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Since 1960 Volume 83, Issue 50

Dressing Men

Not Funny

Article explores how men’s fashion has changed over the years THE HUB, p. 7

Student explains why some pranks should simply not be tolerated OPINION, p. 8

Daily Titan

Tuesday December 5, 2006

The Student Voice of California State University, Fullerton Lost in Translation Part One of Three

The EWP, Race and the Language Gap CSUF provides services to help disabled and non-native students By Rachel Douglass

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

It’s been nearly 27 years since the Examination in Writing Proficiency became a standard requirement for

graduation from the California State University system. The decision to develop a way to gauge students’ understanding of written English came from the California State University Board of Trustees and was individually determined at each CSU. In response to this decision, Cal State Fullerton English Professor John White designed and developed what is known today as the EWP. The EWP does not focus on race,

but on the ability to respond in writing to a general question, White said. However, exam scorers and the coordinator of testing services said that the exam has proved more difficult for non-native speakers. Certain ethnicities aren’t doing well, said English professor and EWP scorer Mari-Lynn Reid. Although many of the students taking the test are “brilliant” biology majors, computer science majors or business majors, they have a difficult

time in writing, Reid said. Coordinator of Testing Services Lorrie Harnach said that the EWP is one part of a double requirement in English comprehension. The English requirement includes not only the exam but also an upper-division writing course fitted to each major. No students, including non-native speakers, are exempt from the exam. “The test evolved because students

Titans Rebound from Loss

were graduating and found that they didn’t have basic writing skills,” Harnach said. “If you’re a native speaker … it’s easy.” Reid said that the purpose of the test is to show that students have the basic ability to write. The test questions are basic and deal with academic life. “I feel that the standards are not rigorous but are more difficult for foreign students,” she said. At CSUF there is writing standard

for almost every class from weight training to quantum mechanics. Students can’t escape it – writing is an essential part of daily life. “I wonder with the basic writing components how they pass their other classes,” she said. In terms of ethnicity the EWP is fairly anonymous, Reid said. The scorers do not know if the student is SEE EWP - PAGE 5

‘Bomb’ Drops on Campus Film Festival Every year animators work for three days to make a short film

CSUF Alumnus Knows the Real Disneyland Former Titan journalism student is an expert on everything Mickey By Laura Lujan

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

While many must choose between pursuing a career in what they love and a career that will pay the bills, few end up with the best of both worlds. Cal State Fullerton alumnus David Koenig is among those few – one path started with a natural talent for writing, and the other started with a mouse. As senior editor of an 85-year-old trade magazine, author of three behind-the-scenes Disneyland books and staff writer of an online Disneyland news publication, the 44-yearold balances work with play. Originally from Chicago, Koenig grew up in a nonwealthy family. The highlight of his childhood years, he said, had always been his family’s trips to Disneyland, which happened once every other year.

“My first trip to Disneyland was in the summer of 1969,” Koenig said. “All I remember was the feeling of ‘wow.’ My life just Koenig seemed so black and white before stepping through the gates.” Aware of his knack for writing, Koenig entered CSUF in the fall of 1980 to pursue a degree in journalism. Writing for the Daily Titan reaffirmed his desire to become a reporter for a print publication, and his friends, several of whom worked at Disneyland, ignited a new one. “They were always more interested in the backside of Disneyland and not so much the company-approved side that they show to everyone,” Koenig said. “It always struck me as interesting.” His last year at CSUF was particularly significant in fueling his interest in what goes on behind the scenes at

the park. All of his Disneyland employee friends went on strike. “I thought it was so interesting how they were working at the happiest place on earth,” Koenig said, “but they were out telling people to stay away, picketing on TV with signs and drawings of Mickey Mouse crying.” From this incident, the idea for Koenig’s first book was born. In 1987, while working as an associate editor at Cutler Publishing in Newport Beach, Koenig began conducting research and formal interviews with Disneyland employees for the book. He interviewed over 200 people in a span of seven years. While compiling the book, Koenig was threatened with legal action by Disney management, who claimed it was illegal to write about company secrets. “That was all bologna,” Koenig said. “As long as it’s true, accurate and fair, it’s OK.” In 1994, “Mouse Tales: A BehindThe-Ears Look at Disneyland” was published. “To my shock, it was a complete success,” Koenig said. “There had never been anything out there like

that before.” Koenig thought that this book would be the only Disney book he would write, but the success of “Mouse Tales” and demand for more books lead him to write a second book called “Mouse Under Glass: Secrets of Disney Animation and Theme Parks.” The book, which focused on Disney movies rather than parks, was successful, but nowhere near as well received as his first. “I realized that while people may have a fondness for Disney movies, they can’t live inside a movie,” Koenig said. “With Disneyland, you can smell it, taste it and touch it too.” His next book was a sequel to his first, but went into more detail about problems within the park which Disney management was at fault for. While the book was once again well received, Koenig came under fire for his criticisms. “The reaction by a few folks was very interesting, where they tried to claim the stories were embellished, made up,” said David Michael, a

Tomorrow The Student Body

ONLINE www.dailytitan.com

A Sexy Holiday

TITAN LIVE

Article looks at the most popular sex toys for the holiday season.

SEE KOENIG - PAGE 5

Check out the Daily Titan online for videos, podcasts, radio shows and more.

By Karl Thunman/Daily Titan

Watch the Ball - Titan Justin Burns watches for the rebound with Texas Keith Spencer and Isaiah Allen during Saturday nights victory for the Titans in Titan Gym. For more on Saturday’s game go to Sports on page 12.

time animators. Sarah Banning, a freshman and art major, had never created a cartoon before. “I do a lot of comics,” she said. The only kind of storytelling she had previously done was in storyboards, so animating was a new exBy Joe Simmons Daily Titan Copy Chief perience for her. On the evening of jsimmons@dailytitan.com day two, she had 34 frames of her animation completed, which she esEvery year since 2001, the Pencil timated to be about halfway done. Mileage Club has hosted a small film She finished on the third day. She festival appropriately called the Ful- wasn’t sure how long it took her, but lerton Film Festival. guessed that the hand-drawn nineIt’s become a tradition that the second clip took about 18 hours to club’s animation students – and any- complete. one else who wants to help – create a “It was really strange how time linked series of shorts. Each clip fea- passed ... If you just eternally think tures an ACME-style bomb, like the it’s 9 o’clock at night, time doesn’t ones used in Warner Bros. cartoons, pass,” she said. as the festival’s opener. Banning said the experience The resulting film and the three- helped her understand how a body day animation frenzy to create it are exists in space and how items get called “The Bomb.” from one point to another. Each clip in the film is the work “It gives you more insight to of an individual student. The nine- where things actually go. When to 15-second clips are animated by you’re doing comics, you can hand, digitally captured then strung easily get around things like that,” together using animation software. she said. “The main goal is for students to The participants seemed to be keep animating,” Megumi Tsuji, the evenly split between new and reevent coordinator, turning animators, said. Tsuji said. Tsuji is the club’s “I’m so glad that historian. She and It gives you more new animators are other club officers insight to where willing to do this host and organize thing,” she said. the event, includ- things actually go. Banning’s piece, ing piecing each When you’re doing in which the bomb of the submissions comics, you can easily drops into the outtogether so that stretched hand of a the bomb moves get around things like decaying Edgar Alin a coherent fash- that. lan Poe, was one of ion from clip to – Sarah Banning the few pieces that clip. Art Major were finished in the When animators three days. submit their piece, “So far I’ve got they must show four or five,” Tsuji which side the bomb is entering and said. In a typical year, the club colwhich side it will exit from. Later, lects 10 or 11 animations. club officers will fill in gaps where Charles Ngo, an animation stuthe bomb doesn’t smoothly move dent, was one of the returning from one piece to the next with participants. In his piece, a chef ’s short clips, Tsuji said. knife causes mayhem when the The Bomb took place last month bomb hits the cook in the back of in a room in the visual arts building. the head. The room was kept open constantly “I don’t know one bomb where it’s throughout the three-day event. not cruel,” he said. Though the event has a “demoOn the second night of the event, cratic, open-door policy” regarding he was trying to decide whether his participants who are not entertain- chef was going to be a fat chef – a ment arts majors, Dana Lamb, the typical slapstick convention – or a club’s adviser and an art professor, skinnier one. He was leaning toward said he thinks that all the attendees the skinny chef, because he wanted were from the art department. Many of the attendees were firstSEE ANIMATION - PAGE 5

weather

TODAY

TOMorrow Sunny High: 75 Low: 44

Sunny High: 74 Low: 47


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December 5, 2006

In Brief

CAMPUS CALENDAR Today

A stress-busting clinic will take place at noon in College Park 770. The clinic will teach five techniques for people to relieve their stress. Methods include the tennis ball technique, partner massage, guided meditation and breath relaxing techniques, all designed to help relieve the holiday stress many encounter this time of year.

Wednesday

A clinic designed for baby boomers will be held at noon in College Park 700 for CSUF faculty and staff only. Pauline Abbott, CSUF’s representative for the White House Council On Aging, will provide attendees with helpful household hints for survival.

Thursday

Titan Women’s Basketball will host the Colorado Buffaloes at 7 p.m. in the Titan Gymnasium. General admission is $7, while CSUF students get in free with a campus ID.

Friday

The official last day of the 2006 Fall Semester – good luck on finals!

Saturday

Titan Women’s Basketball will host Northern Colorado Bears at 2 p.m. in the Titan Gymnasium. General admission is $7, while CSUF students get in free with a campus I.D. The co-creators of Nickelodeon’s animated series “Avatar” will discuss the show in the Visual Arts building, room 189 at 7 p.m. Guests receive free admission if they bring a dish to the potluck reception. SUBMISSIONS: To have your event in the Daily Titan’s Calendar, please submit event information to news@dailytitan. com one week prior to the date of the event.

For the Record It is the policy of the Daily Titan to correct any inaccurate information printed in the publication as soon as the error is discovered. Any incorrect information printed on the front page will result in a correction printed on the front page. Any incorrect information printed on any other page will be corrected on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections also will be noted on the online version of the Daily Titan. Please contact Managing Editor Cindy Tullues at (714) 278-5693 or at ctullues@dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Monday through Thursday. The Daily Titan operates independently of Associated Students, College of Communications, CSUF administration and the CSUF System. The Daily Titan has functioned as a public forum since inception. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The Daily Titan allocates one issue to each student for free. Copyright ©2006 Daily Titan

MYSPACE PROFILE

www.myspace.com/66236504

Student Captures the Moment on MySpace BY noraly Hernandez

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Dressed in a yellow T-shirt and jeans, she sits on a couch looking away as Shakira plays in the background and pictures of friends and family lie around her. This is how “Liberian Girl” portrays herself to her MySpace friends and to the world. “At first I was a little reluctant to get a page,” Laura Villalpando, a communications major, said. “But everyone was getting one and my friends said ‘get one so we can keep in contact with you.’ ” Although she was hesitant to post a page on the Web, Villalpando gave in and created a space of her own.

“When I started posting my pictures up I got really into it and then I got addicted to it and I just wanted to put everything about me up there,” the 23-year-old said. “I just like the way you can be creative and just show a little part of yourself to your friends.” Villalpando said her page reflects a part of who she is and what she likes. “I used to have pictures of Vegas and pictures of me going crazy with my friends but I cut out that slide,” Villalpando said referring to her ever evolving page. “I kind of made it into a more serious page because that is how I am feeling right now.” Currently one thing that stands out in Villapando’s page is a slide show. The pictures were taken by her friend, who had been wanting

to do a photo shoot with her she said. “I guess it reflects my sense of style and fashion,” she said referring to the slide show. “It is also a serious side of me – I am a serious person.” Other photos that make up Villalpando’s page are a collage of artists including Michael Jackson, Gwen Stefani and Mariah Carey. “I have always been a fan of Michael Jackson. I admire him for his music and his dance – he is a true artist to me,” she said. However, Villalpando’s favorite picture is one of her family. “My family is a huge part of my life. Everything I do, everywhere I go reflects on them,” Villalpando said. “We are always together.”

COURTESY OF LAURA VILLALPANDO CSUF student Laura Villalpando is known to her friends on MySpace as “Liberian Girl.”

Over-the-Counter Drug Abuse Increases BY marcus wohlsen Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The number of California teenagers using over-the-counter cough medicines to get high has soared in recent years, mirroring a national trend, an American Medical Association journal reported Monday. Cases of abuse reported to California’s poison control system among adolescents increased 15fold from 1999 to 2004, according to a study published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. “I think a lot of people may have a false perception that it’s safe because it’s available over the counter,” said Dr. Ilene B. Anderson, senior author of the University of California, San Francisco, study and a toxicologist with the California Poison Control System. A survey of data compiled by the American Association of Poison Control Centers cited in the

study showed a parallel increase in the number of cases being reported nationwide. Dextromethorphan, or DXM, the active ingredient in some of the most popular nonprescription cough suppressants, can produce euphoric highs and intense hallucinations when taken in significantly higher doses than what’s recommended. Serious side effects can also include increased heart rate and blood pressure, loss of muscle control, seizures and psychosis. Researchers blamed the jump on easy access to information on the Internet about DXM – also known as Dex, Robo, Skittles, CCC and Triple C – especially Web sites promoting its use. The drug is also cheap, with one package of cough medicine costing a few dollars providing enough DXM to produce a hallucinatory high similar to the effects of PCP. And because cough medicines are legal and safe to use for their intended medical purpose, they

are less likely to arouse suspicion among parents, the study said. Of the 1,382 cases of DXM abuse included in the study, nearly 75 percent involved adolescents, defined as ages 9 to 17. The highest number of cases involved 15- and 16-year-olds. The effects of additional ingredients such as decongestants and antihistamines can increase the dangers of deliberate overdosing. The painkiller acetaminophen, for example, can lead to delayed liver failure in high doses, the study said. No fatalities were reported among California dextromethorphan abuse cases. Seven users experienced severe breathing difficulties, possibly as a result of mixing DXM with other drugs, including alcohol. Efforts to keep DXM out of the hands of minors have proved difficult, with products containing the ingredient still legal and easy to buy in pharmacies and convenience stores across the country.

A California state Senate bill that would have banned the sale of products containing DXM to anyone under 18 stalled in the Legislature earlier this year. Lack of awareness among adults of the scale of the problem, coupled with “vigorous opposition” from pharmaceutical companies and retailers, stymied the legislation, said state Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, who introduced the bill. Several retailers have put voluntary restrictions into place, including Walgreen Co., which has a policy prohibiting the sale of DXM-containing drugs to minors, and CVS Corp., which limits Coricidin sales. The study recommends pharmacies put medications containing DXM behind their counters to limit teenagers’ access to the drug. Similar federal restrictions on nonprescription cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient for making methamphetamine, went into effect earlier this year, pleasing law enforcement officials.


December 5, 2006

3

NEWS

Faculty Member a ‘Well’ of Wisdom, Patience BY KAREN AMAN

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Joann Carter-Wells, chair of the Reading Department at Cal State Fullerton, taught in Watts for nine years as a reading specialist before coming to the university to work on her master’s degree in education. At the request of the then-department chair, Carter-Wells took leave from her job in Watts to develop reading and studying programs for undergraduate students. The hardest part of teaching at 93rd Street Elementary School was living with the reality of the hardships some of her students encountered – and knowing there was no way to change it, she said. “By the time I left there, at least 12 or 13 kids that I actually worked with had been killed two or three years after they left,” Carter-Wells said. “I tried to change things, but it was too difficult.” One student was so incorrigible that the agreement among the teachers was that all he had to do each morning was check in with his homeroom, Carter-Wells said. “He could wander the entire school all day as long as he didn’t cause trouble,” she said. Wells discovered that the boy liked art and set up a space for him in the corner of her classroom with art supplies. “I said to him, ‘this is your area and these are your tools,’ ” CarterWells said. ‘You can come in any time you want as long as you don’t disturb me or the other children. This is your corner.’ ”

He honored the rules, she said. “He would wander in and out during his final year,” she said. “Then I figured he left. And then I figured he’s in a gang, he’s dead.” “Once I got into this environment it was so fascinating to me compared to working in an elementary school,” she said. “It was wonderful to feel that if you had ideas people would value your thinking and people would also value your interests and support them. That’s what fuels me – new adventures and new opportunities.” Carter-Wells got excited about technology while working on projects for the National Science Foundation with her adviser at Claremont Graduate University. Since then, she has been looking for ways to apply new technology as it came along. “The opportunity really arose here, from a curriculum standpoint, in 1995,” Carter-Wells said. A studio classroom was set up in the Pollak library in 1995 as an experiment in utilizing new technology, she said. Carter-Wells was one of two professors chosen from each college to participate in the experiment for an entire year. “The opportunities here have been wonderful,” she said. Carter-Wells previously served as Coordinator of the Undergraduate Reading Program and as Faculty Technology Coordinator for the College of Human Development and Community Service. She was the project director for various university events, including the Dalai Lama’s campus visit and community lecture and the 40th anniversary celebration of CSUF. “Right now I am co-director of the brand new community and literacy learning center at the Irvine Campus that just started this fall,” Carter-Wells said.

Courtesy of joann Carter-wells

outside the box - Reading Department Chair Joann Carter-

Wells taught at an elementary school in Watts before coming to to Cal State Fullerton to pursue her master’s degree.

It was wonderful to feel that if you had ideas people would value your thinking ... That’s what fuels me – new adventures and new opportunities.

Reading department chair uses creativity to help foster education

– Joann Carter-Wells CSUF Reading Department Chair

Carter-Wells is also the developer and program coordinator for the master’s in Instructional Design and Technology at CSUF, the first online master’s degree available at the school. “What is so wonderful is the nature of the students in the program,”

she said. “I’m just relishing how focused they are.” The degree is a huge commitment, said Barbara Glaeser, chair of Department of Special Education. “The reading department and all the committees she is on – that’s a huge commitment,” she said. “The

reading clinic – all those things are big, and she still finds time to do it,” Glaeser said. The degree is for people who are already in the field of human resources or training that need to develop curriculum, Carter-Wells said. Even with her active life, Carter-Wells fits in a little downtime. She plays golf, does yoga and Pilates two to three times a week and manages to sleep seven hours a night. Perhaps some of Carter-Wells’s leadership abilities are derived from her large family background, as she was the eldest of seven girls and two boys. “There were nine of us, but it was never chaotic,” Carter-Wells said. “It was always organized and everyone had a role.” Her father had a sense of independence, Carter-Wells said. He was a builder and a self-made man, she said. “He nurtured in us to be our own person,” she said. “There was no expectation for everybody to be the same.” Being independent was a challenge for Carter-Wells at the time because, in her generation, a woman was supposed to stay home, take care of her husband and children, and not get a degree, she said. Contributing to the overall wellbeing of the Carter family was a nanny who had been a chef in the army. “He was with the family for 35 years,” Carter-Wells said. “And what was wonderful about that is that he taught us how to cook.” Carter-Wells’ motto is to be grateful and appreciative, even for the little things. Traveling and working in different places reinforces that attitude, Carter-Wells said. Working in Morgantown, West Virginia is one example.

“I went there and I thought I was living in 1970,” she said. “I was so unhappy, but I realized how lucky I was to be here.” One of the big problems in Morgantown is the beating of women who are trying to go to school, said Carter-Wells. “You think, ‘Where am I living?’ ” she said. Getting women to come to school, and then getting abused women to come, is a big challenge, Carter-Wells said. “So there’s a mindset still about education, about women in education, and the fact that people need to be educated,” she said. Carter-Wells is grateful for being part of the faculty team here, she said. “I am part of a college that values people working together and collaborating as a team when ever possible,” she said. Carter-Wells has had many special moments at Cal State Fullerton, she said. But one of her proudest moments occurred at the 93rd Street Elementary School. She was in the teacher’s lounge when a young man dressed in a suit came through the door, she said. It had been seven years since she saw him. “I’m here to thank you for what you did for me at 93rd Street School,” he said. “I am now going to UCLA.” “I said to him, ‘You know, I’m really grateful you came back. But this tells me something about you as a person – that you really are a wonderful person.’ ” Wells said she didn’t know what she did for him to come back all these years. “I didn’t help him educationally,” she said. “I didn’t help him get his high school diploma. But I think if I reflect on that, it’s just that there was a person there that supported him and said ‘I care about you as a person.’ ”


NEWS

4

December 5, 2006

Program Practices Diversity Sunny Days for Keeping at-risk students in school by improving skills and confidence By Laura Lujan

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Students heading to class or Carl’s Jr. pass it several times a day, but the office of the Student Diversity Program goes largely unnoticed by many – much like the program itself. The program’s effects on the college experiences of academically atrisk students stretch across the campus and beyond. “Our No. 1 concern is the welfare of the students,” program director John Reid said. “We can help these students stay in school and graduate, so when they leave here, they have skills to back themselves up in life.” The program, unique to CSUF, focuses on keeping at-risk students in school by improving study skills, reading and writing ability, social skills, time management and selfdiscipline through tutoring and mentoring. Reid defines at-risk students as those who experience academic probation, socio-economic disadvantages or educational difficulty. “The biggest problem we see here in students is fear of change,” said Lily Law, a graduate student and tutor for the program. “They see that the lifestyle and time they spend studying isn’t working, and some-

times they just give up.” Law said that though some students who are unwilling to change their habits stop seeking help, she has seen many of the same students come in since she started working for the program in 2004. “Every semester, they slowly change and improve,” Law said. “I think that’s awesome.” Currently, the program provides aid to approximately 350 college students. Divisions of the program reaching out to high school and grade school students. The program was born out of Reid’s master’s thesis in 1994 when he came back to school as a re-entry student. He was inspired to put the program together after reading what he considered a shocking article in USA Today. The article, published in 1993, ranked CSUF as one of the top 25 worst schools in the nation for graduation rates among black male student-athletes. “Athletes were brought in specifically to play basketball, not focused on academics,” Reid said. “They ended up on academic probation, and then they would get disqualified and were gone in a year.” Reid became determined to remedy the situation when he met an athlete from his hometown of Norfolk, Virginia, who came to CSUF and was the top point guard in the Big West Conference. The athlete could not read or write. Reid was horrified and saddened when he realized that students like this athlete were going through

school and failing because they had no one to turn to for help or were too embarrassed to seek it. “They needed something that most people assumed they had, which was pride,” said Reid. “You would think that they had confidence when you saw them on the court, but when they came in with me, they cried.” Named the Black Ombudsman Program, Reid’s thesis project was so successful at bringing the black male student-athletes up to the academic levels of the rest of the student body that it attracted the attention of CSUF President Milton Gordon. President Gordon suggested that Reid open the program up to all student athletes the next year. Getting the same results of high retention and graduation rates, the program was renamed the Student Diversity Program in 2000. Today, the program is multi-cultural and open to all students struggling to cope with the rigors of university life. Undeclared sophomore Demetrius Pyburn learned of the program before his freshman year started through a counselor in the Summer Bridge program, another student assistance program on campus. Pyburn initially sought help from the Student Diversity Program with the registration process and how to get financial aid. Presently, Pyburn is getting tutored for time management and to raise his GPA, which is at 2.8 and is rising. The Program “teaches goal setting, time management and everything

else you need,” Pyburn said. Well-known paradigmatic models are used in conjunction with Reid’s own models and techniques to change the way a student approaches assignments. The main model the program uses is Vincent Tinto’s Student Integration Model, which shows that a high level of both academic integration and social integration are needed for contentment and success in college. “We have several students who came in here on probation, and the following semester, they got on the Dean’s List,” Reid said. “They had gone from below a 2.0, to a 3.5 or higher in one semester.” Funding for the program comes from grants from the university president’s retention budget, with contributions from private benefactors and funds from Student Academic Services. Even with a yearly retention rate of at-risk students consistently around 90 percent, the program still manages to be overlooked by the CSUF community. “The program is very strong, but under-recognized,” Law said. Reid, who plans to retire soon, is confident that the program will live on in the hands of its coordinators and tutors after he is gone because the program has been proven to work wonders for students who didn’t think they had a chance at succeeding in college. “It gives them a real shot in life, and it gives them hope,” Reid said. “People with hope can do anything.”

Go to Go2 Systems for CSUF Specific Searches By Nancy Mora

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Searching three different online directories, paying over $1 for listing information and flipping through the Yellow Pages seems like a tedious process just to find a phone number. With the development of a new search engine, students can now get all of that information on one Web

site. Go2 Directory Systems is a new one-stop information service on the Internet. It caters specifically to the Cal State Fullerton community, according to the company’s Web site. This will allow students and faculty to search for information and businesses around the campus. Students, staff and the community can visit go2CSUF.com and look for local information such as weather reports, movie guides and

business listings. According to the Web site, go2 locates information within a radius of 99 miles of the school. Go2’s top searches to date are for student loans, cheap car insurance quotes, tutoring, discount travel, student credit cards, movie rentals and insurance plans. Other popular searches on the CSUF-dedicated Web site are restaurants, employment, automotive needs, nightlife, electronics and

banking. Students can also reach campus links such as sporting events, housing and the academic calendar from the go2CSUF Web site. The Web site lists businesses and attractions around CSUF, which international students or nonresident students who have moved on campus or around the neighborhood can SEE GO2 - PAGE 5

Fullerton Alumna By Craig Grossman

For The Daily Titan news@dailytitan.com

Through rain, sunshine and turbulent weather, Cal State Fullerton students can expect a familiar face to be delivering the latest forecasts if they travel to South Florida. Elita Loresca, a 2000 CSUF broadcast journalism graduate, is a reporter on the TV airwaves for Miami’s Fox WSVN. Since 2004, Loresca has been serving as a weekday weatherperson on the morning and noon broadcasts of “Today in Florida.” She recently gained national exposure after being named “America’s sexiest newscaster” in the October 2006 issue of FHM, a popular men’s magazine. While visiting her family in Southern California this past April, the Chino native was informed of the FHM nomination and poll by her sister. She was pitted against 15 other broadcasters in the country. Although she harbored initial reservations, Loresca was willing to pose for the magazine’s five-page layout if done tastefully. In addition to her TV station approving the FHM appearance, Loresca had the unequivocal support of her parents. “My promotions director asked if it’s something I would like to do and I said absolutely since it’s a national magazine,” Loresca said in a telephone interview. “For me, I have to do what I feel is right in my heart and comfortable with. So I ultimately talked to my parents and told them about the magazine and they were comfortable with me doing it. I’m here on this Earth for a short time, you know what, and I’m going to do it.” In her time at CSUF, which started in 1995, Loresca was a member of Alpha Ki Omega sorority organization. With her broadcast journalism

Loresca emphasis, Loresca was enrolled with a number of professors in the communications department. She credits Professor Jeff Rowe, who inspired her and gave Loresca her first journalism-related jobs at The Orange County Register and Orange County News Channel in 1999, where she served as an intern for one year before graduating. While there, one of her specialties was doing the weather. “Rowe was my favorite professor at Cal State Fullerton,” says the 29-year-old Loresca, who also minored in sociology. “He helped developed my passion for journalism, got my foot in the door at The Register and opened up a number of opportunities for me.” With her experiences in media, Loresca worked at the CBS affiliate KGPE in Fresno as a weather anchor and the Bakersfield NBC affiliate KGET as an assignment editor, until her agent sent an audition tape to WSVN, where she’s been since 2004. Oncamera experience and weather research prepared Loresca for discussing Hurricane Francis on her first day in Miami. “It was scary, but in the twoand-a-half to three years I’ve been in California, I knew how to adlib and to be thrown into situations where you were uncomfortable,” Loresca said. SEE LORESCA - PAGE 5


NEWS

December 5, 2006

EWP: 70 Percent pass rate (From Page One)

a native speaker or not. “My interaction with the students is on paper,” she said. However, some non-native speakers can speak English eloquently but cannot write it, Reid said. Scorers want to see the basic essay format: an introduction, the body and a conclusion. English comprehension is something that most students, if they are not foreign, should have learned in high school, White said. The pass rate of the exam is 70 percent. Not all of those who fail are non-native speakers, he said. Some students just have a difficult time with the language, but they can take the test as many times as needed, he said. Students who have failed get a 30-minute conference through the English department where the student can go through the test with a scorer. The conference allows for students to review their mistakes and to hopefully pass their next exam. To provide a fair testing environment for disabled students the Test-

ing Center works hand in hand with Disabled Student Services. Shannon Matthews of DSS said that each student can have their needs accommodated on a case-bycase basis. There are many accommodations DSS offers from voice recording to scribes and Braille. Some students receive extra time to complete the exam. DSS counselors determine all accommodations. “If the student wants to take the EWP with accommodations we send a letter to [Harnach],” Matthews said. Harnach then reviews the file and sends the exam to DSS, where it is administered to students. There are plenty of options provided on campus for other students that are finding difficultly in passing. Students can seek aid in the Writing Center where tutors like Cathie Allman and Jennifer Simonson will offer them one-on-one support. “We will help with everything from basic syntax to essays,” Allman said. “Anyone preparing for the

EWP can come in and get undivided attention.” Another option for students who have failed two or more times is English 199. English 199 is an intensive workshop that meets one night a week each semester. The class is the only way to get around the EWP, White said. Writing proficiency exams at CSUF began with the Business English Proficiency Exam but was replaced by the EWP in the early 1980s. White said that the point of the double requirement was to help give students the capability to write within their profession. The EWP consists of an essay question to which students have a 90-minute period to form a response. As the Testing Services Web site explains, the EWP is recommended to students who have completed 60 or more units and are in their junior year. Students can register for the next exam by mail or in person at Student Financial Services UH-180.

LORESCA: GO2: Csuf Directory Titan Covers Hurricane (From Page 4)

(From Page 4)

Outside of her busy work schedule, Loresca enjoys kickboxing, walks on the beach, working on completing her certificate of meteorology from Mississippi State University and doing charity work for numerous Miami-based organizations, including the American Cancer Society. She has fond memories of Southern California, and said she would love to live and work here again someday. Loresca shared a piece of advice to students looking to succeed in broadcast news. “Challenge yourself every day by doing something on a daily basis,” Loresca says. “Do something that you’re scared of because that ultimately prepares you for something in the long run.”

familiarize themselves with. In February, go2 announced that visits to its Web site increased by more than 50 percent in 2005. “With more than 210 million mobile, local search page views in 2005, go2 continues to be one of the most popular mobile Web sites in the U.S.,” said Lee Hancock, CEO and founder of go2 Directory Systems. Psychology major Lucy Garcia liked the idea of the go2 CSUF directory service. “It would just be easier to go to one place for all the information we need,” she said. The service is available online with a site dedicated to each campus. Go2 currently has a dedicated Web site to 12 campuses, including UCLA and USC. They are hoping to operate 60 more campus-specific online and mobile services by this month. Students can also access information on their mobile phones by sub-

mitting their cell phone number and carrier on the Web site. Regular text messaging and online access charges will apply. “Go2 has a national service that helps anyone traveling to any city to find what they are looking for, whether it be a restaurant, movie theater, show times [or] dry cleaner, based on the zip code the user enters,” said go2 representative Robert A. Bigleman in an e-mail interview. Students are not able to communicate via go2 or write reviews at this time, said Bigleman, but they can find information on tutors and landmarks on campus and around. Senior Zuly Martinez, a human services major, had never heard of the Web site and was impressed upon seeing what the Web site offered. “It’s convenient how it has everything from night life, to business to travel,” Martinez said. “It’s very accessible – It takes you everywhere.”

5

Koenig: Going ‘Behind the Ears’ (From Page One)

theme park photographer and Koenig’s fellow contributor at MousePlanet.com. They “want the spin to always go their way. [They] don’t like folks to talk about anything regarding Disney that could be taken in a negative light.” Koenig began writing online news columns about Disneyland in 2000, where he and other Disney news gatherers came together to create MousePlanet.com. “There are a lot of people out there who will only listen to the truth as long as it’s a happy truth,” Koenig said. Al Lutz, former MousePlanet staff writer and now head of his

own Disney information Web site, said of Koenig in an e-mail interview: “He really was one of the first to look beyond the press release and ask the hard questions about what it really takes to run ‘the happiest place on Earth.’ ” Though he makes time every month to visit the park and gather material for his online columns, Koenig’s professional priority is with Cutler Publishing, where he now oversees the editorial and production departments. The past year has been the Merchant Magazine’s best yet, Koenig said. A family man, Koenig enjoys taking his wife, Laura, and their

children Zachary, 8, and Rebecca, 5, to the park with their family’s annual passes. Koenig said that though he wants to pursue other subjects, he will most likely always come back to his roots and write for Disneyland. His forthcoming fourth book, “Realityland: True-Life Adventures at Walt Disney World,” is due out summer 2007. “The key to success is to find something you’re interested in and that you think other people would want to buy,” Koenig said. “If you can find some way to bring your love and passion for it and commercial acceptance together, it’s the perfect combination.”

ANIMATION: Festival a group effort (From Page One)

the audience to not know whether to expect a cruel physical joke or something else. The clips generally work best as visual gags, Lamb said. Most of the bomb submissions aren’t very politcal and don’t contain deep messages because the time constraints – 10 to 15 seconds – typically preclude them. Ngo settled on using the typical fat chef for his clip. The fat chef is more immediately humorous, and Ngo wanted to immediately set the stage and tone for his work, he said.

He’s still working on his piece. He plans to finish it over the winter break, and estimates that it’s going to take a total of 10 hours to complete. The festival will take place in May. The exact date hasn’t been set yet, Tsuji said. The club officers themselves haven’t started working on the introduction and conclusion yet, but they’re considering ideas. The introduction typically creates some sort of story for why the bomb is moving through the different shorts, while the conclusion features the bomb’s explosion. Tsuji said that 15 to 20

minutes for the entire film is a good duration. She’s not sure how long the final product will be this year. “The length all depends on the intro and the bomb submissions,” she said. Because of the relatively low number of completed selections, the club is considering hosting a second The Bomb next semester. Students who didn’t finish their animations the first time and others who missed the chance to create an animation last month would both be welcome, Tsuji said.

Relationship Not ‘N Sync The Associated Press NEW YORK - Lance Bass and his boyfriend, Reichen Lehmkuhl, have called it quits, People magazine reported on its Web site Monday. Bass’ publicist, Ken Sunshine, didn’t respond to a message from The Associated Press. The AP was trying to locate a representative for Lehmkuhl. Bass, who was part of the boy band ‘N Sync, revealed earlier this year that he is gay and was in a relationship with Lehmkuhl, a former Air Force captain and winner of season four of CBS’ “Amazing Race.” The 27-year-old singer told People

in July that he didn’t earlier disclose his sexuality because he didn’t want to affect ‘N Sync’s popularity. “The thing is, I’m not ashamed - that’s the one thing I want to say,” Bass told the magazine. “I don’t think it’s wrong, I’m not devastated going through this. I’m more liberated and happy than I’ve been my whole life.” ‘N Sync, known for a string of hits including “Bye Bye Bye” and “It’s Gonna Be Me,” went on hiatus in 2002. Bass has also made headlines for undertaking astronaut training and failing to raise money for a trip into space. Lehmkuhl, 32, has said he ad-

mired Bass’ decision to disclose his sexuality. Lehmkuhl has a new book, “Here’s What We’ll Say,” which recounts his time keeping his sexual orientation a secret from Air Force colleagues. Celebrity blogger/ gossip guru Perez Hilton began publicly outing Bass on his blog in September of 2005, enhancing speculation that Bass was forced out of the closet. “It upsets me that people think what I’m doing is a bad thing,” Perez told Access Hollywood. “I don’t think it’s a bad thing. If you know something to be a fact, why not report it? Why is that still taboo?”


6

The hub

December 5, 2006

An International Affair - Women’s football is not a highly praised sport in the states. More often then not, the title “powder-

puff” or “flag” precedes the actual sport. In the United Kingdom things are surprisingly similar. Women’s footie, as the locals call it, is little more than a pastime for the improper girls. Proper girls play field hockey or are part of the equestrian team. Playing on the women’s football team has been one of the highlights of my stay in Swansea. The girls are fun, the atmosphere is light and best of all, I am one of the best players out on the pitch. I have played soccer since I was four years old. I played all throughout high school and played for a private club throughout the first two years of college. It never occurred to me that my athleticism would be foreseen as a downfall to my foreign friends. after a game. Read Laura Burrow’s complete blog online at www.dailytitan.com

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

By Christina martinez

Daily Titan Staff Writer

by Christina martinez

news@dailytitan.com

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

tors of beauty in Japan is pale skin. “The contrast with the white skin and dark hair is more of a dramatic look,” Watanabe said. Early in the 20th century, the Japanese went so far as to paint their teeth black to make their skin look paler. “It is more sophisticated to have whiter skin,” Watanabe said. In Japan, the wealthy were indoors away from the sun while the workers became tan from working in the sun all day. Skin color became a way to determine wealth and status, Watanabe said. Being skinny, tall and having no visible signs of muscle or tone is considered beautiful for women in the Japanese culture. Muscle is seen as more of a masculine quality rather then feminine, Watanabe said. However, in modern Japan, there is more of a need to have a western look. “After WWII we were encouraged to follow Western society,” Watanabe said. Nowadays, the Japanese dye their dark hair lighter and sometimes get plastic surgery to achieve that Western look. In modern Japan, men are looked at more for their wealth and status rather than if they are good-looking, Watanabe said. However, the metrosexual look – in which men meticulously groom themselves – is in for modern Japanese men. Watanabe said she can understand why this look is in. The Japanese culture looks negatively toward aggression, which is why it is common to see this metrosexual trend among males. Watanabe said she was on a Tokyo

Shrouded with ancient mysticism, Kabbalah has become one of the latest trends among celebrities like Madonna and Britney Spears. However, the history of this ancient Jewish belief system began before Madonna strutted the trendy red bracelet; it started even before she was born. Kabbalah began around the 1st century of the millennium with “Merkavah,” a type of Jewish mysticism that is one of the predecessor practices of Kabbalah. Followers of Merkavah wanted to have a vision of the divine, much like the followers of Kabbalah today. “According to Kabbalah, the purpose of life is to bring clarity, understanding and freedom to our lives and ultimately to erase even death itself,” said David Langer, publicist for the Kabbalah Center, in an e-mail interview. The main virtues of Kabbalah are wisdom, understanding and love. Kabbalists believe every human action somehow affects God, he said. One of the key thoughts that stem from the Kabbalist virtues is to achieve total happiness in one’s lifetime. “If someone treats you with kindness, it kind of radiates on how your day is affected,” said Ben Hubbard, professor of comparative religion at Cal State Fullerton. “Anything that is divine, that is good, radiates through the cosmos.” Kabbalah is used as a navigator to get rid of pain, suffering and chaos. There is also the possibility of miracles, he said. “We have the power to create our own miracles; we earn them, we make them happen,” Langer said.

subway and saw an advertisement for facelifts and hair removal. To her surprise, next to the ad was a picture of a man instead of a woman. “I do notice in modern Japan is that Japan’s people are definitely trying to imitate European or American fashion,” Watanabe said. Nancy Porras, assistant professor of Chicana and Chicano studies at CSUF, said in traditional Mexican culture, it is beautiful for women to have modest clothing, long hair and very little makeup. “I have a picture of my mother with her long hair at the age of 13 – way down to her back,” Porras said. However, because her mother grew up in the 1920s, she had been influenced by other forms of beauty. “The next picture that I have is of her with her bob, with the pleats in her hair,” Porras said. “The influence of the media [is] both in the American media and in the Spanish-speaking media like newspapers and television programs,” Porras said. The Mexican counterculture defines beauty as having very exaggerated amounts of makeup. The women would also wear pompadours on their heads, Porras said. Porras said men in the counterculture walked differently and had their own lingo called “calo.” She said the men dressed very neatly with their shirts pressed neatly. The counterculture isn’t as exaggerated now but the perception is still around today, Porras said. If the media wasn’t involved, the perception of beauty in Mexican culture would be more traditional, Porras said.

“Every human has a potential for greatness.” Kabbalah also teaches about how to turn selfishness into something that is more of a sharing, positive nature, Langer said. To protect a Kabbalist’s journey to clarity and a positive life, followers wear a red wool bracelet around their left wrist, as seen on some celebrities. “Its purpose is twofold: to protect us from envious looks of others and to help us eliminate feelings of jealousy and resentment in ourselves,” Langer said. According to the Kabbalah Center, the bracelet is almost used as a vaccine against the “evil eye,” which is a form of negative energy that has been referred to by scholars like Aristotle, Plato and Socrates. Celebrities have popularized this practice, as seen throughout Hollywood and in magazines, by wearing red bracelets and even drinking Kabbalah water. “There is a danger in popularizing Kabbalah because it’s strict business,” Hubbard said. “Madonna is trying to reinvent herself regularly and getting into Kabbalah could be her spiritual reinvention.” And while religious promotions may raise awareness of the belief, others are afraid it may not be taken seriously. “There is indeed a level of pop culture influencing us,” Assistant Professor of comparative religion, Paul Levesque said. “Humanity is in a time of transition when many of the old structures that used to order our lives are no longer working, so many are seeking meaning and a way to be happy and successful in their lives more than ever before.” It isn’t just Kabbalah becoming popular, but rather there is more of a spiritual interest around the world, he said. “The teachings and main principles of Kabbalah underlies the core teachings of all the world’s religions,” Langer said.

by katy french

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Psychics Get Metaphysical In Orange County Psychics offer spiritual investigations and predictions of the future by sarah mosqueda For the Daily Titan

news@dailytitan.com

With the new year approaching, many Cal State Fullerton students find themselves wondering what 2007 holds. Orange County has a multitude of psychic services available, but while predictions for the new year aren’t hard to come by, legitimacy is. Beyond tollfree psychic friends and free readings, there exists an entire culture that incorporates philosophy, science, religion and metaphysics in the search for truth in accordance with an individual’s own conscience. Knowing the unknown is the attraction for some people. It is exciting for

some to be greeted with the prospect of possibly comprehending all that humans don’t understand and to think that, with the proper stimulation, anyone is capable of unlocking those truths. Everyone has a sense of intuition, said Hatty Hoover, the programs director at the Learning Light Foundation, the largest metaphysical and holistic education center in Orange County. However, for many, it is often difficult to distinguish what is a genuine phenomenon and what is nothing more than false testimony. The foundation, located on Lincoln Avenue in the city of Anaheim, offers lectures and workshops. The 44-yearold establishment is devoted to the development and growth of individual intuition. The foundation also holds a psychic fair on the first and last Saturday of every month. Admission is $2, with additional charges that vary per service. Clairvoyance, mediumship, aura photography and astrology are among the services offered at the fair. Such activities can be fun and entertaining for

many, but some might be skeptical about just how seriously to take them. Church services also take place at the Learning Light Foundation. Love and Light, Illuminations22, and the

Mystical United Spiritualist Church are all congregations at Learning Light. “Metaphysics is spiritual, not religious,” Hoover said. “It’s nondogmatic.

The only dogmatic practice is our determination in remaining nondogmatic. We take up no set religious beliefs. It’s more about love, about spirituality.” The Orange County Society for Psychic Research, also located in Anaheim, is a nonprofit organization devoted to seeking principles of truth in the paranormal. One service the society offers is the arrangement for on-site investigations of places of strange phenomenon. According to the society’s Web site, a typical investigation begins with members visiting the site and recording their extrasensory impressions on a report form. Mediation circles are formed and both audio and visual recordings are taken. After the psychic impressions and recordings are examined further, verification of the phenomenon is made. The society also offers classes in the metaphysical areas to educate individuals and allow them to develop their skills. The society takes itself seriously, but many outsiders question an organization that also devotes meetings and lectures to UFOs, crop circles and ghost hunting.

7

The Evolution of Men’s Fashion

Kaballah - the Mystical Judaism Hollywood celebrities have turned the ancient religion into a trend

Beauty can be interpreted differently in other cultures. What is considered beautiful in one country may not be beautiful in another

Beauty can come in all shapes and sizes, with different hair colors and different clothes. It can come in the form of the long, dark hair of a woman in traditional Mexican or Japanese cultures or the long light hair of American or European culture. Webster’s Dictionary defines beauty as “the quality or aggregate of qualities in a person or thing that gives pleasure to the senses or pleasurably exalts the mind or spirit.” Advertisements in the U.S. depict beauty as something that only a small percentage of women can obtain. The models used in advertisements are airbrushed and made to look like something that is unattainable. Men are supposed to have muscles and perfect skin, according to the media. Tall, dark and handsome is the criteria they’re supposed to fit into. However, in America, we are a melting pot of the entire world. Beauty varies because of the different cultures America consists of. Associate Professor Thomas FujitaRony of Asian American studies at Cal State Fullerton said there is “not one American culture.” Fujita-Rony, who is originally from Hawaii, said the advertisements in magazines in his home state are different than those on the mainland. He said there is more of a mixed heritage in a magazine in Hawaii compared to one in the rest of America. Fujita-Rony said there is a range of beauty within the Asian culture. From straight hair to curly hair, Asian beauty ranges widely. Professor Kazuha Watanabe, instructor of Japanese history and linguistics at CSUF, said one of the main indica-

THE HUB

December 5, 2006

JeeLoo Liu, a professor at CSUF who teaches a course on Metaphysics, said after viewing the society’s Web site, “I think relating this to metaphysics is giving them too much credit.” Professor Liu mentioned David Hume, author of “From an Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding of Miracles.” According to Hume, individuals must remember to think critically about alleged miracles. Hume said it is suspicious if witnesses to the miracle contradict each other, are of doubtful character or are simply too few. Individuals should also proceed with caution if the witnesses have an interest in what they affirm, deliver testimonies with hesitation, or – on the opposite end of the spectrum – deliver them too passionately. Hoover recommends that someone interested in developing their intuition begin by studying meditation, yoga or tai chi. “I would start with anything that takes you on the path within,” Hoover said. “Whatever you’re looking for is already within you. It’s not on the outside.”

From lace ruffles and silk stockings to leather jackets and bell-bottoms, men’s fashion is constantly evolving. “Men are beginning to become more fashion conscious than they were in the past,” said Tom Garner, director of graphic art for Lucky Brand Jeans. While men have traditionally been attracted to simplicity in their clothing, the boundaries are always stretching, and men are beginning to feel more comfortable and in control of their fashion choices. “ Tr a d i t i o n a l l y, guys like things that are safe, t h i n g s they’re not going to get criticized for,” Garner “But said. simplicity is changing. Men are wearing things that are more daring.” Both designers and consumers are moving in more unconventional directions as the desire to be unique overrides the desire to fit in. However, trends are often unavoidable and in recent years, several have drastically altered what is

acceptable in men’s fashion. Eunice Kim, a sales associate at Express Men in the Brea Mall, referred to the tight jeans, bright colors and graphic tees as the “ ’80s persuasion” trend and is surprised at its popularity. But no matter what the latest trend, men “try to twist things up but they still stick to the traditional,” she said. T-shirts and jeans have long been the staple of the male wardrobe but even those are subject to some change. In recent years, denim jeans have undergone serious changes as manufacturers are paying more attention to cuts, material and washes. While greater attention to detail and better-quality material mean higher prices, males are more than willing to fork over the cash. This season, Kim said that dark and distressed jeans are most popular and that black and grey denim are making a comeback. However, while plenty of trends come and go, few drastically change the limits of fashion boundaries. While the togas worn by the Greeks and the kilts of the Scots were daring, the “pink shirt” craze was the most socially revolutionary trend of this decade. When men were given the green light on a formally taboo color, they became more comfortable claiming these styles as their own. Yet, the hesitation toward certain hues has not entirely disappeared. “Men are just as picky as women,” Kim said. Many men are afraid of the lime-green dress shirts and won’t go for other, brighter colors such as orange or yellow, she said. A color that Kim said looks

good on every man but they avoid like the plague is lavender. Kim still encourages men to be a bit more adventurous. “Take a chance on it, try it out, liven up your look,” she said. While some men are still hesitant to branch out, others are more than happy to indulge in fashion experimentation. “Women are more attracted to men when they have their own sense of style,” said Jeffrey Trott, a public relations major and fashion connoisseur. Trott is pleased that in recent years men’s clothing has become more form-fitting and less trendy. “Things that are coming out now are a little less generic,” he said. Trott’s only complaint, mirrored by many men, is the discrepancy between what is available to women and what is available to men. Men’s clothing is more expensive than women’s, and there are not as many stores for men or as much of a selection as is available to women, he explained. With less selection available, every purchase must count and this is what designers are competing for. “For the last 10 to 15 years, it’s been ‘vintage’ and we’re always looking back, getting inspiration from the past,” Garner said. “Now they’ve gone through so much vintage that it’s copies of copies of copies.” Designers want something fresh and unique. So, what will be hot next season? “The trend now is toward more handmade techniques, things that have the human touch,” Garner said. “It has that sense of something that’s not been mass produced.” Ultimately, however, fashion choices are up to the individual.


6

The hub

December 5, 2006

An International Affair - Women’s football is not a highly praised sport in the states. More often then not, the title “powder-

puff” or “flag” precedes the actual sport. In the United Kingdom things are surprisingly similar. Women’s footie, as the locals call it, is little more than a pastime for the improper girls. Proper girls play field hockey or are part of the equestrian team. Playing on the women’s football team has been one of the highlights of my stay in Swansea. The girls are fun, the atmosphere is light and best of all, I am one of the best players out on the pitch. I have played soccer since I was four years old. I played all throughout high school and played for a private club throughout the first two years of college. It never occurred to me that my athleticism would be foreseen as a downfall to my foreign friends. after a game. Read Laura Burrow’s complete blog online at www.dailytitan.com

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

By Christina martinez

Daily Titan Staff Writer

by Christina martinez

news@dailytitan.com

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

tors of beauty in Japan is pale skin. “The contrast with the white skin and dark hair is more of a dramatic look,” Watanabe said. Early in the 20th century, the Japanese went so far as to paint their teeth black to make their skin look paler. “It is more sophisticated to have whiter skin,” Watanabe said. In Japan, the wealthy were indoors away from the sun while the workers became tan from working in the sun all day. Skin color became a way to determine wealth and status, Watanabe said. Being skinny, tall and having no visible signs of muscle or tone is considered beautiful for women in the Japanese culture. Muscle is seen as more of a masculine quality rather then feminine, Watanabe said. However, in modern Japan, there is more of a need to have a western look. “After WWII we were encouraged to follow Western society,” Watanabe said. Nowadays, the Japanese dye their dark hair lighter and sometimes get plastic surgery to achieve that Western look. In modern Japan, men are looked at more for their wealth and status rather than if they are good-looking, Watanabe said. However, the metrosexual look – in which men meticulously groom themselves – is in for modern Japanese men. Watanabe said she can understand why this look is in. The Japanese culture looks negatively toward aggression, which is why it is common to see this metrosexual trend among males. Watanabe said she was on a Tokyo

Shrouded with ancient mysticism, Kabbalah has become one of the latest trends among celebrities like Madonna and Britney Spears. However, the history of this ancient Jewish belief system began before Madonna strutted the trendy red bracelet; it started even before she was born. Kabbalah began around the 1st century of the millennium with “Merkavah,” a type of Jewish mysticism that is one of the predecessor practices of Kabbalah. Followers of Merkavah wanted to have a vision of the divine, much like the followers of Kabbalah today. “According to Kabbalah, the purpose of life is to bring clarity, understanding and freedom to our lives and ultimately to erase even death itself,” said David Langer, publicist for the Kabbalah Center, in an e-mail interview. The main virtues of Kabbalah are wisdom, understanding and love. Kabbalists believe every human action somehow affects God, he said. One of the key thoughts that stem from the Kabbalist virtues is to achieve total happiness in one’s lifetime. “If someone treats you with kindness, it kind of radiates on how your day is affected,” said Ben Hubbard, professor of comparative religion at Cal State Fullerton. “Anything that is divine, that is good, radiates through the cosmos.” Kabbalah is used as a navigator to get rid of pain, suffering and chaos. There is also the possibility of miracles, he said. “We have the power to create our own miracles; we earn them, we make them happen,” Langer said.

subway and saw an advertisement for facelifts and hair removal. To her surprise, next to the ad was a picture of a man instead of a woman. “I do notice in modern Japan is that Japan’s people are definitely trying to imitate European or American fashion,” Watanabe said. Nancy Porras, assistant professor of Chicana and Chicano studies at CSUF, said in traditional Mexican culture, it is beautiful for women to have modest clothing, long hair and very little makeup. “I have a picture of my mother with her long hair at the age of 13 – way down to her back,” Porras said. However, because her mother grew up in the 1920s, she had been influenced by other forms of beauty. “The next picture that I have is of her with her bob, with the pleats in her hair,” Porras said. “The influence of the media [is] both in the American media and in the Spanish-speaking media like newspapers and television programs,” Porras said. The Mexican counterculture defines beauty as having very exaggerated amounts of makeup. The women would also wear pompadours on their heads, Porras said. Porras said men in the counterculture walked differently and had their own lingo called “calo.” She said the men dressed very neatly with their shirts pressed neatly. The counterculture isn’t as exaggerated now but the perception is still around today, Porras said. If the media wasn’t involved, the perception of beauty in Mexican culture would be more traditional, Porras said.

“Every human has a potential for greatness.” Kabbalah also teaches about how to turn selfishness into something that is more of a sharing, positive nature, Langer said. To protect a Kabbalist’s journey to clarity and a positive life, followers wear a red wool bracelet around their left wrist, as seen on some celebrities. “Its purpose is twofold: to protect us from envious looks of others and to help us eliminate feelings of jealousy and resentment in ourselves,” Langer said. According to the Kabbalah Center, the bracelet is almost used as a vaccine against the “evil eye,” which is a form of negative energy that has been referred to by scholars like Aristotle, Plato and Socrates. Celebrities have popularized this practice, as seen throughout Hollywood and in magazines, by wearing red bracelets and even drinking Kabbalah water. “There is a danger in popularizing Kabbalah because it’s strict business,” Hubbard said. “Madonna is trying to reinvent herself regularly and getting into Kabbalah could be her spiritual reinvention.” And while religious promotions may raise awareness of the belief, others are afraid it may not be taken seriously. “There is indeed a level of pop culture influencing us,” Assistant Professor of comparative religion, Paul Levesque said. “Humanity is in a time of transition when many of the old structures that used to order our lives are no longer working, so many are seeking meaning and a way to be happy and successful in their lives more than ever before.” It isn’t just Kabbalah becoming popular, but rather there is more of a spiritual interest around the world, he said. “The teachings and main principles of Kabbalah underlies the core teachings of all the world’s religions,” Langer said.

by katy french

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Psychics Get Metaphysical In Orange County Psychics offer spiritual investigations and predictions of the future by sarah mosqueda For the Daily Titan

news@dailytitan.com

With the new year approaching, many Cal State Fullerton students find themselves wondering what 2007 holds. Orange County has a multitude of psychic services available, but while predictions for the new year aren’t hard to come by, legitimacy is. Beyond tollfree psychic friends and free readings, there exists an entire culture that incorporates philosophy, science, religion and metaphysics in the search for truth in accordance with an individual’s own conscience. Knowing the unknown is the attraction for some people. It is exciting for

some to be greeted with the prospect of possibly comprehending all that humans don’t understand and to think that, with the proper stimulation, anyone is capable of unlocking those truths. Everyone has a sense of intuition, said Hatty Hoover, the programs director at the Learning Light Foundation, the largest metaphysical and holistic education center in Orange County. However, for many, it is often difficult to distinguish what is a genuine phenomenon and what is nothing more than false testimony. The foundation, located on Lincoln Avenue in the city of Anaheim, offers lectures and workshops. The 44-yearold establishment is devoted to the development and growth of individual intuition. The foundation also holds a psychic fair on the first and last Saturday of every month. Admission is $2, with additional charges that vary per service. Clairvoyance, mediumship, aura photography and astrology are among the services offered at the fair. Such activities can be fun and entertaining for

many, but some might be skeptical about just how seriously to take them. Church services also take place at the Learning Light Foundation. Love and Light, Illuminations22, and the

Mystical United Spiritualist Church are all congregations at Learning Light. “Metaphysics is spiritual, not religious,” Hoover said. “It’s nondogmatic.

The only dogmatic practice is our determination in remaining nondogmatic. We take up no set religious beliefs. It’s more about love, about spirituality.” The Orange County Society for Psychic Research, also located in Anaheim, is a nonprofit organization devoted to seeking principles of truth in the paranormal. One service the society offers is the arrangement for on-site investigations of places of strange phenomenon. According to the society’s Web site, a typical investigation begins with members visiting the site and recording their extrasensory impressions on a report form. Mediation circles are formed and both audio and visual recordings are taken. After the psychic impressions and recordings are examined further, verification of the phenomenon is made. The society also offers classes in the metaphysical areas to educate individuals and allow them to develop their skills. The society takes itself seriously, but many outsiders question an organization that also devotes meetings and lectures to UFOs, crop circles and ghost hunting.

7

The Evolution of Men’s Fashion

Kaballah - the Mystical Judaism Hollywood celebrities have turned the ancient religion into a trend

Beauty can be interpreted differently in other cultures. What is considered beautiful in one country may not be beautiful in another

Beauty can come in all shapes and sizes, with different hair colors and different clothes. It can come in the form of the long, dark hair of a woman in traditional Mexican or Japanese cultures or the long light hair of American or European culture. Webster’s Dictionary defines beauty as “the quality or aggregate of qualities in a person or thing that gives pleasure to the senses or pleasurably exalts the mind or spirit.” Advertisements in the U.S. depict beauty as something that only a small percentage of women can obtain. The models used in advertisements are airbrushed and made to look like something that is unattainable. Men are supposed to have muscles and perfect skin, according to the media. Tall, dark and handsome is the criteria they’re supposed to fit into. However, in America, we are a melting pot of the entire world. Beauty varies because of the different cultures America consists of. Associate Professor Thomas FujitaRony of Asian American studies at Cal State Fullerton said there is “not one American culture.” Fujita-Rony, who is originally from Hawaii, said the advertisements in magazines in his home state are different than those on the mainland. He said there is more of a mixed heritage in a magazine in Hawaii compared to one in the rest of America. Fujita-Rony said there is a range of beauty within the Asian culture. From straight hair to curly hair, Asian beauty ranges widely. Professor Kazuha Watanabe, instructor of Japanese history and linguistics at CSUF, said one of the main indica-

THE HUB

December 5, 2006

JeeLoo Liu, a professor at CSUF who teaches a course on Metaphysics, said after viewing the society’s Web site, “I think relating this to metaphysics is giving them too much credit.” Professor Liu mentioned David Hume, author of “From an Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding of Miracles.” According to Hume, individuals must remember to think critically about alleged miracles. Hume said it is suspicious if witnesses to the miracle contradict each other, are of doubtful character or are simply too few. Individuals should also proceed with caution if the witnesses have an interest in what they affirm, deliver testimonies with hesitation, or – on the opposite end of the spectrum – deliver them too passionately. Hoover recommends that someone interested in developing their intuition begin by studying meditation, yoga or tai chi. “I would start with anything that takes you on the path within,” Hoover said. “Whatever you’re looking for is already within you. It’s not on the outside.”

From lace ruffles and silk stockings to leather jackets and bell-bottoms, men’s fashion is constantly evolving. “Men are beginning to become more fashion conscious than they were in the past,” said Tom Garner, director of graphic art for Lucky Brand Jeans. While men have traditionally been attracted to simplicity in their clothing, the boundaries are always stretching, and men are beginning to feel more comfortable and in control of their fashion choices. “ Tr a d i t i o n a l l y, guys like things that are safe, t h i n g s they’re not going to get criticized for,” Garner “But said. simplicity is changing. Men are wearing things that are more daring.” Both designers and consumers are moving in more unconventional directions as the desire to be unique overrides the desire to fit in. However, trends are often unavoidable and in recent years, several have drastically altered what is

acceptable in men’s fashion. Eunice Kim, a sales associate at Express Men in the Brea Mall, referred to the tight jeans, bright colors and graphic tees as the “ ’80s persuasion” trend and is surprised at its popularity. But no matter what the latest trend, men “try to twist things up but they still stick to the traditional,” she said. T-shirts and jeans have long been the staple of the male wardrobe but even those are subject to some change. In recent years, denim jeans have undergone serious changes as manufacturers are paying more attention to cuts, material and washes. While greater attention to detail and better-quality material mean higher prices, males are more than willing to fork over the cash. This season, Kim said that dark and distressed jeans are most popular and that black and grey denim are making a comeback. However, while plenty of trends come and go, few drastically change the limits of fashion boundaries. While the togas worn by the Greeks and the kilts of the Scots were daring, the “pink shirt” craze was the most socially revolutionary trend of this decade. When men were given the green light on a formally taboo color, they became more comfortable claiming these styles as their own. Yet, the hesitation toward certain hues has not entirely disappeared. “Men are just as picky as women,” Kim said. Many men are afraid of the lime-green dress shirts and won’t go for other, brighter colors such as orange or yellow, she said. A color that Kim said looks

good on every man but they avoid like the plague is lavender. Kim still encourages men to be a bit more adventurous. “Take a chance on it, try it out, liven up your look,” she said. While some men are still hesitant to branch out, others are more than happy to indulge in fashion experimentation. “Women are more attracted to men when they have their own sense of style,” said Jeffrey Trott, a public relations major and fashion connoisseur. Trott is pleased that in recent years men’s clothing has become more form-fitting and less trendy. “Things that are coming out now are a little less generic,” he said. Trott’s only complaint, mirrored by many men, is the discrepancy between what is available to women and what is available to men. Men’s clothing is more expensive than women’s, and there are not as many stores for men or as much of a selection as is available to women, he explained. With less selection available, every purchase must count and this is what designers are competing for. “For the last 10 to 15 years, it’s been ‘vintage’ and we’re always looking back, getting inspiration from the past,” Garner said. “Now they’ve gone through so much vintage that it’s copies of copies of copies.” Designers want something fresh and unique. So, what will be hot next season? “The trend now is toward more handmade techniques, things that have the human touch,” Garner said. “It has that sense of something that’s not been mass produced.” Ultimately, however, fashion choices are up to the individual.


8

December 5, 2006

OPINION Titan Editorial

Providing insight, analysis and perspective since 1960

A Mecca For All

At Carson High School ad- we here at the Daily Titan never ministrators have pulled the want to put a muzzle on anyTrailblazer, the student newspa- one. per of the institution, for a litany Opinion pages are meant to of divisive subjects ranging from be a public forum, as bastion marijuana use to sexual and ra- of thoughts and interactions cial issues. – even if those thoughts and The Trailblazer recently land- interactions do not appeal to ed in hot water in particular the masses. We here at the for an opinion Daily Titan piece, which labelieve everybeled a group of one should African Amerihave a voice. Opinion pages can students Young or are meant to be to “a pack of old, black or monkeys.” white. Jewish a public forum, a Not exactly or Nazi, gay bastion of thoughts He m i n g w a y, or straight, and interactions but, hey, it’s everyone their belief. should have a Granted, voice, even if considerthose do not ing the unappeal to the derlying circumstance of masses. the situation, and the fact That’s what an opinion page is that high school writers may – a forum of public thought. not be as polished as college If it’s legible and been through writers, we can see why the spell check, we are always on school may have chosen to elimi- the hunt for your opinion – We nate a potential riot or upwell- want our opinion page to serve ing amongst students. That said as a Mecca for all.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Titan Editorial is solely the opinion of the Daily Titan editorial board and was written after the open debate between board members. The editorial board consists of the executive editor, the managing editor, the opinion editor, the news editors, the copy chief and other editors upon appointment of the executive editor.

Letters to the Editor The Daily Titan welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must include the sender’s first and last name. Students must include their majors, and other writers must include their affiliation to the university, if applicable. The Daily Titan reserves the right to edit letters for length, grammar and spelling. Send letters to Julie Anne Ines, the executive editor, at jines@dailytitan.com.

For the Record It is the policy of the Daily Titan to correct any inaccurate information printed in the publication as soon as the error is discovered. Any incorrect information printed on the front page will result in a correction printed on the front page. Any incorrect information printed on any other page will be corrected on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections also will be noted on the online version of the Daily Titan. Please contact Managing Editor Cindy Tullues at (714) 278-5693 or at ctullues@dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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I don’t really do pranks any more. I have a laugh in the dressing room here, where it’s safe, and the guys don’t go to the papers and tell them what I’ve done. Paul Gascoigne

When a Prank Becomes Intolerable By Joey T. English Daily Titan Staff Writer opinion@dailytitan.com

A prank is usually intended to rouse some laughter at the expense of someone’s misfortune. Most are harmless, like changing someone’s screen saver to a regretted photo, or slipping a whoopee cushion under another’s seat. Pranksters, though, caught in the excitement of their musings, occasionally take a joke too far. For instance, in 2004, a Utah Jazz mascot poked fun at the legal troubles of Kobe Bryant during a timeout skit in a Los Angeles Lakers’ game against Utah. Bryant was facing sexual assault charges at the time. That stunt earned the Jazz a $15,000 fine from the NBA. A prank lacking personal or cultural sensitivity often winds up a failure, especially when performed in public. It is sensible to deem the

Jazz’s prank as such. But what about mixing dog food in somebody’s spaghetti dinner? That prank proved humorless for the Los Angeles Fire Department, after Tennie Pierce, the joke’s recipient, accused the department of racial discrimination. Pierce, a black firefighter with the department, was nicknamed “Big Dog” by fellow firefighters. He sued the department in 2005 for the prank and the city council agreed in November to reward $2.7 million to settle his lawsuit. However, the case grew complicated last week when photos of Pierce participating in pranks against other firemen emerged on the Web site of “The John and Ken Show,” a conservative radio show. Public outcry prompted Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to veto the settlement. The council, after reconsideration, agreed. The proposed payout was exces-

sive, to say the least. In fact, it would have been the largest in the department’s history. And the prank itself seems no more dehumanizing than when Pierce smeared mustard on a fellow firefighter strapped to a gurney, as shown on the Web site. But pranks have always been a part of the firefighting culture. And that is how the firefighters who planted the dog food in Pierce’s dish view it – as just another prank. They said it didn’t make a difference whether the butt of this joke was white, brown or black because it wasn’t discrimination. There’s no substantial evidence to disprove this. Often times, pulling off a successful prank depends on the luck of the draw. I remember a posse of pranksters smearing shaving cream on a boy named David at a fourth-grade slumber party. He woke up in tears and had his mother take him home.

Simply put, David was the wrong guy to pick on. Had the pranksters known he would take such offense, they most likely would have chosen a different guinea pig. Perhaps adults can do better. Perhaps they can prevent dehumanizing their peers through education, cultural sensitivity and a basic awareness of societal ills. The dog food jokesters surely would have reconsidered the prank had they prioritized their thoughts before their wanted laughter. If some sort of penalty is imposed, it should not go toward making Pierce a millionaire. That would be a waste of taxpayer dollars. Instead, it should aim to educate firefighters and other prone-toprank departments on where to draw the line and how to equate cultural sensitivity into a punch line. If not, the ignorance of pranksters will only serve as their laughter’s demise.

Germs Can be Combated through Good Hygiene By Noraly Hernandez Daily Titan Staff Writer opinion@dailytitan.com

November has passed and the Santa Ana winds have gotten underway, blowing dust and cold air causing allergies and cooler temperatures. With quick changing temperatures, fall and winter never miss a flu season. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 35 million to 50 million people are infected with the flu during the flu season, which lasts from November to March. Even though most people know the invisible, tasteless, disease-causing germs that bring and propagate illness are everywhere, not everyone takes the proper precautions to prevent collecting and spreading them. I must first admit that although I reprove the following health hazard,

I have, in a distant past, committed the following infraction: covering my mouth or nose while coughing or sneezing. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but rather then avoiding the spread of germs, those who do this are actually helping the villains – germs. A common misconception is that most flu germs are spread through coughs or sneezes. The reality is that 80 percent of germs are spread through hand contact. The germs, spread by a person infected with the flu, can live up to three days. Therefore, any healthy person who comes in contact with any germs left behind by an infected person has the risk of becoming infected if they later touch their nose, mouth or eyes without first cleaning their hands. Germs may never escape us but practicing cleanliness is one way to help reduce our risk of becoming ill

by them. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services suggests ways to prevent spreading germs. Some ways covering the mouth and nose when sneezing or coughing with a tissue that should immediately be discarded; avoiding touching the eyes, mouth and nose; staying home when feeling sick; making sure to check with a health provider when needed; and, very importantly, cleaning hands often. According to studies by Chuck Gerba, a professor of environmental microbiology at the University of Arizona in Tucson, about 60 to 70 percent of people who use the bathroom wash their hands. Of those people who do wash their hands, about half of them wash their hands for the necessary 15 to 30 seconds. In another study, Gerba showed that among common public items,

telephones contain the most germs, followed by desks, water-fountain handles, microwave-door handles and computer keyboards. Even ATMs have more germs than a public bathroom doorknob. It is important to learn how to wash our hands effectively. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the appropriate way to wash your hands is to scrub your palms, between your fingers, the back of your hands and under your fingernails for a minimum of 20 seconds. If using a public facility, the paper towel used to dry your hands should also be used to turn off the faucet and open the door. Getting plenty of sleep, being physically active, managing stress, drinking plenty of fluids and eating nutritious food are beneficial not only during the flu season but throughout the year as well.


December 5, 2006

9


SPORTS

10 RIDERS: HOSTS FIRST EVENT (From Page 12)

qualify. “Class sizes range from 6 riders to 11 riders so pointing out of a division is a hard thing to do,� Brownell said in an e-mail. “A rider has to be very consistent in her placings in order to earn the 35 points in only 10 shows.� Team members said that the first

competition CSUF has hosted in the program’s history was a great success and they look forward to hosting more events in the future. “I was very happy with how the team handled hosting our first show,� Team Captain Laura Piper said. “I hope that after I graduate the team will continue to host shows at Laguna Lake Park and keep their home with the Fullerton Recreational Riders.�

December 5, 2006

GUILLEN: TROUBLED TALENT

AN OPTIMAL VIEW

(From Page 12)

By karl thunman/Daily Titan

Photo courtesy of CSUF equestrians TUNNEL VISION – Cal State Fullerton equestrian rider Katrina Ruzics focuses intently while riding Regal in her novice flat class.

HOOPS: READY TO BATTLE

games. Cutley said nothing will keep him out of the UCLA game, but he hopes (From Page 12) Scott Cutley injured his back dur- that his back is healed and he is 100 percent. ing a practice on Cutley is not Thursday and the only injured was unable to Titan, Bureven walk on Friton said. Frank Do the same things day. But on game Robinson (leg night, “I got I’ve been doing for cramp), Marcus lucky,� Cutley four years. I know all Crenshaw (ankle) said. “They (the of them. It will be real and Marcus Mortrainers) got me gan (knee) will all ready to go.� fun. be questionable And it’s a good for tonight, he thing, because – Bobby Brown said. the 6-foot-5On Knowing UCLA‘s Players Crenshaw was inch 235-pound noticeably gimpy forward scored after the game, 12 points and but said he was pulled down 10 fine and that he’ll rebounds. It was his second double-double in three be ready for UCLA.

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RISING UP - Cal State Fullerton’s Justin Burns takes the shot above University Texas-San Antonio’s Isaiah Allen during Saturday’s 76-67 non conference victory for the Titans [5-1] at the Titan Gym on Saturday. The Titans face a monumental challenge tonight when they face the No. 1–ranked UCLA Bruins. According to the official Cal State Fullerton athletics Web Site, the game will be televised live on FSN Prime Ticket at 7:35 p.m. with announcers Bill MacDonald and Sean Farnham making the calls on the air. Justin Alderson and Danny Lee will be doing the radio calls for the Titans, where they can be heard on the Internet at www.fullertontitans.com.

nificant acquisition for us. He plays the game with a lot of passion and heart, he’s not afraid to stick his nose in there.� The 30-year-old Guillen batted .216 in 69 games last season during his second year with the Washington Nationals, hitting nine home runs with 40 RBIs before his elbow injury. He underwent a thorough physical with the Mariners’ medical staff and the team thinks he will return to full strength for 2007. Guillen said doctors have told him he will be completely healthy by January and ready to go in spring training. He is already doing some hitting and light throwing. “We feel like this is a signing with some real upside,� general manager Bill Bavasi said. “Our doctors have given him a very complete physical and we are very confident he’s healthy. When Jose has been healthy in his career he’s put up numbers.� Guillen had several run-ins with manager Mike Scioscia while with the Angels in 2004. Guillen was suspended for the final eight games of the regular season and left off the playoff roster. He was suspended for one game and fined late in 2005 for throwing a tantrum and a lot of equipment during a game against the New York Mets. “I know all of you guys and probably a lot of people will probably make a big deal out of it. I’m not,� Guillen said. Guillen is a career .272 hitter with 143 home runs. “Whatever happened in the past is the past,� Guillen said. “I’ll just put it all behind me and I’m just looking forward to bringing a championship to Seattle. I think most of you guys know the type of player I am. I’m going to bring a lot of fun to this team this year.� He also played for the Oakland Athletics and Cincinnati Reds, as well as Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay and Arizona.

San Francisco Clarifies Position on Bonds Associated Press The San Francisco Giants want Barry Bonds back. It’s unclear whether the Boston Red Sox feel the same about Manny Ramirez. Baseball’s winter meetings opened Monday with a whole lot of talk butlittle action. St. Louis pitcher Chris Carpenter got a new five-year contract worth about $65 million. On the free-agent front, San Francisco finalized deals with Rich Aurilia and Pedro Feliz and Seattle completed an agreement with Jose Guillen. Texas reached a preliminary agreement on a $33 million, three-year contract with right-hander Vicente Padilla, said a person familiar with the negotiations, speaking on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been finalized. Some other contracts were near-

ing agreement. Joe Borowski, whose physical caused Philadelphia to back away last week, was closing in on a deal with Cleveland, and David Weathers was nearing a contract with Cincinnati. But the remaining big names on the market were still in the preliminary phases of talks. Barry Zito’s agent was scheduled to meet with the New York Mets, chief operating officer Jeff Wilpon arrived Monday evening. Agents for Jason Schmidt and Ted Lilly also were due at the meetings, with multiple teams interested. With the meetings just under way, the price of pitching has scared many teams off from even midlevel talent. “It’s like I tell my wife when she goes shopping: Just because you have the money doesn’t mean you have to spend it all,� Cardinals general manager Walt Jocketty said.

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Monday’s most significant development might have occurred when Giants general manager Brian Sabean said he is exchanging offers with Bonds’ agent, Jeff Borris. Sabean was scheduled to meet with Borris on Monday night. “I don’t know where the storyline came from that we didn’t want him back,� Sabean said. “We’ve had a long-standing conversation and offer out there that we’ve adjusted a number of times. Because we were pursuing other players didn’t mean we weren’t interested in Barry. We’re trying to put the best team on the field and sign other people also. I guess it was misconstrued the other way.� Borris was angry when the Giants didn’t offer arbitration Friday to Bonds, coming off a $90 million, five-year contract. The 42-year-old outfielder has

734 homers, 21 shy of Hank Aaron’s record. “We need a presence, a fourth hitter,� Sabean said. “Obviously, he can still play baseball. He can still hit a baseball and is a threat in the middle of the lineup.� San Francisco did agree to an $8 million, two-year contract with first baseman Rich Aurilia and a $5.1 million, one-year deal with third baseman Pedro Feliz. The Giants also are nearing agreement on a three-year deal with catcher Bengie Molina. Second baseman Ray Durham agreed to a two-year, $14.5 million contract last Friday, and 11-time Gold Glove shortstop Omar Vizquel is signed through the 2007 season. “It’s a good infield,� new manager Bruce Bochy said. “These guys have played together. They know each other. It’s nice getting both Pedro and Ray back.�

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12

Titan Men’s Basketball Square off Against UCLA

December 5, 2006

SPORTS

Former Angels Guillen Inks Deal He signs with Seattle to play right field and bat in the middle of the order

CSUF aims to take the nation’s No. 1 ranked team to the limit tonight

Associated Press Jose Guillen and Ichiro Suzuki in the same outfield – Seattle manager Mike Hargrove has never had two arms so strong side-by-side. The Mariners and the former Angels outfielder agreed on a one-year, $5.5 million contract Monday with a $9 million mutual option for 2008, giving Seattle a starting right fielder and a dangerous bat in the middle of the order. The deal was the first formal signing of the four-day baseball winter meetings that began Monday. Guillen missed much of the 2006 season following reconstructive surgery on his right elbow. The Mariners hope his addition is only a start because they want to upgrade their starting rotation. “I’m just looking forward to this opportunity to try to get back on board and have the success that I’ve had before,” Guillen said when introduced in Seattle’s hotel suite. Guillen can earn up to $3 million in performance bonuses. He will take over right field from Suzuki, who is moving to center, making them quite a defensive pair in the outfield. “He’s a hard-nosed player and likes to play the game. That’s what we’re looking for,” Hargrove said. “He fits real well in our lineup among (Raul) Ibanez, (Richie) Sexson and (Adrian) Beltre. Considering the production he has shown in his career, it’s a sig -

BY JAIME CÁRDENAS

Daily Titan Staff Writer jcardenas@dailytitan.com

The Cal State Fullerton men’s basketball team will have a tough non conference match up tonight against UCLA Bruins at Pauley Pavilion. The No. 1 ranked Bruins (6-0) defeated UC Riverside 61-38 on Sunday and look to go 7-0 against the 5-1 Titans. CSUF point guard Bobby Brown said a key for the Titans against UCLA will be to keep their emotions in check. Brown pointed out to last year’s home game against Pacifica as an example. Brown said the Titans came out too amped and ran out of gas. “We can’t come out, like, all rowdy,” Brown said. Head coach Bob Burton said that getting the players excited about the UCLA game won’t be a problem. “If anything, it’s going to be the opposite,” he said. The onus to keep the Titans’ composure level will be on him, and the Los Angeles native knows is. “I’m going to go in and be a leader,” said Brown, who played with a lot of the UCLA players during the summer. “Do the same things I’ve been doing for four years. I know all of them. It will be real fun.”

Injury Report SEE HOOPS - PAGE 10

SEE GUILLEN - PAGE 10

Photo courtesy of CSUF equestrians LEARNING THE ROPES – New member and rider Kristine Mariscal competes on Bear in her walk trot class after learning to ride only two months ago.

Riders Work Their Way Onto the Stage In their first home event CSUF equestrian team finishes tied for fourth BY LAURENS ONG

Daily Titan Sports Editor long@dailytitan.com

In front of 200 people, Cal State Fullerton equestrian team member Tracy Brownell placed third in her immediate flat class, pointing her out of the division and qualifying her for the regional competition as CSUF finished fourth overall in the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association show at the Equestrian Center at Laguna Lake Park in Fullerton on Sunday. “All I needed was a third to qualify for regionals and that is exactly what I earned,” Brownell said. “I am excited to see more of my teammates getting closer to pointing out so that CSUF will be well represented at the regional competition.” The meet was historic for CSUF

Photo courtesy of CSUF equestrians JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS – Cal State Fullerton equestrian CoCaptain Lizz Braley jumps Sonny in her Novice Fences class. since it was the first show they have ever hosted in their two-year history as a team. According to the Dec. 4 issue of

the Orange County Register, the Titans are the only equestrian team in Orange County and joined the IHSA, a 40-year-old national associ-

ation with 300 member colleges and with more than 6,500 participants. “I am very proud of our team for hosting our first show,” CSUF equestrian team member Shaina Feldman said. “All the girls really came together and helped each other out. How we were able to put on a show and compete with only nine riders available still amazes me. I couldn’t be more proud.” At the event, the top four finishers were University of San Diego’s team in first place, followed by USC in second place, UC San Diego in third place with CSUF and UCLA tied for fourth place. Brownell said that the Titans have four remaining shows in their season and have approximately two months before their next show. Brownell said that to qualify for a regional event, riders have to tally up 35 points. Having a limited number of shows left means that riders must do a lot to earn those 35 points to SEE RIDERS - PAGE 10


2006 12 05  
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