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THURSDAY, M ARCH 13, 2014

Volume 95, Issue 25

New fee proposal finalized at $181 per semester CYNTHIA WASHICKO Daily Titan

The Student Fee Advisory Committee (SFAC) voted to approve a recommendation

on the Student Success Initiative (SSI) Wednesday, cutting the proposed fee from $240.50 to $181 per semester. The fee would be phased in over the next three years, reaching its final cost of $181 per semester in fall 2016.

Before the fee is made official, it will require approval from President Mildred García. If García passes the fee, it will then be sent to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White for

final approval. Committee members deliberated concerning several spending priorities for Cal State Fullerton, including athletics and technology. After an initial twoweek student consultation

process followed by a twoweek extension, the SFAC received 3,809 valid paper and online surveys from students. Committee members received the survey data Monday. The meeting began with

time for members of the audience to speak to the committee regarding the fee, and seven students took advantage of that opportunity. SEE FEE, 3

JAMES SMITH / Daily Titan

Thai Dinh Vu, 19, a computer engineering major at Cal State Fullerton, battles with a club member in the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club on campus.

A ‘Game of Foam’

Students take the edge off by fighting with foam swords in CSUF club JAMES SMITH Daily Titan

A foreign land consists solely of warriors looking for a good fight. It’s a land where honor and camaraderie are held in the highest regard and warriors can be found wearing the finest armor of leather plate, old hockey gloves and tennis shoes. The name of this strange realm is Moria, also known to others familiar with this land as the Student Recreation Center lawn. Three days a week these fierce warriors congregate,

schedule–weather permitting– to hone their craft. That craft is hitting each other senseless with foam swords, while the warriors are members of the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club. At first glance, the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club looks similar Live Action Role Playing (LARPing), but the club’s president and founder, Alex Krochman, is quick to point out the differences. “This essentially is a combat sport. We have a set of rules, we have a set of regulations,” said Krochman, a 22-year-old mechanical engineering major. Krochman founded the club in January 2013. Looking for a cheaper alternative to paintballing, he began looking online for cheaper ways to get his adrenaline fix. He eventually discovered foam

fighting and decided to bring a group to Cal State Fullerton. The club is free to join and is open to both students and non-students. It is also part of a larger international organization known as the Belegarth Medieval Combat Society. Belegarth Medieval Combat Society is a live-action battle game, with a loose Lord of the Rings theme. The organization differentiates itself from other medieval role playing games by placing less emphasis on role playing and focusing more on foam-based violence. The rules of the society allow and encourage tactics including full-contact hitting, grappling and shield bashes. SEE CLUB, 6

JAMES SMITH / Daily Titan Student and non-student members of the club battle with each other using foam swords. They protect themselves by wearing hockey gloves and pads.

Women’s basketball undermined by 49ers The Titans’ season was ended by Long Beach after a first round exit in the tournament

Paving the way in AIDS, HIV research

Women’s | Basketball

An interest in sciences led professor to study the virus

60

MICHAEL HUNTLEY Daily Titan 5

The Cal State Fullerton women’s basketball team fell in the first round of the Big West tournament 64-60 to Long Beach State. The Titans (12-18, 8-8 Big West) finished the season with eight conference wins in Head Coach Daron Park’s first season. It is the most conference wins for the team since 2009-2010, when they also won eight games. “I’m so very proud of the effort that they gave day in and day out this year,” Park said. “(I’m) so grateful and humbled that these seniors embraced me and my staff and allowed us to come in and teach them and coach them and push them and develop them and do things with them that I don’t think they thought possible.” The 49ers jumped on the Titans early, scoring nine of the first 11 points of the game. They made four of their first five shots to take a 9-2

NOTEWORTHY SERIES

64

lead just 3:07 into the game. The Titans battled back midway through the first half. A pair of three-point baskets by junior guard Chante Miles and senior guard Brianna Barfield contributed to the Titans getting their first lead of the game at the 7:57 mark of the first half. Long Beach’s Lauren Spargo caught fire in the first half, sinking three of five three-point attempts. The junior guard shot 36.3 percent from the field this season and 27.4 percent from three. In the first half, she shot 57 percent from the field. “What really motivated me more than anything is that I wasn’t about to just lay down and let them beat us, especially in our home gym,” Spargo said. “We’re not going to let a team

REBECCA HARDMAN Daily Titan

WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Sophomore guard Hailey King prepares to take a free throw. King will be one of nine players returning next season for CSUF.

come in and beat us twice in a row.” The Titans beat the 49ers at the Walter Pyramid 71-55 on March 1 and beat them 54-48 in the first round of last season’s Big West tournament at UC Irvine. Long Beach Head Coach Jody Wynn kept last year’s loss to the Titans in her mind throughout the year. “I printed out five articles with headlines about the game and I taped the headlines in my office … I had those five headlines staring at me everyday,” Wynn said. SEE BASKETBALL, 8

INSIDE

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @DAILY_TITAN

A Cal State Fullerton professor is making an impact on a medical mystery by performing extensive research on the genetic aspect of HIV progression and its genetic relationship to immunity. Catherine Brennan, Ph.D., a biology professor, is helping solve the question as to why some people with HIV can live normally for more than a decade before the virus progresses to AIDS. Brennan is looking into the process of phagocytosis, immunology and teaching biology. Prior to becoming a member of the faculty, she spent about the last four years researching why the immune systems of certain individuals infected with HIV help block the

development of AIDS and how some do not require any drug treatment. As an assistant research scientist at the UCLA AIDS Institute’s David Geffen School of Medicine, Brennan’s collaboration with researchers identified a specific immune activation event that occurs in the first months of infection that may result in the long term, slower progression of the disease. As the main author of the study, Brennan has written several scholarly research articles and has also been published as the cover story in the October 2012 issue of the Journal of Virology. Brennan grew up in Vancouver, Canada, and lives in Los Angeles with her family. She possesses a rich academic background and demonstrates her love of learning through teaching and research. SEE RESEARCH, 5

BIKE SAFETY University Police will host course on campus to educate students on proper procedures

CSUF BASEBALL Titans return to Goodwin Field on a threegame losing skid after a seven-game road trip

NEWS 3

SPORTS 8 VISIT US AT: DAILYTITAN.COM


THURSDAY, M ARCH 13, 2014

Volume 95, Issue 25

New fee proposal finalized at $181 per semester CYNTHIA WASHICKO Daily Titan

The Student Fee Advisory Committee (SFAC) voted to approve a recommendation

on the Student Success Initiative (SSI) Wednesday, cutting the proposed fee from $240.50 to $181 per semester. The fee would be phased in over the next three years, reaching its final cost of $181 per semester in fall 2016.

Before the fee is made official, it will require approval from President Mildred García. If García passes the fee, it will then be sent to California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White for

final approval. Committee members deliberated concerning several spending priorities for Cal State Fullerton, including athletics and technology. After an initial twoweek student consultation

process followed by a twoweek extension, the SFAC received 3,809 valid paper and online surveys from students. Committee members received the survey data Monday. The meeting began with

time for members of the audience to speak to the committee regarding the fee, and seven students took advantage of that opportunity. SEE FEE, 3

JAMES SMITH / Daily Titan

Thai Dinh Vu, 19, a computer engineering major at Cal State Fullerton, battles with a club member in the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club on campus.

A ‘Game of Foam’

Students take the edge off by fighting with foam swords in CSUF club JAMES SMITH Daily Titan

A foreign land consists solely of warriors looking for a good fight. It’s a land where honor and camaraderie are held in the highest regard and warriors can be found wearing the finest armor of leather plate, old hockey gloves and tennis shoes. The name of this strange realm is Moria, also known to others familiar with this land as the Student Recreation Center lawn. Three days a week these fierce warriors congregate,

schedule–weather permitting– to hone their craft. That craft is hitting each other senseless with foam swords, while the warriors are members of the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club. At first glance, the Fullerton Foam Fighters Club looks similar Live Action Role Playing (LARPing), but the club’s president and founder, Alex Krochman, is quick to point out the differences. “This essentially is a combat sport. We have a set of rules, we have a set of regulations,” said Krochman, a 22-year-old mechanical engineering major. Krochman founded the club in January 2013. Looking for a cheaper alternative to paintballing, he began looking online for cheaper ways to get his adrenaline fix. He eventually discovered foam

fighting and decided to bring a group to Cal State Fullerton. The club is free to join and is open to both students and non-students. It is also part of a larger international organization known as the Belegarth Medieval Combat Society. Belegarth Medieval Combat Society is a live-action battle game, with a loose Lord of the Rings theme. The organization differentiates itself from other medieval role playing games by placing less emphasis on role playing and focusing more on foam-based violence. The rules of the society allow and encourage tactics including full-contact hitting, grappling and shield bashes. SEE CLUB, 6

JAMES SMITH / Daily Titan Student and non-student members of the club battle with each other using foam swords. They protect themselves by wearing hockey gloves and pads.

Women’s basketball undermined by 49ers The Titans’ season was ended by Long Beach after a first round exit in the tournament

Paving the way in AIDS, HIV research

Women’s | Basketball

An interest in sciences led professor to study the virus

60

MICHAEL HUNTLEY Daily Titan 5

The Cal State Fullerton women’s basketball team fell in the first round of the Big West tournament 64-60 to Long Beach State. The Titans (12-18, 8-8 Big West) finished the season with eight conference wins in Head Coach Daron Park’s first season. It is the most conference wins for the team since 2009-2010, when they also won eight games. “I’m so very proud of the effort that they gave day in and day out this year,” Park said. “(I’m) so grateful and humbled that these seniors embraced me and my staff and allowed us to come in and teach them and coach them and push them and develop them and do things with them that I don’t think they thought possible.” The 49ers jumped on the Titans early, scoring nine of the first 11 points of the game. They made four of their first five shots to take a 9-2

NOTEWORTHY SERIES

64

lead just 3:07 into the game. The Titans battled back midway through the first half. A pair of three-point baskets by junior guard Chante Miles and senior guard Brianna Barfield contributed to the Titans getting their first lead of the game at the 7:57 mark of the first half. Long Beach’s Lauren Spargo caught fire in the first half, sinking three of five three-point attempts. The junior guard shot 36.3 percent from the field this season and 27.4 percent from three. In the first half, she shot 57 percent from the field. “What really motivated me more than anything is that I wasn’t about to just lay down and let them beat us, especially in our home gym,” Spargo said. “We’re not going to let a team

REBECCA HARDMAN Daily Titan

WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Sophomore guard Hailey King prepares to take a free throw. King will be one of nine players returning next season for CSUF.

come in and beat us twice in a row.” The Titans beat the 49ers at the Walter Pyramid 71-55 on March 1 and beat them 54-48 in the first round of last season’s Big West tournament at UC Irvine. Long Beach Head Coach Jody Wynn kept last year’s loss to the Titans in her mind throughout the year. “I printed out five articles with headlines about the game and I taped the headlines in my office … I had those five headlines staring at me everyday,” Wynn said. SEE BASKETBALL, 8

INSIDE

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @DAILY_TITAN

A Cal State Fullerton professor is making an impact on a medical mystery by performing extensive research on the genetic aspect of HIV progression and its genetic relationship to immunity. Catherine Brennan, Ph.D., a biology professor, is helping solve the question as to why some people with HIV can live normally for more than a decade before the virus progresses to AIDS. Brennan is looking into the process of phagocytosis, immunology and teaching biology. Prior to becoming a member of the faculty, she spent about the last four years researching why the immune systems of certain individuals infected with HIV help block the

development of AIDS and how some do not require any drug treatment. As an assistant research scientist at the UCLA AIDS Institute’s David Geffen School of Medicine, Brennan’s collaboration with researchers identified a specific immune activation event that occurs in the first months of infection that may result in the long term, slower progression of the disease. As the main author of the study, Brennan has written several scholarly research articles and has also been published as the cover story in the October 2012 issue of the Journal of Virology. Brennan grew up in Vancouver, Canada, and lives in Los Angeles with her family. She possesses a rich academic background and demonstrates her love of learning through teaching and research. SEE RESEARCH, 5

BIKE SAFETY University Police will host course on campus to educate students on proper procedures

CSUF BASEBALL Titans return to Goodwin Field on a threegame losing skid after a seven-game road trip

NEWS 3

SPORTS 8 VISIT US AT: DAILYTITAN.COM


NEWS

PAGE 2

THE DAILY TITAN

MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

DTBRIEFS Explosion in Harlem kills 3 residents

EXHIBIT 1.1 Species adapt to environmental conditions over time. They become more specialized organisms better able to cope with their surroundings.

MIKE TRUJILLO / Daily Titan The Anthropology Department at Cal State Fullerton has created a proposal to restructure the anthropology degree into three concentrations, so students are better able to study specific practices within a broad field. The proposed divisions are cultural anthropology, archaeology and evolutionary anthropology.

FOR THE RECORD

It is Daily Titan policy to correct factual errors printed in the publication. Corrections will be published on the subsequent issue after an error is discovered and will appear on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections will also be made to the online version of the article. Please contact Editor-in-Chief Ethan Hawkes at (657) 278-5815 or at editorinchief@ dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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Anthropologists plot to evolve curriculum CSUF department plans to create three new concentrations AMAL ROCKN Daily Titan

To better reflect changes in anthropology and enable students to be more specialized, the Anthropology Department at Cal State Fullerton has proposed restructuring the major into three divisions. Anthropology, the study of humankind, constitutes many divisions, and the department has suggested three subfields: cultural anthropology, archaeology and evolutionary anthropology, to provide students with a focal point for their studies. The proposal will also restore the graduate anthropology program, which has been closed for the past three years, starting in the fall 2014 semester. Carl Wendt, Ph.D., an associate professor of anthropology, helped write the proposal, including the series of bylaws and the revised graduate program. Three anthropology professors, Wendt, John Bock, Ph.D. and Barbra Erickson, Ph.D., will each represent a proposed anthropology subdivision. Wendt will be in charge of the archaeology program. The three will all act as coordinators and work with Mitchell Avila, Ph.D., the associate dean for academic programs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The process has been ongoing for about a year before the proposal went to Sheryl Fontaine, Ph.D., the dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It then went up to Provost Jose Cruz, Ph.D., who approved it, and proceeded to an ad hoc committee that made recommendations

and held an open forum on March 5. Kristi Kanel, Ph.D., a professor of human services, was appointed by the Academic Senate to be the chair of the ad hoc committee to handle the proposal. Kanel sent a report to Sean Walker, Ph.D, the chair of the senate, and recommended that the senate support the proposal. The senate scheduled a vote on the proposal for March 20. The proposal was envisioned with the goal of developing the department’s own chair and administration. “Back in 2010, there were issues and we had an external chair from sociology, and he retired, so the dean’s office decided to take over the administration of our department,” Wendt said. At that time, anthropology professors at CSUF had a department and faculty to teach all of the classes, and students could still receive anthropology degrees, but they did not have a chair. Additionally, the dean’s office in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences handled administrative duties for the department on a temporary basis. Wendt said the department’s goal is to develop the three concentrations to allow students to focus on an aspect they are most interested in. “We want the administrative structure to mimic those concentrations, so we found it was beneficial first to get our self-governance back … and then move the concentrations through,” Wendt said. That is also the case with the field of anthropology itself, which Wendt said was “moving toward more specialization.” “I think it’s going to give us a good reputation, because now for people wanting to come and major in anthropology, students are going to know that these

are programs that really specialize, and have expertise in these areas,” Kanel said. For students to become more prepared for the job market and for graduate school, this new proposal will be very beneficial to them. “Say you want to be (the character) Bones from that TV show Bones, you know you’re going to go to the archaeology program and you know you’re going have a better sense of things,” Kanel said. “You’ll get an exposure to all of it, of course, but now students will be able to have better advisement, have an understanding.” Teaching anthropology is important because it is about human value and human diversity, which fosters a greater understanding of others, Wendt said. “It’s a need for anthropology, (a need) for an anthropological perspective on the world, one that looks at all the different aspects of what it is to be human: in the past, in the present, in different cultures, in all places, all times.” The new proposed plan will also consist of the three coordinators acting as advisors of their particular subfields for the students. “It gives the students that much more of a direct person to go to who could really help them, because the field is really broad. We study humans in all places at all times … so you almost have to specialize a little bit,” Wendt said. The Anthropology Department has 15 tenured and tenure-track faculty, who have all expressed support for the proposal. Wendt said across the board, the department has received strong support from others, because everybody sees this change will be a move forward for the university, for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and for the students. “All of the people in anthropology support it; when you have that much support from administration and faculty, I think it’s always better for students,” Kanel said. When everyone agrees and supports a proposal or plan, it frees up the faculty members’ time to give students the best education possible, Kanel said.

A gas leak caused a massive explosion in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York City Wednesday, destroying two five-story apartment buildings. So far, three residents are confirmed dead and several others were injured, according to CNN. Bob McGee, a representative of Consolidated Edison, said the utility company received a phone call about a gas leak at one of the apartment buildings, but they were unable to respond before the explosion occurred. Apartment building records show one of the buildings was cited for numerous violations in the past, including a lack of smoke detectors, blocked fire escapes and broken light fixtures. - KYLE NAULT

OC at risk of wildfires for weekend National Weather Service officials issued a red flag wildfire warning for Orange County Wednesday due to strong winds and dry weather, according to the Orange County Register. The warning was expected to remain in place until 6 p.m. Three lanes on the southbound 57 Freeway near Tonner Canyon Road closed down Wednesday afternoon due to a fire. Brea Police Department officers said the fire was likely started after a car lost a wheel and sparks from the tire ignited nearby patches of brush. No structures were affected by the fire. Winds are expected to be as powerful as 75 mph inland and 68 mph on the coast Thursday. - SASHA BELANI

Crimeans set to vote on secession Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk and President Barack Obama delivered a strong message to Russia Wednesday, according to CNN. The two told the Russian government there will be consequences if Russia refuses to remove troops from the Crimea region in Ukraine. Crimean residents are preparing to consider a controversial secession referendum scheduled for Sunday. Yatsenyuk plans to address the United Nations Security Council Thursday and meet with Congress, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in the future to gain international support for Ukraine’s unstable government. - KYLE NAULT

VISIT US AT: DAILYTITAN.COM/NEWS


NEWS Athletic funding most controversial MARCH 13, 2014

PAGE 3

THURSDAY

FEE Continued from PAGE 1

Adriana Gjonovich, a kinesiology major and member of the soccer team, commended the committee for reaching out to get feedback from students and expressed her support for the portions of the fee allocated to additional advising and courses. “This fee is helping students graduate quicker with the extra course offerings and advising helping us students get on the right track and … get into those classes that we need,” Gjonovich said. While some students spoke

THE DAILY TITAN

in favor of the fee, the majority of student speakers found fault with it, including Ryan Quinn and Carie Rael, members of Students for Quality Education (SQE). The group collected 400 signatures from students opposing the fee as part of its mission to promote affordable public education. “This (fee) is going to directly impact students of low income, who aren’t going to be able to make up the extra $240 over time,” said Rael, a history graduate student. The committee spent most of the meeting Wednesday deliberating on how to amend portions of the fee to more appropriately

reflect student feedback. A particularly contentious aspect of the fee was the funding appropriated for athletics. SFAC members noted that in the surveys, the amount of money going to athletic programs and facilities was the most contentious issue by far. “It cannot stand at what it is right now, because the students have spoken that they believe that it is too much right now that’s going towards one area,” said Jonathan Kwok, the Associated Students Inc. Board of Directors chair. Others on the committee expressed a desire to keep athletic spending a priority. Jonathan Leggett, the vice president of

ASI, said the university needs to keep some SSI funding allocated to athletics, citing revenue from events and campus exposure as potential benefits to athletic funding. “(Athletes) are the ones that promote the pride that is Cal State Fullerton, and so, when we invest in our athletic teams, we are investing in having more alumni coming around and … (we’re) talking about more exposure to the campus; you start getting that attention, which helps promote the great things that we do at this institution,” Leggett said. The SFAC also focused on the portion of the fee that would contribute to expanded

academic advising and provide additional courses. “Academic advising is something that was constantly brought up,” said Harpreet Bath, the ASI chief governmental officer. “If there are cuts being made, they shouldn’t be made to the things that are directly impacting the academics of our students.” In the coming weeks, the SFAC will meet to finalize accountability measures, bylaws and other specifics regarding the implementation of the fee. More information about the specific changes the SFAC made to the spending priorities in the SSI will be published as soon as it is made available.

University Police to host bike safety course Training will offer simulations to help avoid accidents KAYLI CRAIG Daily Titan

Many students and staff at college campuses find their commute can be simplified by using their bicycles to get to, from and around campus. However, with Cal State Fullerton being densely populated, cyclists can cause accidents with pedestrians and motorists throughout campus. Although there is not a high amount of reported Illustration by WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan bicycle-related incidents, The safety course Friday will help explain where it is unsafe for University Police and Envi- students to ride bicycles on campus. ronmental Health and Safety are pairing up to host a “It’s a collaboration to bicycle etiquette, Fonner “hands-on” bicycle safety provide safety tips and a said. course beginning Friday at practical application course Even though Fonner has noon. to students,” Brockie said. a passion for bicycling, he “Even though the (bicycle “It’s also to enhance skills … went through many hours of incidents reported) are low, and it’s fun.” training in order to become we look at the possibility of The attendees will have an instructor for this event. injuries and how we can re- the opportunity to experi- He has enrolled in a bike paduce that, (especially with) ence many potentially dan- trol school, as well as a 40more pedestrians, and cy- gerous on-campus situa- hour certification course clists and more people driv- tions themselves. through Peace Officer Staning cars,” Capt. John Brockie Some of the topics include dards and Training. said. how to successfully naviThe funding for the biThis course gate around cycle safety program was will pro- “When you’re out pede st r ia n s , received in 2012 through vide cyclists the correct the University Mission and k n o w l e d g e on a bike, officers way to wear Goals Initiatives, allowing about the laws tend to be more a helmet and the program to further exthey will be how to navi- tend into an additional onapproachable, gate through line course. required to follow as well The narrated web-based people are more cone patterns. other tools There will also portion can be taken any that will help likely to come up be the oppor- time before the event and them navigate and speak with tunity to wear is accessible through the to and from “DUI goggles” CSUF portal. their destina- you and address to simulate “When we are teaching tion safely. the effects of the class and you are goconcerns.” The mission cycling while ing through as a cyclist, we of this event is CHAUNCEY FONNER under the hope that you think differto provide the University Police Officer influence. ently when you’re driving campus comThe train- on campus, or anywhere,” munity with a functional ing sessions are intended to Brockie said. bike class which emphasiz- demonstrate proper cycling Staff and students are not es safety, lawful transiting techniques to students, the only ones on campus usand rider proficiency so stu- said Officer Chauncey Fon- ing their bikes as a means dents and others can safely ner, the bicyclist instruc- for transportation. The Uniget around campus, accord- tor of the safety course. versity Police also values ing to its syllabus. The course is more or less bike patrol as an important

ETHAN HAWKES / Daily Titan Multiple bicycle routes are available for students and others to use to get through campus. However, some high-traffic areas do not permit anyone to travel on vehicles like bicycles and skateboards.

tool to interact with students in a more down-toearth manner. “People like to get out and talk to us and we like to interact with the community. I generally say that it tends to break that

black-and-white barrier of a police car,” said Fonner, who implemented bike patrol at CSUF. “When you’re out on a bike, officers tend to be more approachable, people are more likely to come up and speak with you and

address concerns.” Those interested in the free event Friday can register by logging onto their CSUF portal. To register for the event, click on student training, my schedule and calendar tabs.

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OPINION

PAGE 4

THE DAILY TITAN

MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

A need for a new etiquette MICHAEL CHEN Daily Titan

The ease of recording with Google Glass raises security concerns Google Glass is a wonderful piece of technology that shows just how much technology has advanced. The glasses can record video, take pictures, be used as a navigation device and can even translate languages. However, the glasses do raise some social concerns with just how easy it is to record with them. All it takes is saying “OK Glass, record a video,” and the device will start recording. Because of this, some public places are beginning to issue bans on the piece of tech, which hasn’t even been officially released to the public. Stop The Cyborgs is an organization devoted to preserving “surveillance free zones.” The organization’s website has PDFs people can download to print out signs that promote the ban on Google Glasses. Some bars in California are also fighting to ban the glasses from being used on their property. In fact, the Willows, a bar

in San Francisco, has already passed an ordinance banning the glasses from its property. “A sign posted at the Willows at Folsom and 12th streets features a picture of the wearable computer with the familiar red circle and a slash over it, along with a message saying customers ‘have expressed concerns with being recorded while enjoying themselves,’” said Gale Holland, a Los Angeles Times writer. Security concerns aren’t exclusive to the people around the Glass wearer. As a new piece of wearable technology, the Glass user also has to worry about the threat of his or her new piece of tech being stolen. The glasses cost $1,500 each and in order to purchase one, an individual would have to fill out a form and wait for a spot to open up. The rarity of the glasses combined with the high value can make an individual a likely target for robbery. “The glasses have became one of several focal points in the escalating tension between young, well-paid tech workers and those who feel their influx threatens to make San Francisco unaffordable to those not earning tech salaries” said USA Today writer Elizabeth Weise. “On Feb. 21, a tech writer named Sarah Slocum had a pair of the high-tech specs stolen at a punk bar in San Francisco’s

courtesy of Google, photo illustration by WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Google Glass can conspicuously record, as opposed to cell phones which require pointing the device at somone in order to record.

Haight-Ashbury neighborhood. Patrons reported they were upset at being recorded during last call. Others noted that flaunting a $1,500 tech toy might make one a robbery target.” Google has also realized their new piece of technology might have some societal issues. Google released a memo on their Glass website,

stating the do’s and don’ts of the glasses to ensure those with the glasses do not abuse the capabilities. “(Don’t) be creepy or rude (aka, a “Glasshole”),” the memo states. “Respect others and if they have questions about Glass don’t get snappy. Be polite and explain what Glass does and remember, a quick demo can go a long way. In places

where cell phone cameras aren’t allowed, the same rules will apply to Glass. If you’re asked to turn your phone off, turn Glass off as well. Breaking the rules or being rude will not get businesses excited about Glass and will ruin it for other Explorers.” The technology is in its infancy and the public is still getting used to the new

fangled eye-wear so concerns are to be expected. As with anything that is new, people tend to be cautious, but that caution is ultimately for the good of the public. As the technology develops and society becomes more understanding, perhaps the ordinances against the product will lift as well.

Ukraine’s people must endure

140

MATTHEW HADDIX for the Daily Titan

Ukraine’s revolution is a prime example of what the millenial generation can accomplish While tensions between Ukraine and Russia escalate, the Western world must help Ukraine realize a bloodless transition to a newly democratic and progressive society. Pundits in Western media can speculate back and forth as to the inf luence President Barack Obama has over (or under) President Vladimir Putin, but they forget about the Ukrainian people. The Ukrainian people are in a terrifying situation where the idea of a civil war is an utter possibility. Civil war cannot happen. The Ukrainian state must not only be allowed to continue, but to f lourish as well. The Ukrainian revolution symbolizes the culmination of political revolutions born from youth movements. The millennial generation has been the key factor in political revolution since the fall of Hosni Mubarak during the Arab Spring in 2011. The Ukrainian revolution did what few could before it: it put into place a government that was keen

on the very youth that put them into parliament comprised of ministers power. from both pro-Russian and pro-EuAll over the world, the millenni- ropean ideologies. al generation has seen the wanton This new Ukrainian governspending on pollutant energy and a ment must be allowed to prevail, lack of upward mobility as signifi- as this will represent a significant cant threats to the future. step for the voices of the millennial These conditions and more generation. spawned the events that gave way The large majority of the millento the Arab Spring, which would set nial generation is too young to enthe stage for millennials around the ter political office or has not found world. their footing in the political arena. Yet even as youth dominated poUntil they are able to do so, millitical movements succeeded in lennials must voice their concerns overthrowing their through their repreThis new previous regimes, sentatives within the those who came to fill State. Ukrainian in the void could hardThe major drawback ly be considered dif- government must of the Ukrainian revferent than those who olution was its devobe allowed to were in place prior. lution into violence, prevail, as this but the results were Look no further than Egypt’s Abdel Fattah will represent a impressive. Al-Sisi, once the genUkrainians were able eral of Egypt’s armed significant step to bring many fresh, forces who helped overfaces to the parfor the voices of new throw Morsi, soon to liament, a feat that be the newly appointed the millennial seems almost impossipresident of Egypt. ble for American youth generation. The Egyptian people today. overthrew the autocAmerican youth will racy of Mubarak out of a desire to never be able to storm the Capitol have democratic elections, but they Building and occupy it until the premay soon be forced to experience vious governance capitulates. The more autocratic rule. American youth must simply wait Ukraine is different, the revolu- and watch their politicians saunter tion did not occur without Ukra- about with near impunity, until one nian blood spilled, but those day we can unite as one and overwho were brought to power were turn the tradition of incumbency. done through legitimate political Ukraine will continue to be an exprocesses. ample to the power of the millennial Arseniy Yatsenyuk, Ukraine’s generation, and Americans should pay Prime Minister, was appointed attention to the most important part through a parliamentary vote, a of this crisis: the Ukrainian people.

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FEATURES Professor studies genetics and immunity MARCH 13, 2014

PAGE 5

THURSDAY

THE DAILY TITAN

RESEARCH Continued from PAGE 1

With her broad academic background and scientific research skills, Brennan provides valuable expertise and knowledge to the biology department and her students. Jose Guardado, a junior biochemistry major, said he enjoyed being in Brennan’s class and the enthusiasm she incorporated into her teaching. “Science-wise, I learned about photosynthesis and how a plant makes its energy compared to an animal cell … she was very straightforward,” Guardado said. “She was also open to any questions; she did not intimidate anybody. She was very enthusiastic about her teaching and very helpful. You can tell she loves her job.” Brennan’s initial academic focus was not on biology. Her interest in biology was sparked while completing her undergraduate degree in philosophy and working on a farm. “I was always very interested in how animals interact with microbes,” Brennan said. “At age 23, I started to think I wanted to go into something life sciences related, but I was at that time thinking something more of ecology so I took some undergrad classes to prepare for that kind of graduate school … and then I got interested in pure biology.” Brennan earned her bachelor’s degree in philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts. She earned her master’s degree at USC in marine biology, focusing on squid luminous bacterial symbiosis in her studies. She continued at USC and went on to obtain her doctorate in molecular biology there. Her academic focus includes cell biology, genetics and immunology.

Courtesy of Cal State Fullerton Catherine Brennan, Ph.D., a biology professor, spent the past four years researching why the immune systems of certain individuals infected with HIV help block the development of AIDS and how some do not require any drug treatment. She has also written several scholary research articles.

Brennan is studying Drosophila, a type of fruit fly often used for genetic research. She is also studying immunity research with a focus on phagocytosis, when white blood cells eat microbes such as bacteria or fungi. She is interested in identifying new genes and understanding how they work, not only in flies but also in humans. This interest eventually led to her research on HIV. After HIV was discovered, medical researchers created a test for people to see if they were infected with the virus, according

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to the UCLA AIDS Institute. They studied the immune system’s response in the early months of infection and found that many people were able to fend off the progression of AIDS. “Soon after they identified the virus, they developed a test for people that had HIV, so even if people did not have symptoms they could recognize they were infected with HIV,” Brennan said. Researchers recognized that genetics play a pivotal role in immunity to HIV progression. Brennan said there are

some genes that are extremely variable. It turned out that people who were resisting the disease progression were still infected, but could contain the infection, she said. Those people tend to have one or two of these variants. “It seemed about 1 percent or half a percent of people that are infected with HIV do not need any drug treatment, they will just stay healthy,” Brennan said. “But as time went by, there were some people that just were not getting sick … 20, 25 years later and they

are still staying healthy without any medication, and so the work that I was doing was focused on those individuals.” Although Brennan spends many hours performing research, she enjoys spending time with her family during her off days. “I spend a lot of time with my family on the weekends. We like hiking, going to the beach and traveling,” she said. As a biology professor, she intends to offer advanced courses on cell biology and immunology in the future.

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FEATURES

PAGE 6

THE DAILY TITAN

Exploring in South Korea Learning about the drinking culture Student begins adventure by going out on the town

THURSDAY

Showing the softer side of sword fighting way for some of its members to get in shape. Peter Werley, a non-student member, said he always As further proof that found gyms boring and the foam fighting com- could never find the motimunity is not a stereo- vation to go. typical group of fragile However, through BelLARPers, Krochman said egarth, he was able to roughly half of the Bele- find enough motivation garth community are ei- to start exercising. Since ther active duty or retired Werley discovered foam military personnel. fighting over two years CSUF’s Fullerton Foam ago, he has lost over 200 Fighters Club also in- pounds. cludes a retired Army “I used to play a lot of Ranger. video games, this is kind The members of the of the next level,” Werley Fullerton Foam Fight- said. “This is better.” ers Club protect themWhile most members selves with join the club unique cloth- “The community for an adrening. Armor aline rush, at large is or “garb” can many found extremely be as siman added ple as an old accepting ... I was bonus of a pair of hockfriendly and in a fraternity a c c e p t i n g ey gloves and some knee for three years community. pads or as Alina Rubextreme as and I never felt as al Kaba, an a full set of -yea r-old welcomed as I do 18 hand-made film major, leather arsaid so far all here.” mor, includof the friends ing a chest ALEX KROCHMAN she has made plate, brac- President of Foam Fighters Club since attenders and heling CSUF met costing over $1,000 have been through the total. club. She is one of two In addition to armor, female members in the fighters create their own Fullerton Foam Fighters weapons. Short swords, Club. long swords and spears “The community at are among the most com- large is extremely acceptmon weapons created. ing and just cool to parThese are constructed ty with and cool to be from various materials around,” Krochman said. that can be purchased “I was in a fraternity for at any local hardware three years and I never store. felt as welcomed as I do The club has also been a here.” CLUB Continued from PAGE 1

ALEX FAIRBANKS For the Daily Titan

My plan was to cut back on drinking before I left to study in South Korea, but upon arriving here that plan was quickly drowned in beer and soju, a well-known Korean beverage. Although I am studying video production in South Korea, I am also on a pursuit to find myself and understand another culture. Since I had an entire week off before school started and since the first week of class is always relaxing for me, the self-persuasion to party in South Korea was undeniable. It all began elegantly at a famous restaurant in the city of Anseong. I sat down to eat with one of our professors, fellow students and other Dong-Ah Institute of Media and Arts (DIMA) faculty. We had a few bottles of champagne, provided by one of the top officials of DIMA, and ate traditional Korean food with extremely tender beef. The next time I drank was at the bar Mazzi Mazzi. Champagne was nowhere to be found, but beer and soju were there to take its place. A notable feature of the bar was its logo. It featured a cartoon cat that appeared to be drunk and sleepy, with one swollen black eye, carrying around a pint of beer as a backpack. I knew from the picture I was in the right place.

MARCH 13, 2014

Courtesy of Alex Fairbanks Cal State Fullerton students studying abroad in South Korea spend time getting to know each other and eat at different restaurants, such as this famous eatery in the city of Anseong.

I was in good company that night at the bar with my new Cal State Fullerton friends, a former DIMA exchange student and my charming British professor, who had a beer with us. That great night ended, but a couple of days later I was exploring Seoul with the CSUF students and some Korean friends. We headed to a restaurant in Gangnam and as the Korean food came, the soju soon followed. We all got to know each other and began a cultural exchange of drinking games. One of the Korean games they taught us was called “Game of Death.” To play, a number is chosen, we chant a certain Korean song and point at one another. The loser then consumes a shot of soju or any alcohol at hand. Each night of drinking blurred into the next, but all

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of them were distinctly differentiated by the crazy moments I experienced. To sum it up, the climax of my drinking experience so far was when I danced around in a circle, holding a flower pot on my head, all while DIMA Korean students chanted my name. I learned that the Korean drinking culture is really good. Someone can go out to a restaurant or bar, spend about $10 and get a decent buzz along with some delicious food. The atmosphere of drinking in South Korea is extremely relaxed. There is no hostility while drinking, as there can be sometimes in America. Drinking is so accepted in South Korea that students may find themselves drinking with professors

and school faculty. However, people are not getting drunk to the point of not being able to control themselves. The DIMA Korean students do party hard, but they also know when it is time to study and focus on school. The drinking and partying is not the main point, but rather in South Korea it becomes a catalyst for social connection. Students can get to know one another and create friendships that will last a lifetime. I will hopefully be making friends that will last a lifetime, but the most important thing I have learned is in order to make friends, I have to put myself out there and get involved. With all that I have witnessed so far here, if you plan on coming to Korea, prepare to meet friendly people and drink a lot of soju.

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MARCH 13, 2014 MARACH

The Daily TiTan’s

THURSDAY PAGE 7

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An amazing development solves a problem at home. It involves teamwork and collaboration. Check out an interesting suggestion from a brilliant friend. Apply this inspiration to beautify and add elegance to your surroundings. Use quality ingredients.

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There’s more work coming in. The very idea you were looking for shows up, from far away. Accept a creative challenge. Plan to travel light. A barrier gets overcome. If you say you’re worth it, others agree.

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SPORTS

PAGE 8

THE DAILY TITAN

MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

CSUF bows out of Titans to host Gaels Big West tourney Baseball welcomes Saint Mary’s to Goodwin Field after being on the road for the last seven games

BASKETBALL Continued from PAGE 1

The Titans struggled to score early in the second half. They only made one of their first four shot attempts and labored to get good shots. “Our zones were significantly better than they were last week,” Wynn said. “We were just urgent on everything that we did. We tried to keep Kat (Kathleen Iwuoha) off the offensive boards and I think we did a very good job of that.” In her previous matchup against the 49ers, Iwuoha had 12 rebounds, four of which were offensive. Her 12 rebounds was more than the entire 49ers front line. In this game, junior forward Ella Clark held Iwuoha to only five rebounds.

“This isn’t the standard that we have set for the program, but I am incredibly proud of all they accomplished this year.” DARON PARK Head Coach

The 49ers and the Titans were neck and neck in the second half. Iwuoha made a jump shot to give the Titans a 56-55 lead with 3:55

remaining in the game. The turning point came when junior guard Tailer Butler fouled Spargo on a three-point shot attempt with 1:39 remaining in the game. Spargo made all three free throws, giving the 49ers a two-point lead. The Titans failed to score for the remainder of the game. The game was ultimately sealed when Butler fouled Clark with eight seconds remaining and Clark made both free throws to give the 49ers a four-point lead. “We had some mistakes towards the end, but I still think we battled and we worked,” senior guard Alex Thomas said. “Unfortunately, we didn’t get the win that we wanted.” The game marked the last time Thomas would wear a Titan jersey. Barfield and senior forward Mya Olivier also saw their CSUF careers end at the Pyramid. “This isn’t where we want to be. This isn’t the standard that we have set for this program, but I am incredibly proud of all they accomplished this year,” Park said. “While this hurts tonight, we’re very excited about the future of Cal State Fullerton women’s basketball.” The Titans have nine players returning next season and hope to build on the groundwork laid this season by Park and the coaching staff. For more information on women’s basketball and all Titan Athletics, go to FullertonTitans.com.

The Mihaylo MBA

JOHNNY NAVARRETTE Daily Titan

The Cal State Fullerton baseball team will look to turn around its recent struggles as it returns home to host Saint Mary’s this weekend at Goodwin Field. After starting the season 8-3, the Titans, ranked No. 9 in the nation by Baseball America, ran into some difficulties at the tail end of their seven-game road trip. The Titans dropped the final three games, all by two runs or less, including a 5-3 walkoff loss to San Diego in 10 innings on Tuesday to fall to 8-6 on the season. A major source of the Titans’ struggles has been their inability to hit with runners in scoring position. Despite tallying 18 hits in its last three games, CSUF left 26 runners on base and scored just seven runs. In 14 games this season, the Titans are batting .262 as a team with a .366 on base percentage. For comparison, last season CSUF batted .285 as a team, finishing with a 51-10 record. One player doing his part to start the season is sophomore Tanner Pinkston, who is leading the team with a .385 batting average and 20 hits. In 52 at-bats, Pinkston has struck out just six times. As a team, the Titans have struck out a total of 103 times. Senior Greg Velazquez is batting .250 on the season with a team-leading 12 runs batted in while junior Matt Chapman is batting .283 with 11 runs batted in. J.D. Davis leads the team with three home runs and is batting .291 to start the season. To break its three-game losing streak, CSUF will turn to sophomore Thomas Eshelman to shut down a Gaels offense batting .267. In 31 innings, Eshelman has 22 strikeouts while allowing just one walk. He will take the mound with a 3-0 record and team-leading 1.45 earned run average. In his last start versus Baylor on March 7, Eshelman threw a complete game shutout, allowing three hits and striking out two in the Titans 11-0 victory. Mark Okumori ’12 MBA Senior Analyst Media/Entertainment Industry

WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Freshman Taylor Bryant and the Titans look to improve on driving in runners in scoring position.

St. Mary’s (7-8) enters the weekend series with some momentum, having won a three-game series versus Penn State. The Gaels compiled 32 hits in the series. Sophomore Anthony Gonsolin, who is batting .370 in 54 at-bats, leads the Gaels offense. While Gonsolin has hit no home runs this season, he has three doubles and five triples, giving him a .611 slugging percentage. This season, the Gaels have yet to hit a home run in 15 games. On the mound, St. Mary’s will look for starters Ryan Brockett and Cameron Neff to silence the Titan bats. Brockett is 2-2 this season with a 3.00 earned run average. In 24 innings, the senior has struck out 15 but has struggled with accuracy, issuing 14 walks. Neff, a 6-foot-3 freshman, will enter the game with a 4.05 earned run average. Sporting a 2-2 record, Neff leads the team in strikeouts with 20 and has only walked four batters. In his last start, Neff threw a complete-game shutout, striking out 10 while walking just one as the Gaels went on to defeat Penn State 4-0. With their opponent’s lack of power and struggling pitching staff, the Titans have a good chance to recover as they near the start of Big West Conference play next Friday. For more information on the CSUF baseball team and all Titan Athletics, go to FullertonTitans.com.

DTBRIEFS Tennis drops third straight to San Diego The Cal State Fullerton women’s tennis team was defeated 6-1 by the University of San Diego Toreros Wednesday at the Skip and Hogan Tennis Center. Their record fell to 3-10 as the Toreros improved to 4-7. This marks the third consecutive loss for the Titans. They scored their only point when freshman Alexis Valenzuela (10-3) beat sophomore Shani Blecher 6-4, 4-6, 105. Valenzuela defeated Blecher in the No. 1 spot, which served as the last singles match of the day. Valenzuela has now won nine consecutive matches after starting the season winning only one of her first four matches. The Toreros came out storming as senior Morgan McIntosh was overpowered by sophomore Marta Stojanovic 6-0, 6-1. Stojanovic had a career-high seven service aces in the singles match. This set the tone for the following matches, which were all straight set victories. The Toreros swept the Titans in doubles matches, winning 8-6, 8-4, 8-5. - IAN O’BRIEN

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NEWS

PAGE 2

THE DAILY TITAN

MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

DTBRIEFS Explosion in Harlem kills 3 residents

EXHIBIT 1.1 Species adapt to environmental conditions over time. They become more specialized organisms better able to cope with their surroundings.

MIKE TRUJILLO / Daily Titan The Anthropology Department at Cal State Fullerton has created a proposal to restructure the anthropology degree into three concentrations, so students are better able to study specific practices within a broad field. The proposed divisions are cultural anthropology, archaeology and evolutionary anthropology.

FOR THE RECORD

It is Daily Titan policy to correct factual errors printed in the publication. Corrections will be published on the subsequent issue after an error is discovered and will appear on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections will also be made to the online version of the article. Please contact Editor-in-Chief Ethan Hawkes at (657) 278-5815 or at editorinchief@ dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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Anthropologists plot to evolve curriculum CSUF department plans to create three new concentrations AMAL ROCKN Daily Titan

To better reflect changes in anthropology and enable students to be more specialized, the Anthropology Department at Cal State Fullerton has proposed restructuring the major into three divisions. Anthropology, the study of humankind, constitutes many divisions, and the department has suggested three subfields: cultural anthropology, archaeology and evolutionary anthropology, to provide students with a focal point for their studies. The proposal will also restore the graduate anthropology program, which has been closed for the past three years, starting in the fall 2014 semester. Carl Wendt, Ph.D., an associate professor of anthropology, helped write the proposal, including the series of bylaws and the revised graduate program. Three anthropology professors, Wendt, John Bock, Ph.D. and Barbra Erickson, Ph.D., will each represent a proposed anthropology subdivision. Wendt will be in charge of the archaeology program. The three will all act as coordinators and work with Mitchell Avila, Ph.D., the associate dean for academic programs in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The process has been ongoing for about a year before the proposal went to Sheryl Fontaine, Ph.D., the dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It then went up to Provost Jose Cruz, Ph.D., who approved it, and proceeded to an ad hoc committee that made recommendations

and held an open forum on March 5. Kristi Kanel, Ph.D., a professor of human services, was appointed by the Academic Senate to be the chair of the ad hoc committee to handle the proposal. Kanel sent a report to Sean Walker, Ph.D, the chair of the senate, and recommended that the senate support the proposal. The senate scheduled a vote on the proposal for March 20. The proposal was envisioned with the goal of developing the department’s own chair and administration. “Back in 2010, there were issues and we had an external chair from sociology, and he retired, so the dean’s office decided to take over the administration of our department,” Wendt said. At that time, anthropology professors at CSUF had a department and faculty to teach all of the classes, and students could still receive anthropology degrees, but they did not have a chair. Additionally, the dean’s office in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences handled administrative duties for the department on a temporary basis. Wendt said the department’s goal is to develop the three concentrations to allow students to focus on an aspect they are most interested in. “We want the administrative structure to mimic those concentrations, so we found it was beneficial first to get our self-governance back … and then move the concentrations through,” Wendt said. That is also the case with the field of anthropology itself, which Wendt said was “moving toward more specialization.” “I think it’s going to give us a good reputation, because now for people wanting to come and major in anthropology, students are going to know that these

are programs that really specialize, and have expertise in these areas,” Kanel said. For students to become more prepared for the job market and for graduate school, this new proposal will be very beneficial to them. “Say you want to be (the character) Bones from that TV show Bones, you know you’re going to go to the archaeology program and you know you’re going have a better sense of things,” Kanel said. “You’ll get an exposure to all of it, of course, but now students will be able to have better advisement, have an understanding.” Teaching anthropology is important because it is about human value and human diversity, which fosters a greater understanding of others, Wendt said. “It’s a need for anthropology, (a need) for an anthropological perspective on the world, one that looks at all the different aspects of what it is to be human: in the past, in the present, in different cultures, in all places, all times.” The new proposed plan will also consist of the three coordinators acting as advisors of their particular subfields for the students. “It gives the students that much more of a direct person to go to who could really help them, because the field is really broad. We study humans in all places at all times … so you almost have to specialize a little bit,” Wendt said. The Anthropology Department has 15 tenured and tenure-track faculty, who have all expressed support for the proposal. Wendt said across the board, the department has received strong support from others, because everybody sees this change will be a move forward for the university, for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and for the students. “All of the people in anthropology support it; when you have that much support from administration and faculty, I think it’s always better for students,” Kanel said. When everyone agrees and supports a proposal or plan, it frees up the faculty members’ time to give students the best education possible, Kanel said.

A gas leak caused a massive explosion in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York City Wednesday, destroying two five-story apartment buildings. So far, three residents are confirmed dead and several others were injured, according to CNN. Bob McGee, a representative of Consolidated Edison, said the utility company received a phone call about a gas leak at one of the apartment buildings, but they were unable to respond before the explosion occurred. Apartment building records show one of the buildings was cited for numerous violations in the past, including a lack of smoke detectors, blocked fire escapes and broken light fixtures. - KYLE NAULT

OC at risk of wildfires for weekend National Weather Service officials issued a red flag wildfire warning for Orange County Wednesday due to strong winds and dry weather, according to the Orange County Register. The warning was expected to remain in place until 6 p.m. Three lanes on the southbound 57 Freeway near Tonner Canyon Road closed down Wednesday afternoon due to a fire. Brea Police Department officers said the fire was likely started after a car lost a wheel and sparks from the tire ignited nearby patches of brush. No structures were affected by the fire. Winds are expected to be as powerful as 75 mph inland and 68 mph on the coast Thursday. - SASHA BELANI

Crimeans set to vote on secession Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk and President Barack Obama delivered a strong message to Russia Wednesday, according to CNN. The two told the Russian government there will be consequences if Russia refuses to remove troops from the Crimea region in Ukraine. Crimean residents are preparing to consider a controversial secession referendum scheduled for Sunday. Yatsenyuk plans to address the United Nations Security Council Thursday and meet with Congress, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in the future to gain international support for Ukraine’s unstable government. - KYLE NAULT

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NEWS Athletic funding most controversial MARCH 13, 2014

PAGE 3

THURSDAY

FEE Continued from PAGE 1

Adriana Gjonovich, a kinesiology major and member of the soccer team, commended the committee for reaching out to get feedback from students and expressed her support for the portions of the fee allocated to additional advising and courses. “This fee is helping students graduate quicker with the extra course offerings and advising helping us students get on the right track and … get into those classes that we need,” Gjonovich said. While some students spoke

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in favor of the fee, the majority of student speakers found fault with it, including Ryan Quinn and Carie Rael, members of Students for Quality Education (SQE). The group collected 400 signatures from students opposing the fee as part of its mission to promote affordable public education. “This (fee) is going to directly impact students of low income, who aren’t going to be able to make up the extra $240 over time,” said Rael, a history graduate student. The committee spent most of the meeting Wednesday deliberating on how to amend portions of the fee to more appropriately

reflect student feedback. A particularly contentious aspect of the fee was the funding appropriated for athletics. SFAC members noted that in the surveys, the amount of money going to athletic programs and facilities was the most contentious issue by far. “It cannot stand at what it is right now, because the students have spoken that they believe that it is too much right now that’s going towards one area,” said Jonathan Kwok, the Associated Students Inc. Board of Directors chair. Others on the committee expressed a desire to keep athletic spending a priority. Jonathan Leggett, the vice president of

ASI, said the university needs to keep some SSI funding allocated to athletics, citing revenue from events and campus exposure as potential benefits to athletic funding. “(Athletes) are the ones that promote the pride that is Cal State Fullerton, and so, when we invest in our athletic teams, we are investing in having more alumni coming around and … (we’re) talking about more exposure to the campus; you start getting that attention, which helps promote the great things that we do at this institution,” Leggett said. The SFAC also focused on the portion of the fee that would contribute to expanded

academic advising and provide additional courses. “Academic advising is something that was constantly brought up,” said Harpreet Bath, the ASI chief governmental officer. “If there are cuts being made, they shouldn’t be made to the things that are directly impacting the academics of our students.” In the coming weeks, the SFAC will meet to finalize accountability measures, bylaws and other specifics regarding the implementation of the fee. More information about the specific changes the SFAC made to the spending priorities in the SSI will be published as soon as it is made available.

University Police to host bike safety course Training will offer simulations to help avoid accidents KAYLI CRAIG Daily Titan

Many students and staff at college campuses find their commute can be simplified by using their bicycles to get to, from and around campus. However, with Cal State Fullerton being densely populated, cyclists can cause accidents with pedestrians and motorists throughout campus. Although there is not a high amount of reported Illustration by WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan bicycle-related incidents, The safety course Friday will help explain where it is unsafe for University Police and Envi- students to ride bicycles on campus. ronmental Health and Safety are pairing up to host a “It’s a collaboration to bicycle etiquette, Fonner “hands-on” bicycle safety provide safety tips and a said. course beginning Friday at practical application course Even though Fonner has noon. to students,” Brockie said. a passion for bicycling, he “Even though the (bicycle “It’s also to enhance skills … went through many hours of incidents reported) are low, and it’s fun.” training in order to become we look at the possibility of The attendees will have an instructor for this event. injuries and how we can re- the opportunity to experi- He has enrolled in a bike paduce that, (especially with) ence many potentially dan- trol school, as well as a 40more pedestrians, and cy- gerous on-campus situa- hour certification course clists and more people driv- tions themselves. through Peace Officer Staning cars,” Capt. John Brockie Some of the topics include dards and Training. said. how to successfully naviThe funding for the biThis course gate around cycle safety program was will pro- “When you’re out pedest r ia n s , received in 2012 through vide cyclists the correct the University Mission and k n o w l e d g e on a bike, officers way to wear Goals Initiatives, allowing about the laws tend to be more a helmet and the program to further exthey will be how to navi- tend into an additional onapproachable, gate through line course. required to follow as well The narrated web-based people are more cone patterns. other tools There will also portion can be taken any that will help likely to come up be the oppor- time before the event and them navigate and speak with tunity to wear is accessible through the to and from “DUI goggles” CSUF portal. their destina- you and address to simulate “When we are teaching tion safely. the effects of the class and you are goconcerns.” The mission cycling while ing through as a cyclist, we of this event is CHAUNCEY FONNER under the hope that you think differto provide the University Police Officer influence. ently when you’re driving campus comThe train- on campus, or anywhere,” munity with a functional ing sessions are intended to Brockie said. bike class which emphasiz- demonstrate proper cycling Staff and students are not es safety, lawful transiting techniques to students, the only ones on campus usand rider proficiency so stu- said Officer Chauncey Fon- ing their bikes as a means dents and others can safely ner, the bicyclist instruc- for transportation. The Uniget around campus, accord- tor of the safety course. versity Police also values ing to its syllabus. The course is more or less bike patrol as an important

ETHAN HAWKES / Daily Titan Multiple bicycle routes are available for students and others to use to get through campus. However, some high-traffic areas do not permit anyone to travel on vehicles like bicycles and skateboards.

tool to interact with students in a more down-toearth manner. “People like to get out and talk to us and we like to interact with the community. I generally say that it tends to break that

black-and-white barrier of a police car,” said Fonner, who implemented bike patrol at CSUF. “When you’re out on a bike, officers tend to be more approachable, people are more likely to come up and speak with you and

address concerns.” Those interested in the free event Friday can register by logging onto their CSUF portal. To register for the event, click on student training, my schedule and calendar tabs.

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OPINION

PAGE 4

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MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

A need for a new etiquette MICHAEL CHEN Daily Titan

The ease of recording with Google Glass raises security concerns Google Glass is a wonderful piece of technology that shows just how much technology has advanced. The glasses can record video, take pictures, be used as a navigation device and can even translate languages. However, the glasses do raise some social concerns with just how easy it is to record with them. All it takes is saying “OK Glass, record a video,” and the device will start recording. Because of this, some public places are beginning to issue bans on the piece of tech, which hasn’t even been officially released to the public. Stop The Cyborgs is an organization devoted to preserving “surveillance free zones.” The organization’s website has PDFs people can download to print out signs that promote the ban on Google Glasses. Some bars in California are also fighting to ban the glasses from being used on their property. In fact, the Willows, a bar

in San Francisco, has already passed an ordinance banning the glasses from its property. “A sign posted at the Willows at Folsom and 12th streets features a picture of the wearable computer with the familiar red circle and a slash over it, along with a message saying customers ‘have expressed concerns with being recorded while enjoying themselves,’” said Gale Holland, a Los Angeles Times writer. Security concerns aren’t exclusive to the people around the Glass wearer. As a new piece of wearable technology, the Glass user also has to worry about the threat of his or her new piece of tech being stolen. The glasses cost $1,500 each and in order to purchase one, an individual would have to fill out a form and wait for a spot to open up. The rarity of the glasses combined with the high value can make an individual a likely target for robbery. “The glasses have became one of several focal points in the escalating tension between young, well-paid tech workers and those who feel their influx threatens to make San Francisco unaffordable to those not earning tech salaries” said USA Today writer Elizabeth Weise. “On Feb. 21, a tech writer named Sarah Slocum had a pair of the high-tech specs stolen at a punk bar in San Francisco’s

courtesy of Google, photo illustration by WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Google Glass can conspicuously record, as opposed to cell phones which require pointing the device at somone in order to record.

Haight-Ashbury neighborhood. Patrons reported they were upset at being recorded during last call. Others noted that flaunting a $1,500 tech toy might make one a robbery target.” Google has also realized their new piece of technology might have some societal issues. Google released a memo on their Glass website,

stating the do’s and don’ts of the glasses to ensure those with the glasses do not abuse the capabilities. “(Don’t) be creepy or rude (aka, a “Glasshole”),” the memo states. “Respect others and if they have questions about Glass don’t get snappy. Be polite and explain what Glass does and remember, a quick demo can go a long way. In places

where cell phone cameras aren’t allowed, the same rules will apply to Glass. If you’re asked to turn your phone off, turn Glass off as well. Breaking the rules or being rude will not get businesses excited about Glass and will ruin it for other Explorers.” The technology is in its infancy and the public is still getting used to the new

fangled eye-wear so concerns are to be expected. As with anything that is new, people tend to be cautious, but that caution is ultimately for the good of the public. As the technology develops and society becomes more understanding, perhaps the ordinances against the product will lift as well.

Ukraine’s people must endure

140

MATTHEW HADDIX for the Daily Titan

Ukraine’s revolution is a prime example of what the millenial generation can accomplish While tensions between Ukraine and Russia escalate, the Western world must help Ukraine realize a bloodless transition to a newly democratic and progressive society. Pundits in Western media can speculate back and forth as to the inf luence President Barack Obama has over (or under) President Vladimir Putin, but they forget about the Ukrainian people. The Ukrainian people are in a terrifying situation where the idea of a civil war is an utter possibility. Civil war cannot happen. The Ukrainian state must not only be allowed to continue, but to f lourish as well. The Ukrainian revolution symbolizes the culmination of political revolutions born from youth movements. The millennial generation has been the key factor in political revolution since the fall of Hosni Mubarak during the Arab Spring in 2011. The Ukrainian revolution did what few could before it: it put into place a government that was keen

on the very youth that put them into parliament comprised of ministers power. from both pro-Russian and pro-EuAll over the world, the millenni- ropean ideologies. al generation has seen the wanton This new Ukrainian governspending on pollutant energy and a ment must be allowed to prevail, lack of upward mobility as signifi- as this will represent a significant cant threats to the future. step for the voices of the millennial These conditions and more generation. spawned the events that gave way The large majority of the millento the Arab Spring, which would set nial generation is too young to enthe stage for millennials around the ter political office or has not found world. their footing in the political arena. Yet even as youth dominated poUntil they are able to do so, millitical movements succeeded in lennials must voice their concerns overthrowing their through their repreThis new previous regimes, sentatives within the those who came to fill State. Ukrainian in the void could hardThe major drawback ly be considered dif- government must of the Ukrainian revferent than those who olution was its devobe allowed to were in place prior. lution into violence, prevail, as this but the results were Look no further than Egypt’s Abdel Fattah will represent a impressive. Al-Sisi, once the genUkrainians were able eral of Egypt’s armed significant step to bring many fresh, forces who helped overfaces to the parfor the voices of new throw Morsi, soon to liament, a feat that be the newly appointed the millennial seems almost impossipresident of Egypt. ble for American youth generation. The Egyptian people today. overthrew the autocAmerican youth will racy of Mubarak out of a desire to never be able to storm the Capitol have democratic elections, but they Building and occupy it until the premay soon be forced to experience vious governance capitulates. The more autocratic rule. American youth must simply wait Ukraine is different, the revolu- and watch their politicians saunter tion did not occur without Ukra- about with near impunity, until one nian blood spilled, but those day we can unite as one and overwho were brought to power were turn the tradition of incumbency. done through legitimate political Ukraine will continue to be an exprocesses. ample to the power of the millennial Arseniy Yatsenyuk, Ukraine’s generation, and Americans should pay Prime Minister, was appointed attention to the most important part through a parliamentary vote, a of this crisis: the Ukrainian people.

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Letter to the Editor The Daily Titan welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must include the sender’s first and last name. Students must include their majors and other writers must include their affiliation to the university, if applicable. Once a letter is submitted, it becomes property of the Daily Titan. Publication of letters is based on the validity of content and may be edited for length, grammar and spelling. Letters may be sent to editorinchief@dailytitan.com

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FEATURES Professor studies genetics and immunity MARCH 13, 2014

PAGE 5

THURSDAY

THE DAILY TITAN

RESEARCH Continued from PAGE 1

With her broad academic background and scientific research skills, Brennan provides valuable expertise and knowledge to the biology department and her students. Jose Guardado, a junior biochemistry major, said he enjoyed being in Brennan’s class and the enthusiasm she incorporated into her teaching. “Science-wise, I learned about photosynthesis and how a plant makes its energy compared to an animal cell … she was very straightforward,” Guardado said. “She was also open to any questions; she did not intimidate anybody. She was very enthusiastic about her teaching and very helpful. You can tell she loves her job.” Brennan’s initial academic focus was not on biology. Her interest in biology was sparked while completing her undergraduate degree in philosophy and working on a farm. “I was always very interested in how animals interact with microbes,” Brennan said. “At age 23, I started to think I wanted to go into something life sciences related, but I was at that time thinking something more of ecology so I took some undergrad classes to prepare for that kind of graduate school … and then I got interested in pure biology.” Brennan earned her bachelor’s degree in philosophy at Williams College in Massachusetts. She earned her master’s degree at USC in marine biology, focusing on squid luminous bacterial symbiosis in her studies. She continued at USC and went on to obtain her doctorate in molecular biology there. Her academic focus includes cell biology, genetics and immunology.

Courtesy of Cal State Fullerton Catherine Brennan, Ph.D., a biology professor, spent the past four years researching why the immune systems of certain individuals infected with HIV help block the development of AIDS and how some do not require any drug treatment. She has also written several scholary research articles.

Brennan is studying Drosophila, a type of fruit fly often used for genetic research. She is also studying immunity research with a focus on phagocytosis, when white blood cells eat microbes such as bacteria or fungi. She is interested in identifying new genes and understanding how they work, not only in flies but also in humans. This interest eventually led to her research on HIV. After HIV was discovered, medical researchers created a test for people to see if they were infected with the virus, according

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to the UCLA AIDS Institute. They studied the immune system’s response in the early months of infection and found that many people were able to fend off the progression of AIDS. “Soon after they identified the virus, they developed a test for people that had HIV, so even if people did not have symptoms they could recognize they were infected with HIV,” Brennan said. Researchers recognized that genetics play a pivotal role in immunity to HIV progression. Brennan said there are

some genes that are extremely variable. It turned out that people who were resisting the disease progression were still infected, but could contain the infection, she said. Those people tend to have one or two of these variants. “It seemed about 1 percent or half a percent of people that are infected with HIV do not need any drug treatment, they will just stay healthy,” Brennan said. “But as time went by, there were some people that just were not getting sick … 20, 25 years later and they

are still staying healthy without any medication, and so the work that I was doing was focused on those individuals.” Although Brennan spends many hours performing research, she enjoys spending time with her family during her off days. “I spend a lot of time with my family on the weekends. We like hiking, going to the beach and traveling,” she said. As a biology professor, she intends to offer advanced courses on cell biology and immunology in the future.

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FEATURES

PAGE 6

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Exploring in South Korea Learning about the drinking culture Student begins adventure by going out on the town

THURSDAY

Showing the softer side of sword fighting way for some of its members to get in shape. Peter Werley, a non-student member, said he always As further proof that found gyms boring and the foam fighting com- could never find the motimunity is not a stereo- vation to go. typical group of fragile However, through BelLARPers, Krochman said egarth, he was able to roughly half of the Bele- find enough motivation garth community are ei- to start exercising. Since ther active duty or retired Werley discovered foam military personnel. fighting over two years CSUF’s Fullerton Foam ago, he has lost over 200 Fighters Club also in- pounds. cludes a retired Army “I used to play a lot of Ranger. video games, this is kind The members of the of the next level,” Werley Fullerton Foam Fight- said. “This is better.” ers Club protect themWhile most members selves with join the club unique cloth- “The community for an adrening. Armor aline rush, at large is or “garb” can many found extremely be as siman added ple as an old accepting ... I was bonus of a pair of hockfriendly and in a fraternity a c c e p t i n g ey gloves and some knee for three years community. pads or as Alina Rubextreme as and I never felt as al Kaba, an a full set of -yea r-old welcomed as I do 18 hand-made film major, leather arsaid so far all here.” mor, includof the friends ing a chest ALEX KROCHMAN she has made plate, brac- President of Foam Fighters Club since attenders and heling CSUF met costing over $1,000 have been through the total. club. She is one of two In addition to armor, female members in the fighters create their own Fullerton Foam Fighters weapons. Short swords, Club. long swords and spears “The community at are among the most com- large is extremely acceptmon weapons created. ing and just cool to parThese are constructed ty with and cool to be from various materials around,” Krochman said. that can be purchased “I was in a fraternity for at any local hardware three years and I never store. felt as welcomed as I do The club has also been a here.” CLUB Continued from PAGE 1

ALEX FAIRBANKS For the Daily Titan

My plan was to cut back on drinking before I left to study in South Korea, but upon arriving here that plan was quickly drowned in beer and soju, a well-known Korean beverage. Although I am studying video production in South Korea, I am also on a pursuit to find myself and understand another culture. Since I had an entire week off before school started and since the first week of class is always relaxing for me, the self-persuasion to party in South Korea was undeniable. It all began elegantly at a famous restaurant in the city of Anseong. I sat down to eat with one of our professors, fellow students and other Dong-Ah Institute of Media and Arts (DIMA) faculty. We had a few bottles of champagne, provided by one of the top officials of DIMA, and ate traditional Korean food with extremely tender beef. The next time I drank was at the bar Mazzi Mazzi. Champagne was nowhere to be found, but beer and soju were there to take its place. A notable feature of the bar was its logo. It featured a cartoon cat that appeared to be drunk and sleepy, with one swollen black eye, carrying around a pint of beer as a backpack. I knew from the picture I was in the right place.

MARCH 13, 2014

Courtesy of Alex Fairbanks Cal State Fullerton students studying abroad in South Korea spend time getting to know each other and eat at different restaurants, such as this famous eatery in the city of Anseong.

I was in good company that night at the bar with my new Cal State Fullerton friends, a former DIMA exchange student and my charming British professor, who had a beer with us. That great night ended, but a couple of days later I was exploring Seoul with the CSUF students and some Korean friends. We headed to a restaurant in Gangnam and as the Korean food came, the soju soon followed. We all got to know each other and began a cultural exchange of drinking games. One of the Korean games they taught us was called “Game of Death.” To play, a number is chosen, we chant a certain Korean song and point at one another. The loser then consumes a shot of soju or any alcohol at hand. Each night of drinking blurred into the next, but all

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of them were distinctly differentiated by the crazy moments I experienced. To sum it up, the climax of my drinking experience so far was when I danced around in a circle, holding a flower pot on my head, all while DIMA Korean students chanted my name. I learned that the Korean drinking culture is really good. Someone can go out to a restaurant or bar, spend about $10 and get a decent buzz along with some delicious food. The atmosphere of drinking in South Korea is extremely relaxed. There is no hostility while drinking, as there can be sometimes in America. Drinking is so accepted in South Korea that students may find themselves drinking with professors

and school faculty. However, people are not getting drunk to the point of not being able to control themselves. The DIMA Korean students do party hard, but they also know when it is time to study and focus on school. The drinking and partying is not the main point, but rather in South Korea it becomes a catalyst for social connection. Students can get to know one another and create friendships that will last a lifetime. I will hopefully be making friends that will last a lifetime, but the most important thing I have learned is in order to make friends, I have to put myself out there and get involved. With all that I have witnessed so far here, if you plan on coming to Korea, prepare to meet friendly people and drink a lot of soju.

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MARCH 13, 2014 MARACH

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THURSDAY PAGE 7

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ARIES

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Accept a creative challenge. Collaboration adds fun and value to the project. Iron out disagreements by finding the common vision. Love finds a way. Allow change to occur naturally. Amuse yourself, and others want to play along.

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You’re especially attractive and charismatic. Ask for what you want. It could get playfully romantic. Cherish a loved one. Consider an unusual suggestion. Accept encouragement. Gather strength and inspiration from someone else’s talent and brilliant ideas.

SAGITTARIUS

(NOV. 22 - DEC. 21):

Clean up and fix something at home that’s broken. Listen carefully to family, and discover a new resource. Nestle into the coziness and get lost in fascinating studies... or travel straight to the source.

CAPRICORN

(DEC. 22 - JAN. 19):

Look at a situation from another perspective. Make a fabulous discovery. Abrupt decisions may need revision. Learn from expert group members. Capture brilliant ideas and find ways to apply them to build shared resources.

AQUARIUS

(JA. 20 - FEB. 18):

Work in partnership and the profit increases all around. Follow intuition about which direction to take a project. Your heart knows the way. Passion and discipline grow your money tree. Tend it with enthusiasm.

PISCES

(FEB. 19 - MARCH 20):

Invent a brilliant solution to a persistent problem. You’re especially creative now. It’s a good time to launch or push forward. Balance work with play, and get plenty of exercise and rest. Serve yourself.

VISIT US AT: DAILYTITAN.COM/CLASSIFIEDS


SPORTS

PAGE 8

THE DAILY TITAN

MARCH 13, 2014 THURSDAY

CSUF bows out of Titans to host Gaels Big West tourney Baseball welcomes Saint Mary’s to Goodwin Field after being on the road for the last seven games

BASKETBALL Continued from PAGE 1

The Titans struggled to score early in the second half. They only made one of their first four shot attempts and labored to get good shots. “Our zones were significantly better than they were last week,” Wynn said. “We were just urgent on everything that we did. We tried to keep Kat (Kathleen Iwuoha) off the offensive boards and I think we did a very good job of that.” In her previous matchup against the 49ers, Iwuoha had 12 rebounds, four of which were offensive. Her 12 rebounds was more than the entire 49ers front line. In this game, junior forward Ella Clark held Iwuoha to only five rebounds.

“This isn’t the standard that we have set for the program, but I am incredibly proud of all they accomplished this year.” DARON PARK Head Coach

The 49ers and the Titans were neck and neck in the second half. Iwuoha made a jump shot to give the Titans a 56-55 lead with 3:55

remaining in the game. The turning point came when junior guard Tailer Butler fouled Spargo on a three-point shot attempt with 1:39 remaining in the game. Spargo made all three free throws, giving the 49ers a two-point lead. The Titans failed to score for the remainder of the game. The game was ultimately sealed when Butler fouled Clark with eight seconds remaining and Clark made both free throws to give the 49ers a four-point lead. “We had some mistakes towards the end, but I still think we battled and we worked,” senior guard Alex Thomas said. “Unfortunately, we didn’t get the win that we wanted.” The game marked the last time Thomas would wear a Titan jersey. Barfield and senior forward Mya Olivier also saw their CSUF careers end at the Pyramid. “This isn’t where we want to be. This isn’t the standard that we have set for this program, but I am incredibly proud of all they accomplished this year,” Park said. “While this hurts tonight, we’re very excited about the future of Cal State Fullerton women’s basketball.” The Titans have nine players returning next season and hope to build on the groundwork laid this season by Park and the coaching staff. For more information on women’s basketball and all Titan Athletics, go to FullertonTitans.com.

The Mihaylo MBA

JOHNNY NAVARRETTE Daily Titan

The Cal State Fullerton baseball team will look to turn around its recent struggles as it returns home to host Saint Mary’s this weekend at Goodwin Field. After starting the season 8-3, the Titans, ranked No. 9 in the nation by Baseball America, ran into some difficulties at the tail end of their seven-game road trip. The Titans dropped the final three games, all by two runs or less, including a 5-3 walkoff loss to San Diego in 10 innings on Tuesday to fall to 8-6 on the season. A major source of the Titans’ struggles has been their inability to hit with runners in scoring position. Despite tallying 18 hits in its last three games, CSUF left 26 runners on base and scored just seven runs. In 14 games this season, the Titans are batting .262 as a team with a .366 on base percentage. For comparison, last season CSUF batted .285 as a team, finishing with a 51-10 record. One player doing his part to start the season is sophomore Tanner Pinkston, who is leading the team with a .385 batting average and 20 hits. In 52 at-bats, Pinkston has struck out just six times. As a team, the Titans have struck out a total of 103 times. Senior Greg Velazquez is batting .250 on the season with a team-leading 12 runs batted in while junior Matt Chapman is batting .283 with 11 runs batted in. J.D. Davis leads the team with three home runs and is batting .291 to start the season. To break its three-game losing streak, CSUF will turn to sophomore Thomas Eshelman to shut down a Gaels offense batting .267. In 31 innings, Eshelman has 22 strikeouts while allowing just one walk. He will take the mound with a 3-0 record and team-leading 1.45 earned run average. In his last start versus Baylor on March 7, Eshelman threw a complete game shutout, allowing three hits and striking out two in the Titans 11-0 victory. Mark Okumori ’12 MBA Senior Analyst Media/Entertainment Industry

WINNIE HUANG / Daily Titan Freshman Taylor Bryant and the Titans look to improve on driving in runners in scoring position.

St. Mary’s (7-8) enters the weekend series with some momentum, having won a three-game series versus Penn State. The Gaels compiled 32 hits in the series. Sophomore Anthony Gonsolin, who is batting .370 in 54 at-bats, leads the Gaels offense. While Gonsolin has hit no home runs this season, he has three doubles and five triples, giving him a .611 slugging percentage. This season, the Gaels have yet to hit a home run in 15 games. On the mound, St. Mary’s will look for starters Ryan Brockett and Cameron Neff to silence the Titan bats. Brockett is 2-2 this season with a 3.00 earned run average. In 24 innings, the senior has struck out 15 but has struggled with accuracy, issuing 14 walks. Neff, a 6-foot-3 freshman, will enter the game with a 4.05 earned run average. Sporting a 2-2 record, Neff leads the team in strikeouts with 20 and has only walked four batters. In his last start, Neff threw a complete-game shutout, striking out 10 while walking just one as the Gaels went on to defeat Penn State 4-0. With their opponent’s lack of power and struggling pitching staff, the Titans have a good chance to recover as they near the start of Big West Conference play next Friday. For more information on the CSUF baseball team and all Titan Athletics, go to FullertonTitans.com.

DTBRIEFS Tennis drops third straight to San Diego The Cal State Fullerton women’s tennis team was defeated 6-1 by the University of San Diego Toreros Wednesday at the Skip and Hogan Tennis Center. Their record fell to 3-10 as the Toreros improved to 4-7. This marks the third consecutive loss for the Titans. They scored their only point when freshman Alexis Valenzuela (10-3) beat sophomore Shani Blecher 6-4, 4-6, 105. Valenzuela defeated Blecher in the No. 1 spot, which served as the last singles match of the day. Valenzuela has now won nine consecutive matches after starting the season winning only one of her first four matches. The Toreros came out storming as senior Morgan McIntosh was overpowered by sophomore Marta Stojanovic 6-0, 6-1. Stojanovic had a career-high seven service aces in the singles match. This set the tone for the following matches, which were all straight set victories. The Toreros swept the Titans in doubles matches, winning 8-6, 8-4, 8-5. - IAN O’BRIEN

THE DAILY TITAN PRESENTS:

LEARNING THEORY HAS ITS PURPOSE.

APPLYING IT HAS AN ADVANTAGE. Learn about the dynamic, hands-on education in Mihaylo College’s Graduate Business programs, ranked by U.S. News & World Report.

MBA PROGRAMS:

• Full-time MBA (Day program) • Flexible Program (Full- or part-time, evening) • FEMBA (Fully Employed MBA)

MASTERS PROGRAMS: • • • • •

M.A. Economics M.S. Accountancy M.S. Information Systems M.S. Information Technology (Online) M.S. Taxation

Food City Pick up our food guide on Thursday, March 20th!

Visit business.fullerton.edu/graduateprograms to apply or to register for an Information Session.

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VISIT US AT: DAILYTITAN.COM/SPORTS


Thursday, Mar. 13, 2014