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Westside, country-fried

PSU graduate invents chemical for Intel

The eats are mmm, mmm good at Hillbilly Bento ARTS & CULTURE: 4

Nabil Mistkawi’s creation saves time, money and the environment NEWS: 3

Advice for advising Less is more OPINION: 6

Portland State University

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Wednesday, August 11, 2010

VOL. 65 NO. 7

PSU to double advising staff University will hire 14 new advisers to enhance student success, increase retention BY Corie Charnley VANGUARD STAFF

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s part of an institution-wide advising initiative, Portland State will invest $1 million to hire 14 new advisers this fall with the intention of enhancing student success and retention through academic support and advising. According to Dan Fortmiller, associate vice provost for academic and career services, the Student Advising Action Council has been looking into how to improve advising services at PSU for several years. Currently, PSU’s faculty advises students, forcing professors and instructors to perform dual roles on campus. However, research conducted by Cathleen Smith, professor emeritus of developmental psychology and co-chair of the advising council, and Janine Allen, a professor of educational research and policy, spurred the university to take action. In order to improve academic advising at PSU, Smith and Allen conducted research to examine how satisfied students are with their advising experience, and to examine the effectiveness of various models of academic advising, including its impact on retention. According to Smith, three groups of students were surveyed: students within academic departments or programs that used professional advisers, students within departments or pro-

grams where only a few faculty members do the advising and students in programs in which nearly all faculty members do the advising. The first survey was sent out to PSU students in 2003, which was followed by additional advising surveys in 2005 and 2006. The latest student survey was completed in May of 2010. These studies revealed that students were more satisfied when they had access to professional advisers, whose only responsibility on campus is to provide professional advising. In addition, students who had access to professional advisers felt more confident in their decision to attend PSU. “If you’re a professional adviser, your job is to advise,” Smith said. “If you’re a faculty member, ‘adviser’ is only one of the several hats you wear, even if you are the designated adviser in that unit.” Because professional advisers do not have multiple roles on campus, students feel that they are more accessible, are better equipped for their advising role and are more helpful when it comes to campus policies and resources. “We have the good fortune to have administrators at this institution who pay attention to data, and Janine and I are humbled and gratified if our research had any part to play in the decision to put more resources into academic advising,” Smith said. “It is a decision that we believe has the best interests of students at heart.” According to Fortmiller, the university has already received several applications. Potential

MICHAEL PASCUAL/VANGUARD STAFF

ADAM WICKHAM/VANGUARD STAFF

■ ADVISING CONTINUED ON PAGE 2

Advising support: By hiring professional advisers, PSU hopes to improve student performance.

Portland State student a successful business owner Ready Set Go Kits for emergency preparedness selected for a yearlong marketing lab BY Tamara K. Kennedy VANGUARD STAFF

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MICHAEL PASCUAL/VANGUARD STAFF

One year in business: Sandoz is one of the few in Oregon to sell emergency preparedness kits.

successful online business owned by Amy Sandoz, a Portland State student, was selected as the winner to participate in a yearlong marketing lab sponsored by Deluxe Corporation through Project Rev. Her business, Ready Set Go Kits, is an online retail store that provides disaster kits to schools, universities and families. “I’m one of nine winners out of over 400 applications nationwide,” Sandoz said. Sandoz is excited about the opportunity offered by the marketing lab to learn how to reduce the amount of time and money spent on marketing to make it effective for her business. However, she has been doing well building her business on her own. According to Sandoz, year-to-date figures show that the business’ revenue has more than tripled since 2009, when she started the business. Sandoz said she owes her business success to her focus on making emergency preparedness easy. Sandoz came up with the idea for her business after working as a long time volunteer for the American Red Cross. As a volunteer, she spoke to community groups about how to build disaster kits. However, when Sandoz tried to purchase a disaster kit, she found it difficult and expensive.

Later, when brainstorming business ideas, she remembered her experience. Ready Set Go Kits works hard to create a system that alleviates the barriers of excessive time and expense when purchasing emergency preparedness kits, she said. Sandoz decided on the business’ name because she believes it is easy to remember. “There were some pretty terrible names I came up with before thinking of Ready Set Go Kits,” she said. Sandoz built her business’ website with help from many people— including a friend who designed her logo—and a tech support team at CoreCommerce, her e-commerce platform, Sandoz said. Sandoz feels it is an advantage to be one of the few resellers of emergency preparedness kits in Oregon. Sandoz makes it easy to replenish and update the kits by sending reminders to replace expired products as well as offering products with the longest shelf life to schools and universities that are required to have emergency plans and emergency supplies.    Sandoz works from about 20 to 30 hours per week on her business, depending on whether she is working on a new blog post, marketing ideas or working on her latest project, which is two new websites that are dedicated to providing emergency preparedness information interactively. Her blogs cover a variety of topics, from how to prepare for winter weather to what to do in an earthquake. According to her website, she hopes to see Ready Set Go Kits’ blog reach 10,000 viewers a month. Research, as well as blogging and other social media such as Facebook and Twitter, are important to her business because it helps her ■ SANDOZ CONTINUED ON PAGE 2


2 VANGUARD ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ NEWS

NEWS

EDITOR: CORIE CHARNLEY NEWS@DAILYVANGUARD.COM 503-725-5690

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

■ Advising CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

VIRGINIA VICKERY

NEWS EDITOR

CORRECTION

CORIE CHARNLEY

NICHOLAS KULA

In the article titled “Job security in Vietnam,” printed on Aug. 4, it should have been reported that the second cohort of Intel scholars is required to attend Portland State, according to Marcia Fischer, director of the Vietnam Intel Scholars program and assistant dean of the Maseeh College of Engineering. In addition, the scholars will return to Vietnam to work for Intel in the summer of 2011, after graduating.

SPORTS EDITOR

The Vanguard regrets its error.

OPINION EDITOR ZACH CHASTAINE

ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR

ROBERT BRITT

COPY CHIEF KRISTIN PUGMIRE

PRODUCTION MANAGER BRYAN MORGAN

PHOTO EDITOR HEATHER NODDINGS

applicants must have a master’s degree and one to three years of work experience in higher education. Additional criteria are specific to each position and department. All of the new advisers will be trained to work with PSU’s faculty to advise students on many academic and student affairs issues, including registering for classes and applying for financial aid, according to a press release. A search committee will be reviewing job candidates from now until early October, Fortmiller said. However, each academic department will do the actual hiring. The university’s decision to hire more advisers is part of a series of steps to increase student success at PSU, including making orientation mandatory for incoming students, requiring first-year students to meet with an academic adviser and requiring all students to declare a major by the end of their second year.

ONLINE EDITOR ADIANA LIZARRAGA

CALENDAR EDITOR KRISTIN PUGMIRE

ADERTISING MANAGER JAE SPECHT

ADVISER JUDSON RANDALL

How will the advisers be distributed? According to Portland State’s Human Resources website, each department is looking for: ■ College of Liberal Arts & Sciences: six positions ■ Maseeh College of Engineering & Computer Science: one position

ADVERTISING ADVISER ANN ROMAN

■ School of Business Administration: one position

ILLUSTRATOR

■ School of Fine & Performing Arts: two positions

HEATHER MCINTYRE

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT JUSTIN FLOOD

CONTRIBUTORS SUSANNAH BECKETT MEAGHAN DANIELS

■ School of Social Work: one half-time position ■ School of Government, College of Urban & Public Affairs: one position ■ Undergraduate Advising & Support Center, Student Affairs: two positions

STEVE HASKE TAMARA K. KENNEDY ERIN MCINTYRE RICHARD OXLEY TANYA SHIFFER ROBERT SEITZINGER ANNA SNOOK CATRICE STANLEY AMY STAPLES NILESH TENDOLKAR ANDREA VEDDER KAT VETRANO ALLISON WHITED

PHOTOGRAPHERS MICHAEL PASCUAL ADAM WICKHAM

COPY EDITOR

■ SANDOZ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

learn and think about how to make preparedness easy for others and provides a good forum for people to learn and ask questions, Sandoz said. Nicole Banta does freelance public relations work for Sandoz. The two met as students in the public administration masters program at PSU, according to Banta. In order to get the word out about her company, Sandoz hired Banta to write press releases for her. “[The business] has done better than Amy hoped and she did it all by herself,” Banta said. “She has a really good head for this.” For more information about Ready Set Go Kits, visit www.readysetgokits.com or e-mail Sandoz at info@readysetgokits.com.

NOAH EMMET

ADVERTISING SALES IRIS MEYERS

ADVERTISING DESIGNER

Products by Ready Set Go Kits According to her website, Sandoz sells a variety of emergency kits, including:

BETH HANSEN

DISTRIBUTOR CODY BAKKEN

■ Kits for the home ■ For children ■ For dogs or cats ■ For cars ■ For offices ■ For school

The Vanguard is published one day a week as an independent student newspaper governed by the PSU Publications Board. Views and editorial content expressed herein are those of the staff, contributors and readers, and do not necessarily represent those of the PSU student body, faculty, staff or administration. One copy of the Vanguard is provided free of charge to all community members, additional copies or subscription issues may incur a 25 cent charge.

The Vanguard is printed on 40 percent post-consumer recycled paper.

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NEWS ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ VANGUARD

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NEWS BRIEFS Portland State named “Best in the West” For the second year in a row, The Princeton Review recognized Portland State for being one of the best colleges on the west coast in its “Best Regional Colleges” list. The list—which includes Reed College, Lewis & Clark College and Oregon State University—identifies the best institutions throughout each of the four regions in the U.S., 120 of which are western institutions. “We chose Portland State University and the other terrific schools we recommended as our ‘regional best’ colleges primarily for their excellent academic programs,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s vice-president of publishing, in a news release. According to Franek, the colleges featured in the list were chosen based on the institutional data collected by The Princeton Review, the company’s visits to each school, information from college counselors and advisers and The Princeton Review’s staff opinions. “We also take into account what students at the schools reported to us about their campus experiences…on our 80-question student survey for this project,” he said. In the survey, students were asked to rate their schools on issues such as professor accessibility, the quality of the food on campus, the student body and the overall campus life, according the press release. One student in the survey described PSU as being a lively institution that is very con-

nected to the city and its region. In addition, the student said that PSU is an “ideal school to complete an educational program while pursuing a career and life,” according to the press release. The student also praised PSU for its faculty, referring to its professors as “concerned, engaged and easy to meet with.” For more information about The Princeton Review and the “Best Regional Colleges” list, visit www.princetonreview.com.

Portland State hires new chief diversity officer After several months of searching for an individual to fill the position, Jilma Meneses has been hired at Portland State’s first chief diversity officer. Her first day will be Sept. 1. The position was designed primarily to guide the university’s diversity agenda and ensure that minority faculty and staff are represented. As CDO, Meneses will also support several diversity-related programs at PSU, including the Office of Diversity and Equity and the Office of Affirmative Action, according to a press release. “We want diversity to get bumped up a bit in our DNA,” said Chip Lazenby, a PSU General Council member, told the Vanguard in May. Lazenby was also the chair of the committee to hire the new CDO. “If you have a diverse faculty and staff, then students feel more secure on campus,” he said. According to the press release, Meneses plans to engage the community and to promote

awareness within minority groups about higher education’s ability to break cycles of poverty and discrimination. “We created this new position,” said PSU President Wim Wiewel in a press release, “because as a society and an institution we all still have much to learn about how we practice and live diversity. Through her professional as well as her personal experiences, Jilma can lead us in this shared learning process.” Meneses has worked for Oregon Health & Science University for over 10 years, and is currently its director of risk management. She is also the founder and current executive officer of Our Family Adoptions, a humanitarian aid organization that provides resources to orphans in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and is the first in the U.S. to partner with the DRC to process adoptions of orphaned Congolese children, according to a press release.

Portland State professor emeritus receives honorary award Gertrude F. Rempfer, a professor emeritus at Portland State, received an honorary award last Monday, Aug. 2 by the Microscopy Society of America. Rempfer, 98, was one of the early pioneers in electron microscopy and is still active in her laboratory at PSU. The award was given out during the presidential session of MSA’s conference, “Microscopy and Microanalysis 2010,” in the ballroom of the Oregon Convention Center. According to Randy Smith, a gradu-

ate student in the Department of Physics at PSU, Rempfer was given a standing ovation by a thousandplus attendees. After wards, family, friends and former students, some of whom trav- Gertrude F. Rempfer eled from as far as Canada, were invited to a reception, Smith said. “Gert is a vital part of PSU’s research community and a trusted and excellent teacher,” he said. “Her laboratory was noted for its open doors and friendly atmosphere. The sign over the door, ‘Electron Optics Spoken Here,’ has special meaning to all who ventured there.” According to the Department of Physics, she is known for her research in the areas of photoelectron microscopy, low-energy reflection electron microscopy and abberation correction. Rempfer is also the only woman to have received the Distinguished Scientist Award from the MSA, which she won in 1990.

Corie Charnley, Vanguard staff

PSU graduate invents chemical for Intel Nabil Mistkawi’s creation saves time, money and the environment BY Catrice Stanley VANGUARD STAFF

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abil Mistkawi has made quite a name for himself. Although he graduated from Portland State last spring with a Ph.D. in chemistry, he has a secure job as a process engineer for Intel, and has already accomplished that which many students only dream about. Recently, Mistwaki was recognized as the inventor of a chemical formulation that easily prepares sub-50 nanometer (nm) process technology for advanced microprocessors manufacturing. Essentially, the new chemical formulation strips away unnecessary metal materials from the microprocessor—the central processing units of personal computers—while leaving important copper wiring and insulators untouched. These microprocessors are as vital to the functioning of personal computers as the brain is to the human body, according to a Portland State Magazine

article. In addition, microprocessors can consist of more than 10 layers of different materials. Mistkawi’s invention allows this process to take place quicker than before, and produces less harmful byproducts in the process. The solution is reportedly 98 percent water and contains less fluoride than a tube of toothpaste. While the lack of harsh chemical makeup might imply that this formulation is slow working, it is much speedier than the previous process. In fact, Portland State Magazine reports that Mistkawi’s “wet-etching” method can take as little as two minutes to complete. “It was nice to incorporate a green chemistry approach, but ultimately the process had to be robust enough through its performance,” Mistkawi said in the article. Not only is this chemical formulation more environmentally friendly than earlier options, it is expected to save Intel tens of millions of dollars every year, according to the article. Prior to Mistkawi’s invention, other toxic solvents were used in the process that were considered damaging to environmental and

human health, and therefore required many rigorous procedures for use. These concerns pushed Intel to find a less harmful procedure. The task was given to outside chemical companies and academic research labs. However, a year passed with no feasible results. Some companies even claimed it was an impossible feat.

This discovery led to Mistkawi receiving Intel’s Gold Award. This award is given each year to groups or individuals that work to create solutions that are both financially and environmentally responsible. Ranavare describes Mistkawi as a “hardworking, helpful and diligent” student. He has worked as a faculty advisor with Mistkawi

“It’s one thing to make it work in a test tube and beaker. It’s quite another to do so at 8,000 gallons each week.” Shankar Rananavare

When the problem was brought to Mistkawi, it only took him three days to propose his cheaper, faster and less destructive option. Needless to say, the idea took off. “It’s one thing to make it work in a test tube and beaker. It’s quite another to do so at 8,000 gallons each week,” said Shankar Rananavare, research associate professor of chemistry at PSU, in Portland State Magazine.

for seven years and continues to keep in touch with him. “I could not be more happy [for him],” Rananavare said. “He deserves it and more.” According to Rananavare, Mistkawi is hardly keeping all the glory for himself. “[He has] found many appropriate job openings at Intel for PSU students and helped them get their foot in the door,” Rananavare said.


4 VANGUARD ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ ARTS & CULTURE

A&C

EDITOR: NICHOLAS KULA ARTS@DAILYVANGUARD.COM 503-725-5694

Westside, country-fried The eats are mmm, mmm good at Hillbilly Bento BY Andrea Vedder Vanguard staff

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hen Tri-Met launched the new Fifth and Sixth Avenue MAX routes, the cheap eats available to Portland State students on a lunch break more than tripled. Hop a line (for free!) and gain access to the myriad of food carts and lunch-only cafés formerly reserved for the bankers and civil servants of Portland’s true downtown. On Sixth Avenue, tucked into the backside of the US Bancorp Tower and just shy of Burnside, you can find Portland’s latest culinary gem—and there’s nothing pretentious about it. Welcome to Hillbilly Bento, where the pulled pork is hot and saucy, the pecan pie is homemade (and right-on) and the music is nothing but down-home Dixie Blues. Owner Jay Irvin hails from North Carolina, and you can taste the sincerity of his affection for Southern comfort food in every item on the HB menu. The restaurant’s “bento” qualities are limited to its rice, tea and to-go boxes, but the rice here is dirty, the tea is sweet and the boxes are lined in cute, red-andwhite checkered paper (you know, to keep all of the saucy goodness from soaking through to your lap). Standard fare is a three-sectioned box with your choice of entree, “base” and

side. Bases are Cajun dirty rice (cooked with sausage and Worcestershire sauce, plus other secret ingredients), rice pilaf or salad; sides range from fried okra to buttermilk biscuits to corn on the cob, and it’s only a dollar more to choose two. And while the sides are top-notch, the entrees are the kicker: Choose from pulled pork (with barbecue or North Carolina vinegar sauce, both available “spicy”), beef pepper pot and Pepsi chicken for a bargain $6.50 and select boiled Gulf Coast shrimp for $7.95 or smoky red beans for only $5.50. Jay Irvin’s daughter Maia says that “the pork is kind of a house favorite,” and it’s easy to see why. What is possibly the best pulled pork in Portland is available with what might be the tangiest, tastiest barbecue sauce this side of the Mississippi. The “spicy” sauces are not all that spicy, but they’re darn good anyway. And while the buttermilk biscuits are of the pullapart, butter-rich variety (i.e., awesome), the macaroni and cheese does not benefit from the cafeteria-style serving line. For a texturally pleasing macaroni and cheese, you’d be advised to arrive early in the day. Hillbilly Bento also runs daily specials, which “start about noon and last until we run out.” While the specials are a little more expensive than the rest of the menu ($6.95 to $9.95), they serve not only to impress the newcomers but also to shake up the sensory experience of HB’s steady regulars. There’s fried chicken on Mondays, chicken and dumplings on Tuesdays, barbecue ribs on Wednesdays, chicken and sausage gumbo on Thursdays and—

perhaps best of all—fried catfish and hushpuppies to satisfy your soul every Friday. These aren’t HB’s only surprises, however. On any given day, a customer may be privy to Irvin’s fresh-baked (and off the menu) jalapeno cheddar biscuits or a sample of an experimental entree like chicken-fried steak. There are also— surprisingly—plenty of vegetarian and even vegan lunch options. They are fullflavored and delicious, not just secondthought menu additions to appease Portland’s food scene. Desserts here are also surprisingly fabulous. The homemade peach cobbler and chocolate pecan pie are served in generous portions, and certainly warrant a trip of their own. There is indoor and outdoor seating, though not much of either. Hillbilly Bento is a little bit bigger than a hole in the wall, and during peak hours you’d probably be most comfortable taking your food to go. Thankfully, “to-go” is what HB does best. Irvin’s love for his restaurant manifests in his exceptional customer service and enthusiasm for creative development. Hillbilly Bento is launching a catering arm, and late night and weekend hours are in the works. One small suggestion: It may betray the bento name, but with both pulled pork and coleslaw on the menu, where are the pulled pork sandwiches? Please, please, for pork lovers in every quadrant—please bake some buns and serve up the best pulled pork sandwich this town has ever seen.

Make room for The Other Guys Mark Wahlberg stars in aptly-named flick BY Richard D. Oxley Vanguard staff

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lam, bam and please excuse the massive property damage. Highsmith and Danson are on the scene and cleaning up the streets— two badass crime fighters who solve cases with style and garner the love of a city. But this movie isn’t about Highsmith and Danson. It’s about the other guys who fight crime—the normal, boring everyday other guys. Allen Gamble and Terry Hoitz are two

cops partnered up for deskwork. Gamble is a mild-mannered accounting detective, protecting the city from building permit violations and financial discrepancies, while Hoitz is a cop cut from a different cloth. He finds himself working a desk job in his precinct after a rather significant screw-up on the streets—however, he can run, shoot and fight as well as any other action star around. It would seem these two guys are total opposites. I wonder what kind of quirky hijinx would occur if they were thrown together? The Other Guys is a buddy cop movie that mocks the genre of buddy cop movies. While other cops are playing out scenes from Lethal Weapon, Gamble and Hoitz—played by Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg, respectively—are calmly working their own case regarding a building permit violation, but happen to stumble upon a much bigger crime at hand. They then embark upon a case that takes the two ordinary detectives along the path more apt for their action-packed counterparts. This movie will surprise you. I found myself impressed with seemingly little things including some of the camera work and shots in the film— particularly a building jump scene and a scene in a bar that looked amazing, while also very humorously contributing to the movie. Ferrell pulls off his punchlines and antics with ease as he has proven to do so well in the past.

PHOTO COURTESY COLUMBIA PICTURES

In general, when you watch a Will Ferrell flick, you can expect a certain Will Ferrell style of character and delivery. You can expect no less here, though Ferrell does take on his docile and good-natured character well, successfully merging it with his comic style. Wahlberg does take steps outside his usual terrain of films into the comedic scene from time to time, and with success such as with I ♥Huckabees. He chose well again when signing on for The Other Guys. At times The Other Guys borders on going too far with over-the-top antics and quirky characters, but narrowly avoids verging beyond comedic and into the absurd. This is no surprise given that the movie is co-written by Adam McKay whose resume includes a number of Saturday Night Live sketches, including Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy and Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, if that is any indication of the film’s brand of humor. But The Other Guys changes things up a bit seeming slightly less over-the-top from McKay’s previous work. Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of the movie is a level of unexpected intelligence not often found in many comedies. You can watch this film, garner some laughs and have a good time, but the plot of the movie involves commentary on certain aspects of our modern society—the case Gamble and Hoitz end up working involves certain financial crimes and fiscal bad behavior. And just in case you didn’t follow it well enough through the film, you may find the end credits rather educational, so stay seated after the movie ends.

THE OTHER GUYS NOW PLAYING

PHOTO BY HEATHER NODDINGS/VANGUARD STAFF

Hillbilly Bento 211 SW 6th Ave. Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 503-808-9283

Corn you feel it? Delicious and cheap, try this recipe despite this corny title Sweet golden corn is running extra cheap these days since it’s in season—I’ve seen it as cheap as 35 cents an ear! So go on, buy some cheap corn and make this recipe for lunch, or make it a dinner and serve it in a quesadilla with queso fresco.

Roasted Corn Salad Ingredients ■ Two ears of yellow or white corn, de-silked ■ 1/4 cup of yellow cherry tomatoes ■ 1/2 of a bell pepper, finely chopped (red provides a nice color contrast, but whatever you have is fine) ■ 1/2 cup canned black beans, preferably low sodium Dressing ■ Juice from two limes ■ 2 tablespoons canola oil ■ 1 teaspoon of red pepper flakes, more if you can handle it ■ Salt ■ Pepper Method Place gas burner on low-medium heat. Put corn ear directly on heat, turning every few minutes so a nice black color appears. Remove from heat once all sides have color, repeat the same process with the other ear. Set aside and let cool. Place the tomatoes and bell peppers in a medium bowl or to-go container. Rinse beans in a pasta strainer with cool water. Shake off excess water, and add them to the bowl. Remove kernels from corn by standing the ear on one end (on a plate or in an empty bowl), and slowly moving knife downward, letting the kernels fall off. Repeat with the other ear, and add kernels to the bowl of vegetables. In a small cup or bowl, add the juice from the limes, canola oil and red pepper flakes and whisk vigorously with a fork. Alternatively, you could place the ingredients in a small jar and shake until they’re incorporated. Add salt and pepper to taste, and top salad with dressing. Use a pair of tongs to make sure every layer of the salad is dressed. Kat Vetrano, Vanguard staff


ARTS & CULTURE ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ VANGUARD

On a recent afternoon, I sat down with some spice connoisseurs to discuss some of Portland’s local offerings of hot sauces. Some of us could take the heat better than others (there were glasses of milk poured for the weak), but we can definitely conclude that Portland knows its spice. Here are our results.

Kat Vetrano, Vanguard staff

Uncle Dubby’s Jamaican jerk sauce This flavor-packed sauce won almost instantly amongst our judges. We found it particularly delicious for its flavor variants: The combination of parsley, garlic, cilantro and other spices made something so special that one of us claimed, “This sauce makes me want to cook and create things.” The spice level is especially impressive, since it slowly hits you, taking its time to make way to your taste buds. The especially prominent taste of garam masala had our mouths watering and us feeling like it should be called “Indian Jerk Sauce” instead. Another factor that places this sauce in the Gold position is its maker. Uncle Dubby’s hot sauces are made inside John “Uncle Dubby” Wray’s apartment. This bearded pinball pro/ artist/bartender acts almost like a spicy “dealer”; only those who are in the know can purchase his sauces. His sauces—which are vegan—are sold in mason jars, and he said he started making them by taking cookbook recipes and tweaking them: “I liked the recipes, but I knew they could be better,” Wray said. Many of Wray’s friends use the sauces as marinades as well as for dipping. All of his flavors are available for $5, and the only way you can reach him is by going to Hawthorne’s Bar of the Gods and asking.

The power of choice Indie games’ varied experiences are becoming increasingly relevant in an evolving game industry

IMAGE COURTESY OF NINTENDO

BY Steve Haske Vanguard staff

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hen you review games for a living, it’s all too easy to start treating everything you see with a healthy dose of cynicism. With the industry’s ever-increasing penchant for shilling carbon-copy games created and marketed entirely around what sells, me-too design is plenty prevalent in this business. Much how a lot of celluloid dreck is plagued with terrible writing and shallow-if-bombastic storytelling, so too do video games often sell themselves too hard on a payout that’s generally no more than a variation on a theme—one that very rarely goes beyond some semblance of competition, violence or both. Lately I’ve been taking a break from a lot of the gaming industry’s Mountain Dewswilling mainstream to scope out the growing indie scene, and now that I have I’m frankly surprised I waited this long. Freed from the demands of consumer (and corporate) expectations, indies take risks that bigger games simply can’t—at least not without staking a massive investment on ideas that may not jive with an attention-addled, expectant consumer base. Though gameplay experiences between indie titles often differ greatly, a common thread running through many of them is the simplicity of their design, more often than not constructed with basic coding, sound and visuals. Few games demonstrate this as well as Nintendo’s own recently-released Light Trax, part of their almost wholly-ignored Art Style series. Unlike most other titles in the puzzle-heavy series, Light Trax is a racer, and one that immediately individualizes itself with its very basic-but-unique looks and design. The player controls a beam of white light, competing against other colored light beams on-screen. The whole game is created out of simple black-on-color wireframe graphics, as though it were ripped out of 1982—an appropriate timeframe, considering the game is highly reminiscent of Tron. Beyond the aesthetic simplicity of its scrolling 2D-to-3D planes, Light Trax’s gameplay is simi-

larly streamlined. Compared to other racers, Light Trax is on-rails—you can only slow down, use speed or invincibility power-ups or your finite boosting ability. To get more boost, you have to stay in close proximity to other beams of light, which will recharge your boost meter. Though your path on the track is predetermined, your placement is not, meaning that strategy involves maneuvering through obstacles and around speed-killing terrain while keeping an eye on your boost, placement of the race and items. The design tenets of the game are so simple that the “tutorial” doesn’t even use text, and can be figured out in just a few minutes. The stark, purgatorial XBLA darling Limbo is the same way, with its basic puzzle-platforming design experienced as a continuously-unfolding, intuitive journey, while Wiiware’s retro-homage Bit. Trip series uses prompts as little as possible. The point is, even when these games ratchet up the complexity and challenge within the confines of their respective designs, there’s still a certain experiential element that many commercialized games just don’t focus on, whether it’s sensory, intellectual or just the result of sheer expressionistic variety. Even Super Mario Bros. Crossover gives us something we haven’t seen before, reconstituting its classic design to interact with the movesets of various NES mascots. Some indies, like the flash-based Every Day the Same Dream (a nightmarish repetition of the nine-to-five grind) and Beloved (an exercise in agency as told through an individual’s relationship with an omnipotent being), are entirely focused on the thematic experience or message rather than often-simplistic gameplay. These can be “beat” in a matter of minutes, although beating them isn’t really the point. Instead of instant gratification, these quiet offerings have something to say—a distressingly rare trait in most mainstream titles. I realize this isn’t a new argument, but as the number of indies popping up across the digital landscape continues to grow, their relevance becomes greater and greater an issue. In any case, there’s seemingly no shortage of fascinating ideas, themes and settings being explored on this smaller scale, and—regardless of the top-down financial stranglehold that keeps development teams constantly under the thumb or powerful corporate publishers— there’s no reason to focus exclusively on the latest flash-in-the-pan. But we all want something different from time to time, even in a place as shortsighted as the game industry tends to be. So next time you’re feeling the myopic pinch of the mainstream, just remember you’ve got other options. If Hollywood can do it, so can games.

Fire on the Mountain’s bourbon chipotle This all-purpose sauce came in at a very close second to our winner. The sauce, which originates from the Portland restaurant Fire On The Mountain Buffalo Wings (they have one location on North Interstate and one on Burnside), is more like a BBQ sauce than a salsa. The heat, unlike Uncle Dubby’s sauce, hits you straight away, then the flavors arrive after, almost like a good wine. The fruit juices (lime and orange) are a nice aftertaste without being overwhelming. One taster said, “It’s not too sweet, which I love. I hate it when BBQ sauces overdo it with the sugar.” The bourbon flavor is not a major component of this sauce, but only a slight note. This sauce would be delicious on chicken or tofu, or perhaps added to a chili for some extra kick.

THE REST IMAGE COURTESY OF SECRET AARDVARK

Hot Damn!

SILVER IMAGE COURTESY OF FIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN

Gold

5

Secret Aardvark habanero hot sauce Although this sauce has been named “crack-like” by many of its followers, our tasters weren’t as impressed. Perhaps it was its sensational competitors that shadowed its greatness, but we found the carrot flavor extremely overpowering in this sauce. Uncle Dubby’s mango habanero and chipotle red Both of these were also delicious, but one taster found the mango habanero “Too much mango and not enough heat.” As for the Chipotle Red, it had a nice smokiness and heat in the back, but just wasn’t as memorable as its flavorful brothers and sisters.


6 VANGUARD ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ OPINION

OPINION

EDITOR: ZACH CHASTAINE OPINION@DAILYVANGUARD.COM 503-725-5692

Advice for advising Less is more BY Zach Chastaine Vanguard staff

T

he announcement that the Portland State University administration recenlty chose to bring on 14 new advisers to bolster the current staff this year is a good thing for students, as additional staff to support students is generally quite helpful. The goal of the hirings is to help improve retention rates by giving students additional support. Not a bad plan considering there are 28,000 students, all of whom need advising. But will bringing on additional staff make advising any easier for students? As a student who has been to the advising office enough times to know a few of the advisers by name, I have the sneaking suspicion that additional advisers may not be the only thing advising needs. When I go to advising, I print off my DARS report—for any student who has never had to do this, a DARS report is more or less a summary of your academic history and your progress as a student. Once the adviser has helped me decipher the report, I take as many notes as possible to make sure that in a couple of weeks (when I forget the exchange with the adviser) I can figure out what my next move should be during registration. It is a complicated process, made even worse if you are a visual learner and have to see a flowchart or something for the progression to make sense. I feel that the biggest problem facing advising is the confusion associated with planning classes. While hiring additional advisers is by no means a bad thing, perhaps the university should revamp the system. Will the addition

of more advising staff make the processes any easier, or will I just have more advisers to talk to when I drop by the office? When mistakes are made in advising they are not only frustrating and expensive, but also a waste of time. By far the most disheartening thing about advising is when the advisers themselves seem confused or are lacking the information needed to help make an informed decision. The solution is simply to send students to another adviser in a different department. While it’s unreasonable to expect every adviser to be an expert on every corner of every major, I don’t think it’s unreasonable for the system to be simple enough that our advisers don’t have to spend half of a meeting trying to figure out where students currently stand academically. So here is an idea to revamp the advising process and make it more streamlined for everyone involved: Consider that while 28,000 students struggle with advising, there are probably around 10 million 12-year-old kids out there playing the computer game World of Warcraft and not struggling in the slightest to figure out complicated advancement structures with thousands of possible outcomes. Did I just suggest that a university use a videogame as a model to help it organize academic pathways? Why shouldn’t academic advising be that simple to understand? Consider that if the 12-year-old playing Warcraft wants to get his wizard up to the highest level, he has to follow a certain set

of accomplishments to achieve that level. This is very similar to how a business major must take specific classes to get a bachelor’s. Certain classes go towards certain credits, and thus we register for our classes to try and follow the progression. Yet when a 12-yearold gets stuck, they just look at a little chart that lays out exactly what needs to be done to get to the next game level. On the other hand, the 20-year-old business major has to see an adviser and then another adviser specifically for the major to figure out how to grind out the next 12 credits correctly, so as to not waste a whole term, accidentally taking classes that will not help with graduation. Why not make a simple-to-understand progress tree for each certificate, major and minor the university has to offer so students can see exactly what classes they have taken, can take and must take in order to progress?

Stopping the traffic Portland works to fight human trafficking BY Meaghan Daniels Vanguard Staff

M

any people in Portland used to joke about the city’s high number of strip clubs and porn shops. Portlanders took pride in their city’s illicit businesses. However, the jokes are not quite as common anymore, as Portland has woken up to a serious tragedy that occurs here every day: human trafficking. Recently it has come to Portland’s attention that human trafficking has become a huge problem here. According to the United States Department of Justice, approximately 300,000 youths are trafficked for sexual exploitation every year. Portland is ranked second in the United States for minor sex trafficking. More and more facts like these are surfacing, making people realize that the problem is not just overseas, but occurring right in Portland’s own backyard. One of the reasons Portland is such a hot spot for human trafficking is because of its position along the I-5 corridor, as well as its many ports along the Willamette River. Government officials, activists and others are taking steps to try and make a change, as well as help Portland’s reputation. They are trying to help both the victims and the offenders by trying to make a dent in the problem. One step being taken to help aid victims is that the YWCA in Portland will use $900,000 in federal money to help create a shelter for victims of human sex trafficking. Providing a shelter will create a safe space, which could help make victims feel like they have options other than just servitude. They will have a place to go, a place to escape the horrible pain of the life that they are living. Steps are also being taken to ensure that perpetrators own up to their actions. Multnomah County leaders are trying to open up a “john school” by the end of the year.

The john school is a day-long voluntary class for first-time offenders who pick up adult prostitutes. The first john school existed in San Francisco, and the plan for Portland is to create a similar one. Although Portland has had two other john schools in the past, according to The Portland Tribune, it seems like a john school could be the answer for Portland’s troubles today. This is an important step in helping stop the human trafficking epidemic in Portland. Offenders will be referred to treatment when necessary. The plan is also to teach offenders about the impact their crimes have on the people involved as well as the people within the community instead of just sitting in a jail cell. Once the convicted offender completes the john school, they will get the charge erased from their record after six months if they do not commit further offenses. The offender must pay $1,000 to participate in the class, a fee that will go to paying the courts, police and victim services. Ideally, with the establishment of the john school, repeat offenses could be stopped if the perpetrators can actually learn from their actions. If they cannot learn, then further actions could be taken. While important steps such as these are being taken toward preventing human trafficking, it is important to make note that more can still, and should be, done. Oregon must take another important step toward human trafficking prevention, and that is to create stricter laws for offenders who solicit sex for the first time. As the law stands, a first-time offender would typically receive probation or community service. What is the incentive for first-time offenders to fork over the $1,000 for the john school class? Other than getting the crime expunged off their record, there is not much if the laws stay the way they are. Stricter punishments need to be enforced. The steps that Portland is taking are important in making a dent in human trafficking. Portland’s plans make sense and are good first steps, but more needs to be done and more people need to be involved.

ILLUSTRATION BY SUSANNAH BECKETT

Organization that simple could be the difference between students missing one or two credits needed to graduate, saving them thousands of dollars and months of time. So while the addition of new advisers to the wonderful PSU advising staff is welcome and will no doubt be helpful to the large student body at PSU, it still remains that the advising process itself could be simplified.

ANARCHISTS UNITED? Some in Portland may have heard of the lemonade stand controversy, where the City of Portland tried to shut down a 7-year-old girl’s lemonade stand and fine her mom $500 after it failed to pass a health inspection. While that is all very lame, it also sheds light on an interesting development. Since the lemonade stand controversy last month, anarchist groups have been rallying behind the incident as a beacon against bureaucracy. They’re even planning a “lemonade bloc” just so they can stick it to the city. The first thing I wondered was why anarchists are organizing anything? That seemed to defeat the point. To be clear, Webster’s Dictionary defines anarchy as “the complete lack of government.” So if that is to be believed, then an anarchist is someone who totally rejects the idea of government. That is simple– Molotov cocktails and free people standing on the rubble of a capitol building. No laws to keep you down and no system to direct how you live. The path to a world free of “The Man” to be sure, but are you an anarchist if you’re organized? It’s hard to say, but what is not in question is how people calling themselves “anarchists” all over the northwest seem to have a habit of being quite organized, managed and united behind this little girl’s lemonade stand plight. I feel if you are going to rally behind a cause, or against the government, maybe it should be for something meaningful like poverty, education or healthcare. Then again if I were an anarchist I wouldn’t waste my time organizing a lemonade stand with a bunch of teenagers wearing black.

Zach Chastaine, Vanguard staff

Letters to the editor are gladly accepted and should be no longer than 300 words in length. Submissions may be edited for brevity and vulgarity.


ETC.■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ VANGUARD

ETC.

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation EDITOR: VIRGINIA VICKERY 500 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 EDITOR@DAILYVANGUARD.COM For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Wednesday, August 11, 2010 503-725-5691

CALENDAR Today

Edited by Will Shortz Across 1 Veracruzʼs capital 7 Its motto is “Semper paratus”: Abbr. 11 Bonobo, for one 14 You can count on it 15 Kelly of “Live With Regis and Kelly” 16 Word with band or sand 17 Command to a French composer at an intersection? 19 Conciliatory gift 20 Pen 21 Tickle response 22 Uccello who painted “The Battle of San Romano” 24 Don Corleone 25 Loading locale 27 City south of Luxor 30 Command to a Hungarian composer at the piano?

34 Activities 36 Jacques Cousteauʼs middle name 37 “Tippecanoe and Tyler ___” 38 Move like mud 39 Sophia of “Marriage ItalianStyle” 41 Fringe benefit 42 Sch. supporter 43 Author who famously ended a short story with the line “Romance at short notice was her specialty” 44 Cell on a slide 46 Command to a German composer on a baseball diamond? 49 Lessen, as fears 50 Jay Gatsbyʼs love 51 Mayberry boy 53 Leaf holders

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A L T O D O H S Z W E I B E R O L D I L O G S E W E E P O S S T O P T S H O E L I E P A L M S L E E T A R D

S O L N I E O N S S C E E N P H L S K Y

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A S A M I

H A A P J U O A T E S

N U E V O

R D O E M M A C N E T E A Q R E P O D D Q U E G N C H T E E N R T

E X E C U T E D A L P A C A

C L E A N S E

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55 Czar of Russia between Feodors 57 Initials at sea 60 Snap, Crackle or Pop 61 Command to an Austrian composer on a scavenger hunt? 64 Freudian concept 65 Adm. Zumwalt, chief of naval operations during the Vietnam War 66 Word before a sentence 67 Guerraʼs opposite 68 Does, e.g. 69 “Woo-hoo!” Down 1 Injures with a pencil, say 2 Somewhat 3 Unlike a gogetter 4 Point of no return? 5 Green skill 6 Plus 7 What an addict fights 8 Symbol of simple harmonic motion 9 Tax pro, for short 10 Bachelorette party attendees 11 Hard core? 12 Game involving banks 13 Fair 18 Dennyʼs competitor 23 Talent agent ___ Emanuel 24 Roof topper 26 Relative of an aardwolf

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Climbing Center—Beginner’s Hour 32

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This is an opportunity for those who have never climbed before to take part in a free introductory informal movement class.

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6 p.m. ASRC

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Noon, Student Rec Center

Power yoga works with strong, flow-based sequences, working to improve overall well-being while helping participants to gain strength and stamina.

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Power Vinyasa Yoga

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Intensive English Language Program Day Trip: Seaside, Ore.

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9 a.m. IELP Activities Office (EH 113)

The group will spend the day in the beach town of Seaside. Participants are required to pay a deposit of $40 upon signing up, to be returned on the day of the trip. For more information or to sign up, visit the IELP office.

63

Puzzle by Will Nediger

27 Make oneʼs own 28 Truth, archaically 29 1939 title role for Frank Morgan 31 Like much poetry 32 1964 title role for Anthony Quinn 33 Hungarian wine 35 Hearty helpings of meat loaf, say 40 “Go ahead”

Tuesday

53 Sound made by a 48-Down 43 Moved, as a 54 Kurylenko of horseʼs tail “Quantum of 45 “But of course!,” Solace” in Marseille 56 Febreeze target 47 Symbol of 57 Succor strength 58 Parcel (out) 48 Device making a 59 ___ terrier 53-Down 62 Hearty quaff 52 “Little” digit 63 Take in slowly 41 It may be + or –

Introduction to Interviewing 11 a.m. PSU Career Center

This free introductory workshop teaches the basics of interviewing and helps participants to develop their interviewing skills.

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Todayʼs puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

TO PLACE AN EVENT: Contact vgcalendar@gmail.com or pick up a calendar request form at the Vanguard advertising office, SMSU, room 114.

EVENT OF THE DAY The department of Speech and Hearing Sciences is offering free postbaccalaureate advising sessions for those with a bachelor’s degree (not in Speech and Hearing Sciences) who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in speech-language pathology. KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2010 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved. Dist. by UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

● Each row and each column

must contain the numbers 1 through 4 (easy) or 1 through 6 (challenging) without repeating.

● The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called cages, must combine using the given

When: 5 p.m. Where: Neuberger Hall, room 77

operation (in any order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners. Fill in single-box ● Freebies: cages with the number in the top-left corner.

7-29-10

NOW HIRING WRITERS NEWS ARTS & CULTURE OPINION SPORTS

apply now! dailyvanguard.com

7


8 VANGUARD ■ WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 2010 ■ SPORTS

SPORTS

EDITOR: ROBERT BRITT SPORTS@DAILYVANGUARD.COM 503-725-4538

Women’s soccer prepares for 2010 season Viks ready to kick off new campaign BY Nilesh Tendolkar VANGUARD STAFF

The Portland State soccer team, the reigning Big Sky Conference’s regular season champion, is preparing to begin the 2010 season. The team began practice on Aug. 4 with two-per-day training sessions at Stott Field and held a walk-on tryout on Friday. “Practice has been very competitive so far this fall,” head coach Laura Schott said. “We have a number of players vying for positions this year and the competition has been fun to assess.”

On the pitch: The PSU soccer team began practices last week.

Portland State opens the new season on the road against crosstown rival and NCAA-contenders University of Portland on Aug. 20. The Vikings then open their home schedule on Aug. 22, when they will host Boise State at Hillsboro Stadium. “We have a great schedule this year and a challenging opening weekend to get us started,” Schott said. “We have a good mix of

teams, including [several] 2009 NCAA Tournament teams on our schedule.” Last season, Portland State won the Big Sky regular season title for the second time in the program’s history and finished the season with an enviable 10-6-4 record. At the end of the last season, the Vikings were the highest-ranked Big Sky team in the NCAA women’s soccer ranking, standing 117th in the country. The defense conceded only 21 goals all season, while the offense registered 25 goals. The team had nine selections to the Big Sky All-Conference team, including both the Offensive and the Defensive MVPs. Schott, last season’s Big Sky Coach of the Year, said she is proud of how her Vikings performed in 2009. “Last year was a very good year in our program,” she said. “We have a lot of returners from that team and I know they are excited to start playing games.” Nine upperclassmen—six juniors and three seniors—top off the 28-player roster, and three of the four starting defenders from last year return to the team. One player who will not be returning is former goalkeeper Cris Lewis, who graduated after breaking the school’s records for wins, saves and shutouts. In her absence, senior Rachel Jarvis and sophomores Lainey Hulsizer and Kenisha Macklin will all compete for the goalkeeping spot. Senior Frankie Ross, former Big Sky Golden Boot winner, will be the team’s top returning scorer with three goals and assists. The team has 10 newcomers, including two juniors and one transfer. In 2009, the Viks again lost to Northern Arizona in the Big Sky semifinals at PCC-Rock Creek in a closely contested penalty kick shootout. Northern Arizona knocked the Vikings out of the semifinals in 2008. Schott said her goals for this season are similar to last year’s. “We want to perform well and get better during preseason,” she said.

ALL PHOTOS BY HEATHER NODDINGS/VANGUARD STAFF

Scouting the team: Portland State women’s soccer coaches assessing the Vikings during practice Tuesday at Stott Field.

“And the next goal will always be to win a Big Sky Championship. This year, we want to build on last year’s success and move on in our tournament and advance to the NCAAs.” During the spring offseason, the Viks saw difficulty regaining the goal-scoring touch they had last fall. The Vikings scored two goals while conceding eight over the course of four scrimmages. Sophomore striker Megan Martin scored both goals during the spring matches. In a departure from last year, when the team played its home games at PCC-Rock Creek, the Vikings will call Hillsboro Stadium home this season. “It will be nice to be in a stadium this year,” Schott said. “The community in Hillsboro is already supporting PSU soccer, and we are looking forward to playing there.”

UPCOMING VIKINGS GAMES:

Hard work expected to pay off Volleyball players, coach feel good about upcoming season BY Robert Seitzinger VANGUARD STAFF

After an arduous offseason and its first training camp last weekend, the Portland State women’s volleyball team is full of confidence about its workouts and the schedule the team faces in the upcoming season. Head coach Michael Seemann said he is excited to see how the returning players fare, and that they have some promising new prospects as well. Last season, the Vikings won the Big Sky regular season title with a 21-8 record—the program’s fifth consecutive 20-win season. Nine players return from last year’s championship squad, and Seemann said they have all worked very hard during the offseason to sharpen their game.  “This summer has been really good,” he said. “You can tell everyone has put a lot of work in.”  Among the matches he is looking forward to is a meeting with Pac-10 member University of Washington, which will be a rare match for the Vikings as a Big Sky team. That game will be part of the Northwest Challenge, hosted in Washington state during early September. 

Returning star, and senior outside hitter, Whitney Phillips said she is looking forward to the NW Challenge and the season overall after putting in a lot of training during the offseason. “We’ve all worked very hard and it shows, and I’m excited about [the upcoming season],” Phillips said. The match against Washington is one she looks forward to in particular. “It’ll be a good test of our skill,” she said.  Fellow returning player and senior outside hitter Christie Hamilton said the offseason has been one of due diligence and that the 2010 campaign will reflect that.  “Personally, for me, I think this is the most work I’ve ever done during an offseason,” Hamilton said. “We are in great shape, and I know I’m excited for the challenges.”  The Vikings will host Eastern Washington on Oct. 9, a match that Hamilton, Phillips and Seemann are all looking forward to. “They’ll be tough, but I know we’ll be in great shape for it,” Seemann said.  The Portland State volleyball coaching staff has a new addition in Laura Collins, an assistant coach that Seemann said specializes in setters and offense. Collins previously played for Seemann at Oregon State, and he said her addition is going to be very beneficial for the squad.  “We’ll see how it goes, and I feel good about the experience we have on the team,” Seemann said. “We have players that are

Aug. 20

Soccer

at

Aug. 22

Soccer

vs. Boise State

Aug. 27–28 Volleyball at

VANGUARD ARCHIVE

conference in points and kills last year.

really physical, young, experienced… It’s a good mix.” 
  The Vikings’ volleyball season begins Aug. 27 when PSU meets Seattle University as part of The Invitational at Seattle. Portland State’s first home match is set for Aug. 31, when the Viks host Oregon State at the Stott Center. The full schedule can be viewed at www.GoViks.com.

The Invitational at Seattle

Aug. 27–29

Soccer

at

Aug. 31

Volleyball

vs. Oregon State

Sept. 3–4

Volleyball

at

Northwest Challenge

Sept. 4

Football

at

Arizona State

Sept. 7

Volleyball

vs. Oregon

Sept. 10

Soccer

at

Sept. 10–11 Volleyball at

Killer: Senior Whitney Phillips led the

Portland

Las Vegas Invitational

Oregon State Santa Clara/San Jose Tournament

Sept. 11

Football

at

Sept. 12

Soccer

vs. Western Oregon

Sept. 17

Soccer

at

UC Riverside

Sept. 17

Volleyball

at

Montana State

Sept. 18

C. Country at

Sundodger Invitational

Football

at

Oregon

Sept. 18

Volleyball

at

Montana

Sept. 19

Soccer

at

San Diego

Sept. 18

UC Davis

VISIT WWW.DAILYVANGUARD.COM FOR SPORTS UPDATES DURING THE SUMMER BREAK

AROUND TOWN TODAY’S GAMES VS. Portland Timbers (7-7-6, 27 pts.)

NSC Minnesota Stars (7-9-6, 27 pts.)

7 P.M. at PGE Park

UPCOMING HOME GAMES VS.

AT Portland Beavers (44-73) 10:05 A.M.

Iowa Cubs (67-49)

Portland Beavers

Albuquerque Isotopes

Aug. 13–16

VS. Portland Beavers

VS. Round Rock Express

Aug. 17–20

PSU Soccer

Boise State

Aug. 22

Vanguard August 11, 2010  

Vanguard August 11, 2010

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