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C a l i f o r n i a S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y, F u l l e r t o n

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SPORTS

OPINION

No. 7 Titan baseball team hits the road, heads to Houston Page 10

Dating & Mating: Oral pleasure? Oh, Please! Page 6

Students Fire Alarm Startles Students in TSU Lounge Compete in Math, Science By Courtney Bacalso & Phil Fuller

Daily Titan Editors

High school students use problem-solving skills to win contest

As she reported for work in the Mainframe Computer Lounge in the Titan Student Union, biology major Tanya Samra heard a strange sound. “Everyone started looking around and saying ʻWhatʼs that?ʼ ” she said.

It happened that an electrical shortage in a drinking fountain triggered the fire alarm, forcing the evacuation of students and staff from the TSU Wednesday, Lt. Will Glen said. Samra gave exit instructions to the 30 students in the lab, and then she evacuated the building. The Fullerton Fire Department was dispatched to the scene, but the call was can-

celled while they were on route, Battalion Chief Mark Huckabey said. Junior Ho Tran, 20, was sitting in the cafeteria when the alarm when off at 12:44 p.m. “Everyone didnʼt know what to do. But a loudspeaker came on and told us to evacuate and the workers helped escort us out,” Phil Gordon/Daily Titan said Tran, who had to wait about 10 minutes REMAINING CALM: Crowds of students exit the before being allowed back into the TSU. TSU during a lunchtime firedrill

Name Calling, Catfights No More

By Paolo Andres

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Mousetrap racers zoomed and catapults of PVC pipes soared as future engineers flooded Cal State Fullerton for an engineering contest Wednesday. The Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement program hosted the all-day event where high school students competed against other schools in math and science. “The students have been preparing for this day all year by working on various projects that utilize engineering, science and mathematic skills,” program coordinator Vonna Hammerschitt said. From building paper and balsa wood bridges to creating multipurpose vehicles from mousetraps and CDs, the team of high school students competed in events that pushed the limits of their math and science capabilities. Other teams built balsa wood gliders and homemade medieval catapults, which were judged based on their projectile trajectories. A few teams even competed in different problem-solving and public speaking contests. Winners of the events received medals and were given the opportunity to compete in the regional competition on April 22 at CSUF where they would face off against other students. Many of those who participated realized the implications of having such an engineering event occur so early in the studentʼs academic pursuits. Problem-solving skills the students exercised in the competition hold top priority in math and in civil disciplines, said Tom Glenn, Saddleback High School biology teacher. But he also tried to emphasize the importance of enjoying the task at hand. “Sometimes it can be stressful and I tell them, ʻWhat do you expect from it? Have fun.ʼ ” Glenn said. But despite the pressures and the strain of competition, many students found the prospect of building enjoyable. “Engineering is a lot of fun. Itʼs probably one of the most fun of professions,” said Alex Krochman, a Costa Mesa High School freshman. “Who wouldnʼt want to sit around all day and design stuff to be built and help [people]?” The program hopes the students will carry the lessons learned from the competition with them. “We hope that theyʼll realize that there are real world applications to math and science,” Hammerschitt said. “And we hope that some of them will be excited enough about math, science and engineering that they would like to pursue that for their major.”

Lecture encourages female harmony as kickoff to Women’s History Month By Jessica Escorsia

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Junnun Quazi/For the Daily Titan

TOGETHER THEY STAND: Students, parents and Muslim leaders gather outside the Crystal Cove Auditorium at UC Irvine Tuesday night to protest the unveiling of contraversial cartoons of Islamʼs last prophet, Muhammad.

Muslims Protest at UCI

Protestors gathered in response to a forum showing cartoons of Islam’s Muhammad By Julie Anne Ines

Daily Titan Staff Writer

O

range County Muslims, UC Irvine student groups and their supporters gathered at UCI Tuesday evening outside the Crystal Cove Auditorium to protest a forum that featured a showing of the cartoons depicting Islamʼs prophet Muhammad.

in dialogue that some people are not engaging in,” said Jesse Petrilla, founder of the committee. The committee is a “non-partisan movement of concerned Americans, promoting awareness of threats from within its borders,” according to the committee Web site. Kristin Lucero, a senior at UCI and the president of the club, said the unveiling of the cartoons had nothing to do with provoking the Muslim community, but rather its goal was SEE PROTEST = PAGE 4

SEE LECTURE = PAGE 3

Court Refuses to Hear Case First Ammendment rights debated in college publications By Lisa Chung

Daily Titan Staff Writer

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or decades, college campuses have experienced issues where First Amendment rights have been strongly exercised. Flags have burned, protests have erupted and students have changed the systems in this country. One of the most consistent ways that young, educated adults

U.S. MILITARY DEATHS IN IRAQ

2,295 As of March 1, 2006; up from 2,270 on Feb. 16 2006 Numbers compiled from The Associated Press

The forum -– which was hosted by the UCI College Republicans and sponsored by the United American Committee -– hosted four speakers including Abed Jlelati, a Cal State Fullerton alumnus and president of the California chapter of the Free Muslims Coalition. Lee Kaplan, a spokesman for the committee; Ted Hayes, committee board member; and Jesse L. Peterson, a conservative minister, also spoke on the panel. Titled “The Unveiling of the Cartoons and a Discussion to Confront Terror,” the protest aimed to “really engage

N

ame calling, comparisons, dishonesty and an underhanded agenda to out-do other females were themes discussed on campus Tuesday at a lecture titled “Catfights and Competition Between Women.” The lecture commenced a series of events held for womenʼs history month in March, sponsored by several groups including the womenʼs studies program, Womenʼs Center and the Womenʼs Studies Association. Leora Tanenbaum, author of “Slut!” and “Catfight,” spoke about how women are aggressive in competing with each other. Although itʼs such a common issue among women, the topic is rarely discussed even among the closest friends because the subject may be taboo, Tanenbaum said. But an extremely big problem like this should be addressed she said. “We need to talk about things we donʼt usually talk about,” Tanenbaum said. Tanenbaum focused on four main areas where women are found to be more competitive: beauty, dating,

are voiced is through the studentrun media on these campuses. Last week that legacy came into question. The Supreme Court opted not to hear the case of Hosty v. Carter. This case involved a student publication, The Innovator at Governors State University in Illinois. Articles critical of the school administration were published, which prompted Dean Carter to demand review of the paper prior to publication. When student editors refused, the publication of The Innovator was halted and has not resumed since.

INTROSPECT

SEE AMENDMENT = PAGE 3

INSIDE

PLASTIC SURGERY Connecting the dots between beauty and technology

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The case has made its way to the 7th U.S. Court of Appeals, and the decision in Haelwood v. Kuhlmeier was applied. This 1988 decision limited the First Amendment rights of high school and elementary school publications. Extending the same paradigm – from high schools to colleges – has angered many people. The general student feel on the CSUF campus is that the decision of the seventh circuit is unfair and that

Irvine Campus to Host Blood Drive By Sara Havlena

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Cal State Fullerton students and faculty can help save lives by participating in the Irvine campus Red Cross Blood Drive. It will be held Tuesday March 7 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the Irvine Campus at 7320 Trabuco Road. Students who participate will receive a free Vans Warped Tour CD and music download

scratch-off, as well as saving up to three lives with their donation. The blood will go to one of the 175 Southern California hospitals in need. To schedule an appointment, call Irvine student affairs at (949) 936-1650 or go online at www.givelife.org using the sponsor code: csufeltoro. Walk-ups are welcome but appointments are appreciated, as they need a minimum number of participants to hold the event.

WEATHER

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Partly Cloudy High: 63 Low: 48

Showers High: 61 Low: 42

Partly Cloudy High: 66 Low: 44

Partly Cloudy High: 70 Low: 47


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NEWS

N E W S @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

IN

OUT

OTHER NEWS

N’ ABOUT

WORLD

ON CAMPUS

Bombing in Baghdad, 26 Dead

TONIGHT: Titans menʼs basketball will take on UC Davis at 7 p.m. in the Titan gym. Tickets are $6 to $12. Free for students with ID!

BAGHDAD, Iraq – Bombings in Baghdad killed 26 people, and four others died when mortar rounds slammed into their homes in a nearby town Wednesday, the second day of surging violence after authorities lifted a curfew that briefly calmed sectarian attacks. A spokesman for the powerful Association of Muslim Scholars criticized the Shiite-led government for failing to protect Iraqis, and he urged Sunnis to defend their mosques.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY: “The Philadelphia Story,” the Broadway hit that starred Katharine Hepburn as the inhibited, spoiled daughter of the privileged Philadelphia Lord family, will play at the Young Theatre in the CSUF Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $9 ($8 with advance Titan discount).

Bush Makes Detour to India KABUL, Afghanistan – In a surprise visit under extraordinary security, President Bush expressed unwavering confidence Wednesday that Osama bin Laden will be captured despite years of fruitless manhunts for the elusive terrorist leader who ran training camps in Afghanistan and plotted the deadly attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Bush ordered Air Force One, on a flight to India, to make a secret detour to this war-scarred country to show U.S. support for the fledgling democracy led by President Hamid Karzai, whose authority has been weakened by suicide bombings and rising violence by insurgents.

SATURDAY: Titan Softball will be taking on Texas Tech at 1:30 p.m. and Oregon State at 3:45 p.m. in a back-to-back softball extravaganza in the Titan Softball Complex. Free for students with ID.

NATION Senate Tries To Renew Act WASHINGTON – The Senate on Wednesday cleared the path for renewing the USA Patriot Act, swatting aside objections while adding new protections for people targeted by government investigations. The overwhelming votes virtually assured that Congress will renew President Bushʼs antiterror law before it expires March 10. The House was expected to pass the legislation Tuesday.

Bush Warned Before Katrina WASHINGTON – In dramatic and sometimes agonizing terms, federal disaster officials warned President Bush and his homeland security chief before Hurricane Katrina struck that the storm could breach levees, put lives at risk in New Orleansʼ Superdome and overwhelm rescuers, according to confidential video footage. Bush didnʼt ask a single question during the final briefing before Katrina struck on Aug. 29, but he assured soonto-be-battered state officials: “We are fully prepared.”

LOCAL Coach to Pay $63 Million SAN BERNARDINO – A former Kaiser High School coach was ordered to pay $63 million to a former student who said she was sexually abused by the volleyball instructor. The teenager filed a Superior Court civil suit against Edward Kang and the Fontana Unified School District in November 2004. Less than five months later, Kang pleaded guilty to criminal charges of unlawful sex with students and he was sentenced to four years in prison. Investigators said Kang may have had sex with up to 19 students. Reports compiled from The Associated Press

DAILY TITAN EDITORIAL

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The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Monday through Thursday. The Daily Titan operates independently of Associated Students, College of Communications, CSUF administration and the CSUF System. The Daily Titan has functioned as a public forum since inception. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The Daily Titan allocates one issue to each student for free. Copyright ©2005 Daily Titan

Songha Lee/Daily Titan

ART APPRECIATION

Doug Urquilla, a junior illustration major, left, and his friend Martin Molina look at The Pursuit of Hapiness art piece inside the Salz-Pollak Room Tuesday afternoon.

STUDENT BY DAY By Jody Cason

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Some students ran. Some tried to hide. But most students said they didnʼt have time to do a random, on the spot interview for the Daily Titan. Not Edwin Arvizo. Arvizo looked cool strolling through Lot E last Saturday morning as I approached him armed with my pen and pad. “Sure I got the time,” he said. Arvizo was coming from his child abuse/human service class, which meets from 9-11:45 a.m. He said he prefers his class on Saturday rather than his weekday courses because it is more laid back. “The parking is really great, and the classes are smaller as well,” he added. But Arvizo has not always strug-

EDWIN ARVIZO Junior, human services major gled to find a parking space at Cal State Fullerton. The junior human services major is a recent transfer student from Santa Ana College. He said he loves going to CSUF, and knew he wanted to attend the university after visiting the campus in his junior year of high school. He lives in Santa Ana with his family, and said it takes about 35 minutes to make the commute to school each day. Like most CSUF students, Arvizo has a very hectic schedule. He is carrying 12 units, and works at both a full-time and a part-time job.

He plans to pursue a career in law enforcement, working either as a correctional officer or a parole agent. Arvizo has also considered becoming a sheriff. “Anything in the police department will be fine with me,” he said. “Once I get in I can always move around from there.” His passion to work in that particular field stems from his early childhood. He said he grew up in a bad neighborhood, and it motivated him to help others out. When he finds the time in between work and his studies, Arvizo likes to go paint balling out at SC Village in Corona, or Junk Island in Lake Elsinore. Spare time is not abundant for Arvizo though, which is why he is planning on just working and catching up with homework on the upcoming spring break. He also likes the professors he has had so far at CSUF. When asked if he had any teacher pet peeves, he said he only had one: the dreaded tangent lecturer. “When they go on and off the subject matter like that, it just backs you up,” he said.

OFF CAMPUS TODAY THROUGH MARCH 12: Artist Fabrice Gygi transforms common civic and military structures (crowd-control barriers, bleachers, podiums and tents) into large-scale sculptures that portray a poignant view of political authority at the Orange County Museum of Art in Santa Ana. Itʼs open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $10. TODAY: The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles presents a homage to comic strips and comic books that examines 15 key American artists and features approximately 900 original drawings, progressive proofs, vintageprinted Sunday pages, and comic books by Winsor McCay (“Little Nemo”), Gould (“Dick Tracy”), Charles Schulz (“Peanuts”) and more. $5 for students. Visit www. moca.org for more information. If you would like to submit an event to Out nʼ About please e-mail news@dailytitan.com


N E W S @ D A I LY T I TA N . C O M

AMENDMENT FROM PAGE 1 the decision, or rather, lack of decision by the Supreme Court, is offensive. Still, it might not be as bad as it seems. “While we wish the Supreme Court would have taken the case and would have said definitively that Hazelwood does not apply to colleges, the fact that it did not take this case doesnʼt mean the sky is falling. What it does mean is that one circuit thinks the law is unsettled in the area. Other circuits do not have to follow this idea,” said Genelle Belmas, communications law professor. The decision may not affect

LECTURE FROM PAGE 1 the workplace and motherhood. Women criticize each other for things such as not breastfeeding and taking pain medication during labor, Tanenbaum said. “We are constantly measuring ourselves with other women,” Tanenbaum said. Rhonda Schultz, senior psychology major, felt all women could relate to Tanenbaumʼs speech. Schultz admitted to secretly being competitive among her friends at one time or another saying “Nobodyʼs excluded when it comes to that.” Tanenbaum said one of the factors that contribute to interfemale competition is the fact that women receive conflicting messages on how to live their lives. These messages create confusion and a feeling of defensiveness leading to further competition between women. Tanenbaum also said there is a double standard when it comes to competition. Men are expected to be naturally competitive, yet women are expected to be “sugar and spice and everything nice.” This causes women to formulate sneaky ways to be competitive. “To compete is feminine and un-feminine at the same time,”

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CSUF and California directly, but the matter is still unsettling to some students and faculty. “I believe college students are much more mature than high school students and can maintain professional journalism standards and should be given press freedom,” said Rick Pullen, dean of the College of Communications. Both Belmas and Pullen doubt that the ninth circuit, which is the circuit that CSUF is in, would ever make the same kind of decision that the seventh circuit did. However, it is impossible for one to make that prediction with absolute certainty and fears still arise. “Iʼm hopeful that this does not have a negative impact on college press freedom across the nation,” Pullen said.

she said. Nikki Luck, senior womenʼs studies major, said she found the topic of competition for beauty interesting. “Women are made to believe they have to be a certain size and look a certain way in order to have real values,” Luck said, adding that younger generations focus more on a beauty image and a need to compete because the pressure on them is strong. “Competition comes from comparing, and we need to just stop it,” Luck said. Although some might argue that women are instinctively critical of each other, Tanenbaum said itʼs a learned behavior that comes from insecurities, which is why having an open forum, especially during womenʼs history month, is important to raise awareness. Tanenbaum concluded by saying she hopes women learn not to be so insecure, to be nicer to each other, and not to hesitate to give a compliment or tell someone they admire a quality about them. There are bigger issues women need to worry about instead of backstabbing and manipulating each other just to make themselves feel better, she said. “Itʼs good to know youʼre not alone, and that our thoughts and feelings are not unusual,” Luck said.

Kevin Rogers/Daily Titan

UPLIFTING EXPERIENCE: A

UH-1 Huey Helecopter ascends from the Titan soccer field Wednesday with ROTC students on board for a “Familiarization flight” for practicing loading and disembarking procedures. This is in support of the Engineering Fair. About 21 Cal State Fullerton students enjoyed a birdʼs eye view of Downtown Los Angeles during an ROTC event Wednesday afternoon. A crew chief and two pilots transported seven students at a time in an Army medical helicopter, known as a Huey, taking off from the Intramural Field. They made three trips transporting all 21 students. “It was interesting to see an aerial view; you realize how much of the land is developed,” said Stephanie Herbert, 20, a sophomore womenʼs studies major. The ROTC performs this exercise with its cadets every semester. “It was my first plane anything,” Herbert said. “I was holding onto the side Phil Gordon/Daily Titan thingy the whole time.”


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NEWS

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N E W S @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

Patricia Cummings/For the Daily Titan

SPEECH: Houssam Chamma holds sign while chanting with the crowd during Tuesday nightʼs protest.

CHEER: Sisters Hana and Noura Qreini cheer with the crowd to a reading from the Quran.

PROTEST FROM PAGE 1

Junnun Quazi/For the Daily Titan

PRAYER: Anas Amla gives the Azzan (the Islamic call to prayer) during the Tuesday night protest.

to promote discussion about an important issue that needed to be discussed. Muslim student leaders and Muslim organizations, however, saw the showing of the cartoons as more of a provocation than an invitation to open discussion. They held up signs that read: “This is not a debate, itʼs an expression of hate,” and “Fight hatred disguised as freedom.” Quanita Mohiuddin, the event coordinator of the Muslim Student Union at UCI, said she believed the main goal of the College Republicans was to promote hate and Islamophobia. “There was no educational value of the program, and all it did was incite hate,” she said. She added that the gathering outside, or teach-in as she called it, would educate people about the prophet Muhammad. Teach-in speakers included representatives from the Society for Peace and Justice and

Patricia Cummings/For the Daily Titan

Junnun Quazi/For the Daily Titan

PROTEST: An aerial view of a group of protestors that assembled to protest a discussion sponsored by the College Republicans at UC Irvine. Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan at UCI, the Council on American Islamic Relations in Anaheim and the Islamic Center in Irvine. “[The College Republicans] had a clear intent to incite and provoke, not to inform people,” said Osman Umarji, former Muslim Student Union president and UCI alumnus. In a previous interview, Sabiha Khan, the spokeswoman for the council, said the committee is itself “fringe, extremist, [and] hateful.” The teach-in participants – which numbered 700-plus at the highest point of the night teachin, organizers said – and those who entered the auditorium for the forum had been separated by barricades, security volunteers, event staff and officers from the UCI Police at the beginning of the event. A Los Angeles Times article Wednesday estimated the number of participants outside closer to 250. Throughout the evening, event staff in yellow windbreakers and University Police continued to guard the entrance to the audi-

“Hey, Republicans stop the hate, all you do is instigate.” Protest Chant UC Irvine Rally

torium. Despite the goals of the forum to foster discussion about the cartoons and of the teach-in to educate people about Islam and Muhammad, the physical separation of the two groups highlighted the lack of actual discussion between them. Only a small group of Muslims were able to get into the event because of the limited number of seats, and panel speakers and club members were escorted out a separate exit when the event was over. The only contact made between both sides during the event was when forum attendees exited the auditorium to shouts of “Hey, Republicans stop the hate, all you do is instigate.” There were also a handful of people, including a man with a megaphone, outside with the demonstrators that said the showing of the cartoons is a First Amendment right. “All [people that come

to America] have to adapt to the Constitution and the Bill of Rights,” said Steve Nelson, 53, a contractor from San Juan Capistrano. During the interview, he yelled, “Are there any free thinkers here?” drawing angry remarks from teach-in attendees. Prior to the event, dissent also arose in the ranks of the College Republicans. Umarji and Mohiuddin said early Tuesday morning the board members of the club voted on whether or not to show the cartoons, with the final vote, 43, favoring their showing. The club president herself was in the minority vote, Umarji and Mohiuddin said. Hayes, a panelist, acknowledged that the event was a provocation. However, he said it was “A provocation to promote discussion.” If the groups didnʼt talk that night, “Whether they agree or disagree, theyʼll be talking now,” he said. Despite the passionate viewpoints of people on both sides of the issue, Paul Henisey, police chief for UCI, said the event was “very successful all the way around” because both groups cooperated by maintaining security.


N E W S @ D A I LY T I TA N . C O M

just couldnʼt take it anymore. The leather straps of my shoes bit into my tender, blistering feet. They stung with each step on this “beautiful” cobble stone sidewalk. The sun smothered me relentlessly as I hobbled down the 6-mile route back to the hotel. The Italians pierced me with their stares as if I was staining their highly fashionable and composed city. I hobbled past Gucci, Christian Dior, Armani and Prada, remembering the excitement and anticipation these stores drew at the beginning of my journey. I arrived in Florence, Italy as idealistic as they come. I dreamed of living in France or Italy since as long as I could remember, so when I found out Cal State Fullerton offered a summer program in Italy, my prayers had been answered. I would dine in the swankiest of restaurants, enjoy the daily siestas, meet hot and romantic Italian boys, and purchase designers shoes and bags much cheaper. I would get skinny and toned from all the walking, and maybe even capture the essence of being “chic,” which so many Italian women have mastered. Little did I know, my romantic dream of living under the Florentine sun would not play out in reality as it had in my head since childhood. As I prepared for my first night out, things went a little differently than planned. I didnʼt have any clothes since the airport lost my luggage in Paris. You would think that they would apologize, but no; Italians do not apologize. The women behind the help desk coldly informed me to write my address down and simply wait for the luggage to come. So I borrowed my new friend Meganʼs clothes, which didnʼt exactly fall cute on me. I tried to do my hair, but the humidity just made it a frizzy, icky mop. At least I had makeup. Besides, the face is everything. That didnʼt work out either. The warm Italian weather had melted my makeup, and two minutes after application I looked like a drunken clown.

NEWS

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by Lauren Padilla

special to The Daily Titan

A personal essay about the not-so-glamorous side of Italy I guess being “chic” would have to wait. My hopes perked up as we arrived at a bar overflowing with cute guys. Everyone was in an intoxicated and sociable stage. I was amid hot foreign men and endless alcohol, the perfect aphrodisiacs. I zoned in on the bartender who resembled Enrique Iglesias -– minus the Jupiter-sized mole. He grew up in Florence but spoke perfect English and told us of his travels around the world. I fell in love. This was a short-term love, though since he was taking off to Los Angeles the following morning for a six-month stay. How ironic. s Megan and I exited the bar, I almost lost my step when someone grabbed me, twirled me around and stuck a tongue down my throat. It was a pretty cute Italian guy, but, hello! You canʼt just do that. What happened to introducing oneself? I guess meeting cute – and romantic – Italian guys would have to wait. I decided to browse the outdoor markets, hoping to find some priceless trinket that all my friends

back home would envy. As Megan and I approached the markets we were hounded by gross, dirty men screaming “Bella,” and merchants yelling, “Free, free.” We wandered into a store where they placed necklaces on us, repeating, “Free, free.” But as we thanked them and walked out, they placed their hands out demanding “30 Euro.” Do Italian merchants know what free means? The markets didnʼt get much better. Merchants continued bombarding our eyes with the typical touristy junk. I guess finding a priceless trinket in a flea market would also have to wait. About a week later we were desperate to be pampered and decided dinner at Il Latini would be the perfect medicine. We were whisked to our tables, through a beautifully candlelit patio. The aroma of home-cooked pastas, sizzling seafood and an array of spices enlivened our senses. Our stomachs transformed into fierce roaring tigers as our vision was blurred with meals that would make an anorexic change her ways. But the server danced around the restaurant count-

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less times before even taking the time to greet us. We waited another 40 minutes for drinks, without any acknowledgement or apologies from our server. With tigers for stomachs and the smell of pesto lacing our nostrils, we grew delirious with hunger. What happened to customer service, like back home? The atmosphere of an Italian restaurant in Italy tends to lose its ambiance when a girl is left hungry and unattended to. Doesnʼt fancy restaurant mean a girl gets treated like a princess? No, the Italians believe it means a girl lucky enough to sit in their fancy restaurant. Enjoying a swanky restaurant would have to wait. couple of weeks into the trips Megan and I realized all of our clothes fit too tight. Could we really have gained weight from all the pastas, breads, and bi-hourly trips to the gelato store? The walking didnʼt really help us, since we stopped every 10 minutes to eat. The heat was unbearable, so we found refuge in air-conditioned restaurants. I was supposed to arrive home with an unbelievably perfect Italian body. My skinny toned body, would have to wait. Three months in, I became so home sick that my eyes welled with tears thinking of Oreos, unknown to the Italians. I just couldnʼt take it anymore. I had blisters from wearing exquisitely uncomfortable designer shoes to fit in with the Italians, who despise flip-flops. I felt sick but could not understand what the Italian medicine bottles said. No one understood me. I missed my family, my gym, my car, my friends, my food and American customer service. I was sick of waiting! The next month-and-a-half passed by quickly, and I was finally packing my bags for the muchawaited trip home. I was overcome with joy, and finally returning home after more than four long months. I beamed a 100-watt smile at every single person who walked by me. As I buckled my seat belt and the plane lifted off, I anticipated the moment when I could put on makeup, eat Oreos, run on my treadmill, kiss complicated but tamer American boys and be spoiled by the customer service that America so happily provides. I peered out the planeʼs window to catch a last glimpse of Italy and a sly smile covered my face. I was so over waiting.

Tusk Magazine Cal State Fullertonʼs only student-run magazine publication hits campus newsstands this May.


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TITAN EDITORIAL

Providing insight, analysis and perspective since 1960

FREEDOM TO WATCH

Q

uickly, in a frustrated game show fashion, name all five rights guaranteed to all Americans in the U.S. Constitution. Now, just as quickly name all five family members of TVʼs “The Simpsons.” If you answered the second question faster, or with more certainty, donʼt worry. According to a survey conducted by the McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum, only one in four people polled could name any of the freedoms protected by the First Amendment. Only one tenth of one percent of the surveyʼs respondents were able to name all five freedoms. America seems more savvy with Simpsons trivia than with the First Amendment. Of those polled, more than 50 percent could name two or more Simpsons characters, and 22 percent could name all five members of the animated family. Other freedoms that respondents believed to be constitutionally protected include the right to own a pet, and the right to drive a car. The traditional response to a survey of this nature would be to stand aloof and gawk at the ignorance of everyone but us. Because we know all five freedoms, right? The truth is that the U.S. Constitution doesnʼt play a huge role in the lives of private

citizens. It protects our speech, our religion, our press, our right to peaceably assemble, and to petition the government to fix the horrible messes that it incessantly creates. The tactics of this survey are questionable. In high school, most students spend one semester learning about the federal government and the constitution. College classes offer more insight into the constitution, but those who donʼt attend college will never receive that information. Contrast that with 17 seasons of “The Simpsons” beamed into TV sets around the world. And the re-runs that are shown every day. Itʼs no wonder Americans know more about a TV family than about their own rights. We have never been without these rights, and therefore take them for granted. But that isnʼt so bad. Maybe that indicates that we believe speech, religion, press, assembly, and petition to be rights that are universal. That the ability to do these things is beyond the bounds of government and its restrictions, and that we should stop kissing their feet with credulous thanks for “granting” these rights to us. Or maybe it means that television is more fun than memorizing amendments. Either way, one thing is certain: there needs to be a “Simpsons” episode about the Constitution.

Editorial Board Philip Fuller, Opinion Editor Nicole M. Smith, Executive Editor Kim Orr, Managing Editor In deference to the paradigm established by venerable Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, unsigned Titan Editorials strive to represent the general will of the Daily Titan editorial board and do not necessarily reflect the view of the university.

OPINION

O P I N I O N @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

Microchip in My Shoulder By Daniel Monzon

Daily Titan Staff Writer

How would you like it if you could know exactly where your spouse, child or elderly parent was at any moment? Well, you might get that chance someday. A company that specializes in surveillance equipment has recently begun a program that will have a few of their employees volunteering to have microchips implanted in their forearms to access their vaults, where they house data and images for police. Chips with similar technology have been used to track pets and vehicles. The company who created this chip initially made it for medical usage. But letʼs extend its usage beyond medical. Letʼs begin a national program where everyone, including newborns, would

have the chip implanted in them. Missing children could become a thing of the past. Reunions, not funerals, would become commonplace. No one would mourn the loss of a child anymore. Maybe you want to know where your boyfriend or girlfriend is right now, or whether they are at someone elseʼs house. Letʼs help the show “Cheaters” by cutting out the middle-man and captureing them in the act ourselves, then the people that produce the show can find a real job. Imagine the day when we can track down potential terrorist suspects in the United States, swarm in and capture them, and stop them before it is too late to stop their plans from being executed. We could track the people who have been kidnapped in Iraq and rescue them, including freelance reporter Jill Carroll who has been held by kidnappers in Iraq since Jan. 7.

How about putting implants in convicted child molesters? In 2003 it was reported that of more than 75,000 registered sex offenders, 33,000 of them vanished with no one knowing their whereabouts. We would know with certainty the location of registered sex offenders. We would know whether they had left the state and violated their parole. Any person with Alzheimerʼs or another memory impairment who wandered off could be found in a matter of seconds, before any possible harm would come to pass. It could additionally help find children who have been kidnapped to other states or countries in custody disputes. We should have, as part of the chips function, the ability to have basic information so authorities can identify anyone who canʼt remember who they are or where theyʼre live.

Microchips would be a great way of stopping human trafficking in this or any other country. My point is we have the technology to retrieve lost pets with chips embedded in their collars or under their skin, as well as recover stolen vehicles. There are a number of possible ways to make use of the chips, positive – and negative. How long until someone figured out a way to misuse them for purposes other than the common good? There are members of society looking for every opportunity to exploit others. Embedded chips could one day become a reality. Individually, and as a society, we will have to decide whether to maintain this course and see where it takes us, or, rather, stop where weʼre at and decide whether or not it embedded chips are worth whatever consequences, good and bad, occur as a result.

Fellatio, better know as male oral sex, is one of those topics that tend to raise a lot of opinions and a lot of questions. For many women, the act of oral sex isnʼt something they do because they want to or because they receive any pleasure out of it, but because it makes men happy. For this weekʼs column I hit the streets, interviewing friends, coworkers, and random strangers here and there to ask them about their thoughts on oral sex. Here is what I found out. For some women it is simply better to receive than give, “It goes without saying that Iʼd rather have it done than do it. But I do enjoy giving it,” one female in a steady relationship said. “Itʼs empowering for me to know I can make him feel that good and either rush or delay his orgasm depending on how I feel.” Others feel quite differently about the topic. “I think it’s easier

for a man to disrespect a girl if she gives (fellatio) before sex. It really is a humiliating task,” one CSUF alumna said. “Personally, I think oral sex is much more personal and intimate than plain old normal sex.” I think we have former president Bill Clinton to thank for this diverse view on oral sex. His opinion that oral sex wasn’t really sex caused a lot of people to have a more laid back feeling towards fellatio. But despite what Willie told us, oral sex is sex. Itʼs an intimate part of the relationship between men and women. Itʼs not something to take lightly and not something to take part in if you are only doing so in order to make some guy happy. Especially if the relationship is still very new. For those women who do feel comfortable giving oral sex, more power to you. Be sure to be safe and to use

protection, because many diseases are spread from unprotected oral sex due to the idea that it isnʼt really sex. I wonder where we got that one from. Know your partner and his views on the topic, and also make sure he’s as willing to give as he is to receive. No part of a relationship should ever be one-sided. As for those women out there who aren’t fans of oral sex, my advice to you is don’t do it. If you feel uncomfortable performing the act you shouldn’t feel like you have to do it simply to make a guy happy. Most guys can understand if a woman is hesitant to perform oral sex and will consider her feelings on the matter. Those that push a woman to do something she doesn’t want to do isn’t the type of guy a woman may want to spend her time or her energy on anyway.

You Want Me to Put That Where?

Dating and Mating A friend of mine was recently set up on a date with a friend’s cousin. The pair had decided to go to a local bar with a group of friends Virginia and eventuTerzian ally a handful Columnist from the group headed to a friend’s house for a while. My friend had enjoyed the evening well enough. The guy seemed nice but as they sat chatting, he suddenly turned to her and asked, “So are we going to do this or what?” while looking from her mouth to his crotch. Her response. “Yeah…I’m going to go now. Later.”


I N T R O S P E C T @ D A I LY T I TA N . C O M

INTROSPECT

T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 2 , 2 0 0 6

C S n e t n t d o n c i g h e o t

PopularTrends in Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery By Cindy Tullues

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Plastic surgery has become a common topic of debate, and not just among celebrities. Every year, thousands of men and women flock to surgical centers for a self-esteem boost that could cost thousands. “Plastic surgery is a very innovative field,” said board-certified plastic surgeon Andrew Smith. “People are always trying to do things better.” Some blame Hollywood mediums for encouraging plastic surgery. “You do not see a lot of unattractive people in the media unless they are being ridiculed,” said Cal State Fullerton psychology professor John Mearns. The beautiful bodies that fill magazine pages have become some of the most idolized images in popular culture. Over time, people have become accustomed to the idea of what is considered beautiful by Hollywood standards. And through current popular television shows like “Nip/Tuck” and “Dr. 90210,” people are seeing what is possible Smith said. California has also become a particular hot spot for plastic surgery. Tenely Voris, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Irvine, said that the California climate is a big incentive for people to want surgery. “People wear less clothing and [plastic surgery] is also more widely accepted,” Voris said. Mearns said that many people elect to undergo plastic surgery to gain social approval. “People are highly motivated to get social approval, so they need to think what they get out of [the surgery],”

Mearns said. “If they hope to get more approval, they need to think if that is the approval they want.” Breast augmentation has increased dramatically since the early ʻ90s. According to implantinfo.com, implant sizes have also increased. Approximately 40 percent of women who have had breast augmentation wished that they had selected a larger implant, according to the Web site. “Women are afraid of what other women think,” Mearns said. “It is all part of societyʼs standards.” Men are also becoming more accustomed to plastic surgery. Facelifts and eyelid surgery are popular male surgeries, Smith said. But male plastic surgery patients are less likely to admit to having any procedures done. “It does not fit the typical male stereotype,” Mearns said. “There is an increased awareness of men to look younger and to look [their] age.” Despite the obvious incentives for plastic surgery, patients are advised to do some research before selecting a plastic surgeon. Many plastic surgeons recommend that patients search for a board-certified plastic surgeon, rather than a cosmetic surgeon. “Plastic surgery is board certified,” Voris said. “There is no training in cosmetic surgery [and] no board certification.” Bleeding, infection or complications are risks that could occur in all surgical procedures, and plastic surgery is no exception. “Risks are small but real,” Smith said. Contrary to the popular belief that plastic surgery can fix all imperfections, surgeons recommend that patients have reasonable expectations. “Plastic surgery does leave scars,” Smith said. “We just hide them well.”

CHANGING f a c e By Jickie Torres

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Like fashion, the world of plastic surgery is often influenced by the newest and latest trends. Richard Lee of Renaissance Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery in Newport Beach said breast augmentation and liposuction are staples in the Orange County area. “That has always been in the forefront of what we do,” Lee said. “Breast implants probably take up about 30 percent of our practice.” Brian Wong is an associate professor at UC Irvine in the division of facial plastic surgery and otolaryngology. He said the most common procedures are injectable resurfacers such as Botox and collagen because of their shorter recovery period. The emphasis on a shorter recovery period has shaped technical advancements in plastic surgery over the past decade. One change lies in making smaller and more efficient incisions, Wong said. This produces less dramatic results, but the

healing process is more tolerable. “A good example is the facelift. Forty years ago, the facelift procedure, was all about cutting out excess skin and pulling up and stitching together,” Wong said. “That did get big results but they didnʼt last a long time.” Lee agrees that technology is becoming less invasive and in many cases eliminating the need for surgery in the first place. “As far as facial resurfacing goes, there are varying degrees or strengths of peels and [patients] can affect how much downtime they have to go through,” Lee said. Laser technology is at the forefront of both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Web site. Carbon dioxide, argon and copper vapor lasers are highly effective in correcting skin pigmentation problems. The YAG laser is a common tool that when highly focused, can be used directly on the skin the same way a scalpel is, according to the Web site. “Itʼs a brave new world and transplants are one thing, but

The Cost of Beauty By Kirsten Alto

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Plastic Surgery can be expensive. Many plastic surgery offices in Beverly Hills and Orange County offer finance options for those who are interested in a procedure but deterred by the costs. Below is a list of the average costs for common surgeries at poplar offices in Southern California. Full facelift: about $12,000 Brow lift: $6,000 Cheek implant/lift: $4,500 Rhinoplasty (nose job): $6,000

Breast augmentation: $7,000 (Saline is cheaper than Silicone) Breast lift: $5,500 Tummy-tuck: $7,000

especially with the UCʼs and CSUʼs perseverance in the area of stem cell research, we would like to get to a place toward regeneration,” Wong said. “To ultimately to be able to re-engineer tissues is amazing. Itʼs where you want to go, but that may be one, 10, 20 or a 100 years off in the future.” A different spin on cosmetic surgery trends is a shift in the idea of whatʼs desirable. Wong teaches a course at UCI called “The changing face of beauty in the age of extreme makeovers.” “Itʼs changed with all these silly TV shows. Patients are looking at these examples, and it definitely [creates] a desire toward aggressive, huge results,” Wong said. Amy Bock, a senior human services major thinks most people arenʼt that idealistic and said that the trends in plastic surgery make sense. “Breast augmentations will always be popular,” Bock said. “That and liposuction and Botox. But I think that the less drastic the result, the better because it will look more natural and youʼll able to get back out there a lot faster.”

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SPORTS

S P O R T S @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

GAME

NFL Labor Talks Break Down Under the current agreement, 2006 is scheduled to be the last year with a salary cap. An uncapped year in 2007 means NEW YORK - NFL owners new rules that will force teams will try Thursday to find labor and agents to change their plans peace before the start of free this year and could keep a lot of agency, hoping to avoid the mass teams out of the free-agent market dumping of veterans for salary- entirely. cap reasons. “It might mean that no rookies The owners will meet in New get signed because no one is sure York, looking to reach an agree- of the long-term ramifications,” ment with the playersʼ union that said Tom Condon, the agent for could add $10 million to $15 mil- a number of the gameʼs top playlion to a 2006 salary cap that cur- ers. rently is $94.5 million. Without Even more urgent are salaryit, some teams could be forced cap ramifications for many teams, into wholesale cuts to get beneath which anticipated a labor agreethe cap by midnight. Free agency ment and planned for a much starts Friday. The NFL extended bigger ceiling. Washington, for the deadline for teams to termi- example, could be as much as $25 nate contracts and request waivers million over the salary cap after on players six hours, from 4 p.m. signings over the past few years Thursday to 10 p.m. that anticipated a salary cap figure The NFL said in a statement well over $100 million. Wednesday that the management The ramifications of a lower council executive than anticipated cap committee unanimously rejected were evident the unionʼs latest We d n e s d a y, “We’re in pretty proposal “as a when some good shape. They’re basis for further high-priced negotiations.” veterans were going to give us a cap “Without an cut. Among number and we’ll agreement with them were be ready for it. You the union on an defensive end extension, the Trevor Pryce always prepare for a league year will and running worst case, no matter begin as schedback Mike what the situation” uled at midnight Anderson of Thursday under Denver, the the current terms teamʼs leadErnie Accorsi ing rusher of the CBA,” the last season. statement said. NY Giants Denver also Three days of General Manager cut tight end talks between Jeb Putzier. the league and Buffalo, the NFL Players meanwhile, Association to extend the agreement that runs released defensive tackle Sam out in 2008 ended Tuesday with Adams and Carolina released three the sides far apart on the percent- veterans: running back Stephen age of league revenues earmarked Davis, defensive tackle Brentson for players. Buckner and kicker returner Rod Gene Upshaw, the unionʼs Smart, “He Hate Me” of old XFL executive director, said the league days. is offering to 56.2 percent of its Miami cut left tackle Damion total revenue for the players, McIntosh, saving $3.8 million almost four points lower than the against the cap, and former Pro unionʼs. Bowl cornerback Sam Madison. “Our number has to start with a The Dolphins are a prime example six,” Upshaw said. of a team that needs a new labor But beyond the numbers is an agreement: They are estimated to issue that has divided the owners be about $9 million over a $95 for two years — revenue sharing million cap, but would be under it among the teams. if the agreement is reached. Under the current system, some Other teams seem ready for teams make far more than others whatever happens. in ancillary income, ranging from “Weʼre in pretty good shape,” local radio rights to stadium nam- New York Giants general maning rights and advertising. ager Ernie Accorsi said. “Theyʼre The lower revenue teams say going to give us a cap number and that forces them to commit as weʼll be ready for it. You always much as 70 percent of that money prepare for a worst case, no matto the players while teams with ter what the situation. You never more outside money contribute want to be surprised by something far less, giving the high-revenue negative, only something positeams more available cash for tive.” Accorsi said heʼs also not worupfront bonuses to free agents. The NFL said in a statement ried about new rules. He said after talks broke off that rev- those contingencies are covered enue sharing wonʼt be discussed in the contracts of two young Pro at Thursdayʼs meeting. Bowl players — tight end Jeremy Still, it is bound to come up dur- Shockey and defensive end Osi ing a meeting that on the surface Umenyiora — that the Giants is considered a strategy session to extended last fall. determine the ownersʼ next move. But others are in a different sitLabor negotiations often have a uation, which could mean wholeway of being moved forward by sale cuts of big-name players at deadlines, and revenue sharing is midnight Thursday. What happens considered a critical part of the in the meetings may determine that. formula.

CALENDAR CSUF GAMES

The Associated Press

TODAY: The CSUF menʼs basketball team will be playing against University of California, Davis at Titan Gym at 7:05 PM TODAY: The CSUF womenʼs basketball team will be playing against UC Davis at UC Davis. Fans can follow the game on Gametracker at Fullertontitans. com. FRIDAY: The CSUF baseball team will be playing in Houston, against Rice University. FRIDAY: The CSUF softball team will be playing against Georgia University at the Titan Softball Complex at 3:45 and against Northwestern at 6:00 PM. FRIDAY: The CSUF womenʼs tennis team will be playing against Southeastern Louisiana at the Titan Courts at 1:30 PM . FRIDAY: The womenʼs gymnastics team will be competing against Stanford at the Titan Gym at 7:00 pm. SATURDAY: The CSUF baseball team will be playing against Rice in Houston at 2:00 PM. Fans can follow the game on Gametracker at Fullertontitans. com Songha Lee/Daily Titan

HEADLINE: Junior Mai-Ly Tran returns a backhand against her opponent Wednesday. Nevada beat CSUF, 5-2, at the Titan Courts. Tran and teammate Ruya Inalpulat won their matches against their Nevada opponents.

USA Prepares Hoops for International Play The Associated Press

Allen Iverson is looking forward to spending the summer at home with his family rather than in Japan with Team USA. The Philadelphia 76ers star said Wednesday that he isnʼt upset about not being one of the players invited to try out for the U.S. basketball team that will compete at the world championships this summer. “I just wasnʼt picked. Iʼm not bitter. Iʼm not mad,” Iverson said after a win over the Rockets. “It just means Iʼll get to spend more time with my wife and kids over the next three summers. I still hope they bring back the gold. Iʼm just honored to have played before.” Iverson, who co-captained the Americans to a disappointing bronze medal in the 2004 Olympics, said he is worried more about rings than medals these days. “Thereʼs only one thing I still havenʼt done and thatʼs win (the

championship),” Iverson said. “Thatʼs the only thing I want now.” USA Basketball director Jerry Colangelo will invite 22 players to Las Vegas tryout to for the 15-man team that will compete in Japan this summer and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Washington teammates Gilbert Arenas and Antawn Jamison and Torontoʼs Chris Bosh all said Wednesday that they expect to get invitations. Arenas was vocal in his disappointment when he didnʼt get picked by Eastern Conference coaches for the All-Star game. Commissioner David Stern appointed him to replace the injured Jermaine OʼNeal, and Arenas has been taking his frustration out on opponents ever since. The talkative guard said before Wednesday nightʼs loss to Indiana that he and Jamison will be in Vegas. Many of the NBAʼs biggest stars have declined to play on the team, saying the three-year commitment

IVERSON

HOOPS

FROM PAGE 10

FROM PAGE 10

The Cal State Fullerton menʼs basketball team will have one more opportunity to gain some much coveted momentum heading into the Big West Tournament as they host the UC Davis Aggies Thursday night at 7:00 p.m. and the South Dakota State Jackrabbits Sunday at 2:05 p.m. in a pair of non-conference games at Titan Gym. The Titans (13-12 overall, 5-9 in the Big West) will have to take the long road if they want to win the Big West Tournament and earn an NCAA tournament berth. The Titans are currently sixth in the conference and cannot move past fifth, meaning they will have to play in the opening round of the Big West tournament, which tips off March 8 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Titans Head Coach Bob Burton stressed the importance of this

SATURDAY: The CSUF softball team will be playing at home against Texas Tech at 1:30 PM and Oregon State at 3:45 PM at the Titan Softball Complex.

Matt Petit/Daily Titan

LAY IT UP: Titans junior point guard Bobby Brown skies to the hoop for a layup against CSUN.

A couple weeks ago, I was talking sports with a few friends of mine. One of my buddies brought up a story about how he missed the chance to see Michael Jordan play against the Lakers a decade or so ago. This was Chicago Bulls Jordan, not the guy who played for the Washington Wizards. Anyway, it led to me wondering: Will we be telling the same story about players in this generation? Itʼs hard to gauge how great active players will become while theyʼre still playing, but will we be asking the same question about Kobe Bryant? Lebron James? Allen Iverson? In sports, history has always been a significant factor. There is always a concern about how athletes affect their legacy with what they do today. Every second, every inning,

Colangelo is requiring would be too much wear and tear on their bodies. Thatʼs not a problem for Arenas, who plays all summer long. “Like I told Colangelo, Iʼm going to be playing anyway if you donʼt pick me,” Arenas said. “Iʼm training all year ʻround anyway, so it doesnʼt affect me.” Before scoring 27 points in a loss to the Hawks on Wednesday night, Bosh all but confirmed heʼs one of the invitees. “I expect to be there,” Bosh said. Detroitʼs Chauncey Billups said he will be joining Team USA, too, but not for the world championships. His wife is due to give birth this summer and Billups said heʼs been granted an exemption. “Iʼm excited to have the USA across my chest,” Billups said after a loss in Denver on Wednesday night. “Iʼm glad they thought I was capable enough to regain our dominance.” ESPN.com first reported the list of invitees that Colangelo plans to

announce on Sunday. “Itʼs sort of like I got it, but Iʼve got to make sure I get a confirmation on it,” Howard said late Tuesday night. “Iʼve talked to (Colangelo) a couple of times and I also met him at All-Star weekend, so I finally met him for the first time. Heʼs awesome. I canʼt wait to get USA basketball on top.” When hired to remake the team, Colangelo vowed to choose team players over superstars in hopes of avoiding some of the selfishness and lack of cohesion that doomed the 2004 team. “Iʼm very surprised that Iverson didnʼt make it,” Howard said. “I think he was one of the best leaders the team had in the Olympics, but I think what theyʼre trying to do for the Olympic team is get a group of guys thatʼs willing to play team ball. Iʼm not saying that Iverson isnʼt like that, but I think theyʼre doing a youth movement for the Olympics. I think the older legs are getting brittle, so they might need some young fresh legs out there.”

every yard, every goal is recorded for the sake of records and history. No one really appreciates it until itʼs over. For me, the player that Iʼd hate to ever say I never saw is Allen Iverson. The 6-foot-even, 165-pound point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers has been a controversial figure ever since he came into the league in 1996 from Georgetown University. Heʼs been called a ball hog and a me-first kind of guy. Yet, when Kobe Bryant — and I know this is going to be a sore subject for some you — goes and scores 81 points one night and 62 in three quarters another night, he doesnʼt get half the negative criticism that Iverson got and still gets. But the comparison between Kobe and AI isnʼt the subject of this column. Itʼs just that Iverson has never been able to shake off that negative impression, no matter what he does. And thatʼs why the Team USA snubbing of Iverson is a sore

subject for me. Iverson, a willing participant, was left off the 22man preliminary roster of the U.S. National Team heading to Japan for the World Championship and for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. As Team USAʼs most valuable player in 2004, Iverson displayed everything that made fans love him before or since his breakout year in 2001 when he led the 76ers, which was the only team to win a playoff game against the much more talented Los Angeles Lakers that year, to the NBA Finals. In the 2004 Games, when notable NBA stars turned down an invitation for various reasons like the threat of terrorism, contract disputes and alleged rape trials, Iverson was among the few who stood up and accepted the call. How could Jerry Colangelo, the managing director for U.S. Basketball and the Phoenix Sunsʼ general manager, and Mike Krzyzewski, the head coach of Team USA and Duke University,


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SPORTS

S P O R T S @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

GAME

NFL Labor Talks Break Down Under the current agreement, 2006 is scheduled to be the last year with a salary cap. An uncapped year in 2007 means NEW YORK - NFL owners new rules that will force teams will try Thursday to find labor and agents to change their plans peace before the start of free this year and could keep a lot of agency, hoping to avoid the mass teams out of the free-agent market dumping of veterans for salary- entirely. cap reasons. “It might mean that no rookies The owners will meet in New get signed because no one is sure York, looking to reach an agree- of the long-term ramifications,” ment with the playersʼ union that said Tom Condon, the agent for could add $10 million to $15 mil- a number of the gameʼs top playlion to a 2006 salary cap that cur- ers. rently is $94.5 million. Without Even more urgent are salaryit, some teams could be forced cap ramifications for many teams, into wholesale cuts to get beneath which anticipated a labor agreethe cap by midnight. Free agency ment and planned for a much starts Friday. The NFL extended bigger ceiling. Washington, for the deadline for teams to termi- example, could be as much as $25 nate contracts and request waivers million over the salary cap after on players six hours, from 4 p.m. signings over the past few years Thursday to 10 p.m. that anticipated a salary cap figure The NFL said in a statement well over $100 million. Wednesday that the management The ramifications of a lower council executive than anticipated cap committee unanimously rejected were evident the unionʼs latest We d n e s d a y, “We’re in pretty proposal “as a when some good shape. They’re basis for further high-priced negotiations.” veterans were going to give us a cap “Without an cut. Among number and we’ll agreement with them were be ready for it. You the union on an defensive end extension, the Trevor Pryce always prepare for a league year will and running worst case, no matter begin as schedback Mike what the situation” uled at midnight Anderson of Thursday under Denver, the the current terms teamʼs leadErnie Accorsi ing rusher of the CBA,” the last season. statement said. NY Giants Denver also Three days of General Manager cut tight end talks between Jeb Putzier. the league and Buffalo, the NFL Players meanwhile, Association to extend the agreement that runs released defensive tackle Sam out in 2008 ended Tuesday with Adams and Carolina released three the sides far apart on the percent- veterans: running back Stephen age of league revenues earmarked Davis, defensive tackle Brentson for players. Buckner and kicker returner Rod Gene Upshaw, the unionʼs Smart, “He Hate Me” of old XFL executive director, said the league days. is offering to 56.2 percent of its Miami cut left tackle Damion total revenue for the players, McIntosh, saving $3.8 million almost four points lower than the against the cap, and former Pro unionʼs. Bowl cornerback Sam Madison. “Our number has to start with a The Dolphins are a prime example six,” Upshaw said. of a team that needs a new labor But beyond the numbers is an agreement: They are estimated to issue that has divided the owners be about $9 million over a $95 for two years — revenue sharing million cap, but would be under it among the teams. if the agreement is reached. Under the current system, some Other teams seem ready for teams make far more than others whatever happens. in ancillary income, ranging from “Weʼre in pretty good shape,” local radio rights to stadium nam- New York Giants general maning rights and advertising. ager Ernie Accorsi said. “Theyʼre The lower revenue teams say going to give us a cap number and that forces them to commit as weʼll be ready for it. You always much as 70 percent of that money prepare for a worst case, no matto the players while teams with ter what the situation. You never more outside money contribute want to be surprised by something far less, giving the high-revenue negative, only something positeams more available cash for tive.” Accorsi said heʼs also not worupfront bonuses to free agents. The NFL said in a statement ried about new rules. He said after talks broke off that rev- those contingencies are covered enue sharing wonʼt be discussed in the contracts of two young Pro at Thursdayʼs meeting. Bowl players — tight end Jeremy Still, it is bound to come up dur- Shockey and defensive end Osi ing a meeting that on the surface Umenyiora — that the Giants is considered a strategy session to extended last fall. determine the ownersʼ next move. But others are in a different sitLabor negotiations often have a uation, which could mean wholeway of being moved forward by sale cuts of big-name players at deadlines, and revenue sharing is midnight Thursday. What happens considered a critical part of the in the meetings may determine that. formula.

CALENDAR CSUF GAMES

The Associated Press

TODAY: The CSUF menʼs basketball team will be playing against University of California, Davis at Titan Gym at 7:05 PM TODAY: The CSUF womenʼs basketball team will be playing against UC Davis at UC Davis. Fans can follow the game on Gametracker at Fullertontitans. com. FRIDAY: The CSUF baseball team will be playing in Houston, against Rice University. FRIDAY: The CSUF softball team will be playing against Georgia University at the Titan Softball Complex at 3:45 and against Northwestern at 6:00 PM. FRIDAY: The CSUF womenʼs tennis team will be playing against Southeastern Louisiana at the Titan Courts at 1:30 PM . FRIDAY: The womenʼs gymnastics team will be competing against Stanford at the Titan Gym at 7:00 pm. SATURDAY: The CSUF baseball team will be playing against Rice in Houston at 2:00 PM. Fans can follow the game on Gametracker at Fullertontitans. com Songha Lee/Daily Titan

HEADLINE: Junior Mai-Ly Tran returns a backhand against her opponent Wednesday. Nevada beat CSUF, 5-2, at the Titan Courts. Tran and teammate Ruya Inalpulat won their matches against their Nevada opponents.

SATURDAY: The CSUF softball team will be playing at home against Texas Tech at 1:30 PM and Oregon State at 3:45 PM at the Titan Softball Complex.

USA Prepares Hoops for International Play The Associated Press

Allen Iverson is looking forward to spending the summer at home with his family rather than in Japan with Team USA. The Philadelphia 76ers star said Wednesday that he isnʼt upset about not being one of the players invited to try out for the U.S. basketball team that will compete at the world championships this summer. “I just wasnʼt picked. Iʼm not bitter. Iʼm not mad,” Iverson said after a win over the Rockets. “It just means Iʼll get to spend more time with my wife and kids over the next three summers. I still hope they bring back the gold. Iʼm just honored to have played before.” Iverson, who co-captained the Americans to a disappointing bronze medal in the 2004 Olympics, said he is worried more about rings than medals these days. “Thereʼs only one thing I still havenʼt done and thatʼs win (the

HOOPS FROM PAGE 10

ing double figures in scoring. The Jackrabbits (9-18) will first travel to San Diego State Friday night, before closing out their regular season against the Titans. They have won three out of the last five, including a 57-53 victory against Texas Pan American Saturday. They will be out to avenge an 82-70 defeat to the Titans on November 28 in the first meeting ever between the two teams. Sophomore guard Matt Cadwell leads the Jackrabbits in scoring at 15.3 ppg, while junior forward Ben Beran contributes 11.8 ppg and 5.3 rebs. With two victories this weekend, the Titans can clinch their first consecutive winning seasons since 1983-1984 and 1984-1985. This weekend also marks the final home Matt Petit/Daily Titan games for seniors Jamaal Brown, John Clemmons, Vershan Cottrell, LAY IT UP: Titans junior point guard Bobby Brown skies to the hoop for a layup against CSUN. and Jermaine Harper.

championship),” Iverson said. “Thatʼs the only thing I want now.” USA Basketball director Jerry Colangelo will invite 22 players to Las Vegas tryout to for the 15-man team that will compete in Japan this summer and the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Washington teammates Gilbert Arenas and Antawn Jamison and Torontoʼs Chris Bosh all said Wednesday that they expect to get invitations. Arenas was vocal in his disappointment when he didnʼt get picked by Eastern Conference coaches for the All-Star game. Commissioner David Stern appointed him to replace the injured Jermaine OʼNeal, and Arenas has been taking his frustration out on opponents ever since. The talkative guard said before Wednesday nightʼs loss to Indiana that he and Jamison will be in Vegas. Many of the NBAʼs biggest stars have declined to play on the team, saying the three-year commitment

IVERSON FROM PAGE 10

everything that made fans love him before or since his breakout year in 2001 when he led the 76ers, which was the only team to win a playoff game against the much more talented Los Angeles Lakers that year, to the NBA Finals. In the 2004 Games, when notable NBA stars turned down an invitation for various reasons like the threat of terrorism, contract disputes and alleged rape trials, Iverson was among the few who stood up and accepted the call. How could Jerry Colangelo, the managing director for U.S. Basketball and the Phoenix Sunsʼ general manager, and Mike Krzyzewski, the head coach of Team USA and Duke University, make such an oversight? In no way am I saying that Team USA — which has invited players like Kobe, Lebron James

Colangelo is requiring would be too much wear and tear on their bodies. Thatʼs not a problem for Arenas, who plays all summer long. “Like I told Colangelo, Iʼm going to be playing anyway if you donʼt pick me,” Arenas said. “Iʼm training all year ʻround anyway, so it doesnʼt affect me.” Before scoring 27 points in a loss to the Hawks on Wednesday night, Bosh all but confirmed heʼs one of the invitees. “I expect to be there,” Bosh said. Detroitʼs Chauncey Billups said he will be joining Team USA, too, but not for the world championships. His wife is due to give birth this summer and Billups said heʼs been granted an exemption. “Iʼm excited to have the USA across my chest,” Billups said after a loss in Denver on Wednesday night. “Iʼm glad they thought I was capable enough to regain our dominance.” ESPN.com first reported the list of invitees that Colangelo plans to

announce on Sunday. “Itʼs sort of like I got it, but Iʼve got to make sure I get a confirmation on it,” Howard said late Tuesday night. “Iʼve talked to (Colangelo) a couple of times and I also met him at All-Star weekend, so I finally met him for the first time. Heʼs awesome. I canʼt wait to get USA basketball on top.” When hired to remake the team, Colangelo vowed to choose team players over superstars in hopes of avoiding some of the selfishness and lack of cohesion that doomed the 2004 team. “Iʼm very surprised that Iverson didnʼt make it,” Howard said. “I think he was one of the best leaders the team had in the Olympics, but I think what theyʼre trying to do for the Olympic team is get a group of guys thatʼs willing to play team ball. Iʼm not saying that Iverson isnʼt like that, but I think theyʼre doing a youth movement for the Olympics. I think the older legs are getting brittle, so they might need some young fresh legs out there.”

and former CSUF Titan Bruce Bowen — is not going to be good without Iverson. I just think itʼs a raw deal that they would deprive themselves of such a competitor and team leader. The only valid argument I have heard so far for the snub was that they were thinking long term, and that they could have a real team to represent the United States for international tournaments like the World Championships and Summer Olympics. Using this method, the U.S. would have a set group of players instead of having to rebuild every four years or so. I buy that argument. It makes sense, a lot of sense since thatʼs how most foreign national teams work. By the time the 2008 Olympics arrive, Iverson will be 32 years old and will most likely be playing his last time in the Summer Games. Despite that fact, how is it that he isnʼt even at least invited to tryout? College players like Dukeʼs

J.J. Redick and Gonzagaʼs Adam Morrison were invited, and even Indianapolis high school star Greg Oden was invited to tryout. So there is definitely a youth movement. I would think that Iverson – who despite all the question marks that have haunted him— is a competitor in his most basic form. No matter how he is criticized, no one can ever question how much heart and passion he has for the game. And with the U.S. coming off a Bode Miller Winter Olympics, isnʼt that the spirit that we want to send into international competition? I can understand if he wasnʼt on the final team, but to not even invite him? Even more, to reject his request to play on the team? Thatʼs an insult. Whether Iverson is on the Olympic team in 2008 or not, Iʼll still watch and Iʼll still root and cheer for the U.S. because one man does not a team make. See you in the stands.


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W E D N E S D A Y, M A R C H 2 , 2 0 0 6

Titans Look to Cook Rice CSUF to travels to Houston; farthest road trip of young season By Kirk Dingley

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Who knew the College World Series would start in March this year? Well, it hasnʼt actually - but this weekend series between Cal State Fullerton and Rice University could certainly be a preview of two of the top teams playing in Omaha in June. The Titans, currently ranked seventh in the nation by Baseball America, will play the fourth-ranked Owls in Houston. Their overall record in 2006 is 11-2 and the Owls feature 20 returning letterman from a 2005 team that came within four outs of reaching the College World Series. The Owls won the national championship back in 2003, the year before the Titans won it all in 2004. The Owls have won six-straight games going into the weekend series, including a victory against #23 ranked Nebraska. Sophomore Rice pitcher Cole St. Clair (2-0, 0.59 ERA) grew up in Orange County and still uses his 714 cell phone number. His mother graduated from CSUF and he graduated from Foothill high school. The hard-throwing-lefthander said that he is looking forward to playing against the Titans. “It will be a fun game to play. The team is looking forward to it,” St. Clair said. The Santa Ana native doesnʼt hear much about the Titans in Texas, but is eager to

SPORTS

S P O R T S @ D A I LY T I T A N . C O M

Essence of an Answer

reacquaint himself with his former neighbors. “Itʼs definitely fun to play my hometown team, a name Iʼve grown up hearing,” St. Claire said. “Iʼm excited.” St. Clair threw 13 scoreless innings to start the season, but finally showed heʼs human giving up his first earnedrun last weekend. Not only will the series against Rice be a challenge on the field for the Titans, but also off. “This is the farthest we have traveled this season so the older guys have been talking to the younger guys about what to expect playing in a big city like Houston,” Titans shortstop Blake Davis said. “We all want have a good time, and were all really excited, but we know we canʼt break curfew and that sort of thing.” Davis says the series against Rice will be a good measuring stick for the Titans. “Itʼs definitely an early season test,” Davis said. “We know theyʼre a really good team. The game definitely has extra meaning for us.” After sweeping the UNLV Rebels earlier in the season, the Titans broke out the brooms again against the UCLA Bruins. The three-game series showed that this years Titan team has versatility. After the pitchers kept the Bruin bats silent in the first two games of the series, allowing just three runs total, the offense out slugged the Bruins in the 12-6 series finally. The Titans stellar play continued against Pepperdine Tuesday, shutting out the Waves in a 5-0 victory. Senior outfielder Danny Dorn went 4-for-4 and drove in two runs for the Titans, who have won nine out of their last 10 games.

MAN IN AN IRON MASK: CSUF catcher John Curtis looks to get signs from the Titan dugout in a game against UN Las Vegas.

will begin at the same time on all three days with teams playing on both fields of the Titan Softball Complex. Oregon State won last yearʼs event after posting a 4-0 record in the 2005 Worth Invitational that was hampered by downpours of rain. CSUF posted a 2-1 record in the tournament last year. This weekend will mark the first time that the softball team plays a game at the Titan Softball Complex this season. “We are exciting to play on the field that weʼve been practicing on everyday,” Titans junior pitcher

Brooke Weekley said. “This is our home.” CSUF will have plenty of opportunities to showcase their talents in front of their home crowd, as 17 of their next 22 games are at Titan Softball Complex. Competition will be tough, as five nationally ranked teams will be competing in the field: Tennessee, Georgia, Oregon State, Northwestern, and Stanford. Along with the Titans, the other teams participating are UC Davis, UC Santa Barbara, Texas Tech, Purdue, and Loyola-Chicago. “This weekend is no different

than any other, we can only beat ourselves,” Titans junior outfielder Ashley Van Boxmeer said. “Every opponent is faceless.” The Titans (8-7 overall) are coming off a successful trip last weekend at the Palm Springs Classic in Cathedral City where they went 32, including a win over nationally ranked Texas A&M in their final game of the tournament. With the help of a home crowd, the Titans look to carry the momentum of winning their final two games last weekend. CSUF Head Coach Michelle Gromacki has a 15-9 record against

this weekendʼs opponents. “Our big area of focus is on playing hard every inning,” Gromacki said. “Battle as hard against every team.” The Titans will begin play on Friday at 3:45 p.m. against Georgia, followed by Northwestern at 6 p.m. Saturdayʼs schedule includes games against Texas Tech and Oregon State at 1:30 p.m. and 3:45 p.m. respectively. Sunday will mark the final day of the tournament, with the Titanʼs first game against Purdue before closing out their weekend against Stanford.

CSUF basketball shoots to beat UC Davis to warm up for Big West Tournament

tips off March 8 at the Anaheim Convention Center. Titans Head Coach Bob Burton stressed the importance of this weekendʼs games. “We have a lot at stake,” Burton said. “We want to continue to win games and finish with a winning season. The team wants to establish a positive attitude and get momentum heading into the Big West Tournament.” The Titans are coming off a 1-1 road trip, where they defeated UC Santa Barbara 80-76 and dropped a close decision to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo 76-72. On offense, the Titans shot 50 percent in both games and combined to make 17 three-pointers. However, key defensive breakdowns plagued the team in the loss to the Mustangs. Titans senior center Jamaal Brown, who averaged 14.5 points and 12.5 rebounds on the road trip, outlined a simple path to success for the team. “Defense will always be the key

for us,” Brown said. Leading scorer Bobby Brown (17.5 ppg) recently stated what it would take for the Titans to experience post-season success. “We must maintain our intensity on defense,” Brown said. “We must also continue to trust each other.” The Aggies (8-18) are coming off a 96-92 loss to Long Beach State in their home regular season finale. They have lost three straight and five out of seven, including a 94-92 triple overtime thriller to the Titans on Jan 28. Both teams combined to score 16 points in the first two overtime periods, before the Titans exploded for 18 points in the third overtime, narrowly fending off the Aggies. Senior forward Phil Rasmussen and junior guard Rommel Marentez, who average 12.5 ppg, lead the team in scoring. Three other Aggies are also averag-

THE TRUC STOP

Phil Gordon/Daily Titan

CSUF Softball Comes Home After Road Trip

Titans return for first home game of season; will play Oregon State first By Jon Castillo

Daily Titan Staff Writer

The Cal State Fullerton softball team will finally be playing in front of a home crowd as they host the 2006 Worth Invitational at the Titan Softball Complex this weekend. The Titans will host the 11team, three-day round-robin event starting this Friday at 9 a.m. Play

Titans Look For Momentum By Jason Eichelberger

Daily Titan Staff Writer

Matt Petit/Daily Titan

COOLER HEADS: Junior forward Justin Burns goes strong to the hole for CSUF.

The Cal State Fullerton menʼs basketball team will have one more opportunity to gain some much coveted momentum heading into the Big West Tournament as they host the UC Davis Aggies Thursday night at 7:00 p.m. and the South Dakota State Jackrabbits Sunday at 2:05 p.m. in a pair of non-conference games at Titan Gym. The Titans (13-12 overall, 5-9 in the Big West) will have to take the long road if they want to win the Big West Tournament and earn an NCAA tournament berth. The Titans are currently sixth in the conference and cannot move past fifth, meaning they will have to play in the opening round of the Big West tournament, which

SEE HOOPS

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PAGE 3

A couple weeks ago, I was talking sports with a few friends of mine. One of my buddies brought up a story about Henry how he missed the chance to Truc see Michael Daily Titan Jordan play Sports Editor a g a i n s t the Lakers a decade or so ago. This was Chicago Bulls Jordan, not the guy who played for the Washington Wizards. Anyway, it led to me wondering: Will we be telling the same story about players in this generation? Itʼs hard to gauge how great active players will become while theyʼre still playing, but will we be asking the same question about Kobe Bryant? Lebron James? Allen Iverson? In sports, history has always been a significant factor. There is always a concern about how athletes affect their legacy with what they do today. Every second, every inning, every yard, every goal is recorded for the sake of records and history. No one really appreciates it until itʼs over. For me, the player that Iʼd hate to ever say I never saw is Allen Iverson. The 6-foot-even, 165-pound point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers has been a controversial figure ever since he came into the league in 1996 from Georgetown University. Heʼs been called a ball hog and a me-first kind of guy. Yet, when Kobe Bryant — and I know this is going to be a sore subject for some you — goes and scores 81 points one night and 62 in three quarters another night, he doesnʼt get half the negative criticism that Iverson got and still gets. But the comparison between Kobe and AI isnʼt the subject of this column. Itʼs just that Iverson has never been able to shake off that negative impression, no matter what he does. And thatʼs why the Team USA snubbing of Iverson is a sore subject for me. Iverson, a willing participant, was left off the 22man preliminary roster of the U.S. National Team heading to Japan for the World Championship and for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. As Team USAʼs most valuable player in 2004, Iverson displayed

SEE IVERSON = PAGE 8

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