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Leaving Their Marks

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Since 1960 Volume 83, Issue 8

From the Stage to the Field

Student artists express themselves in different ways Introspect, p. 6

After fullfilling his dream, coach returns to baseball SPORTS, p. 11

Daily Titan

Thursday September 14. 2006

The Student Voice of California State University, Fullerton

Alleged Murderer ‘Very Bonded’ to Son Students’ records show domestic disputes prior to death of young son BY ADAM LEVY Daily Titan News Editor alevy@dailytitan.com

The road to the Gideon Walter Omondi’s Orange County jail cell was paved by years of bitter court

battle with his wife Helen. The pair riddled each other with contentions of domestic violence and child abuse. Omondi, a Cal State Fullerton mechanical engineering major, is currently being held with no bail on first-degree murder charges in the death of his 4-year-old son Richard. Sunday night, he confessed to drowning the child to Fullerton Police officers. He was taken into custody and arraigned two days later.

The couple left a long paper trail of hearings, mediations and visitation arrangements over the past 18 months. They chronicled the contempt they had toward one another as they battled through the stages of a divorce and custody battle. Gideon had originally filed for divorce in March 2005. Along with the split he sought custody of Richard and child support. This set off a domino effect of vitriolic incidents between the estranged

pair in both the spoken and written word. Through their respective declarations to the Orange C o u n t y Superior Court L a m o r e a u x Omondi Justice Center, the estranged couple painted portraits of violence and instability about

DANCING WITH CYRUS

each other. Many of the documents were sealed as “confidential,” more than likely these were reports from the California Department of Social Services. The agency was contacted three times over the course of eight months in regards to the child abuse allegations that hovered over both the mother and father. The CSUF student put his disenchantment on the record with his May 2005 declaration, which characterized his 4-year marriage with

Helen as “turbulent.” He alluded to a November 2004 incident in which she had threatened suicide to the employees at the Fullerton College daycare facility and how Helen had often raised the idea of placing the child up for adoption. He detailed the pattern of psychological warfare Helen allegedly waged on him in the waning days of

Professor has spoken on “The Oprah Winfrey Show” about subject

broad range of twin related topics including identical, fraternal and “virtual twins” – same-age children raised together. She has written two books: “Indivisible by Two: Lives of Extraordinary Twins” and “Entwined Lives: Twins and What They Tell Us About Human Behavior.” She also appeared on other nationally syndicated shows such as “Good Morning America” and “Dateline NBC.” CNN is producing a one-hour special about happiness. It delves into the scientific and emotional aspects of happiness and how to achieve it. The special brought CNN to Cal State Fullerton to speak with Segal. Sanjay Gupta, senior medical correspondent for CNN, sat down with Segal in the quad to talk about whether or not certain traits, like happiness, are genetic or emotional

Expert on Twins Visited by CNN By Katy French Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

The television network CNN came to campus Friday to interview Nancy Segal, professor of developmental psychology and director of the Twin INSIDE Studies Center on campus. The crew Check out filmed Segal giving page 2 for a profile a class lecture on her research in twin studies on Nancy Segal. and interviewed her for an upcoming segment. Segal runs the Twin Studies Center, a research center on campus that she established in 1991. At the center, Segal conducts research about twins’ physical and mental development. Her work covers a

By KARL THUNMAN/Daily Titan Staff Photographer

PErsian Festival - The Aghili & Siamak Pouian perform a cultural dance during the Persian Festival of Autumn (Mehregan) at the Orange County Fair & Expo Center Sept. 10. See story on page 3.

The Three Percent - Part Three of Three

Gordon Making Strides To Diversify Campus Segregation of CSUF and Orange County is an issue on president’s mind By Adam Levy Daily Titan News Editor alevy@dailytitan.com

As a young child growing up in inner-city Chicago, Cal State Fullerton President Milton Gordon was exposed to a diverse mix of cultures bonded together by their common plight. His formative years were a multicultural tapestry of people and experiences, bonded by class rather than ethnicity. “The area I grew up in, in Chicago, I went to my first Bar Mitzvah when I went to my first Gospel church,” Gordon said. “It was all integrated – we were all poor together.” Gordon’s exposure to a variety of cultures at a young age would eventually lay the template of a man who understood diversity and would later apply that knowledge in his career as the university’s

By Ian Hamilton/Daily Titan Assistant News Editor

Between Classes - Uche Ollawa, psychology major, watches tele-

vision in the African American Resource Center. President. Through its educational options and solid relations with the community, CSUF has trended upwards when it comes to improving those conditions. The leader said he believes that the keys to this awakening lie in

educating the open-minded youth about racial myths. “I think our campus does a fairly good job – the younger people are in an integrated situation, the easier it is for them to reject myths,” Gordon said. “When people are separated, they have myths about each other.”

“The climate is getting better,” said Afro-Ethnic Studies Professor Wacira Gethaiga. “The mere fact that there is a so-called ‘minority President’ gives young [blacks] hope. For the longest time, the University had no black president – they were always white.” The improvements can be attributed to, amongst other factors, an educational program that gives all students a multicultural prism in their classroom exchanges with others; an on-campus location intended for black students to congregate; and the steady hand of an esteemed leader who has made huge strides in diversifying the campus over the past 16 years. “The 3.41 percent is higher than it has ever been,” said Gordon. “Because of our size, we are attracting more students outside of Orange County, we’re getting them from L.A., Pomona and Riverside as well.” President Gordon took his chair

Monday NEWS

ONLINE www.dailytitan.com

Concert under the Stars

TITAN LIVE

Musical Theater Students and alumni perform in show Friday at 6 p.m. Check out the paper on Monday.

SEE THREE - PAGE 5

Check the Daily Titan online for videos, podcasts, radio shows and more.

SEE OMONDI - PAGE 5

SEE CNN - PAGE 5

My School is Better Than Your School CSUs have similar costs, but money is spent on different programs By Christina Martinez Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

The CSUs seem to be the “go-to” colleges after high school because of their reasonable prices and popularity. However, each school in the system differs from the other in price and majors offered, among other things. Enrollment at the different CSUs varies. Cal State Fullerton is the largest with 35,040 students enrolled for the fall of 2005, but is built on a mere 236 acres. Long Beach State has about the same number of students enrolled at 34,547, however their school sits on 323 acres. “Larger campuses can usually manage to offer more choices,” said Dave Dowell, vice provost, director of strategic planning and professor of psychology at Long Beach State. Also the differences in the cost of living, transportation, degrees offered and job opportunities can make the different CSUs vary in

weather

TODAY

Extra CSU Fees

Each year, campuses add fees for materials, services and facilites:

Fullerton — $470 Long Beach — $344 Dominguez Hills — $471 Los Angeles — $515 Northridge — $486 San Bernardino — $572 Source: CSU Web Site

enrollment. Undergraduate adviser and CSUF Professor of economics Radha Bhattacharya said in an email interview that we have a larger population in Orange and Los Angeles Counties compared to a city like Fresno or Bakersfield. The state university fee for a resident full-time undergraduate student at every CSU is currently $2,520 a year. However, each CSU has extra costs students pay depending on which CSU they are attending. CSUF tacks on extra fees of $470 per year while Long Beach State students pay an extra $344, SEE COST - PAGE 4

TOMorrow Partly Cloudy High: 75 Low: 61

Partly Cloudy High: 71 Low: 58


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September 14, 2006

In Brief

CAMPUS CALENDAR

Images in Glass

Today

Running until Oct. 13, “Han Zi Reinvented: The Rhythm of Chinese Script” is an art exhibit showcasing art using Chinese characters by AmericanChinese artists at the Main Art Gallery. The gallery is open from noon to 4 p.m.

Friday

The Science Laboratory Center will be officially renamed Dan Black Hall. The ceremony will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. in the walkway between McCarthy Hall and Dan Black Hall. Musical Theater Students will put on a Concert Under the Stars by performing “With a Song in My Heart: the Music of Richard Rodgers” Saturday 6 p.m. at the North Lawn of the Titan Gymnasium. By SONgha Lee/Daily Titan Photo Editor

Saturday

i See you - Passing students and the Education Classroom building are reflected off the Pollak Library windows on Sept. 5.

The American Psychological Association’s writing workshop presented by Leah Brew will be held from noon to 3 p.m. in the Education Classroom Building room 124.

Sunday

Jazz pianist and CSUF professor Eric Dries will perform in Meng Concert Hall at 4 p.m. Dries is a frequent performer at Steamers Jazz Club and Cafe.

Monday

FACULTY FOCUS

Professor Known Around ‘Xena’ Booted, Dwarf Nation For Work With Twins Planet Renamed Eris By Katy French

FIRST is sponsoring “A Walk through the Constitution” to commemorate Constitution Day from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Portola Pavillion at the TSU. There will be 13 learning stations providing four-minute presentations, OC Superior Courts Justices and Revolutionary War fife and drum reenactors. SUBMISSIONS: To have your event in The Daily Titan’s Calendar, please submit event information to news@dailytitan.com one week prior to the date of event.

FOR THE RECORD

It is the policy of the Daily Titan to correct any inaccurate information printed in the publication as soon as the error is discovered. Any incorrect information printed on the front page will result in a correction printed on the front page. Any incorrect information printed on any other page will be corrected on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections also will be noted on the online version of the Daily Titan. Please contact Managing Editor Cindy Tullues at (714) 278-5693 or at ctullues@dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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on the wire

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

When she’s not being sought as a national authority on twin research or writing a new book, you might catch Nancy Segal swing dancing, watching classic films or running. A professor of developmental psychology and director of the Twin Studies Center on campus, Segal often lends her expertise to national television shows like “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “Dateline NBC.” She was awarded CSUF’s Outstanding Professor of the Year award in 2005 and has since continued her breakthrough research in the area of twin studies. Q: When did you first know that you would like to study twins? A: It was probably when I was a senior in college and I was asked to write a paper about personal adjustment and I sort of dabbled in twin literature and I just found it so fascinating that I couldn’t resist it for the rest of my life. Q: What do you enjoy most about working at Cal State Fullerton? A: I love the freedom to do the research that I love. I love the diversity of students who bring different interests and talents to my work. I’ve

had a lot of students working in my lab. A number of my grad students have gone on to pursue careers in twin research which has given me great satisfaction. I really love the support of research atmosphere that I get from my dean, my chair and my colleagues. Q: What has been the most rewarding experience of your career? A: I think writing my two books: “Indivisible by Two” and “Entwined Lives.” Doing those, which brought together such huge bodies of work in one place, the one [book] getting a lot of research out there and the second book where I actually profiled the lives of interesting twins. These are two areas I care a lot about and it was great to have done that. Do you enjoy being on Television? I love it. It gives me real satisfaction to give findings to the public because I know there are lots of mothers and fathers of twins out there who are not going to get access to the professional journals and this is a way of getting important information out to them. Segal’s books: “Indivisible by Two: Lives of Extraordinary Twins” and “Entwined Lives: Twins and What They Tell Us About Human Behavior” are available at the campus bookstore.

BY ALICIA CHANG Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) - A distant, icy rock whose discovery shook up the solar system and led to Pluto’s planetary demise has been given a name: Eris. The christening of Eris, named after the Greek goddess of chaos and strife, was announced by the International Astronomical Union on Wednesday. Weeks earlier, the professional astronomers’ group stripped Pluto of its planethood under new controversial guidelines. Since its discovery last year, Eris, which had been known as 2003 UB313, ignited a debate about what constitutes a planet. Astronomers were split over how to classify the object because there was no universal definition. Some argued it should be welcomed as the 10th planet since it was larger than Pluto, but others felt Pluto was not a full-fledged planet. After much bickering, astronomers last month voted to shrink the solar system to eight planets, downgrading Pluto to a “dwarf planet,” a category that also includes Eris and the asteroid Ceres. Eris’ discoverer, Michael

Brown of the California Institute of Technology, said the name was an obvious choice, calling it “too perfect to resist.” In mythology, Eris caused a quarrel among goddesses that sparked the Trojan War. In real life, Eris forced scientists to define a planet that eventually led to Pluto getting the boot. Soon after Pluto’s dismissal from the planet club, hundreds of scientists circulated a petition protesting the decision. Eris’ moon also received a formal name: Dysnomia, the daughter of Eris known as the spirit of lawlessness. Eris, which measures about 70 miles wider than Pluto, is the farthest known object in the solar system at 9 billion miles away from sun. It is also the third brightest object located in the Kuiper belt, a disc of icy debris beyond the orbit of Neptune. Eris had been without a formal name while astronomers grappled over its status. Brown nicknamed it “Xena” after the fictional warrior princess pending an official designation. He admits the new name will take some getting used to. “It’s a little sad to see Xena go away,” he said.


September 14, 2006

3

NEWS

Autumn Persian Festival Celebrated By Sean McCormick

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

T

he Mehregan festival doesn’t begin for a couple more weeks in Iran, but on Sept. 9 and10 approximately 20,000 Iranians from Southern California came together at the Orange County fairgrounds to celebrate their harvest season and the achievements of Cyrus the Great. For the 11th year the Network of Iranian-American Professionals of Orange County organized a Mehregan festival, the Persian celebration of autumn. The festival is garnished with slogans describing the event as a time to reflect on the past and welcome the future with love, compassion and understanding. The network compared the celebration to Thanksgiving, when families gather to be humble and thankful.

The importance of the event is not as important as the emotion. “It’s like Christmas,” 62-year-old Roy Niazi said. “We gather here and have fun together. Every year it gets stronger and stronger and we see people and it looks like everybody is OK.” This year, news media from eight Iranian television stations, 14 publications, seven Web sites and two radio stations covered the event. As dawn crept in on the final day of the Persian harvest festival, wind blew through corridors containing translucent veils of purple, gray and tan. Droves of people, and not just Persians, passed through the entrance to the Mehregan festival. Passers-by occasionally stopped to read posters along the corridor walls, most of which contained information about the ancient Persian Empire, Cyrus the Great and Iranian customs. Sadaf tea wafted through the air

Photos By Karl Thunman/Daily Titan Staff Photographer

Harvest Festival - The Persian festival Mehregan art exhibit attracted many curious visitors (above). The festival offered music not usually heard on the popular radio stations (below).

It’s like Christmas. We gather here and have fun together. Every year it gets stronger and stronger ...

The Mehregan festival, which celebrates the harvest season, draws approximately 20,000 Southern California Iranians to the Orange County Fairgrounds

– Roy Niazi Festival Attendee

as people clamored in Farsi – the native Persian language. Whether it was with dancing, music or poetry readings, three stages set at the front, middle and back of the rectangular field were constantly active with entertainment. This year’s Mehregan looks to the Achaemenid Dynasty, when Cyrus the Great reigned. Cyrus is viewed as an embodiment of the Mehregan philosophies. Cyrus the Great “was a historical figure at least at the same level as

Alexander and Ceasar,” said Cyrus the Great biographer Cyrus Kar. “He drafted the first human rights legislation in recorded history, over a thousand years before the Magna Carta. He abolished slavery. “He freed the Jews from 60 years of Babylonian captivity and he built their temple in Jerusalem,” he said.

Kar, also a documentary filmmaker, was invited to the festival by the network to prescreen his documentary film about the life and times of Cyrus the Great. Kar shared a tent with a poet named Shoja Adel whose poems deal with issues of war. The Army recruiting tent in the

center of the festival created a buzz among artists. An empty gallery space held a sign that read: “We artists object. This is a cultural event. This is NOT a place for any Army/Military. Mehregan symbolizes peace and friendship, not war.” Visitors avoided the tent, save a few children who were interested in the Hummer parked behind. What drew the largest crowd was the food. Lines stretched back as far as 20 people waiting to sink their teeth into kabobs, ashe reshteh and Persian ice cream. “The ice cream is different, it is plain but much creamier than regular ice cream,” 60-year-old graphic designer Khoslow Jahanbin said. “At this moment my favorite food is ashe reshteh, it’s a little bit warm and a little bit spicy. I like to enjoy it.” Ashe reshteh is a green soup with garbanzo beans and special noodles, seasoned with fennel and coriander. Jahanbin added that the food maintained a very authentic flavor. He drove 50 miles from Los Angeles to be at the event. “I love it here, it’s the reason I drove 50 miles,” Jahanbin said. “It’s one of the biggest festivals.” Behind Jahanbin was a stage of festive dancers in colorful dresses performing traditional Persian dances. Across from the stage of traditional dancers was a tent titled “Cyrus’s Lounge” filled with sweating Persian teenagers dancing to Iranian hiphop. Niazi sat at the lunch tables with his 26-year-old daughter eating ashe reshteh. He too comes for the food, but Niazi has other favorites at the festival. “I like young people, I like that disco over there,” Niazi said, pointing to Cyrus’s Lounge. “I love to dance and live young.” Niazi wasn’t the only one dancing. An older crowd gathered on thick red traditional rugs to watch the performance of Aghila & Siamak Pouian. Older men and women clapped or stood up and twisted their arms to the Persian version of Wayne Newton.


NEWS

4

COST: CAL STATE SYSTEM OFFERS MANY CHOICES according to the California State University Web site. One of those extra expenses is for the school’s student body center. CSUF students pay $208 for their student body center, but Long Beach State students only pay $100 for theirs. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo is the most expensive CSU, with full-time students paying an extra $1,725 a year. $842 of that money goes to materials, services and facilities whereas CSUF students only pay $46 a year for those services. “Local campuses have developed different fees to pay for locally unique projects,” Dowell said. One of these projects at Long Beach State is called the “Beach Pride referendum,” Dowell said. It imposed a fee that supports athletics. However, even with the extra fees, the CSUs are more affordable than private universities like USC. USC’s tuition and fees per year are $33,892. That’s an extra $30,903 a year compared to CSUF. There will still be the contacts at a CSU that a student might also get at a private university like USC, said Chuck Moore, CSUF’s Director of Enrollment Management. College students who are working part time need a place that is affordable, Moore said. The average cost for a CSUF student living off campus is $17,140 a year, according to the CSU Student Academic Support Web site. The cheapest average cost of living, if the student is living off campus, is $14,217 at Fresno State. The most expensive living costs are at San Francisco, where a student who lives off campus pays an average of $19,794 a year, according to the California

Local campuses have developed different fees to pay for locally unique projects. – Dave Dowell Professor of Psychology at Long Beach State

(From Page One)

State University Web site. “Student surveys suggest that key factors in student choices are preferences for location, preference for rural or urban environment, preference for a small or large campus, choice of academic majors and cocurricular activities such as sports,” Dowell said. CSUF doesn’t offer a forestry major like Humboldt State does, but we do have the art program which is bigger, Moore said. Opportunities differ at each CSU, which in turn will bring in different students, he said. Another difference between CSUs is the flexibility of classes. “We offer courses [students] are looking for,” Moore said. He said that CSUF tends to offer more night and weekend classes than UC Irvine does. The way the CSUs promote themselves will also make the enrollment and popularity fluctuate, Moore said. Some schools promote themselves with sports while others hold conferences to attract attention. CSUF promotes itself with their NCAA championshipwinning baseball team and hosting conferences for the College Board, the AP test designers. Each CSU has varying costs and differences no matter which one a student chooses, but it is ultimately what kind of education the student is seeking that is the deciding factor.

September 14, 2006

A Professor By Day, but Pianist By Night By Sean McCormick Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

The world of Eric Dries is held together by the 88 black and white keys on the piano. He is a Cal State Fullerton professor by day and a pianist by night. Jazz classics, from Thelonious Monk to Charles Mingus, will be performed by faculty artist Dries in Meng Concert Hall Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. “He is a strong asset to our faculty because he is so versatile,” said Director of jazz studies Chuck Tumlinson. “He is really strong with computers and he has set up the Michalsky Resource Center.” Dries has a doctorate in composition from UC San Diego and a master’s in music theory, according to his teacher profile from the Cal State Fullerton Web site. Tumlinson, who plays the trumpet, has informally performed with Dries and said that he has great musicianship, and punctuality has never been an issue. “He is a fine performer,” Tumlinson said. Dries has been a performer since high school. He learned to play by ear from vintage jazz concerts and recordings such as Jelly Roll Morton, Duke Ellington, Bill Evans and Thelonius Monk. Dries said Monk, Charles Mingus and Ellington have impacted him most. Works by those artists will be featured at the show. “It is important for students to see if their teachers play well,” piano professor Eduardo Delgado said. “If the teachers don’t play well then the students may not play well.” Dries “is a strong composer in both jazz and classical music,” Tumlinson said. Performing works by Ellington requires an extensive knowledge and understanding of the time, place and emotion Ellington was in to justly reproduce his sound, Tumlinson said. Dries performs mainly in Southern California but is in the process of booking shows elsewhere in the United States and abroad. Locally, Dries plays downtown at Steamers.

PIANO

By SUZANNE SULLIVAN/For the Daily Titan

- Eric Dries, professor on campus, is set to perform in the upcoming jazz piano recital.

Dries has taught a variety of fields within music that vary from musicianship, theory, analysis, point-counterpoint, piano and private composition lessons. Dries has been teaching for six years. While studying at UCSD, Dries

was surrounded by accomplished composers like Rand Steiger, Brian Ferneyhough, Bill Ogdon and George Lewis. Dries’ compositions have been performed by SONAR, a resident new music ensemble at UCSD. Graduate student Wong Nguyen

is studying piano performance and said that recitals are very inspirational to him. “I have been to at least 10 recitals,” Nguyen said. “To perform well you must have a good knowledge of the material, a background in music and good knowledge of the arts.”


OMONDI: A Man’s Troubled Home (From Page One)

their union. “We were renting an apartment, but I recently moved out due to her instability and her constant remarks that she is planning on filing a domestic violence restraining order,” Gideon wrote in his declaration. The security guard for Oranges’ Securitas USA also discussed his devotion to his son and the sacrifices he made as a single father. “I love and care for our son very much and I have been the primary caretaker of the child,” Gideon wrote. “I have been the one who takes the child to the daycare provider and picks him up even though I work a long schedule and I go to school full time.”

5

NEWS

September 14, 2006

In her declaration, Helen portrayed Gideon as a sadistic bully whose guerilla tactics made life unbearable for her and the boy. She presented a litany of his transgressions, such as threatening her with deportation, cutting off her communication with the outside world, accusing her of prostitution and leaving her and their son with no food at home while he would dine at restaurants. As Gideon remains in custody with his second arraignment set for Friday, Sept. 29, the juxtaposition of his statements jump off the legal documents they were cast upon. “I am very bonded to our son,” Gideon wrote. “And I wish to make certain that our son is safe.”

CNN: Sanjay Gupta Sits down With Twins Professor (From Page One)

responses and if twins can or do prove this. David Martin, senior producer for CNN, said they had selected Segal because she’s one of the nation’s leading experts. Twins are a fascinating subject to Segal, who is a twin herself. She said they are important to study because they can help us understand both human genetics and psychology. “This is a very exciting time to be involved in twin research,” Segal said, citing the increase in twin births from the 1960s to present. Twins offer a unique insight into humanity, Segal said. She also considers the reasons why people are so fascinated by twins. “Everybody finds it a little bit intriguing,” Segal said. “The reason for the interest in twins is that they challenge our beliefs about how the world works.” Segal’s interview with CNN will appear during a one-hour special, scheduled to air Nov. 5 at 10 p.m.

Expert

- CNN’s Sanjay Gupta sits down to interview CSUF professor Nancy Segal.

By DANIEL SUZUKI/For the Daily Titan

THREE: Proportion of CSUF Blacks Higher Than Fullerton’s (From Page One)

in the Titan Oval Office in August of 1990, immediately expressing his intentions to have a proactive role in enhancing the integration of the campus and surrounding community. His term began during a period of tenuous race relations that included fraternity-sponsored mock slave auctions and poor communication between the Associate Students Inc. and MEChA. “What he has done is publicized CSUF’s policy of accepting minorities and others into the program, all the time,” said Gethagia. “He has made the campus more accepting in making sure ethnicities are recognized and supported – our numbers have risen from over 500 to 1000 [black students.]” “As we are increasing this population, we are increasing the diversity of our students and faculty,” Gordon said of CSUF. The president responded with takes on issues previously discussed in the series, such as the predominantly Caucasian mystique of “The Orange Curtain,” as well as the social separation between blacks and whites on the campus.

He conceded that the demographics of Orange County make the school an underdog next to Los Angeles County, which has a much higher black population to draw upon. In regards to the harmonious distance blacks and whites seem to keep from one another on campus, the President acknowledged the divide while pointing out the intercultural networking opportunities CSUF provides within the curriculum. There’s “a natural affinity for people at time wanting to be with like, but that doesn’t mean they don’t work together,” Gordon said. The university has focused its efforts on breaking down cultural barriers through education. CSUF was ahead of the curve with the advent of its ethnic studies program in 1969 as a progressive answer to the social unrest that lie in the fabric of the day. “The Afro-Ethnic studies programs is one where [students] will learn something here they will not learn somewhere else,” Gethaiga said. “It’s a program to try and bring about some sanity, an open forum where we want people to confront

those issues. Once we know how much we can interact with people, imagine if that were to happen on a grander scale.” Gethaiga suggested offering aid to help prospective students overcome certain economic obstacles to compensate for Fullerton’s high cost of living, travel expenses and tuition as a method of recruiting. Gordon has been active in CSU recruitment programs in Oakland and Los Angeles churches and schools in efforts to attract a higher number of black students into the system. One of the president’s biggest steps in making a principally white campus more comfortable for its black students was the creation of the African American Resource Center. “A number of years ago, the leaders of the African American Student Association talked to Vice President Palmer and myself, so we opened the AARC and I think it has attracted more diversity to the campus,” Gordon said. Located in room 222 of the Humanities Building, the center functions as a home base for

the school’s black students for both educational and recreation purposes. “CSUF does not seem to foster an environment in which black students are not invited to participate in social groups and activities,” said K.C. White, an alumnus who is black. While CSUF ranks low in the actual number of enrolled black students – about 1,000 – the university is efficient in staying ahead of its surrounding community in terms of percentage. The city of Fullerton has a black population of 2 percent. CSUF’s enrollment is at 3.41 percent. The city of Long Beach has a robust black community, composing 14.5 percent of its population; Cal State Long Beach has a total black population of 5.6 percent. Up the 57, the city of Pomona has a black population of 9.6 percent while 3.7 percent of the student body is made up of black students. “Right now we are really celebrating the 3 percent,” Gethaiga said. “[Comparing] our numbers to the population, I’d say CSUF has done very well.”

On-campus Resources for Race, Culture and Gender Relations Afro-Ethnic Studies Students Association

This on-campus group sponsors various events to promote a flow of communication between people of all backgrounds. Membership is open to students regardless of background. If interested contact adviser Julie Stokes at (714) 2783485 or jstokes@fullerton.edu.

Alliance for the Preservation of African Consciousness

This primarily male group’s mission statement is to promote a higher degree of education and community between AfricanAmericans and the public at large. If interested, contact Mike Stafford at (310) 638-1936 or

roccafella6@hotmail.com

Afro-Ethnic Studies Community Ensemble

This group pays homage to the African-American culture with music and dance performances. If interested, contact Stan Breckenridge at (714) 278-7003 or http://hss.fullerton.edu/afro/ Ensemble.html.

Sistertalk

This group is intended to give women of all backgrounds a chance to discuss ethnicity and gender in pertinence to personal relationships and professional endeavors. If interested, contact Rosalina Camacho at (714) 278-3928 or Chyrel McLeod at chyrelmcleod@charter.net.


September 14, 2006

INTROSPECT

D Design

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

By ian hamilton/Daily Titan Assistant News Editor

skin art - Tim McAlary, art major, works on a tattoo on the leg of radio-TV-film major Brian Thomas. Both are CSUF students. This is the fifth tattoo McAlary has done for Thomas.

said McAlary’s skills are improving. Thomas is also a CSUF student and is wearing the second tattoo McAlary ever created. “Some he has done recently that I have seen are like top professionalquality tattoos,” said Thomas, a radio-TV-film major. He has come a long way since his second tattoo, which Thomas said, had several errors. Overall, Thomas doesn’t mind the mistakes. “It is just part of the game. It is better. I like imperfections in all forms of art,” he said. He recently performed his first walk-in. He said he was nervous because the tattoo was on the client’s forearm, which meant the customer was watching the procedure the entire time. “It was the most nerve-racking thing I have ever done. It was the first person who wasn’t one of my friends. He was stoked [with the finished tattoo], but I wasn’t. He gave me a good tip,” he said. Growing up, his mother always thought he would pursue a career in art. But with holes in his ears the size of dimes and images etched across his body, it is obvious to Diane McAlary that her son is drawn to the art of tattooing. She is now used to her son’s career and is proud of his accomplishments. “I think it is wonderful that he can do something with his talent. It maybe is not what I expected, but never the less, he is passionate about it and very professional,” Diane said. Although McAlary has asked his mother several times, she will not be getting a tattoo. “It has become more of a joke between us now,” she said.

WearableArt

S

Pushing his lips tightly together, Tim McAlary leans down about five inches away from his canvas and begins tracing the lines of a vicious-looking wolf. He stretches the latex gloves over his fingers and prepares to do his fifth tattoo on Brian Thomas’ right leg. Between the moments of deep concentration, they find time to joke and laugh. Thomas pats his own stomach to the beat of the music playing in the studio. Neither of them appears nervous. McAlary has spent the last year and eight months as an apprentice at Classic Tattoo Studio in Fullerton. Since he was 15 years old, McAlary has dreamed of becoming a tattoo artist. He was drawn to the idea of being an independent contractor. He wants to travel and display his

art. With a developing portfolio, McAlary can promote himself in the company of other artists. He looks forward to a time when people will ask for him by name. “It is pretty cool to draw something that people will want to wear forever,” McAlary said. The Cal State Fullerton student took this semester off to complete his apprenticeship and is planning on finishing school in the spring. “This doesn’t distract me from school. I will finish my degree,” the art major said, adding that taking a semester off “is good because it is hard to designate enough time to this while going to school.” McAlary spends approximately 11 hours a day, six days a week at the shop. As part of his daily duties, he stocks working stations, sterilizes equipment and creates line drawings for future tattoos. He’s also had the chance to create approximately 25 tattoos. Thomas

S

Of The Beholder

A tattoo artist looks at his art as a body of work BY JULIANNA CRISALLI

& &

Brick Mortar

Paint on walls. Some say it’s vandalism, others argue it’s high art

From gravity-defying styles to crazy colors, hair is art you can take with you

BY PAUL SAIEDI

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Who can forget the “Rachel” haircut from “Friends” or the day that Felicity chopped her luscious locks? From the Midwestern mullet to the ’70s Afro, alternative hairstyles continue to shear their way to the cutting edge of current culture. Hairstyles, like fashion and art, change from generation to generation. Leaders like Julius Caesar and Hollywood starlets like Jean Harlow have inspired hairstyles since antiquity. In the 1920s the “flapper bob” deviated from past traditions ­­ –not just in style, but in attitude as it symbolized a change in notions of femininity, sexuality and womanhood, said Trista O’Connell, an American studies professor. Today, alternative trends in hair can be seen covering the heads of Cal State Fullerton students. Titans sport hairstyles that span from dyed dreadlocks and buzzed barbershop flat-tops to a full spectrum of vibrant hair colors. Hair hipsters who desire the latest in alternative hair travel to Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. Melrose, offering an abundant mix of Gothic and alternative hair salons, is where trendsetters converge. The sidewalks of Melrose are dotted with an eclectic mix of music stores, vintage clothing shops, international cafes and hair salons. Cutting at the Royal Salon, sandwiched between a punk record store and a dry cleaner, is one of the driving forces in alternative hair. Simply known as Atila, the 61-yearold salon owner has cut everyone from Dee Dee Ramon, a founding member of the Ramones, to poppunk diva Pink. In his modern minimalistic salon, Atila eagerly relates his philosophy on alternative hair trends while sharing stacks of client photos from the past 25 years. “If you want to understand alternative hair then you have to understand Elvis,” Atila said, pointing to a drawing of the king. “He was the original rebel. Try to picture that thick chunk of sexy hair

7

There’s more to art than meets the eye. It’s off the canvas and on our streets, our bodies and even on top of our heads

S

Of Human

INTROSPECT

September 14, 2006

Q

6

swinging around his face when he sang, that’s punk, that’s alternative.” On the cutting edge of hair today there are wild extensions, waxy dreadlocks, fluorescent colors and even battery-operated moving hairpieces, Atila said. Edgy hair comes from subcultures in dark little bars in big cities like New York, Los Angeles and London. “I’ll tell students what I told Pink when I dyed her hair for the first time,” Atila said. “Take a chance and do something that really says who you are. Hair is not the most important impression that we make, but it is the truest.” All haircuts, especially alternative haircuts, express how we feel about ourselves and how much we care for ourselves, Atila said. Most alternative cuts today are governed by simple rules, Atila said. “Keep the front and top longer, think of the sexy bangs that Paris Hilton peeks through, and keep the cuts sharp and strong.” One block down from Atila’s salon is Vous Hair equally known for its creative hair concepts. James Boring, currently cutting at Vous Hair, specializes in using unorthodox coloring combinations and short wild cuts. His own hair is

dyed jet black and tied into a long ponytail almost reaching his butt. “What’s wild in hair is the trying to blur the line between men and women’s cuts,” Boring said. “There is this whole sort of androgynous movement that is on the fringes of being accepted.” It is sad how there is a total lack of originality in hair. We are just redoing what has been done or interpreting what a stuck-up hair guru from London says is trendy, Boring said. “Right now the most current cuts are cleaned up ‘80s looks with shaved designs,” Boring said. “If you have seen a hairstyle on a TV show then forget about it, it’s already mainstream.” Back at the Royal Salon Atila continues talking about where he sees the future of alternative hair heading. “I think that we will see hair like we have never seen before,” Atila said. “A mixture of shaved lines and either painted designs or tattooed drawings intermixed with hair.” Alternative hair to one person can be dull to another. Anyone can have alternative hair, they just need to step out of their comfort zone and try something new, Atila said.

BY PAUL SAEIDI/Daily Titan Staff Writer

mowhawk - Punk rock music store owner, and one of Atila’s regular clients, leaves the salon fashioned with a new Mohawk.

BY HARMONY TREVINO

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Up-and-coming artist Chris Allen has found his niche. At 17 years old, he started to take notice of the graffiti art sprawled across the city of Anaheim. Already into sketch art, he grabbed some markers and ventured out to create his own voice through a medium he had never used before. Allen, always thinking outside the box, never wanted to be told how to create his art. “I got into graffiti ‘cause I realize that there are some people in the same shoes,” Allen said. “They can’t paint what people want them to paint, but they can do their own thing.” Now the 20-year-old, currently an employee in the paint department of a hardware store –a deliberate move– thrives on the adrenaline rush of being a graffiti artist. As he sat in his chair with a calm intensity, talking about graffiti and his art, the blood pumping through his veins could almost be seen. His medium for artistic expression has led him to have some close calls with authorities while out on his excursions, but he said that it is all part of being a graffiti artist.

“It’s a thrill,” he said. “Some people they get that thrill from drinking and partying, mine is just from doing graffiti.” Allen defends the integrity of the craft by adding that not just anyone can just pick up a spray can and call themselves a graffiti artist. “Most people pick one up and think that they are a tagger, but they don’t know where it originates from,” he said. “Their style usually never progresses because they are so concentrated on being badass that they are not looking at the art side.” Allen wants people to see the skill involved in creating these art pieces, and go past labeling all of it vandalism and gang tagging. “A lot of people call it vandalism… but if you actually look at the art ones, [they] are really good, and yes, it may be a freeway, but the time and the skill that actually goes into it is remarkable,” he said. Allen calls Los Angeles the top city for exceptional graffiti art and it is there where he finds most of his inspiration. He looks up to famous graffiti crews like AWR, or Angels Will Rise­­­­­­, who have made the largest illegal graffiti piece in Los Angeles, which took 300 gallons of paint to complete. His girlfriend of two years, Victoria Tobin, admires his work and

has some of his paintings hanging in her room. But she disagrees with the way he expresses himself. “I always try to be supportive of Chris and his hobbies,” she said. “Unfortunately, this hobby includes destroying others’ property and putting himself in dangerous situations. I feel that it belongs on a canvas and not on a freeway. I don’t agree with destroying peoples’ property that they have worked hard for.” In the beginning of the relationship, she had no idea how serious Allen was about graffiti. “I thought graffiti was a phase that he would eventually grow out of, but now, I see no end in sight,” she said. Tobin also worries about his safety when he takes his art to the streets late at night. “I’m scared that I’ll get a phone call one night saying he was hit by a train,” she said. “If I asked him to stop, I know he would out of respect for me, but that would break his heart. I keep my mouth shut, and I hope that eventually he decides the consequences aren’t worth the thrill.” Paul Racs, the director of the Office of Community Beautification in Los Angeles, said in the fiscal year of 2005 to 2006 there were 53, 367 call-in requests from Los Angeles residents for graffiti removal. He said the total amount of graffiti removed from the city streets and freeways covered an area of 25 million square feet. The program spent $7 million last year on Los Angeles street clean up alone. Only a small portion are reports of more artistic pieces like the ones Chris creates, Racs said. He even added that he admires their artistic ability. “I certainly think that many of these guys are very talented,” Racs said. “But if they do something without the permission of the property owner then it’s vandalism whether it’s artful or not.”

Photos By Leslie umali/For the Daily Titan

Spray paint- Anthony “Cowboy” Rico (above) adds dimension to his piece for the Focus Ministries Youth Outreach event at Venice Beach last Saturday. Graffiti Artists like Rico were there to inspire youth to appreciate graffiti as an artform. Joe Jimenez (left) wears a gas mask while he paints on the provided wall.

To serve as an outlet for local graffiti artists, some cities have set up areas where artists are free to tag without worrying about police officers stopping them. Companies, like Red Bull, also sponsor “graffiti jams” where graffiti artists can unleash their talent. “Sometimes you don’t want to have the thrill, you just want to show people what you can really do,” Allen said. For now Allen mostly tags his

name, but he’s still trying to improve his skill of painting murals. He wouldn’t even mind being paid for his work. “I do a lot of sketches. I don’t want to be one of those people who, yes, get up a lot, but it looks like crap,” he said. “Once I feel I’ve reached that point I want to go all out. It just takes time.” He has turned down multiple opportunities to paint murals, recognizing that he still has a way to go.

“My lack of self-confidence, because I haven’t done enough [paintings], has caused me to turn a lot of jobs down for that exact reason I don’t want to look like an idiot…I don’t want my name to go down like that,” he said. When finally asked the million dollar question as to how graffiti artists get their work on freeway overpasses, he sat back and smiled. “A lot of cajones.”


September 14, 2006

INTROSPECT

D Design

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

By ian hamilton/Daily Titan Assistant News Editor

skin art - Tim McAlary, art major, works on a tattoo on the leg of radio-TV-film major Brian Thomas. Both are CSUF students. This is the fifth tattoo McAlary has done for Thomas.

said McAlary’s skills are improving. Thomas is also a CSUF student and is wearing the second tattoo McAlary ever created. “Some he has done recently that I have seen are like top professionalquality tattoos,” said Thomas, a radio-TV-film major. He has come a long way since his second tattoo, which Thomas said, had several errors. Overall, Thomas doesn’t mind the mistakes. “It is just part of the game. It is better. I like imperfections in all forms of art,” he said. He recently performed his first walk-in. He said he was nervous because the tattoo was on the client’s forearm, which meant the customer was watching the procedure the entire time. “It was the most nerve-racking thing I have ever done. It was the first person who wasn’t one of my friends. He was stoked [with the finished tattoo], but I wasn’t. He gave me a good tip,” he said. Growing up, his mother always thought he would pursue a career in art. But with holes in his ears the size of dimes and images etched across his body, it is obvious to Diane McAlary that her son is drawn to the art of tattooing. She is now used to her son’s career and is proud of his accomplishments. “I think it is wonderful that he can do something with his talent. It maybe is not what I expected, but never the less, he is passionate about it and very professional,” Diane said. Although McAlary has asked his mother several times, she will not be getting a tattoo. “It has become more of a joke between us now,” she said.

WearableArt

S

Pushing his lips tightly together, Tim McAlary leans down about five inches away from his canvas and begins tracing the lines of a vicious-looking wolf. He stretches the latex gloves over his fingers and prepares to do his fifth tattoo on Brian Thomas’ right leg. Between the moments of deep concentration, they find time to joke and laugh. Thomas pats his own stomach to the beat of the music playing in the studio. Neither of them appears nervous. McAlary has spent the last year and eight months as an apprentice at Classic Tattoo Studio in Fullerton. Since he was 15 years old, McAlary has dreamed of becoming a tattoo artist. He was drawn to the idea of being an independent contractor. He wants to travel and display his

art. With a developing portfolio, McAlary can promote himself in the company of other artists. He looks forward to a time when people will ask for him by name. “It is pretty cool to draw something that people will want to wear forever,” McAlary said. The Cal State Fullerton student took this semester off to complete his apprenticeship and is planning on finishing school in the spring. “This doesn’t distract me from school. I will finish my degree,” the art major said, adding that taking a semester off “is good because it is hard to designate enough time to this while going to school.” McAlary spends approximately 11 hours a day, six days a week at the shop. As part of his daily duties, he stocks working stations, sterilizes equipment and creates line drawings for future tattoos. He’s also had the chance to create approximately 25 tattoos. Thomas

S

Of The Beholder

A tattoo artist looks at his art as a body of work BY JULIANNA CRISALLI

& &

Brick Mortar

Paint on walls. Some say it’s vandalism, others argue it’s high art

From gravity-defying styles to crazy colors, hair is art you can take with you

BY PAUL SAIEDI

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Who can forget the “Rachel” haircut from “Friends” or the day that Felicity chopped her luscious locks? From the Midwestern mullet to the ’70s Afro, alternative hairstyles continue to shear their way to the cutting edge of current culture. Hairstyles, like fashion and art, change from generation to generation. Leaders like Julius Caesar and Hollywood starlets like Jean Harlow have inspired hairstyles since antiquity. In the 1920s the “flapper bob” deviated from past traditions ­­ –not just in style, but in attitude as it symbolized a change in notions of femininity, sexuality and womanhood, said Trista O’Connell, an American studies professor. Today, alternative trends in hair can be seen covering the heads of Cal State Fullerton students. Titans sport hairstyles that span from dyed dreadlocks and buzzed barbershop flat-tops to a full spectrum of vibrant hair colors. Hair hipsters who desire the latest in alternative hair travel to Melrose Avenue in Hollywood. Melrose, offering an abundant mix of Gothic and alternative hair salons, is where trendsetters converge. The sidewalks of Melrose are dotted with an eclectic mix of music stores, vintage clothing shops, international cafes and hair salons. Cutting at the Royal Salon, sandwiched between a punk record store and a dry cleaner, is one of the driving forces in alternative hair. Simply known as Atila, the 61-yearold salon owner has cut everyone from Dee Dee Ramon, a founding member of the Ramones, to poppunk diva Pink. In his modern minimalistic salon, Atila eagerly relates his philosophy on alternative hair trends while sharing stacks of client photos from the past 25 years. “If you want to understand alternative hair then you have to understand Elvis,” Atila said, pointing to a drawing of the king. “He was the original rebel. Try to picture that thick chunk of sexy hair

7

There’s more to art than meets the eye. It’s off the canvas and on our streets, our bodies and even on top of our heads

S

Of Human

INTROSPECT

September 14, 2006

Q

6

swinging around his face when he sang, that’s punk, that’s alternative.” On the cutting edge of hair today there are wild extensions, waxy dreadlocks, fluorescent colors and even battery-operated moving hairpieces, Atila said. Edgy hair comes from subcultures in dark little bars in big cities like New York, Los Angeles and London. “I’ll tell students what I told Pink when I dyed her hair for the first time,” Atila said. “Take a chance and do something that really says who you are. Hair is not the most important impression that we make, but it is the truest.” All haircuts, especially alternative haircuts, express how we feel about ourselves and how much we care for ourselves, Atila said. Most alternative cuts today are governed by simple rules, Atila said. “Keep the front and top longer, think of the sexy bangs that Paris Hilton peeks through, and keep the cuts sharp and strong.” One block down from Atila’s salon is Vous Hair equally known for its creative hair concepts. James Boring, currently cutting at Vous Hair, specializes in using unorthodox coloring combinations and short wild cuts. His own hair is

dyed jet black and tied into a long ponytail almost reaching his butt. “What’s wild in hair is the trying to blur the line between men and women’s cuts,” Boring said. “There is this whole sort of androgynous movement that is on the fringes of being accepted.” It is sad how there is a total lack of originality in hair. We are just redoing what has been done or interpreting what a stuck-up hair guru from London says is trendy, Boring said. “Right now the most current cuts are cleaned up ‘80s looks with shaved designs,” Boring said. “If you have seen a hairstyle on a TV show then forget about it, it’s already mainstream.” Back at the Royal Salon Atila continues talking about where he sees the future of alternative hair heading. “I think that we will see hair like we have never seen before,” Atila said. “A mixture of shaved lines and either painted designs or tattooed drawings intermixed with hair.” Alternative hair to one person can be dull to another. Anyone can have alternative hair, they just need to step out of their comfort zone and try something new, Atila said.

BY PAUL SAEIDI/Daily Titan Staff Writer

mowhawk - Punk rock music store owner, and one of Atila’s regular clients, leaves the salon fashioned with a new Mohawk.

BY HARMONY TREVINO

Daily Titan Staff Writer news@dailytitan.com

Up-and-coming artist Chris Allen has found his niche. At 17 years old, he started to take notice of the graffiti art sprawled across the city of Anaheim. Already into sketch art, he grabbed some markers and ventured out to create his own voice through a medium he had never used before. Allen, always thinking outside the box, never wanted to be told how to create his art. “I got into graffiti ‘cause I realize that there are some people in the same shoes,” Allen said. “They can’t paint what people want them to paint, but they can do their own thing.” Now the 20-year-old, currently an employee in the paint department of a hardware store –a deliberate move– thrives on the adrenaline rush of being a graffiti artist. As he sat in his chair with a calm intensity, talking about graffiti and his art, the blood pumping through his veins could almost be seen. His medium for artistic expression has led him to have some close calls with authorities while out on his excursions, but he said that it is all part of being a graffiti artist.

“It’s a thrill,” he said. “Some people they get that thrill from drinking and partying, mine is just from doing graffiti.” Allen defends the integrity of the craft by adding that not just anyone can just pick up a spray can and call themselves a graffiti artist. “Most people pick one up and think that they are a tagger, but they don’t know where it originates from,” he said. “Their style usually never progresses because they are so concentrated on being badass that they are not looking at the art side.” Allen wants people to see the skill involved in creating these art pieces, and go past labeling all of it vandalism and gang tagging. “A lot of people call it vandalism… but if you actually look at the art ones, [they] are really good, and yes, it may be a freeway, but the time and the skill that actually goes into it is remarkable,” he said. Allen calls Los Angeles the top city for exceptional graffiti art and it is there where he finds most of his inspiration. He looks up to famous graffiti crews like AWR, or Angels Will Rise­­­­­­, who have made the largest illegal graffiti piece in Los Angeles, which took 300 gallons of paint to complete. His girlfriend of two years, Victoria Tobin, admires his work and

has some of his paintings hanging in her room. But she disagrees with the way he expresses himself. “I always try to be supportive of Chris and his hobbies,” she said. “Unfortunately, this hobby includes destroying others’ property and putting himself in dangerous situations. I feel that it belongs on a canvas and not on a freeway. I don’t agree with destroying peoples’ property that they have worked hard for.” In the beginning of the relationship, she had no idea how serious Allen was about graffiti. “I thought graffiti was a phase that he would eventually grow out of, but now, I see no end in sight,” she said. Tobin also worries about his safety when he takes his art to the streets late at night. “I’m scared that I’ll get a phone call one night saying he was hit by a train,” she said. “If I asked him to stop, I know he would out of respect for me, but that would break his heart. I keep my mouth shut, and I hope that eventually he decides the consequences aren’t worth the thrill.” Paul Racs, the director of the Office of Community Beautification in Los Angeles, said in the fiscal year of 2005 to 2006 there were 53, 367 call-in requests from Los Angeles residents for graffiti removal. He said the total amount of graffiti removed from the city streets and freeways covered an area of 25 million square feet. The program spent $7 million last year on Los Angeles street clean up alone. Only a small portion are reports of more artistic pieces like the ones Chris creates, Racs said. He even added that he admires their artistic ability. “I certainly think that many of these guys are very talented,” Racs said. “But if they do something without the permission of the property owner then it’s vandalism whether it’s artful or not.”

Photos By Leslie umali/For the Daily Titan

Spray paint- Anthony “Cowboy” Rico (above) adds dimension to his piece for the Focus Ministries Youth Outreach event at Venice Beach last Saturday. Graffiti Artists like Rico were there to inspire youth to appreciate graffiti as an artform. Joe Jimenez (left) wears a gas mask while he paints on the provided wall.

To serve as an outlet for local graffiti artists, some cities have set up areas where artists are free to tag without worrying about police officers stopping them. Companies, like Red Bull, also sponsor “graffiti jams” where graffiti artists can unleash their talent. “Sometimes you don’t want to have the thrill, you just want to show people what you can really do,” Allen said. For now Allen mostly tags his

name, but he’s still trying to improve his skill of painting murals. He wouldn’t even mind being paid for his work. “I do a lot of sketches. I don’t want to be one of those people who, yes, get up a lot, but it looks like crap,” he said. “Once I feel I’ve reached that point I want to go all out. It just takes time.” He has turned down multiple opportunities to paint murals, recognizing that he still has a way to go.

“My lack of self-confidence, because I haven’t done enough [paintings], has caused me to turn a lot of jobs down for that exact reason I don’t want to look like an idiot…I don’t want my name to go down like that,” he said. When finally asked the million dollar question as to how graffiti artists get their work on freeway overpasses, he sat back and smiled. “A lot of cajones.”


8

OPINION Titan Editorial Providing insight, analysis and perspective since 1960

WORD on the Street Do you earn enough money to pay for the cost of living? COMPILED BY Joey T. English/Daily Titan Staff Writer

Faux News

The right wing offers up As journalists, albeit in the budding stages of out careers, fare that is not much better. we here at the Daily Titan have You have super-schmuck Bill taken exception to a form of the O’Reilly preaching his pompous news that prioritizes entertaining morality while sexually harassing the masses over informing the his female producer. democracy. Or Rush Limbaugh preaching These days, we are seemingly conservative values and the “way force fed our information in things ought to be” in between glossy shrinkhis thinly wrap that veiled racist emphasizes comments and style and They have all reached multiple hits production of Oxycontin. a level of success we quality over It’s not can only wish to accuracy and that we hate achieve one day - but any of these balance. They come from all not at the expense of guys, all to the angles. contrary. our credibility. From the They have left, we have all reached a the bleedinglevel of success heart Goodyear we can only blimp known wish to achieve as Michael Moore spewing one day – but not at the expense his subversive propaganda of our credibility. under the guise of an impartial What all of these men have in common is while they may have documentary. Or there’s that nice young started as journalists, they clearly man Jon “Stewart” Leibowitz jumped the shark at some point showcasing his arrogant East and decided a top hat and cane Coast sarcasm under the guise of would be better accessories than a news program. a pen and a pad. EDITOR’S NOTE: The Titan Editorial is solely the opinion of the Daily Titan editorial board and was written after the open debate between board members. The editorial board consists of the executive editor, the managing editor, the opinion editor, the news editors, the copy chief and other editors upon appointment of the executive editor.

Letters to the Editor The Daily Titan welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must include the sender’s first and last name. Students must include their majors, and other writers must include their affiliation to the university, if applicable. The Daily Titan reserves the right to edit letters for length, grammar and spelling. Send letters to Julie Anne Ines, the executive editor, at jines@dailytitan.com.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Titan Editorial is solely the opinion of the Daily Titan editorial board and was written after the open debate between board members. The editorial board consists of the executive editor, the managing editor, the opinion editor, the news editors, the copy chief and other editors upon appointment of the executive editor.

Lisa Ochoa Business Marketing Senior

Ryan Gernsh Illustration Senior

Samantha Bonzer Musical Theater Sophmore

Joseph Aguilera Biology Sophmore

“I don’t have to worry about any of that because I live at home.”

“Yes, because I’m fortunate enough to have a cash job. I’m a server, live on my own and pay my own rent.”

“I’m not making enough money to live [on my own] and I’m living on my last pennies.”

“Not. I still live at home and I’m only working part-time as a full-time student.”

Nancy T. Matarrita Child and Adolescent Development Senior

“Yes. But I get help from my parents, so I don’t have the full burden that other students do.”

‘Land Of Opportunity’ a Future Myth By Joey T. English

Daily Titan Staff Writer opinion@dailytitan.com

The economy and workers’ well being appears to be the growing partisan squabble between Republicans and Democrats. For the past five years, terrorism and national security overshadowed populist concerns of stagnant paychecks and income inequality (except during that brief Hurricane Katrina episode). However, the disconnect between President Bush’s praise of a growing economy and the majority of American workers who believe they “are worse off now than a generation ago,” according to a new Pew Research Center survey, has recently stirred opinions from both sides of the political spectrum. Regardless of the partisan belligerence that will ensue, income inequality is alive and well

in America. Even the president’s latest Treasury head, Henry Paulson, admitted this during one of his first major speeches, saying, “Amid this country’s strong economic expansion, many Americans simply aren’t feeling the benefits.” Based on recent U.S. Census Bureau data, the richest fifth of households in America accrue 50.4 percent of all national income. That’s the highest share since 1967, when the Bureau began compiling such data, according to the Economic Policy Institute. Both the middle fifth and the lowest fifth broke the record for receiving the lowest share of the economic pie – the middle fifth receiving 14.6 percent and the bottom fifth, just 3.4 percent, the EPI said. Further, the new Census data reveals an unchanged poverty level – still at 12.6 percent – and an increase in Americans without

health insurance, from 15.6 percent to 15.9 percent (46.6 million). These numbers raise a conflict of priorities in America. Does a growing economy outweigh the fortunes of U.S. workers? “American workers are now more than 17 percent more productive than they were in 2001, “ Bush said during a January speech in Chicago. “That’s important because productivity means America will remain the leader in the world.” Yet, considering the current inflation-adjusted median income is lower than its 2001 level, as shown in the Census report, Bush’s words strike a patronizing chord. Essentially, Americans work harder for less compensation. Perhaps that explains why a majority of Americans believe that work life is getting worse. According to the latest Pew survey, among the most popular explanations for such discontent are a decline in

job opportunity and security, lower salaries, the rising cost of living and worse benefits. And as gas prices climb and American companies search for cheaper labor abroad, those pursuing a middle class lifestyle may find it a struggle to keep up. America needs to reinstate a broadly shared national interest that chooses to include all citizens in its growing economy, not just the top fifth percentile. “And as for declining benefits – well, every other advanced country manages to provide everyone with health insurance, while spending less on health care than we do,” wrote New York Times columnist Paul Krugman. Unless America rethinks her direction and addresses these legitimate concerns of income inequality, the “land of opportunity” may very well manifest as a myth for future generations.


9

OPINION

September 14, 2006

Globalization Creates Inequality in U.S. and Orange County By Paul Peretz

CSUF Professor of Politics, Administration, and Justice opinion@dailytitan.com

Over the last 30 to 40 years the distribution of family income in the United States has become increasingly unequal. Though there are many causes the major cause has been globalization. This increased U.S. economic growth, but at a price. As trade barriers fell in the United States and imports and exports grew, the incomes of Americans who owned capital or

had advanced skills increased. The incomes of those who relied on labor, especially unskilled labor, for their incomes grew much more slowly, as cheaper overseas labor limited wage gains, and competed away worker benefits. Over the 30-year period from 1975 to 2005 mean real incomes for the poorest 20 percent of households increased 15 percent to $10,655 and mean incomes of average households increased 23 percent to $46,301, both less than 1 percent a year. Because worker benefits such

as pensions and health benefits grew worse over this period, the real increase was less than this for average workers. Over the same period the mean income of those in the top 20 percent of households increased 66 percent to $159,583 and mean incomes of those in the top 5 percent increased 92 percent to $281,155. In 1975-2001 period the share of all household income going to the top 20 percent of households increased from 43 percent to 50 percent, with almost all of this coming from the increase from 16 percent to 22 percent of the share

going to the top 5 percent. This tendency appears to have increased in the 2001 to 2005 period. Summarizing, there were small gains for all groups in the 30-year period but a disproportionate share of the increase in American gross national product went to the top 5 percent of the income pyramid. Some of you may say, “if things are so unfair why don’t I see it?’ One answer is that people often look at current income rather than income adjusted for inflation, and that people are not good at calculations over time.

A second is that there have actually been dollar improvements for most, even if they are very small. But a bigger one is that most of you live in North Orange County. Compared to both California and the United States, Orange County’s population is more likely to have a bachelor’s degree or other higher education, more likely to have a higher income and more likely to be in management or professional positions. The percent living below the poverty line is almost twice as

high in Los Angeles County as in Orange County. Finally, the poor population within Orange County is primarily in the South, in cities like Santa Ana, Garden Grove and Westminster. Nonetheless there are approximately 270,000 people living below the poverty line – currently $1,300 a month for a family of three – in Orange County. About 40 percent of these have income less than half of the poverty line. Even in one of the richest counties in America, all is not perfect.

TITANS TALK BACK

“A good newspaper, I suppose, is a nation talking to itself.” - Arthur Miller

NOT A WAr about oil, or Ideologies EDITOR: The article “The Arrival of World War III” defines a world war as one that “usually span multiple continents, have many casualties and are severely destructive.” So do we really need to wait for history totell us we are in the middle of World War III? This is a “different” kind of war. We are not hiding in the trenches to meet our enemy face-to-face. The enemy has come on our turf, invaded our land; and Bush gets the credit, although the attacks occurred only eight months after his inauguration. How soon we forget that the signs of the terrorists attacks were there during the eight years of the Clinton administration. Was this retaliation? Yes, against America and what we stand for. We stand for freedom and the terrorists use that right against us. This is not a war about oil or even ideologies. These terrorists do not value human life and we cannot change that, but we can stand up against it. That is what we needed to do. President Bush cannot be seen as a dictator by the very fact he was voted into office by the American

people but, surely, historical views can be askew at times. The terrorists did not attack simply because we invaded Iraq. These same attacks have been seen throughout the world and not only against America. Like Hitler, their goal is for world domination and submission. The difference is we strive to give the citizens of these countries the freedom they long for. I do not believe anyone here longs for the ideologies of these terrorists. Stacy Clements Student and mother Negative connotation of “black’ EDITOR: First off, I read the Daily Titan often, and think it is a great paper. However, while reading Adam Levy’s article on the low presence of African-Americans on campus, I couldn’t help but feel offended. The part of the article that caught my attention, but angered me the most was the title: Lack of Black. I don’t understand why a respectable publication such as the Daily Titan would rather offend students for the sake of a “clever” title, than be politically correct. When addressing ethnicities I

find that it is most appropriate to identify them by the politically correct term. Do we refer to Native-Americans as reds, Asian-Americans as yellows, and Hispanics as browns? Then why is it OK to refer to AfricanAmericans as blacks? I know that Caucasians are often referred to as “white,” but there is a much more positive connotation to the word than black. According to Webster, white is morally or spiritually pure; spotless, innocent or free from evil intent. Webster defines black as evil; wicked; harmful. Full of sorrow or suffering; sad; dismal; gloomy. The opposite of white. We use white to describe the good in the world, while black is used for negativity, i.e. “black market.” When Europeans first encountered Africans they called them blacks or Negros not only because of the darkness of their skin, but because of where they saw them on the totem pole of society. It was not meant to be a kind categorization. Africa was long referred to as the Dark Continent, because it represented the darkness of the world to the Europeans. So perhaps amongst friends it is ok to call an African-American “black,” or a Caucasian “white.” Personally when I am with my

friends I don’t mind being referred to as black, because I know there is no negativity behind it. But when you are speaking out to a mass audience it is important to not use slang to identify an ethnic group. We are people of a specific ethnicity and culture, not crayons from a box. While I was upset about some of the semantics in the article, I am glad that the low presence of African-Americans on campus is getting some exposure. I appreciate the information the article provides. My father was a student at Cal State Fullerton in the ’70s and experienced an enormous amount of racism through his college years. I am glad that the Daily Titan has decided to acknowledge the fact that there was and still is an underlying race issue in Orange County. I feel that racism toward African-Americans stems from ignorance of the race and its culture. Too many people develop their opinions of African-Americans from one bad personal experience, BET, unfair media depiction and professional athletes. I truly and honestly appreciate the Daily Titan’s attempt to educate the public, and I look forward to the rest of the series. Randall Davis Junior, Marketing

a crime outside of fraternity-related life. EDITOR: Once again the media has perpetuated a negative stereotype. Well, once again the Daily Titan All fraternity members are has managed to make one more “ignorant party boys” like you ignorant remark while trying to stated. pretend to be reporters. Do you know that Greeks have While I agree that it is shame the highest GPA among students; that hate crimes the Greek can still happen system develops I also think it’s a shame strong leaders in this point in time, in this and gives back to that the Daily Titan diverse campus, at the community decided to call out a place of higher more then the Delta Chi on one bad learning, and average student. while I strongly But we always member. believe that this hear the bad person should be things about punished by the Greeks. full extent of the Strangely law. enough, when we call the media out I also think it’s a shame that the to come to our positive events they Daily Titan decided to call out Delta fail to show up. Chi on one bad member. What a shame. You could have Do you even know what you have made your point across without done? Do you even think? having to do what you did. Once again one bad apple will Bash the Greek Community. spoil a whole bunch. Again, this person should pay for Yeah you are right, “if people what he did, and the crime you, the have to apologize for being who Daily Titan, have done is no where they are, in the year 2006, we are in near close to the crime he must trouble.” now pay for, nor am I trying to But, now all Delta Chi members, compare them, but still its a crime which more likely than not are nonetheless. respectable citizens, will be called Again, what a shame. racist. Araseli Cuevas Because one member committed Communications/ Chicano Studies Ignorant remarks create stereotypes


10

September 14, 2006

SPORTS

The Demise of CSUF’s Gridiron Gangs Part II: A new stadium is built for a program that never quite makes it BY JAMES THOMPSON

Daily Titan Staff Writer sports@dailytitan.com

It’s said “money makes the world go ‘round,� and the lack of it eventually caused the pigskin to stop rolling at Cal State Fullerton. A lack of interest bred a lack of respect, which eventually led to a lack of funding, dooming the program. Mel Franks, CSUF associate athletics director of media relations remembers 1984 as a one of the “Doomsday events� for CSUF’s football program. That year Titan Head Coach Gene Murphy led the football team to a 11-1 record, one of the best records in CSUF’s young football program. Franks said that same month the Marriott Hotel, which became neighbors with CSUF opened up for business. That same year the NCAA decided to put on the Freedom Bowl, which was to be played in Anaheim, and in which Iowa was to play either Texas or CSUF, whic had identical records that year. The game was to be televised and it was no coincidence that the general manager of the Marriott had an influential role on the television packaging.

Titan Media Relations SHORT LIVED – The first coin toss at Titan Stadium took place in a game between the Titans and Cal State Northridge on Sept. 5, 1992. CSUF won 28-7. Franks said that the general manager of the Marriott would much rather have two out-of-state teams play each other than have

one of the teams play in their own backyard. There would have been more money for the hotel if Iowa and

Texas had played each other, Franks said. “Iowa didn’t want to play us,� Franks said. “There was a television

package deal and it was either Iowa versus Texas or Iowa versus Cal State who?� No one thought CSUF would

ever generate the same ratings that Texas could. Franks recalls that Texas didn’t care about the game and they didn’t even bother to bring their band. In the end Texas was blown out in a horrible game and the ratings were just as bad, Franks said. Talk about lack of interest and lack of respect. Another problem for the program was that the Titans never had a legitimate place to call home and were constantly bounced around. Sometimes they played in Angel Stadium, then known as Anaheim Stadium, which they shared with the Los Angeles Rams and nearby high schools with less than marginal fields. Coaches even built makeshift “erector� stadiums in order to play games like when they played Fresno in September of 1980. One incident in particular, Franks said, was Nov. 12, 1983. The Titans were playing UNLV for the Championship game and the teams were kicked out of Angel’s stadium the morning of the game. “CSUF had a deal with the stadium that if it rained we couldn’t play there because we would mess up the field for the Rams on Sunday,� Franks said. The game was relocated to Glover Stadium in Anaheim and UNLV beat the Titans 13-0. The late comedian Rodney Dangerfield and the Titans must’ve SEE FOOTBALL - PAGE 12

Women’s Soccer Faces Uphill Climb on the Road BY ALVIN ANOL

Daily Titan Staff Writer sports@dailytitan.com

The CSUF women’s soccer team will have their hands full this weekend when they travel to Texas to face two nationally ranked teams. The Titans will play the No. 6 – ranked Texas A&M Aggies Friday night in College Station, Texas. Following that match, the Titans will travel to Austin, Texas, to take on the No.23-ranked Texas Longhorns. “We don’t put too much emphasis on any one opponent,� said CSUF Head Coach Ali Khosroshahin. “Our main concern is our development as a team.� The Titans (3-1-1) are coming off a rebound 3-0 victory against the

San Diego State Aztecs on Tuesday. It marked the third shutout for the season for senior goalkeeper Karen Bardsley. The Titans spread the wealth, getting three goals – all in the second half – from three different players. Khosroshahin said the team is still in the process of discovering what they are capable of doing together. “Our biggest weakness is lack of experience,� Khosroshahin said. “But each week you see the team doing a lot of growing up.� The previous trip for the Titans last week to San Diego resulted in a 2-1 double overtime loss to the University of San Diego. The loss was the first for the Titans on the season. “We’re going through a bit of a

process, understanding each other, learning about each other,� he added. Senior and Titan team captain Lauryn Welch felt the same way. “Experience has a lot to do with a good team, and I know right now, there’s not that experience – which isn’t a bad thing,� Welch said. “We just haven’t played together.� “All these road trips are bringing us together, but it doesn’t count for the experience of playing with one another,� she added. The weekend on the road will provide more time to bond as a team, but also will feature the Titans’ toughest competition to date. The Aggies are currently 3-2-1 on the season – but both losses came at the hands of teams ranked in the top

5 [UCLA and Santa Clara]. The Aggies have defeated Illinois, and handed North Carolina, ranked No.5, its only defeat of the season. The Longhorns have scored two upset victories against two Top 25 teams. Penn State and Illinois, ranked Nos. 9 and 18 in the nation, respectively, both lost in their matchups against Texas. Those victories helped catapult Texas into their current top 25 standing. “If you beat big teams, it’s going to help get into the [NCAA] tournament,� redshirt senior Desiree Flint said. “It’s big in that aspect, but conference [play] is our main focus.� SEE SOCCER - PAGE 12

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SPORTS

September 14, 2006

11

Playwright Kernen Restarts Titan Coaching Career Veteran coach returns to CSUF to find his way back on the diamond BY JONATHAN SAAVEDRA Daily Titan Staff Writer sports@dailytitan.com

To coach or not to coach, that is the question. Returning Cal State Fullerton volunteer assistant baseball coach Bill Kernen had an easy answer to that question after taking an 11-year hiatus from the game to pursue his goal of becoming a playwright. “Once I got back on the field, I was like, ‘Wow, I’m not finished with this,’ ” Kernen said. On the Titan staff, Kernen replaced Ted Silva, who was hired by Fresno State. Kernen, 58, is unlike other coaches. Aside from being a successful playwright who studied dramatic writing at Columbia, he is a self-described connoisseur of classical music and has a high appreciation for art. “He’s a little different, it’s a little broader scope than most baseball coaches,” Titan Head Coach George Horton said. “We’re usually jocks, we read the sports page, we read sports books and our hobbies are going to games, watching ESPN. It’s a pretty tunnel–vision kind of lifestyle choice.” Assistant Coach Rick Vanderhook also thinks Kernen is a little different than the typical baseball coach, but welcomes those differences. “He brings a lot of experience and a different vision and perspective,” Vanderhook said. While at Columbia, Kernen wrote and produced two full-length plays in 1997: “And Other Fairy Tales” and “A Graveyard Symphony.” In 1998, he wrote “Galleria degli Angeli,” which was honored as a finalist in the Oglebay Institute National Playwriting Competition. He also wrote “Musica de Mariposa” in 1999. Currently, “And Other Fairy Tales” and “Galleria degli Angeli” are in film production. As different as the two worlds of baseball and theater are, Kernen finds many similarities between the

By CAMERON PEMSTEIN/For the Daily Titan

RENEWED TIES – After 11 years as a playwright, Bill Kernen steps back onto the diamond as an assistant volunteer coach for the Titans baseball team. two. “You rehearse, you perform, you make adjustments, you budget,” Kernen said. “You do all the same things; it’s just that you’re doing it with a different set of skills and a different discipline.” Horton is looking forward to the out-of-the-norm coaching style of Kernen, which he described as, “lifelesson kind of a coaching.” “I’m a little intrigued with learning some of the philosophical things and the methods that he has that I can add to my bag of tricks,” Horton said. “Just the other day he was talking about how eccentric Beethoven was.” The opportunity for Kernen to

dive into the world of theater from baseball came in 1994 with the Northridge earthquake. He left coaching shortly after the magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquake. At the time, he was the head coach at Cal State Northridge. “Playwriting is something I’ve always wanted to do and I figured I’d do it a lot later than I did,” Kernen said. “But the way things came down at Northridge after the earthquake in ’94, it pretty much leveled the campus and they put all resources into rebuilding the campus.” Kernen said that after the quake he was told that CSUN’s athletic director had been fired and the

baseball program was dropped due to budget cuts. He then made the decision to move to New York City, study at Columbia and focus on becoming a playwright. “It was a little scary,” Kernen said. “I go to New York City with no job, very little money, never having written a word of dialogue in my life. It was a little bit of a leap.” While in New York, Kernen lived about 30 blocks from the World Trade Center. He said Sept. 11 was the most memorable experience he took with him from his time there. “It’s just one of those defining events that’s so surreal you can’t believe you’re in the middle of it,” Kernen said.

Kernen said that it was a desperate time for many of those in New York. “Everybody was scrambling to grocery stores because of the fear that tunnels and bridges were going to get shut off and there wasn’t going to be any more food.” Being so close to the World Trade Center at the time of the terrorist attack was life changing, Kernen said “I took it as a wake up call on the scale of what happened to us in World War II when we finally figured out Hitler was out to conquer the world and mow down everybody in sight,” Kernen said. “It just kind of changes your whole perspective of

where you are in the scheme of the world as a country and as a person, a citizen in that particular country.” Kernen described the general feeling in New York post Sept. 11 as a combination of outrage and shock. “Like anything else, if it happens to you, it’s completely different,” Kernen said. “If you lose a child as a parent, everybody else is going to think how terrible that is, but for you as a parent that it actually happened to, it’s going to redefine your life and you’ll never get over it.” After taking a chance in life and SEE KERNEN - PAGE 12


SPORTS

12

September 14, 2006 run upwards of $5 million or so,” CSUF athletic directed Brian Quinn said. “Our entire athletic budget for the 17 current sports is about $7 million.” For these reasons, Quinn said, Long Beach State, Cal State Northridge, University of Pacific, Santa Clara and St. Mary’s all have dropped football. Football is very expensive to

operate these days and it is up in the air as to whether or not there football will make a comeback at Cal State Fullerton as a collegiate sport. “We don’t have the infrastructure to support a football program,” CSUF Associate Athletics Director of Marketing Steve DiTolla said. “But never say ‘never.’ I’m a big proponent of football.”

Titan Media Relations TOUGH RUNNER – Former Titan Mike Pringle breaks past defenders in a play which he gained 67 of his then NCAA record 357 yards on Nov. 4, 1989.

FOOTBALL: A LEGACY DROPPED (From Page 10)

shared the same feelings – no respect. Regardless of how they were treated, the coaching staff and the players were determined to stay resilient and keep the program going by playing what they called “body bag” games.

KERNEN: STARTING OVER (From Page 10)

going to Columbia, becoming a playwright, and witnessing one of the country’s most historic events, Kernen has found himself back to

In these games the Titans would travel to places like Miami or Georgia where they would be completely overmatched. These colleges, well-known for their outstanding football programs would pay CSUF $300,000 to $400,000 to come and play on their home turfs. Once there, these teams would

bully the Titans the entire game. They would make the Titans look more like pachyderms. The Titans even played Miami the first year they had Hall of Fame running back Emmitt Smith. “We lost 65-0,” Franks said. They would play more of these games, regardless of the beatings, and the coaching staff would take

the money for scholarships and stadium costs. In fact some of the “body bag” money went to construction of the current Titan stadium, which was to be built for the football program before its ‘too soon’ demise. In the end, it all came down to money and lack of support. “All in all the cost would probably

square one in the baseball coaching world. Horton said that volunteer assistant coaches are typically young and talented but inexperienced. With Kernen being an assistant coach at CSUF for former Head

Coach Augie Garrido from 1978 to 1982 and again in 1987, he brings to CSUF the coaching experience that most volunteer assistants lack. “With young volunteer coaches, players kind of check them out to figure if they’re worthy of their

respect, and those kind of things,” Horton said about Kernen. “I think just the nature of who he is gives him a good start, so that trust level back and forth from player to coach is there and I think that’s a big thing.”

Titan Media Relations GAME ACTION – Former Titan quarterback Damon Allen hands off the football. Allen has enjoyed his time as a professional player in Canada.

SOCCER: TOUGH COMPETITION (From Page 10)

The Titans were able to get to the Sweet 16 of last year’s NCAA tournament and Flint hopes that this year’s team can meet the same

standard – if not go further. The Titans have posted one tie and one loss against teams ranked in top 25 this season. The Titans remain in the 25th position in the poll released by SoccerTimes.


ge k-3 n, n. 2.

September 14, 2006

Index Announcements 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2100

Campus Events/Services Campus Organizations Greeks Legal Notices Lost and Found Miscellaneous Personals Pregnancy Research Subjects Sperm/ Egg Donors Tickets Offered / wanted

Merchandise 2200 2300 2400 2500 2600 2700 2800 2900 3000 3100 3200 3300 3400 3500

Appliances Art/Painting/Collectibles Books Computers/Software Electronics Furniture Garage/Yard Sales Health Products Miscellaneous Musical Instruments Office Equipment Pets Rentals Sports Equipment

Transportation 3600 3700 3800 3900

Auto Accessories/Repair Auto Insurance Miscellaneous Vehicles For sale/Rent

Travel 4000 4100 4200 4300

Resorts/Hotels Rides Offered/Wanted Travel Tickets Vacation Packages

Services 4400 4500 4600 4700 4800 4900 5000 5100 5200 5300 5400 5500 5600 5700 5800 5900 6000

1-900 Numbers Financial Aid Insurance Computer/Internet Foreign Languages Health/Beauty Services Acting/Modeling Classes Legal Advice/Attorneys Movers/Storage Music Lessons Personal Services Professional Services Resumes Telecommunications Tutoring Offered/Wanted Typing Writing Help

Employment 6100 6200 6300 6400 6500 6600 6700 6800 6900 7000 7100

Business Opportunities Career Opportunities P/T Career Opportunities F/T Child Care Offered/Wanted Help Wanted Actors/Extras Wanted Housesitting Internship Personal Assistance Temporary Employment Volunteer

Housing 7200 7300 7400 7500 7600 7700 7800 7900

Apartments for Rent Apartments to Share Houses for Rent/Sale Guest House for Rent Room for Rent Roommates - Private Room Roommates - Shared Room Vacation Rentals

Classifieds

Advertising Information To place a classified ad, call

714.278.4453 By Fax: 714.278.2702 By Email: classified@dailytitan.com By Mail: The Daily Titan College Park Bldg. 2600 E. Nutwood Ave. Suite 660 Fullerton, CA. 92831-3110 Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9 am - 5 pm Rates: One insertion, up to 20 words .........................................$5.00 each additional word........$0.35 12pt Headline...................$1.60 16pt Headline...................$2.25 Border..............................$5.00 • Weekly and monthly rates are also available. • For classified display ads, please see our rate card for rate information. Deadlines: Classified Line Ads: 3 Business days before printing @ 12 noon. Classified Display Ads: 3 Business days before printing @ 12 noon. Payment: Please make checks payable to: "The Daily Titan" We also accept Visa and Mastercard Read the Daily Titan online @

www.dailytitan.com

13

1300

6200

6200

Greeks

Career Opportunities P/T

Career Opportunities P/T

Sigma Alpha Lambda, naional honors organization is seeking motivated students to serve as founding chapter officers/members to begin a campus chapter. Contact: RMINER@salhonors.org

P/T to F/T Good office and typing skills. Will work around school scheduled if applicable. Paralegal Student preferred. Please fax or e-mail resume. Fax: 626-929-6906. Email: employeeapps@yahoo.com.

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3300 Pets

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5300 Music Lessons

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Job Announcement Tutor middle or high school students in English, Math, and/ or Science. Competetive pay $9.50 to $12.00 (DOE) Contact Jeff Hernandez at (626) 9346837 or jmhernandez2@csupomona.edu.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Growing real estate and pre school operation company has opening for part time admin. assistant. Knowlege of Word and Excel needed. 10 hours a week. Starting $12/ hr. Business classes or ECE classes a plus. Flexible hours. Fax resume to 714-9920560 or call 714-323-9632. INTERNET WORK! $8.75-$38.50/hr. PT/FT/ Summer. $25 Bonus. Studentsurveysite.com/titan2

$10+/HR - BABY SITTER NEEDED

Babysitters needed for local families. www.sittercafe.com. Or email resumes to sitters@ sittercafe.com. RECEPTIONIST Cheerful Orthodontic office receptionistwanted. Will train. 253-5333.

Part-time Help Wanted

Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary needs staff for tour guides, maintenance, animal care & feeding. Weekend and weekdays available. (714) 649-2760 or kcornell@fullerton.edu. www.tuckerwildlife.org.,29322 Modjeska Canyon Rd., Modjeska Canyon, CA 92676 Energetic individuals wanted to work at Action Kids Fitness Center. P/T & some weekends. Fitness/sports experience preferred. (714) 528-1000

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3800 Miscellaneous DRIVING LESSONS Offering behind-the-wheel training for a class C driver’s license. Ask for student discount. Lic. #I4027008. Ask for Glen (714) 595-1541.

6400 Childcare Offered/Wanted CSUF instructor needs childcare for 2 and 5 year old. 8-12 hours/week. $10/hr. Contact Jenny (714) 585-7826 Sitters Wanted. Average $10 per hour. Register free for jobs near campus or home. w w w. s t u d e n t - s i t t e r s . c o m

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2006 09 14