canada and Alaska, according to BBC. Smoke has blocked the sun and made it difficult for people to breathe in several countries, and some governments have declared a state of emergency. Fires in the northern hemisphere between May and October are not abnormal, yet the location, intensity and length have been more extreme than usual, according to CAMS. The World Meteorological Organization reported 2019 saw Earth’s warmest June on record. With warmer conditions, fires grow more rapidly and can persist longer. Russia’s Federal Forestry Agency reported over 6.5 million acres of land are currently burning across Siberia and Eastern

Russia. Russian President Vladimir Putin has sent the Russian army to help fight the fires in Siberia, and United States President Donald Trump has offered Putin assistance to put the fires out. According to USA Today, firefighters in Russia have few resources in some parts of the Sberian Arctic. In Siberia, rain is one of the only available resources to extinguish the flames. Hundreds of thousands of people have signed a petition calling for tougher action regarding the fires, claiming what Putin is doing is not enough. While Russia is one of the regions most affected by the fire season, there are currently 21 fires burning through over 1 million acres of land in Alaska, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. BBC reported the majority of the fires throughout Alaska have been started by lightning strikes. In Canada, a single wildfire in the Northwest Territories has burned at least— if not more—100,000 acres according to the Environment and Natural Resources Ministry. “The ongoing Arctic fires have been most severe in Alaska and Siberia, where some have been large enough to cover almost 100,000 football pitches, or the whole of Lanzarote,”

Parrington stated in a CAMS report. “In Alberta, Canada, one fire is estimated to have been bigger than 300,000 pitches. In Alaska alone, CAMS has registered almost 400 wildfires this year, with new ones igniting every day.” In addition to affecting air quality, climate scientists claim soot absorbs sunlight and warms the atmosphere. If soot falls on ice or snow, it absorbs heat as soot reduces reflectability. Fires also contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Scientists estimate that fires in July 2019 resulted in the release of about 100 megatons of carbon dioxide, the equivalent of the carbon output of the entirety of Belgium in 2017. “We haven’t crossed any major irreversible tipping points yet, but for each tenth of a degree that we get close to 1.5 [degrees Celsius], it’s sort of like time’s running out,” meteorologist Eric Holthaus told TIME. “We’re already there in some places where the ice just doesn’t exist in the times and places that it used to. That’s a permanent change effectively to those parts of the Arctic.” Greenland is one place serious ice sheet changes can be seen every year. The National Post reported the 2019 melting season could set a record for the most melted ice in history. 250 billion tons of ice have already melted this year due to a combination of low snowfall and significant melt run-off, according to The National Post. This is enough water to sustain the world population’s water intake for over 40 years. “The basic chemistry and the basic physics of how the atmosphere absorbs heat—there’s no path where you can imagine that the Arctic is going to start to cool off again,” Brian Brettchneider from the International Arctic Research Center told TIME. “Cold air has to come from somewhere, cold air doesn’t just magically appear, and that somewhere has to be accounted for in the entire energy balance of the Earth. It would take a dramatic reversal of the chemical composition of the atmosphere.”

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

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COVER

PSU COMMUNITY MOURNS DEAT DEANTE STRICKLAND AND LANE

DYLAN JEFFERIES

STRICKLAND AT A GAME VERSUS THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON IN 2017. COURTESY OF LARRY C LAWSON.

The Portland State community continues to mourn the death of standout athlete Deante Strickland, who was fatally shot on the afternoon of Aug. 2 at his grandmother’s home in Northeast Portland. He was 22 years old. Strickland—a star basketball player who was also set to play football for the Vikings in the fall—was a PSU student and social science major. He was commonly referred to as “Strick.” “We are deeply saddened by the loss of Deante,” said PSU Athletics Director Valerie Cleary. “He represented everything it means to be a Viking in his hometown of Portland. He will forever be remembered for his character, determination and warm smile. Our prayers go out to his family and friends.” Strickland was born and raised in Portland. He attended Central Catholic High School, where he attracted attention as a standout basketball and football player. He wanted to one day coach kids in his neighborhood, get his master’s de-

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gree and work with children as a teacher or a coach, according to OregonLive. Viking basketball coach Barret Peery said of Strickland, “We are better for having had Deante in our lives. His smile, passion and energy for life was second to none. He lit up a room and made the people around him better in every way. He loved his family, his friends and everyone around him. He had great pride in being a kid from Portland and it showed in how he competed each day. We will never forget him and he will always be with us.” “I love Deante and am a better man for having the opportunity to coach him. This entire community will miss him.” In an email sent out to the PSU community, Interim President Stephen Percy stated, “We at Portland State are shocked and saddened by the tragic loss Friday of student athlete Deante Strickland.”

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

“We offer our condolences to the family, friends and others touched by [his] death.” Strickland suffered fatal gunshot wounds to the chest at the hand of his sister, Tamena Strickland, 30, on the afternoon of Aug. 2. Two others, Deante’s grandmother Shirley Strickland, 67, and aunt Shirley Strickland, 25, were also shot, according to court documents. The other two victims were identified by family members to OregonLive. Deante ran to a nearby construction site after the shooting for help. Construction workers attempted to help Strickland by calming him down and applying pressure to the wound while they waited for paramedics to arrive, according to Russell Steen, a construction worker who spoke with OregonLive. Deante died shortly thereafter, according to court documents. Tamena Strickland was located and arrested later that evening on suspicion of murder and attempted murder, according to court documents. The other two victims were transported to the hospital where they underwent surgery and are expected to recover. Tamena was charged with murder and two counts of attempted murder on Aug. 5. The motive for the shooting is unclear; as the case remains ongoing, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s office is unable to provide any additional information. Damien Strickland, Deante’s uncle, told OregonLive that a 4-yearold child was also present at the shooting but was not harmed. Mourners laid flowers and candles beneath a poster of Strickland at the Viking Pavilion on Aug. 3—the day after the shooting—and many members of the PSU community released statements commemorating Strickland and the positive impact he had on those who knew him. Hundreds of mourners attended a vigil for Strickland held by his family members on the evening of Aug. 6. “Strick had great personality, a great smile and a great love for life,” Peery said. “He was a happy, fun person. He was so proud to be a Portland kid, and I think that’s why he loved being at Portland State so much, because wearing Portland State on his chest really meant something to him.” “He was just that guy that warmed up a room, and had a great light about him, and a great energy, and again, everyone will tell you, he had a great smile.” Holland Woods, a teammate and friend of Strickland’s who played with him on the Vikings for two years, said, “He was like my best friend. When I got [to PSU] two years ago in June, he was my roommate...Soon as I got here, I didn’t know anybody. I’m from Phoenix. So he was right there, he put his arms around me from the start, treated me like his younger brother. I treated him like my younger brother. We were just there for each other.” “It’s just weird, going from talking to someone every single day, a bunch of hours in the day, seeing them everyday to not seeing them—it’s just hard. He was a loving and caring dude. I loved playing with him.” According to a statement released by the PSU athletics department, the Center for Student Health and Counseling and the athletics department are working to provide assistance to PSU athletes and the larger PSU community through the grieving process. A celebration of life ceremony is scheduled to take place at 1 p.m. on Aug. 14 in the Viking Pavilion that the public is welcome to attend.


COVER

THS OF E MARTIN PSU student Lane Martin passed away on July 30. He was 31 years old. Martin was enrolled in the School of Art and Design and was hired on for a work-study position. He had previously attended Portland Community College and two other California community colleges to study art. For Martin, art was a lifelong pursuit. “Art has been something I did since I was 5 years old, and it became a tool I used while incarcerated,” he wrote on his website. “For me art is a way of life, it’s a hustle, it’s something that I live and breathe every day. My hope is that as I continue to paint and create art, I can inspire others to use art as a vehicle to help overcome their obstacles and make it through the painful experiences that life has to offer.” According to Martin’s obituary, published in the Reno Gazette Journal, “Lane loved the outdoors, and spent most of his free time out hiking in the mountains or enjoying some time at a lake with his family and friends.” “Although we are all deeply saddened by his loss, Lane will forever live on in our hearts and minds, and his art will live on as a reminder of his creativity and colorful personality.” On his website and Facebook page, Martin has many of his paintings and sculptures displayed—lush, abstract and psychedelic works centered around mandelas and nature, as well as portraits of pets, friends and family. “Over the last several years, the pervasive theme in my life and art practice has been my struggle with substance abuse,” Martin had written on his website. Martin wrote that his addiction to narcotics led him down a “dark and painful path” where the only way out was “death or incarceration.” “When the consequences of my actions finally caught up and I was sent to prison, I sought to use my experience to become a better artist and become a better human being and a stronger artist,” he wrote. He wrote that while he was in prison, he began to work with yarn and other materials that he was able to get through a mailorder catalogue. He made crocheted beanies and sold them online for commissary. According to his obituary, “Lane struggled with addiction and mental health issues over the years but was able to return to his beautiful self, time and time again, and we are forever grateful to those who helped him with his struggles.” Martin was shot and killed by Portland Police in East Portland on July 30, the day before his birthday. Police were called to the scene when they received reports of a man causing a disturbance with a weapon outside of a Southeast Portland apartment complex. Witnesses said that police took action after Martin displayed what looked like a hatchet or a small axe. Officers initially fired at him with beanbags, causing Martin to drop his weapon and flee. The officers then caught up with Martin and switched to regular bullets as he turned to flee again, according to a witness who lives in the apartment complex speaking with OregonLive. Witnesses told OregonLive that Martin appeared to be experiencing a mental health crisis. One resident of the apartment complex told OregonLive that he was once housed at Multnomah County Inverness Jail with Martin, and that Martin was a diagnosed schizophrenic.

LANE MARTIN PRESENTING IN HIS ART 105 CLASS AT PORTLAND STATE. COURTESY OF SAM PETERS. All three officers involved in the shooting are on paid administrative leave during an ongoing investigation into the shooting, according to OPB. Court records show that in 2014, Martin pleaded guilty to an attempted assault when he unexpectedly attacked a friend, as well as to one count of heroin possession. Martin hadn’t been arrested since then and was enrolled in treatment programs for addiction, according to court records.

PSU associate professor Michelle Illuminato, who taught Martin sculpture and worked closely with him during his work-study, told OPB, “He was a hard worker, smiled easily, extremely kind and always helpful.” “We all will miss him at PSU.” Martin’s family asks that those who wish to make a contribution in Lane’s memory to donate to the organization Transition Projects, an organization based in Portland that seeks to provide housing for houseless individuals.

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

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INTERNATIONAL

THIS WEEK

around the

WORLD August 5–10

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Aug. 5

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CAIRO, EGYPT

A stolen car was crashed into three oncoming vehicles outside a cancer hospital before exploding, killing 20 people and injuring 47 more. “We ran to the main entrance of the hospital but it was on fire, so we left through another side door,” Nermal al-Awady told The Guardian. “I saw body parts and lots of blood. Inside the hospital, there was panic.” BBC reports the blast caused substantial damage to both the outside and inside of the cancer hospital, but all of the patients have been transferred to other facilities. Authorities believe the car was rigged with explosive devices by Hasm, a group believed to be a violent subgroup of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood. The Interior Ministry of Egypt believe the “car was being transported to a location for use in the execution of a terrorist operation,” according to Reuters. 2

Aug. 7

KABUL, AFGHANISTAN

In a suicide bomb attack outside a western Kabul police station, 14 people were killed

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with an additional 145 injured. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which is another one of the near-daily attacks the group has been staging in Kabul for several weeks. An explosive-packed car was stopped at the checkpoint outside of the police station before it exploded, injuring mostly civilians and killing four police officers. The Taliban and Afghan government have been in the middle of peace talks with assistance from the United States for several months now, but U.S. Ambassador Roya Rahmani told AP News those talks could stop completely if the Taliban continues these attacks. “It’s simply not understandable why somebody with the idea of peace in mind would like to continue killing people,” Rahmani told AP News. The Aug. 7 attack was one of the Taliban’s worst attacks of 2019, AP News reported. 3

Aug. 8

URUAPAN, MEXICO

Authorities reported the discovery of 19 bodies scattered throughout three different locations of the city. Some of the bodies were hanging

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from bridges, while others were cut up and thrown along the side of roads, according to Al Jazeera. Authorities report the Jalisco New Generation drug cartel has claimed responsibility for the killings, and they are believed to be part of an ongoing conflict between drug cartels for territory. “There is a turf war between the [local] cells of different criminal groups,” chief prosecutor Adrian Lopez told Al Jazeera. “They are fighting for territorial control over the production, distribution and consumption of drugs. That leads to this type of incident, which alarms the population, and rightfully so.” 4

Aug. 8–11

ADEN, YEMEN

Since fighting began again in the conflict-prone zone in Yemen, at least 40 people have been killed with over 200 more injured. The fighting between southern Yemeni separatists and presidential guards broke out on Aug. 8 when the fighting killed three civilians and nine fighters from both sides, according to The Middle East Eye. The separatist forces had seized control of the presidential palace and several

military bases throughout Aden as of Aug. 11. “Two hundred soldiers from the Presidential Guard were given safe passage out of the palace,” an official from the separatist forces told BBC. Many nations, including the United States, have demanded the latest fighting in Aden be ended with a ceasefire, but neither side of the conflict has admitted defeat. 5

Aug. 10

RUSSIA

In Russia’s largest political protest in years, authorities detained 72 people throughout the country. With 40,000 protesters nationwide, Reuters reported 55 people were detained in St. Petersburg, 10 in Moscow and seven in Roston-on-Don. The protests were organized after authorities announced they would be limiting who could run in the country’s upcoming local elections and would not be allowing independent candidates. The protests in Moscow were the largest, taking place outside the presidential administration building where many could be heard chanting: “Putin in a thief.”


INTERNATIONAL

ETHIOPIA PLANTS ECUADORIAN 353 MILLION TREES WOMEN FIGHT FOR IN ONE DAY SAFE ABORTIONS AFFORESTATION ON THE RISE TO COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE

GOALS INCLUDE DECRIMINALIZING PROCEDURE

MADISON CECIL Thousands of people across Ethiopia planted a total of 353,633,600 tree saplings in 12 hours on July 29, setting the world record for most trees to be planted in a single day. Ethiopia more than tripled the previous world record—set by India in 2017—of 66 million trees in one day, according to CBS. In order to help increase the number of participants, many schools and government buildings were closed for the day. The trees were planted throughout 1,000 sites throughout the country. Several corporations took part in the treeplanting event as well, including Ethiopian Airlines. Executives of the airline company were photographed as they planted trees near the company’s airplanes on July 29. “Environmental sustainability is one of our company’s philosophies” a company representative told EcoWatch. Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed began a new initiative in May 2019, aiming to plant at least 4 billion trees by October, according to the Indiana Environmental Reporter. In order to achieve this goal, Ethiopians must plant approximately 200 million seedlings each day. According to EuroNews, Ethiopia is on track to achieve the goal and has already planted over 2.6 billion trees. According to the Office of the Prime Minister, Ahmed’s Green Legacy project “is an ambitious undertaking to become a green society by planting various types of eco-friendly seedling to combat environmental degradation and a national platform that will be used for various societal green activities.

DANA TOWNSEND

Ethiopia’s forest coverage has dramatically decreased in the last century and now covers only 4% of the country rather than the 35% it covered in at the beginning of the 1900s. “Afforestation is the most effective climate change solution to date, and with the new record set by Ethiopia, other African nations should move with speed and challenge the status quo,” said Juliette Biao Koudenoukpo, director of the UN Environment’s Africa Office, in an official statement. Afforestation is said to be an effective tactic because the trees planted will grow and continue to absorb carbon dioxide, one of the main contributors to climate change. A recent report released by EcoWatch was one of Ethiopia’s main motivators, as the report claimed the planting of 500 billion trees could result in the removal of as much as one fourth of the carbon emissions in the atmosphere. “Africa has what it takes to spearhead this global push, and as the most affected and vulnerable continent, climate change mitigation must be the topmost priority in the coming days,” Koudenoukpo stated. “We at UN Environment are taking the lead in helping to build capacity for nations and people to apply themselves to afforestation and climate change mitigation strategies.” Several other African countries, including Kenya, have begun implementing environmental programs similar to Ethiopia’s Green Legacy with the assistance of the UN.

DANA TOWNSEND

MADISON CECIL AND EMILY PRICE Movements throughout Ecuador are fighting to make abortions safer for women. The country has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world, according to The Nation. While some groups are fighting to decriminalize abortions, one group, Las Comadres, is making illegal abortions safer. The Nation describes Las Comadres’ approach as one that “skirts legal restrictions” and works to make the risky procedures easier and more hygienic for people looking to have an abortion. The Comadres are a counter-current feminist group who work to make abortion accessible with a goal to decriminalize the procedure. Ecuadorian law dictates having an abortion is illegal, so the Comadres—which translates to ‘Godmothers’ in English—provide young women the information they need in order to obtain Misoprotal, a medication that causes a safe abortion. A member of the Comadres will then stay with the woman while she takes the abortion medication. Although abortions are illegal in Ecuador, providing information is not. “We facilitate the contact but don’t sell them the pills,” Tamia Maldonado from Las Comadres explained. The services are free other than a service fee to deliver the pills. Wealthy women in Ecuador can obtain safe abortions if they can cross the border into a different country, but for women in less financially stable situations, many turn to back

alley abortions. These illegal abortions often result in complications, illness and even death. In 2014, back alley abortions were the third largest cause of maternal death in Ecuador and made up 15.6% of all deaths in the country, Reuters reported. Prosecutions against women who have abortions have escalated sharply in the past few years. In January 2019, attorneys investigated 378 cases, according to The Nation. A significant portion of the women who obtain abortions became pregnant after they were sexually assaulted, and many times these assaults were at the hands of close friends or family. According to Reuters, there have been over 14,000 cases of rape reported to authorities over the last three years. 718 of the reported cases involved girls younger than 10 years old. 20,000 girls under 14 years old gave birth between 2008 and 2018, many of them due to instances of sexual assault, Reuters reported. “Here we talk about child pregnancies, but these are rape,” Ecuadorian lawmaker Karla Andrade told Reuters. “It’s not that a child just gets pregnant. A lot of times it’s done by fathers or other family members, so they never get reported.” Ecuador’s National Assembly is currently debating whether or not to allow a change in the criminal code which would allow for access to safe and legal abortions in the case of rape or incest, but no conclusive decision has been released yet.

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OPINION

GENTRIFIED POVERTY RICH PEOPLE ARE OBSESSED WITH WANTING TO LOOK POOR—AND IT’S DISTURBING

TAYLAR RIVERS

JOHN ROJAS

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Those who can most afford to dress—and live—any way they want are consciously emulating those who lack that freedom, making those people stuck in a situation wherein they are unwilling participants of a new aesthetic. From clothes to housing, the “poor aesthetic” is one with the characteristics of something old and/or something used. Some things are purposely made to look old or worn, and there’s been an embrace of a minimalistic approach to fashion that fills the more financially privileged world. There is nothing fun about poverty. Lack of resources and wealth usually makes rich people feel uncomfortable. To overcome their inner conflict, they aestheticize the poverty and the simple lifestyle as authentic and cultural. Wealthy people regard poverty as purity during materialistic times of consumption. Rich people see poor people’s lack of material prosperity as a means to be more happy and more thankful for the little things. “When volunteer tourists confront poverty, they often become uncomfortable and seek ways to negotiate personal anxieties regarding the inequality of the encounter by aestheticizing the host community members’ poverty as authentic and cultural,” Mary Mostafanezhad wrote in an article in Annals of Tourism Research. The danger of poverty aesthetics lies in the romanticisation of poverty. The “poor-but-happy” remarks are well known but are meant to justify the system of total inequality instead of questioning it. They do not see—or do not want to see—poverty as a problem. With this mindset, poverty or living and maneuvering life with few resources symbolizes a noncommercialized, natural and beautiful world. An example of this misinterpretation is the disparity that exists between students around the meaning of the word “broke.” The definition of “broke” is often interpreted differently in the minds of wealthy students compared to their low-income peers. For many low-income students, “broke” is defined by a lack of financial stability. The broke college student or hipster movement can be summarized as nothing more than half-hearted wallowing in poverty aesthetics without recognition of poverty’s real-life hardships. Completely immersing themselves in a superficial lifestyle imitating poor white culture leads them into a soldem lack of understanding towards the reality of true hardships. Low-income people are being trivialized by the fake poor aesthetic, which is seen when higher-income people use poorness—in the form of thrift store clothing or secondhand items—as a fashion statement. Quite often, discussions of poverty in are misunderstood as equivalent to the lived experiences of low-income individuals. Being on an allowance that doesn’t allot for eating out does not equate to not being unable to afford food, and not having money to go out as much as you’d like is not being “poor” or being “broke.” Someone’s livelihood should not be the newest trend. You cannot accessorize poorness and identify with it when you choose.


OPINION

CANCEL CULTURE: ONE STRIKE, YOU’RE OUT! TAYLAR RIVERS Cancel culture is meant to uphold a certain level of accountability amongst society, but the standards have become a bit unrealistic. Political correctness is the newest obsession and cancel culture is, essentially, when people who have said or done problematic things either now or in the past are decidedly “canceled,” and people no longer support them or their endeavors. Although it is important to be conscientious of who you support and the ethical implications that come with supporting them, questions arise: Where is the line? Where is the statute of limitations on problematic words and behavior? When is “young and ignorant” no longer a valid excuse? There is an expectation today to be, on some level, socially aware. We have all been given access to various platforms to broadcast our every thought, and with this platform has come the ability for those sentiments to be immortalized as well. This—mixed with our society’s newfound social awareness— has led to people actually being held accountable now. While this shift is a necessary part of the progression of our society, there have been many casualties of this cultural change.

In this day and age, examples are everywhere. Celebrities are called out for problematic behavior or racist remarks and losing everything from record deals to television shows. These attacks usually come in the form of people dredging up questionable, often old social media posts from celebrities. Take the example of Doja Cat, who continuously failed to grasp the ethics of where she had erred when it was exposed that she had repeatedly used homophobic slurs on social media years before she become a recognized artist. In this particular instance, past tweets of hers were discovered and revealed her casual usage of “faggot.” Though an apology was issued, there still lingers a dark cloud of misunderstanding. The public can outcry and demand an apology, but what we can’t do is expect them to understand. Where cancel culture truly originates is the idea that because certain people may have a platform and/or make loved content, they are suddenly socially aware. People still suck even when they make good music. There are positives that derive from cancel culture, such as the fact that we now have the power to hold celebrities

accountable for JOHN ROJAS their actions, demanding that they act as better members of society. On the other hand, the culture perpetuates an anti-growth narrative. Discovering dated remarks that are sexist, facist and/or racist should never be ignored or dismissed. The line begins to blur when addressing the matter is merely an act of negativity and not a learning experience. Not everyone wants to learn, and not everyone deserves your energy to teach. The fact of the matter is that whether you believe in cancel culture or empathizing with everyone, our energy should be diverted elsewhere. These celebrities that vote a certain way, behave a certain way or look a certain will probably never change. No think piece, social post or anything of the sort are needed. No one requires forgiveness. Take care of yourself first.

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ARTS & CULTURE

PORTLAND THEATER ROUNDUP BEAT THE BACK-TO-SCHOOL BLUES WITH FRESH SUMMER AND FALL SHOWS MAGGIE LOMBARD Now that we’re well into August and fall quarter looms around the corner, maybe it’s time to shake up your summer agenda while there’s still a chance. For something a little different than the normal bar-river-couch routine, no further than the theaters of Portland. A diverse array of theaters, ranging from teeny amateur companies to professional repertories, are showing fresh works to keep you laughing, crying and thinking about the state of art in our great dramatic city.

‘FOOTLOOSE’ AT BROADWAY ROSE AUG. 1–SEPT. 1

‘1984’ AT IMAGO THEATRE SEPT. 7–OCT. 6

Somehow, Broadway Rose managed to find a cast full of super-gymnasts capable of performing acrobatic choreography so intense that it’ll blow your mind. Relish in the score chock-full of ‘80s hits such as “Holding Out For a Hero,” “Let’s Hear It For The Boy,” and of course, “Footloose.” Leading man Eric Asakawa dazzles as Ren McCormack and will certainly have you tip-tapping along in your seat.

The first show of Artist Repertory Theater’s “Art on Tour” season—which takes ART all around Portland as their home base is being remodeled—1984 will surely hit home granted the context of our political landscape. Steven Suskin of the Huffington Post calls the theatrical adaptation “astonishing, riveting and almost literally shocking,” so, it’s pretty much light and digestible entertainment.

‘IN THE HEIGHTS’ AT PORTLAND CENTER STAGE

‘MALA’ AT COHO THEATER

AUG. 31–OCT. 13 Who could forget Hamilton, that musical about the founding fathers that captivated the world in 2015 and is somehow still going strong? Turns out, its creator Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote something just as good before it. In The Heights takes place in Washington Heights in Manhattan, sizzling with the sounds of hip-hop, rap and multilingual lyrics. If you’re reluctant to see a musical because you expect tap dance, ingenues and fake smiles, go see In the Heights. It changed the game back in 2007 and is still around thanks to its ingenuity, electricity and energy.

‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’ AT LAKEWOOD CENTER FOR THE ARTS SEPT. 6–OCT. 13 After they close their summer run of the childhood classic of Matilda the Musical, Lakewood Center for the Arts takes a sharp turn in maturity and begins their run of The Rocky Horror Show. It’s basically the source material for every cult classic movie, so see where your favorite characters originated from, and sing “Time Warp” from your seat while real, live humans in tights and glitter do that silly dance.

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SEPT. 6–28 A one-person show starring Portland’s own Julana Torres as the lead character, Mala promises to be a “darkly funny” show about a first-generation child caring for her dying mother. With lovingly-crafted language about family, death, stubbornness and preparedness, it’s a cathartic production for anyone deep in the throes of family drama.

‘THE WOLVES’ AT PORTLAND PLAYHOUSE SEPT. 25–OCT. 20 Remember when we won the World Cup like, last month? Lest we forget that women dominate the modern soccer-scape, The Wolves allows us into the lives of a suburban girls’ soccer team. If you like the shocking authenticity of movies like Eighth Grade or Booksmart, head to Portland Playhouse for this production. Speaking, scoring, stretching and fighting with the ferocity that only teenage girls have, these unnamed players—we know them only by their numbers—speak such uncensored truths that you have no choice but to listen, though, at times, you may only wish to look away.

PSU Vanguard • AUGUST 13, 2019 • psuvanguard.com

‘THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW’ IS COMING TO THE LAKEWOOD CENTER FOR THE ARTS SEPT. 6. COURTESY OF CREATIVE COMMONS.


COMICS

“EVIL SIRI”

BRANDON PAHNISH

“DON’T ROCK THE BOAT”

“RESPECT”

DANA TOWNSEND

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Cervanté Pope

AUGUST 13-19 MUSIC

FILM & THEATRE

COMMUNITY

WATERCOLOR PET PORTRAITS DIY BAR 7–9 P.M. $45 This mini workshop for artists of all skill levels will leave you with a lovely portrait of your favorite friend.

CASUAL BOYFRIEND, TINY TIGERS, THE COUCH SCENE THE LIQUOR STORE 8 P.M. $7 • 21+ Lo-fi in all the right ways.

“THEY CAME FROM THE BINS!” KICKSTAND COMEDY 9 P.M. DONATION-BASED Pay what you want to enjoy this improvised comedy show centered around thrift store scores of $5 or less.

CONVERSATION CAFE—DISASTER PREPAREDNESS THE ENCOREPRENEUR CAFE 2–3:30 P.M. $5 SUGGESTED DONATION The first in this new discussion series featuring a convo leader guiding attendees on how to properly prepare. Come with questions ready.

‘SKIP’ RELEASE PARTY FLOATING WORLD COMICS 6–8 P.M. FREE Molly Mendoza’s latest comic deals with alternate universes and beautifully drawn landscapes.

1 YOUNG MICAH, MAL LONDON, ADEBISI GOODFOOT PUB & LOUNGE 8 P.M. $7 Local neo-soul and hip-hop for big moods and mad vibes.

‘BLUE’ HOLLYWOOD THEATRE 7:30 P.M. $9 In honoring the 25th anniversary of his death, the last film by queer filmmaker Derek Jarman reflects his blue-hued battle with AIDS.

FRIENDS OF LAURELHURST PARK CLEANUP LAURELHURST PARK 9 A.M.–NOON FREE It’s such a beautiful park—let’s keep it that way!

OPENING RECEPTION: E C H O 3636 N. MISSISSIPPI AVE. 7–9 P.M. FREE Womxn House presents new works from Carolyn Hazel Drake and Claiborne Columbo.

SHADOWHOUSE, DEVOURED BY FLOWERS, FLAXEN HAIR WHITE OWL SOCIAL CLUB 8:30 P.M. FREE • 21+ Thursdays are perfect for dark sounds like these.

DIVE-IN MOVIE: ‘SPACE JAM’ MONTAVILLA SWIMMING POOL 7:30 P.M. $4.75–5.75 You literally get to play around in a pool while watching Space Jam. That’s like a childhood dream come true.

REPAIR CAFE THE ROSEWOOD INITIATIVE 6–8 P.M. FREE Got something that needs fixing? The Repair Cafe will have a whole room full of people who are equipped for the job.

“YUNOMIS & MORE” EUTECTIC GALLERY 10 A.M.–6 P.M. FREE Stephen Mickey makes wood- and soda-fired pottery, whatever that means.

DEATHLIST, FRENCH TIPS, PARTY WITCH THE FIXIN’ TO 9 P.M. $7 , 21+ Deathlist is dropping a new moody pop tape, and this is its release show.

‘INVADER ZIM’ MOVIE & DRINK THE NERD OUT 9 P.M. FREE They’ll even have special Zim themed cocktails!

BANANA SUNDAES FRIENDLY HOUSE 6–7 P.M. FREE Every Friday, Friendly House opens up their first-floor facilities for the public to use and this Friday, they’re giving out banana sundaes.

“MONOLITHS” FROELICK GALLERY 11 A.M.–5:30 P.M. FREE Gwen Davidson captures Oregon’s coastal rock formations beautifully.

COMMUNITY GARDEN: LIVE AMBIENT SHOW UNITED CHURCH 7:30 P.M. $12 Ambient and harsh noise lovers will get a kick out of this immersive sensory experience with John Dutton, Amulets and Coyote Animus.

RICKMOBILE ECLIPTIC BREWING 2–5 P.M. FREE It’s the Rick & Morty pop-up shop you didn’t know you needed. Warning: the line to get in will be LONG.

ROSE CITY GROWS RESISTANCE TOM MCCALL WATERFRONT PARK 10 A.M.–4 P.M. FREE If you’re against the far-right, this is the counter-protest for you.

ARTIST TALK: STEPHEN ADAMS WATERSTONE GALLERY 11 A.M. FREE Hear Stephen Adams discuss his new collection of mixed-media sculptures.

AN ORCHESTRAL RENDITION OF DR. DRE: 2001 CRYSTAL BALLROOM 7 P.M. $25 • 21+ No Strings Attached will be running through the album orchestrally, with some guest lyricists and DJs to help liven the mix.

COHO LAB NEW WORK SHOWCASE COHO PRODUCTIONS 7:30 P.M. $5–25 CoHo will be running through and workshopping some of their upcoming productions in progress.

STREET ROOTS’ STREET PARTY STREET ROOTS 1–4 P.M. FREE Street Roots turns 20 this year, so help them celebrate with a familyfriendly party.

“EIGHT DEADLY SINS” GALLERY 903 10 A.M.–5:30 P.M. FREE Gary Irving’s photo composites tell old tales.

GOATWHORE, RINGWORM, BEWITCHER, DOMINUS NOX PARIS THEATER DOORS 6 P.M. $15 Blackened death metal at its most extreme.

‘APOCALYPSE NOW: FINAL CUT’ CLINTON STREET THEATER 7 P.M. $8 Francis Ford Coppola’s famed Vietnam flick has reached its 40th anniversary and a remastered version that’s pristine.

PNG ROTARY: FOREST PARK CONSERVANCY PORTLAND NEW GENERATIONS ROTARY CLUB 5:30 P.M. FREE This open meeting sees local citizens brainstorming ways to conserve Forest Park and its surrounding acres.

ART TUE AUG 13 WED AUG 14 THU AUG 15 FRI AUG 16 SAT AUG 17 SUN AUG 18 MON AUG 19

Profile for Portland State Vanguard

Portland State Vanguard, Vol. 74, Issue 2  

Portland State Vanguard, Vol. 74, Issue 2  

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