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Ray Charles performs at the House of Blues

INSIDE A young boy dons 8 nthePERSPECTIVES: robes of a monk for the summer

—see Detour page12

n SPORTS: Women’s soccer wins a 2-1 21 exhibition against Cal State Bakersfield

T U E S D AY

Vo l u m e 7 2 , I s s u e 1

Augus t 2 8 , 2 0 0 1

Harassment suit disputed by universinCOURT: Professor still plagued by a hostile working environment after winning a settlement

By Amy Rottier

Daily Titan News Editor After losing a $311,000 sexual harassment suit, Cal State Fullerton decided to retaliate against the assistant biology professor with an appeal rather than stop the harassment. Out of fear for her job, Sandra Banack filed suit against CSUF in March 2000 for several years of sexual harassment that created a

hostile working environment. Even after the court decision, the harassment continues, Banack said. The suit was prompted by a letter of reprimand that the court found to falsely accuse Banack of violating her Department of Fish and Game permit by trespassing during a field trip in February 1998. Margaret Atwell, associate vice president of Academic Affairs, informed Banack that a second let-

ter could result in her termination. Because Banack claims she did nothing wrong to prompt the first letter, she took the university to court to protect her job. Atwell could not comment due to university policy prohibiting the discussion of personal information. The university recently informed Banack that the letter would be removed from her file, although they previously refused to do so in spite of the court’s decision. Banack felt the university handled the situation poorly, all the way up to President Milton Gordon

who initially rejected her appeal to remove the letter from her file and authorized the appeal to the court. As for the harassment, Banack says that she has survived so far and this semester will be no different. Banack became a victim of harassment shortly after she began working at CSUF in the fall of 1997. Banack said that members of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee on campus aggressively went after her reputation and ultimately her job. IACUC oversees animal research on campus and is responsible for determining

and permitting appropriate research and field activities. Banack must go through the committee to collect animals for her studies. The harassment began with the committee continuously requiring Banack to resubmit protocols, which were capriciously rejected as unacceptable, according to the lawsuit. Vickie Langille, who then worked for the IACUC, told Banack that she and the other members planned to treat Banack differently than the male professors and that she had better watch out, the lawsuit said. Banack was later accused of tres-

passing during a February 1998 field trip to Carbon Canyon. John Chappell of the IACUC claimed that a student reported the trespassing. The “whistler blower” policy on campus that protects those who report wrong-doings prevented Chappell from producing a witness. Through the court it was found out that the information came from a student who heard from another student that trespassing might have occurred,”, said Keith Walden, Banack’s lawyer.

BANACK/ 3

CSU in need of full-time faculty nEDUCATION: Instructor recruitment suffers due to heavy workload and lack of competitive salaries By Amy Rottier

Daily Titan News Editor The future of faculty and students hangs in limbo as bargaining between the California Faculty Association and CSU has hit a wall. Unable to come to an agreement, the two groups have entered into mediation in attempt to move forward for the benefit of all. A strike may loom in the future of CSU if the mediation and fact-finding process cannot find a common ground for the groups, said G. Nanjundappa, president of CFA’s Fullerton Chapter. Since 1994, CSU has increased by about 35,000 students and Nanjundappa claims that the net total of new tenure-track faculty hired is one. The system has many more positions than can be filled, he said. This year, Cal State Fullerton hired about 52 new tenure-track employees. However, that doesn’t fill the gap made by faculty who have retired or left, Nanjundappa said. “Hiring 52 people looks good, but it is not enough,” he said. The 52 have filled some vacant positions but not all, many more need to be hired. While Nanjundappa is claiming only one new tenure-track faculty member has been added in the last five years, the Chancellor’s Office has different numbers. Colleen Bentley-Adler, director of Public Affairs for the Chancellor’s Office, claims that over the past five years CSU has hired 23,000 new tenure-track faculty members making the net gain 241. Although this statistic is substantially higher, the ratio still seems lacking at 241 faculty added for 35,000 students. Although it is a struggle to keep up when the system is losing senior facul-

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extras online n Check out the

Daily Titan online this year at http:// dailytitan.fullerton.edu.

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Look out for the Daily Titan’s first special issue focusing on diversity, available at the end of September.

ty to retirement, said Ephraim Smith, vice president of academic affairs at CSUF, “we are doing all right.” The universities automatically make new positions as they grow so a constant teacher/student ratio remains, Smith said. The reason CSU has a difficult time hiring faculty is because salaries are not competitive and the workload is very high, according to the CFA. A study by the California Post Secondary Education Commission found salaries in the CSU system to be eight percent below salaries of comparable schools. CFA is asking administration to make salaries attractive enough to recruit faculty. To fill positions that cannot attract full-time faculty, more and more part-time faculty members are being hired. This becomes a problem for students because part-time faculty is not around to mentor students after class or supervise projects, Nanjundappa said. “These are the essential things we need to do to ensure education is imminent,” he said. The universities need more permanence because the increase of part-time faculty is detrimental to the students. Bentley-Adler disagrees. She believes that most of the part-timers are very dedicated to the students. In the latest compensation budget, salary and benefits for faculty were reduced from four to two percent, according to the CFA. The Chancellor’s Office received an eight percent increase. Nanjundappa says that that they know the money is in the budget somewhere to increase money for salary and compensation. But the budget has been provided by the state and money cannot be taken away from one group and given to another, Bentley-Adler said. There is only so much funding. The CFA is not looking for all the money right now, but a commitment to bridge the gap in two or three years, Nanjundappa said. Other issues on the table include getting faculty the same amount of money for participating in year-round operations, such as teaching summer

ADAM BYRNES/Daily Titan

Opening the celebration of Pakistani Independence at Cal State Fullerton, AnamAli recites passages from the Quran.

CSUF opens nation-wide event

Thousands participate in the sixth annual celebration hoping to educate and spread cultural awareness among California’s largest Pakistani population By Kathleen Gutierrez

Daily Titan Detour Editor It is one of the most expansive minority events in Southern California. Yet, those who reside outside the circle of Pakistani-American culture may never hear of the Independence Day celebration held annually at Cal State Fullerton. The event, which occurred on Aug. 11, is now in its sixth year according to Wajahat Farouk, outgoing president of the CSUF Pakistani Students Association (PSA). “This is the first of the three nation-wide events for Pakistani Independence Day and it is the largest of all,” he said.

New York and San Francisco run a close second and third, respectively. They have yet to match the CSUF’s attendance, which reached nearly 10,000 attendees in one night. Farouk said that out of respect for the three celebrations, the other two cities schedule their observance on different days, giving Pakistanis the chance to attend every ceremony. CSUF is always first. Farouk, a Pakistani national, studied in the United States at CSUF and received his master’s degree in Advertising this past May. He actively participated in the last three Independence Day festivities and moved back home to Pakistan just after this year’s celebration. He left a strong legacy of cultural awareness

for future members of PSA. “We are trying to bring families together to teach children about our culture since we live so far away,” said Shazia Peshimam, CSUF student and current PSA president. Part of the cultural awareness is based on publicity. It is not known whether the mass Orange County society knows how strong the presence of Pakistanis really is, especially in Fullerton. Local media tend to ignore the event, while local Pakistani-Americans spread the word. If the entire county knows about them, it is okay, Peshimam said, but it appears that the

PAKISTANI/ 4

MEDIATION/ 19

Parking woes continnCAMPUS: High expense fees aim to alleviate the crunch as CSUF’s crowded lots accommodate a growing student population By Heather Blair

Daily Titan Asst. News Editor Verizon Wireless Ampitheatre holds 16,000 people. The Arrowhead Pond holds 18,900 people. Cal State Fullerton tries to accommodate 30,000 people. But with little room left, there are only 9,000 people who are able to park on campus. During the first week of school,

thousands of students drove down designated paths to search for the elusive parking spot. Like ants marching back from a picnic, one by one the cars filed down each aisle until there was no more room. Maximum capacity had been reached. But CSUF Parking and Transportation Services had anticipated the shortcoming, and tried to implement several programs for the students to choose from. It is widely known that CSUF is a commuter campus, and with record enrollment this semester, students should try to plan ahead, said Paulette Blumberg, associate director for the Parking and Transportation. “Between campus roadways, stack parking and the PA lawn we were able to have an additional 1,000 parking spots,” Blumberg said.

“That would’ve been more people that were just circling.” This semester Bill Barrett, associate vice president for administration, approved using the Performing Arts lawn as a parking lot for the first three weeks of school. The cars are only parked on the lawn between 8 a.m. and 2.pm., which are critical times, Blumberg said. Stack parking has made its return to campus as well. CSUF has contracted AmpCo to run their program in Lots, A, B and G through the week before Thanksgiving. If students have to park in lots that are far from the central campus, they can use the Titan Shuttle to provide transportation to and from the inner

http://dailytitan.fullerton.edu

LOTS/ 4

CHRIS TENNYSON/Daily Titan

The Performing Arts lawn took the overflow of the distant lots and stacked parking . The campus can only accommodate 9,000 cars.


2 Tuesday, August 28, 2001

NEWS

two

A GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING

BRIEFS New Dean Appointed Dr. Raman Unnikrishnan was recently appointed as the Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Sciences. Under Unnikrishnan, the Electrical Engineering department at the Rochester Institute of Technology was recognized at the fifth best EE program in the country by US News and World Report. The new dean received his Ph.D in electrical engineering in 1975 from the University of Missouri, an M.S. in electrical engineering from South Dakota State University, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Kerala, India.

Queen Mary prepares for Halloween If anyone is looking for some interesting work this fall, the Queen Mary is hiring for the seventh annual Halloween horror program. Shipwreck 2001 will be held in Long Beach, and for 13 nights the crew will terrify, excite and intensify the public’s visit to the old ship. Auditions will be held September 7, 21, and 28 at 6 p.m. and September 8, 22, and 29 at 10 a.m. at the Queen Mary Exhibit Hall. They are looking for monsters, demons and vampires to fill its chambers for designated dates in October. For ghoulish characters who are working inside the mazes, the pay rate is $7.50 per hour, and attendants pay is $6.25 per hour. Anyone who is looking to spice up their life by adding a little Halloween horror is invited to audition, but they must 18 years or older. All applicants must be prepared to complete an applica-

Darleene Barrientos Lori Anderson Samantha Gonzaga Magda Liszewska Robert Sage Charles Davis Gus Garcia Amy Rottier Heather Blair Rita Freeman Melanie Bysouth Jonathan Hansen Kathleen Gutierrez Michael Del Muro Adam Byrnes Chris Tennyson Elana Pruitt Gus Garcia Jeffrey Brody Editor in Chief Managing Editor News Sports Main Photo

278-5815 278-5693 278-5813 278-3149 278-2128 278-2991

tion and interview upon arrival. Shipwreck and 97.1 KLSX FM Radio are also holding a contest for the 2001 Queen Mary Shipwreck “Fright Mistress.” The contest winner will receive a cash prize and represent the Shipwreck for 2001. In 2000 the ship added a sixth maze—“House of Hallucinations”—and it was the first to be done entirely in 3-D, according to www.queenmaryshipwreck.com. This year they plan on having seven mazes, live bands and a dance party every night. For more information, call (562) 499-1798.

Getty Museum celebrates American photography Two exhibitions will be winding to its close by Sept 16. In the only exhibit outside New York, the works of photographer Walker Evans are featured along with other works of American photographers. All in all, there will be 350 images from 100 different artists. Sixty of these photographs are by Evans, and 20 pieces that were only published in the “Walker Evans & Company” catalogue will be shown. Another showcase ending on Oct. 28 will place the Getty’s collections of Evans’ works, alongside images captured by other photographers. The spread serves to display the aspects of American life from the first half of the 20th century. Other works by artists include those of regional photographers Langenheim Brothers, to classic photographs by Dorothea Lange, Paul Strand and Doris Ulmann. For more information, call the Getty Museum at (310) 4407360.

Editor in Chief Senior Editor Managing Editor Managing Editor Business Manager Advertising Sales Manager Advertising Production Manager News Editor Asst. News Editor Asst. News Editor Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editor Detour Editor Opinion Editor Photo Editor Photo Editor Copy Editor Production Manager Faculty Adviser Advertising 278-3373 Editorial Fax 278-2702 Advertising Fax 278-2702 Internet 278-5440 Web site: http://dailytitan.fullerton.edu E-mail: dailytitan@yahoo.com

The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Tuesday through Friday. The Daily Titan operates independently of Associated Students, College of Communications, CSUF administration and the CSU system. The Daily Titan and its predecessor, the Titan Times, have functioned as a public forum since inception. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The mail subscription price is $45 per semester, $65 per year, payable to the Daily Titan, College Park 670, CSUF, Fullerton, CA 92834. Copyright ©2001 Daily Titan

Campus David Leisner will be in concert Friday, September 28. He will also be holding a master class on Thursday September 27. An exhibit of unique natural objects and other hand-crafted works are on display in “Objects Extraordinaires: Awakening the Sense of Wonder” in the Pollak Library: Atrium Gallery. The display will be open through December 20, 2001.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

“The Torquays” will be in concert on Wednesday, August 29 from 12-1 p.m. in the Becker Amphitheater.

Stop by the College Legal Clinic for a free consultation on Wednesday, August 29 from 1-3 p.m. in Bradford A room in the Titan Student Union. If students are interested in joining a student club or organization join KROQ in the quad on Wednesday and Thursday, August 29-30 from 10:30-1:30 p.m. Different groups will be there

to hand out information about getting involved in campus life.

If any students are interested in volunteering or community service there will be an introductory orientation in the TSU-2 at 11 a.m. on Friday, August 31. The event is sponsored by the Volunteer and Service Center. For more information call (714) 278-7623.

Community The last Wednesday to experience a concert at the Brea

Dam Recreational Area is this Wednesday, August 29. With free admission, people can bring lawn chairs, a picnic dinner and friends to listen to 1950s doo-wop music with “The Alley Cats” from 6:30-8 p.m. Fullerton Market, featuring farm-fresh produce, live entertainment and arts and crafts, is being held on Thursdays from 4-8:30 p.m. The market will be open through October 18 on Wilshire Avenue between Harbor and Pomona. Admission is free.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS COP BLOTTER Monday, Aug. 20 A silver Mitsubishi was blocked by two cars at 11:45 a.m. Stacked parking attendants did not mark the car keys and were unsure which keys went with which car. At 1:13 p.m. two suspicious people in Library South were taken into custody. At 9:39 p.m. a car in Lot C was reported as keyed. A person in a blue Chevrolet El Camino was arrested around 11:57 p.m.

Tuesday, Aug. 21 A red Geo Prism with its hazard lights on was reported at 8:24 a.m. The owner had left a note on the car. At 2:38 p.m. an Atlas Van and a student driving a white Saturn were involved in a noninjury traffic accident on East Campus Drive. Two cars blocking an aisle in Lot E were towed around 7:15 p.m. At 10:01 p.m. a person was found with marijuana in Lot E.

Wednesday, Aug. 22 A vehicle with expired registration was towed from Lot E at 11:09 a.m. At 11:40 a.m. a shuttle was involved in a non-injury traffic accident with a Lexus. A vehicle was stopped at 7:28 p.m. and a person was taken to Orange County Jail.

Thursday, August 23 A pedestrian was minimally injured by a white Toyota at the Titan Gym at 8:02 a.m.

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At 1:22 p.m. shoplifting from the bookstore was reported. A hit and run of a parked car in Lot E was reported at 1:25 p.m. A person could not find their car in the Fullervale Lot at 10:15 p.m.

Saturday, August 25 At 12:44 p.m. Public Safety responded to a female having trouble breathing at the Mobil gas station at Associated Road and Yorba Linda Boulevard. The window was smashed out of a gray vehicle in Lot G at 6:58 p.m.


NEWS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

3

Admissions capped nINCREASE: Student enrollment rises by six percent to bring the total to a record-high of 26,616 By Elana Pruitt

Daily Titan Copy Editor

CHRIS TENNYSON/Daily Titan

For the past few years, the student average for units taken has been less than 12.

Cal State Fullerton had to brake early on contributing to the mass overflow of parking lots and overcrowded classrooms, in order to manage the student influx. This fall, 26,616 students are enrolled at CSUF, toppling last year’s first day count of 25, 092, according toAdmissions and Records documents. The university closed its doors to undergraduate applicants of all majors on April 13, with openings only for graduate students, said James Blackburn, director of Admissions and Records. For the past five years, the average units students have taken are 11.11, as stated in the documents. Proving that as a whole, students are not attending CSUF on a full-time status, Blackburn concluded that the high volume of part-time students might be a major factor on the crowded campus of long-term students.

“When I went to college, students graduated in four years. But because CSUF is a commuter school and most students have outside jobs, the average time to graduate has become about fiveand-a-half years,” Blackburn said. Continuing students comprise 19,374 of the CSUF student population, while there are 2,697 first time freshmen, 3,251 new and returning transfer students, and grad students are the least amount enrolled, totaling 1,294, according to the documents. “Because we are one of the fastest growing CSU campuses in the last five years and growing so rapidly, we are trying to manage the growth,” President Milton Gordon said. “We will always admit those qualified during the open months.” As recorded in documents, seniors make up the highest percentage of students enrolled this fall, totaling 8,093, while sophomores are at 2,354, Freshmen reached 4,529, while juniors slightly trail behind seniors at 6,835. A Public Affairs news release reported that with a 6 percent enrollment increase from last year, CSUF has shifted rank from seventh to third place among the 23 CSU campuses in enrollment. Cal State Long Beach, Cal State Northridge, San Diego State, Chico State

and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo provided only one month, the least possible time from Nov. 1 through Dec. 1, for this fall semester/quarter application process. CSUF held their application process period from Nov. 1 as well, but cut it short on April 13. “We want to provide as much access as we can,” Blackburn said. Construction plans for the Physical Education Building and the Performing Arts Center, as well as the newly used College Park building for the Communications Department are accommodations that Blackburn said are part of the plan to serve future students. CSUF is still maintaining its parking lots with stack parking, allowing students to leave their keys with attendants, similar to valet parking. Other parking solutions include allowing parking alongside interior campus roads, as well as returning trams and carpooling benefits, which are still in progress. CSUF administrators ended the allotted application period two months earlier this year, as compared to last year’s ending period in June. So how would one describe the admissions process, which still leaves the hallways crowded and congested? “‘Complicated’ is too nice of a word,” Blackburn said.

University Gables offer professors affordable

By Jonathan Hansen

Daily Titan Asst. Sports Editor In an effort to lure new professors and to provide affordable housing for faculty and staff members, Cal State Fullerton and its partners broke ground on a housing project exclusively for CSUF employees in June. University Gables is scheduled to open in the summer of 2002 and will consist of 86 homes in Buena Park at the corner of Malvern Avenue and Dale Street. “University Gables marks a sig-

nificant advancement in Cal State Fullerton’s landmark program to provide for-sale housing for its faculty and staff,” said President Milton A. Gordon. “University Gables is a unique, new-home neighborhood that shows how powerful a public-private partnership can be,” Gordon continued. “It’s one of the few communities built in this country solely to accommodate a university’s faculty and staff.” The partnership responsible for University Gables consists of CSUF and its housing authority, the County of Orange, the Orange County Flood Control District, the City of Buena Park, Orange County Affordable Homeownership Alliance and developer Ambling West. “It’s in the county’s best interest to ensure Cal State Fullerton and other local colleges and universities are able to grow physically and intellectually by attracting the best scholastic and administrative tal-

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ent possible, said Cynthia P. Coad, County Board Chair and 4th district supervisor. “University Gables can serve as a template for other public-private affordable housing projects in the county, whether it’s university housing for faculty, staff and students or housing for other county residents such as librarians, hospital workers, policemen and firemen.” The detached homes will range in size from 1,500 to 1,600 square feet and will feature landscaped front yards, front porches and private courtyards. Detached models will be avail-

able in either three- or four-bedroom plans with two and a half baths. T h e attached homes will be smaller, ranging in size from 1,350 to 1,450 square feet and all the attached homes will have three bedrooms and two and a half baths. “From the city’s perspective, University Gables is an excellent example of how infill sites can be turned into usable land for necessary devel-

It’s one of the few

communi-

ties built in this

‘‘

n PROJECT: New housing partnerships hope to have residences for faculty by summer of 2002

country solely to

accommodate a university’s facul-

ty and staff.

opment,” Buena Park Mayor Art Brown said. “The beauty of University Gables is that it will transform a marginal parcel of land — what some may consider an eyesore — into a very attractive neighborhood of lovely homes, a park, a swimming pool and a new population of talented residents, who will help make our city, and our county a better place,” Brown continued. The Orange County Flood Control District contributed the land for the development to the City of Buena Park, which in turn dedicated the land to CSUF. Prices start in the mid-$100,000s for the attached homes and in the low-to-mid $200,000s for the detached homes. “The value of University Gables is that, for the University and for the Authority, it opens the door through a creative public-private partnership to a new era of university housing that will help accommodate

the addition of a much needed faculty and staff to keep pace with the university’s growth, both physically and academically,” said William Dickerson, executive director of the CSUF Housing Authority. Citigroup Center for Community Development Enterprise provided a $16.2 million loan to finance the construction and will lend and invest $6 billion through the year 2008. “We are pleased to work with CSUF in taking this innovative approach to addressing the critical need for quality, affordable housing near its Fullerton campus,” said Steve Hall, Citigroup Center Director of Community lending in California. “We believe that this important housing initiative will aid CSUF in its efforts to recruit and retain high quality staff and facult, he continued. “We hope that it is one of many such solutions that we can help to achieve at CSU campuses.”

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4 Tuesday, August 28, 2001 LOTS

n from page 1 core of the school. But for these systems to run, there is a price to pay. Joseph Ferrer, director of parking, said it costs about $275,000 a year for stack parking, and another $250,000 for the shuttle. “There is a rumor that if students buy a parking permit they are guaranteed a space,” Ferrer said. “But that permit only grants them permission to park in that designated lot if there is a spot.” Over the summer, Ferrer said the office sent out two different postcards to warn students about the parking situation this semester. One was to inform students that they can purchase their parking permit before the semester begins to ease the congestion at the cashier’s office, and the other was to let the students know about commuter alternatives. “We’re not trying to sugarcoat the problem,” Ferrer said. “We just want students to know we are doing the best we can.” Not only are they trying to give students incentives to carpool, ride the bus, or take Metrolink or Amtrak, CSUF is implementing a commuter

BANACK n from page 1 Chappell was unable to be reached for comment. Banack’s department backed her up and went to the committee to confirm that she did not trespass. According to the lawsuit, a colleague informed Banack in April that because of derogatory comments Chappell and another IACUC member, Stuart Ross, made about Banack to Atwell, Banack would not receive tenure as long as Atwell held her position. The colleague suggested Banack look for a job at another university. Her colleague also told Atwell that the IACUC members should be advised to stop their harassment of Banack or else risk legal action, the lawsuit said. On June 4, Langille sent a letter without Banack’s knowledge to the Department of Fish and Game falsely accusing Banack of misusing DFG permits by trespassing and conducting animal research without

NEWS program for faculty and staff as well. Christine Lua, a student who works on the program, said they are subsidizing 50 percent or up to $60 if faculty or staff take either the Metrolink or Amtrak to campus. If they want to ride a bike, walk or carpool each person will receive $1 a day. There are also incentives such as quarterly and yearly drawings in which they can win prizes such as a pass to park in 30 minute parking, $50 or $100. Parking and Transportation also expanded the faculty and staff parking lot located directly behind the College Park building. They marked off 100 spots for faculty and staff, and they re-striped the 300 spots in the student lot so cars weren’t parking so close together. “The spaces were so narrow last semester that it wasn’t suitable for cars to park there,” Blumberg said. But all of this is still not enough to solve the parking dilemma. Other alternatives are being looked into. While there have been no concrete plans made to build a parking structure, it is being considered. “We have to look into the financial feasibility of a parking structure,” Blumberg said. She said they estimate the project to cost between $24 to $30 million.

The only way to pay the bill would be to have a parking permit fee increase. If it did get approved they said the earliest they could break ground would be next summer, and from there it would take 8 to10 months to complete. “If we are looking at a worst case scenario, we would spend about $30 million building two parking structures—one in Lot B and one in Lot A—and we need to be able to support the extreme,” Ferrer said. “The fee projection would be almost double what students pay now.” In the meantime Ferrer said they are trying to scout out land around the campus to purchase so during construction the land could serve as a temporary parking lot. “We need 500 contiguous spaces within a five mile radius of campus,” Ferrer said. “Students approved a recreation center on campus, but that will be taking away parking spots in Lot B.” Ferrer said they cannot reasonably expand anymore, and if they want to be able to accommodate the growing population at CSUF, they will have to think about building up instead of out.

a permit. The purpose of the letter, according to the lawsuit, was to cause Banack to resign or create a false and misleading employment record so that she would not gain tenure. The IACUC members have been Banack’s only problem. All of her reviews have been very positive and Banack feels supported by her department. “From what I can gather, she is very well regarded by her colleagues and department,” said Paula Selleck of the Public Affairs Department. A question to be asked is why Banack was targeted for harassment when other women in the department were not. Banack’s theory is that the harassment against her is a result of longterm hostility between the committee and faculty. In the past years, regulations of the IACUC have changed and many of the long-term biology professors have “thumbed their noses” at the required procedures, Banack said. As a result of disrespect or disregard by a predominantly male faculty, Banack believes that because she

is a woman, committee members saw her as a non-threatening figure to take their anger out on. Banack explains it as a “kick the dog” theory. “Everyone picks on someone they think is weaker than they are,” she said. Other female faculty members in her department do not have to collect animals and deal with the committee in the way that she does, therefore they have not received bad treatment, Banack said. The jury unanimously voted in favor of Banack. Jury forewoman Gaetane M. Boutin criticized the university for letting the case go to court at all. She also said that the officials involved should be punished. CSUF still feels that the university was not in the wrong, which is why they are going forward with the appeal, Selleck said. Walden is convinced that Banack will, without a doubt, win the appeal.

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NEWS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

Minority graduation rates improving, students more motivated to sucBy Michael Del Muro

Daily Titan Opinion Editor Cal State Fullerton is steadily becoming an educational symbol for minority success and a reflection of the surrounding communities. Over the last few years, the minority graduation rates at CSUF have risen enough to be recognized by “Black Issues in Higher Education,” a watchdog publication dealing with college minority issues,, black students in particular. According to the magazine’s June issue, CSUF is ranked seventh in the nation for awarding bachelor’s degrees to minority students, specifically Hispanics and Asian Americans for the 1999-2000

school year. This is an improvement from 10th last year and 12th the year before. “The campus is changing,” said Chuck Moore, the director of Enrollment Management. “The composition of our incoming classes is changing and becoming more diverse.” The growing number of graduating minorities is a result of Enrollment Management reaching out into diverse communities. Yet Moore said it involves more than getting minority students to CSUF. He stressed the fact that students are being persistent and are making it to graduation. “Give the credit to the faculty and the retention programs,” Moore said giving

credit to the students’ classroom experiences. JamesBlackburn, the Director of Admission and Records agreed. “I don’t care what the freshman class looks like,” Blackburn said. “It matters how many graduate.” And the recognition paid to the school because of the accomplishment appeased Blackburn. “I can’t think of any greater success than a graduating class that resembles the area in which we serve,” Blackburn said.

‘‘

There were many other minority graduate honors bestowed on CSUF. • Ninth in Hispanic degrees. • 10th in degrees awarded to Asian Americans. • Second in communications degrees awarded to minority students. • Third in business degrees awarded to Asian Americans. According to Analytical Studies, Hispanics, including Chicanos, made up 20.6 percent of those receiving bachelor’s degrees. Asians, Pacific Islanders and Filipinos combined

Cal State Fullerton

Graduation Rates Others <1%

greater success than

a graduating class that resembles the

area in which we serve.

Blacks 2.4%

International

(including U.K)

13%

Hispanics

(including Chicanos)

I can’t think of any

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nRECOGNITION: CSUF named as one of the top 10 universities awarding degrees to an ethnically diverse student body

Asians

The university ranks the second highest in awarding communications degrees to minorities.

20.6%

(including Pacific Islanders & Filipinos)

21.9% White/Anglo 41.2%

Source: Analytical Studies LORI ANDERSON/Daily Titan

to make up 21.9 percent, while blacks made up 2.4 percent of the graduates. Moore said the diversity of the 19992000 graduating class is merely the beginning. He said the last three incom-

ing freshmen classes have been more diverse than ever before. “The next few graduating classes should be breaking records [for minorities graduating],” he said.

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NEWS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

TECHNOLOGY

eeBBooookkss -- tthhee nneexxtt sstteepp??

Convenience made possible by high-tech equipment By Darleene Barrientos

Daily Titan Executive Editor The world ten years ago is nothing like the world today. Ten years ago, the average person could not imagine two-way pagers, Internet-ready cellular phones, mp3 players, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or the lightweight laptops boasting the same capabilities as desktop computers. Today, they are a way of life. In education, new heights have been achieved with the help of technology. At Cal State Fullerton, Professor Mark Shapiro in the Physics Department can remember when his students used log tables and slide rules. At that time, he and his students could hardly imagine white boards or hand-held calculators, much less personal computers. But now, Shapiro uses e-mail and chat rooms to bring his students together for group projects. He requires his students to put together Web presentations, which makes his students learn how to properly search the Internet and how to put together Web pages. Through faculty development, professors can now instruct their students to log on to their Blackboard site to participate in a message board discussion for class credit. Students can download their notes or copies of the overhead sheets before class from the professor’s Web site. There is no more wait-

ing till the next week to find out a test score; many professors now post anonymous test scores on their Web site immediately after the exam. This is what is called distance Internet instruction. These programs began threeand-a-half years ago with the implementation of two systems. The two systems, Blackboard Course Info and Web CT, are now used by several hundred CSUF faculty to supplement classes to over 20,000 students, said Dr. Sorel Reisman, academic technology faculty coordinator.for the Faculty Development Center. Education seems to be heading in the direction of technology. “More and more faculty are offering classes predominantly online,” said Reisman. “There are now two master’s programs, Instructional Design and Information Technology, being offered completely online.” With the convergence of technology and education, one very logical step would be toward ebooks, digitized versions of printed literature. Companies like WizeUp have been busy courting retailers and e-tailers like Barnes & Noble College Bookstores to be able to offer WizeUp digital textbooks. According to TechMall, WizeUp has been able to obtain partnerships with major publishers like Harcourt College Publishers and

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McGraw Hill. Publishers and electronic companies have also been busy developing their own standards and their own ebook readers, like Franklin Electronic Publishers’s Ebookman and RCA’s REB 1100 and 1200. Digitized publications could certainly be the wave of the future. Ebooks can be much easier and cheaper to update. A second or third edition could go out to consumers on a $1 compact disc. Ebook readers also offer the very same features that we love about printed books — glossaries, highlighting, bookmarking and annotating. Probably the best thing about an ebook would be the reduced physical capacity. “Imagine being able to carry just one thing the size of a sheet o f paper and just click on it to go from book to book,” said Senior Director of Information Technology Dick Bednar. “If the world was right, it would be fantastic.” Unfortunately, the world is not right — at least, not yet — for ebooks. Problems with the wide use of ebooks include the steep initial investment in hardware and software, limited titles in digitized

format, and the problem with format standardization. Computer viruses, hackers and worms, like the recent Sircam and Code Red worm scares, would, as one student put it, “give new meaning to ‘the dog ate my book.’” However, the most prohibitive problem with the wide use of ebooks is copyright infringement. Just recently, the most widely publicized incident in regards to ebooks was the arrest of a Russian software programmer on July 16. Dmitry Sklyarov was incarcerated for creating a program that allowed people who purchase books in digital form and use Adobe System Inc.’s eBook Reader to make and transfer the book. His arrest was made under the yet-untested U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which prohibits the creation or distribution of technology that can be used to circumvent copyright protection. But, at CSUF, Director of Titan Shops Jerry Olson said just getting permission from all the parties involved in creating a book — the writers, illustrators, photographers, researchers, publishers — is the main limiting factor as to why there are so few ebooks. Of the 2,800 titles offered by Titan Shops,

there are less than 200 offered in digital form. In addition to copyright concerns, students don’t seem prepared for digital text. “Students don’t like to access large amounts of info on screens,” Olson said. Barry Pasternack, department chair of Information Sciences and Decision Sciences, is in agreement. “Even if I give students material on a CDROM, they will print it out anyway. They’d rather have me give it off to the bookstore so they can buy it for three bucks, rather than tie up their printers with 60 pages,” Pasternack said. One avenue that Olson and Titan Shops is looking into is digital materials, excluding textbooks. The company Olson is looking to partner with, XanEdu, offers course packets and research engines in several disciplines in digitized form. “They’ve got almost complete copyright clearance on everything they offer,” Olson said. However, limitations which include the no buy-back factor for CDs, the limited bandwidth for downloading ebooks, and the reluctance of publishers to embrace the new and unfamiliar technology prevent CSUF — for now — from jumping wholeheartedly into ebooks. “We’ve chosen to not get too involved in it,” Olson said.

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NEWS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

PAKISTANI

n from page 1

PSA on the Fullerton campus is doing just fine without them. Peshimam, like many of the attendees that evening, is a first generation Pakistani-American, but this was not always so. She was born in Canada and moved to the United States when she was about four years old. “My family is very traditional. We follow Islamic value right to the page,” she said. She explained that her involvement with the Pakistani Independence Day celebration is an integral part of her family upbringing. “We were always encouraged to go to Pakistani events”, she said about her childhood. “We went to be in touch with and make friends with other Pakistani people. [My family] works very

hard to keep our back home culture.” Thousands of Pakistanis strolled the memorial lawn in front of the Student Health &Counseling Center. By nightfall, the grounds were so packed with gatherers that it was nearly impossible to navigate through the thick crowd. Many in attendance traveled from outside of Orange County to participate in the festivities, which ran for more than six hours. Rana Rahim, counselor general of Pakistan for the U.S. Embassy spoke to the crowd in Uurdu, the native Pakistani language, and praised them for their nationalistic pride. She reinforced the need to invest time in the culture. She also reminded the Pakistani immigrants of the importance of staying in touch with their nation of origin. Before Rahim spoke, a young

girl sang both the Pakistani and American national anthems and read from the Qu ran – the Muslim holy book. “The Qu ran is our code of life,” Peshimam said. “Before a big event you have to give praise to Allah.” As the young girl sang, members of the audience sang along to both national songs and listened intently to the readings, responding favorably to each. The shiny migrant thread between Pakistan and America glistened under the bright floodlights, revealing a usually invisible tie to the homeland. The audience’s traditional outfits varied in color and scope, though they remained uniform in style and meaning. They ran the gamut of fabrics, jewels and adornments synonymous with Eastern culture. The majority of the women wore traditional shalwar kameez outfits with fabrics dyed a rich cranberry, some tinted the shade of champagne or others stained as deep as fresh blueberries. Some had elaborate and intricate gold embroidery – often with tiny mirrors inserted – and others still held on to their simplicity with a crepe-like material also used as a shawl. A few men wore their traditional costume, a similar outfit known as the shalwar kurta. Almost every child was adorned with the finely detailed celebrationwear. “There are no other real occasions for us to come together. This is a big celebration,” UCLA student Raza Jaffery said. He came to the event by way of Los Angeles County where he heard about it through his local PSA on campus.

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The event, well-known in the Pakistani population, has escaped the general public’s spotlight. There is no large celebration in the LA area. Pakistan Independence Day is actually on Aug. 14, when the nation separated from India in 1947. The northwest section of India is now Pakistan and is predominantly a practicing Muslim culture. “Those who remember the murders and the war are still alive. This is very important to our people,” Jaffery said.

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Different generations partake in the gaiety of Pakistani cuisine, arts and historical remembrance.

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Tuesday, August 28, 2001

19

Poverty in Orange County

GRAPH AND INFORMATION COURTESY OF EDWARD CASTRONOVA

One of the causes of poverty stems from an unstable family environment.

By Samantha Gonzaga

Daily Titan Managing Editor Orange County is booming. According to the “Economic and Business Review,” it has produced about $125 billion in goods and services last year. For 2001, the county is predicted to up that number at $133 billion. Orange County boasts of popular shopping centers like the Southcoast Plaza and Fashion Island, amusement parks like Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm, beach cities and theatres, generators of commerce that currently keep the majority of its estimated 3 million residents employed. While the triple combination of tourism, arts and a fertile business ground seem to reconfirm its affluence, Cal State Fullerton economics professor Edward Castronova found something else. Poverty. In a study Castronova conducted, Orange County’s level of poverty is higher than the nation’s 16.3 percent at 21.9 percent. In comparison with a report

MEDIATION n from page 1 classes and offering lecturers permanent positions, Some action should be decided upon by the end of the fall, Nanjundappa

by the U.S. Census Bureau – which found the homeownership rate in the county, at 61.4 percent, to be higher than the state’s 56.9 percent – the numbers seem contradictory. “When I first moved from the East Coast, my impression [of Orange County] is that it is a rich place,” Castronova said. “But when I looked closely I saw pockets of poverty.” To assume that an area is rich, he warned, can be misleading. In fact, a region with a big ratio of people can also have huge number of people with small incomes. “Economic well-being can be high on the average, but distribution is not even,” he said. Among his study’s findings were errors in the surveys conducted on the federal level. Using the U.S. Census Bureau’s data, he looked at the 1999 American Housing Survey (AHS) containing individual incomes as well as housing costs. The AHS chooses a sample of people who are

said. “It depends on how reasonable CSU will deal with us in the mediation and fact finding process,” Nanjundappa said. “Therefore, any action including strike can’t be ruled out.” CSU remains optimistic. “As long as both sides look realistically at the money provided by the state we can come to a conclusion.”

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ADAM BYRNES/Daily Titan

Source: AHS 1999. Median income is the income at which half the households have more income and half have less. The 10th percentile is the income at which 10 percent of the households have less, and at the 90th percentile income, 90 percent of the households have less. Average income is the sum of all incomes divided by the number of households. representative of Orange County. In the most recent report (1999), 719 people were interviewed, a number that can give a reliable measurement. It yielded results that were different from the federal government’s report, which was based on its Current Population Survey (CPR). That sampling didn’t take into consideration the county’s high cost of housing in relation to family size. That may be a factor that contributes to the poverty Castronova saw. Using two fictional families as examples in his study, he contended that a family with no children earning $70,000 a year is “materially well-off”, while a family also earning the same amount but has 10 children have a hard time making ends meet. In addition to that are the complications that arise from being a single parent that makes financial mobility for some individuals difficult. “Single-mom poverty is impossible to get out of,”

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he said. “You either have to spend a lot of money on daycare or even transportation.” Underlying Castronova’s study is a concern for the impact poverty can have in Orange County’s future. Child poverty is a problem with implications that go further than money, stating in his study that it “may or may not be a justification for later problems in life, but…a leading indicator of them.” “The biggest issues involved with poverty is that it’s also a leading indicator of social problems, such as crime and drug activity,” he said. These elements are detrimental to the county’s development in the future. One possible remedy to keep poverty at bay, according to Castronova, was developing strong family relationships. “If we work towards a world where every pregnancy is supported,” he said. “A good strong family is the foundation that can affect social conditions…that also affects the economic state and activity.”

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arts & entertainment August 28, 2001

Blues legend delivers subtle yet soulful performance in Anaheim nCONCERT: Rhythm and Blues musician Ray Charles gives fans a concert worth every single penny. By Kathleen Gutierrez

Daily Titan Detour Editor

KATHLEEN GUTIERREZ/Daily Titan

Ray Charles takes a bow after his House of Blues performance.

Ray Charles is known for selling out concert venues, but the House of Blues Anaheim on a Thursday night was not a sell-out crowd. The veteran musician played to a less than capacity gathering of fans, and gave those in attendance a show worthy of an arena tour and possibly an HBO concert special. Charles walked out on stage amidst uproarious applause and whistling. He laughed and smiled, but immediately went to work. After more than 50 years in the business, Charles knows how to get the job done. The concert was mild and mellow, yet musically intense, as the richness and depth of Charles’ soul reverberated throughout the venue. Passersby visiting Downtown Disney also caught part of the show, as House of Blues has speakers positioned to the main strip, adding a soulful ambiance to an otherwise humid and expressionless

Charles hams it up with the audience between songs at last week’s evening. along to every tune. Charles only stopped playing once Charles is a fixture for the history and to chat briefly with the crowd, and the evolution of Rhythm and Blues, and room quieted to a mere whisper during knowing that this may be the only chance his impeccable delivery of "Georgia On to see him, House of Blues is a wish My Mind." come true. Never again will a fan get that It was a sign that this was a man with close to a musical legend. experience and talent spilling out of his Each of his songs poured out with fingertips. ease, and Charles never made a mistake. The Anaheim venue is most likely the Perfection is expected from someone as only chance a Ray Charles fan will get to exemplary as Charles. stand less than 10 feet from him and sing Granted, he’s been playing these

KATHLEEN GUTIERREZ/Daily Titan

performance. songs for decades, but rather than slip in his elderly years, Charles gets more delicious; he is vintage fine wine for the Rhythm and Blues circuit. Behind him were multiple images of Charles at his piano. Although the image was multiplied and highlighted as part of the set, they stood only as a reminder that Charles, the King of R&B can never be duplicated, both in personality, music, and sheer debonaire chivalry. Charles is one classy dude.

Comedy Duo is not quite ready for their close-up nMOVIE: Staples of all Kevin Smith films get a shot at the big screen in their own feature film. By Heather Baer

Daily Titan Staff Writer Four sexy jewel thieves, two stoners and a silly orangutan should make for some hilarious comedy. But for Kevin Smith writer/producer/actor (Silent Bob) the new “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back” movie contains nothing but outdated potty humor leaving movie watchers to wonder if Smith has lost his edge. Those who have seen Smith’s previous flicks including “Clerks,” “Mallrats,” “Chasing Amy” and “Dogma,” know that he is known for his lewd jokes and stoner antics. His other movies, although never blockbuster hits at the box office, still have come to be known as video classics to many. However, whereas Jay (Jason

Mewes) and Silent Bob have been supplemental characters in previous movies, here they take center stage and prove that although they can be funny, they were never meant to be the dominant characters of a feature film. Set in New Jersey, Jay and Silent Bob are two stoners who loiter in front of a convenience store with nothing to do. Jay is the foul-mouth, sex-crazed loud character, while Silent Bob is known for his lack of conversational skills as well as his invention belt, which resembles that of Batman’s. When the two characters find out Miramax is making a movie called Bluntman and Chronic based on their comic book characters, the two start dreaming of what to do with the big check they should be getting. However, when they find out that there are no royalties and that online movie reviewers are slamming Jay and Silent Bob’s characters, the boys decide to go to Hollywood to stop production of the film. Along the way, they learn the unofficial rules of hitchhiking from George Carlin, meet four sexy undercover

R&B singer Aaliyah dies in Bahamas airplane crash nTRAGEDY: Plane nose dives into the ocean after its takeoff. By Amy Rottier

Daily Titan News Editor An abrupt end to the flourishing life and career of R&B singer and actress Aaliyah, leaves the world with a rising star gone, but most certainly, not forgotten. After filming a video for the next single off her new self-titled album, Aaliyah and eight others were killed when the small plane crashed seconds after taking off. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y. and raised in Detroit, Aaliyah Dana Haughton made her debut as an orphan in “Annie” when she was just six-yearsold. At age 14, Aaliyah hit the music charts and her album “Age Ain’t Nothing But A Number” went gold. Two years later, a song off her second album went double platinum. Her latest record, “Aaliyah,” debuted at No. 2 on Billboard’s Top 200 albums chart when it was released last month. Aaliyah’s talent sliced into the big screen when she starred next to Jet Li in “Romeo Must Die.” The startling death of the young actress marks an uncertain fate for several movies in the making. Aaliyah was cast to play the Zee in the second and third sequels of the Matrix. It is unknown how much

of her central part has been filmed and the part may need to be recast. A third movie project, a remake of a 1976 film, “Sparkle,” may never be released. A movie based on the third book in Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles, “Queen of the Damned,” is one finished project that will no doubt get thrust into theaters prematurely. She stars as a 6,000-year-old Egyptian vampire awakened by the music of a vampire rock star. Captured forever on the sliver screen and the golden air waves, the world will always be reminded of the beautiful young star it lost too soon.

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jewel thieves that frame them, and Jay finds himself a girlfriend named Justice (Shannon Elizabeth). When the four girls Sissy (Eliza Dushku), Missy (Jennifer Smith), and Chrissy (Ali Larter) pose as animal activists, they need decoys to divert attention from their plan, and ask the chronic duo to do it. Lacking any sort of brainpower, the two agree. After scooping an orangutan, the two are then followed by Federal Wildlife Marshall Wilenholly (Will Ferrell), the only character who apparently is dumber than Jay and Silent Bob. In the past Smith has been able to come up with great dialogue, though always including his usual jokes about pot, flatulence and hot women. However, in this film, that is all the two characters talk about. There is no great dialogue, no witty humor; in short it was a waste of money. Jay and Silent Bob were never meant to own the spotlight; instead their characters are used best for comedic relief. Many old favorites returned to appear in the movie including Jason Lee, Ben

Affleck, George Carlin, Matt Damon, Joey LaurenAdams and Shannon Doherty. The only truly interesting part of the movie is finding out just how Jay and Silent Bob came to be friends and how they found their convenience store. Another flaw is Jay ever finding and

hooking up with a girl like Shannon Elizabeth’s character Missy. What makes Jay so funny is his inability to appeal to anything female. With every other word being of the four-letter sort, this R rated movie is not appropriate for children and even

some adults. Disappointing to us Jay and Silent Bob fans, this movie is a bust and fans leave the movie wondering what the theater’s money-back policy is.

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Kevin Smith’s latest, “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back,” is now in theaters nationwide.

Musician is young in years but old in soul

nREVIEW: The songbird finds a home in the world of adult pop contemporary music. By Vu Nguyen

Special to the Titan Michelle Branch is a very busy girl. While most 17-year-olds are looking forward to their senior year in high school, Branch is touring across the country promoting her new album “The Spirit Room.” In an era when relatively boyish bands rule the radio airwaves and genetically-altered, teen divas get million-dollar soda pop endorsement deals; Branch doesn’t really fit in the teen music scene. For one thing, she writes all of her own music and lyrics. Dude, what’s that all about? And get this — she can’t dance. And won’t cake on tons of make-up or get in sexy seductive outfits to shake that booty on stage. What is a virile young man to do? Well, first of all, we could listen to her. “The Spirit Room” is definitely a nice departure from the standard “Total Request Live” synthesizer sounds. Not only does Branch use real instruments (imagine that!) home

girl is straight out keepin’ it real with doused hip-hop beats and a snarling viewpoint. She’s got the acoustic musical vibe of Joan Osborne, attitude of Alanis Morrisette and the syrupy sweet voice of Natalie Imbruglia. Comparing her to Jewel would be a fair assessment, but she’s not that annoying yet. The best song on the CD would easily have to be “All You Wanted.” Pop music doesn’t get any better than this.

The track starts out on a simple drum beat with Branch earnestly crooning along until it suddenly switches to a high energetic zenith chorus: “If you want to/I can save you/ I can take you away from here/So lonely inside/ So busy out there/ And all you wanted was somebody who cares.” The only real criticism of “The Spirit Room” is that the songs tend to be a little too cohesive. Tracks that start to sound similar

at first almost get to be repetitive after a while. Another thing is that her sound isn’t too distinct yet, but then again she is 17-years-old. After looking diligently, we still found no topics revolving around being a genie in a bottle or hitting babies one more time - which is truly disappointing to this virile young man.

Courtesy of Maverick


13

DETOUR

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

Punkers infiltrate Inland Epire: Making amendswith the

909

KATHLEEN GUTIERREZ/Daily Titan

Social Distortion fans bake in the intense heat while waiting for their favorite band to take the stage at Saturday’s Inland Invasion at the Glen Helen Blockbuster Pavilion.

nCONCERT: KROQ tries to accommodate fans in the first-ever end of summer festival. By Kathleen Gutierrez

Daily Titan Detour Editor Grass was the enemy at Saturday’s Inland Invasion concert in Devore, as a few hundred music fans decided that grass was better when it was on fire. Glowing bright orange in patches along the huge expanse of open field, the mini-bonfires on the lawn were tiny mirror images of the intense, flaming combustion of music on the main stage. This was clearly an all-Incubus show. The boys from Calabasas walked off that stage knowing that nobody, not even veteran Orange County skate punks The Offspring, could outdo their dynamic spectacle of jazz, blues, hard rock and rap all rolled into one. Singer Brandon Boyd proved that a radio show doesn’t have to be a regurgitation of a CD or a dry list of old standards required to push album sales. He used a giant bongo drum to accompany his scat singing a la Mel

Torme, cover Madonna’s “Like a Virgin,” and provide a sophisticated transition between his lyrical endeavors. The band took their time and gave the audience a performance worthy of the seven-and-a-half hour wait and the nearly $40 ticket. It is just too bad the rest of the show fell flat on its punk rock face. Dexter Holland, lead singer of The Offspring, gave one his worst performances ever. His performance was tired, he sang off-tempo, and the only interesting moments of the band’s entire stage presence was during “Intermission” when a fat guy in Speedos danced on a platform while the band sat back on inflatable arm chairs. Anyone who has seen The Offspring within their last three tours knows their schtick and they added nothing new to their already weary performance of seven-year-old radio fodder. Original Orange County punks Social Distortion played early on as the sun was still setting and sounded as crisp live as they do on a studio recording. They played one new song, “I Wasn’t Born to Follow,” that is slated for their upcoming album dedicated to late guitarist Dennis Danell. Lead

singer Mike Ness also sang, “Don’t Take Me for Granted,” a song he debuted earlier this year for his friend and band mate. Although the band played a tight set, there was little variance off their standard album tracks. Anyone who has heard their album, “Social Distortion Live at the Roxy,” has heard Ness’ between-song banter and strategically placed interjections during song bridges. The Inland Invasion, a play-off of morning show disc jockeys Kevin and Bean’s hate for people in the 909 area code, was no better than a Weenie Roast/Coachella hybrid with a sprinkling of Almost Acoustic Christmas. The bands were the same, the food was the same, and the set-up sucked just as hard. Constant technical errors plagued the main stage, making the show run longer than expected and making fans more antsy and attention-deficient. Geek punks Weezer played a lively hour-long set with every radio hit they have ever had. They were an uppity departure from mellow and under-rehearsed Long Beach Dub Allstars who were so bland that hardly anyone paid attention they were even on the stage. Pennywise played a fast-paced set of songs that all sound exactly the

KATHLEEN GUTIERREZ/Daily Titan

Beastie Boy Mike Diamond (left) and DJ Mix Master Mike keep crowd entertained between bands.

same, but no one seemed to mind. Their only standout moment was when Pennywise departed from their three-chord album to cover the Ramones as a tribute to the late Joey Ramone. Strangely, they used the same three chords and sounded much better playing someone else’s songs than they did with their own album. Between Incubus and The Offspring, an impromptu DJ session overtook the sound booth, managed by Beastie Boy Mike Diamond and DJ Mix Master Mike. The crowd rushed to get a glimpse of the 20-year rap veteran, and those who couldn’t get close enough began dancing in the aisle. It was one

of the more enjoyable moments of the evening, with people just waiting to see what they were going to mix together next. Weezer rushed through songs off their new self-titled album, their old self-titled album, and just one song off their second endeavor, “Pinkerton” —an album well received by Weezer fans, but practically chucked out the window by music program directors nation wide. Fans sang along to catchy new hits like, “Island in the Sun,” and “Hashpipe,” and bellowed the lyrics to campy old hits like, “Buddy Holly,” and “The Sweater Song.” They sounded good, but no differ-

ent than just a few months back at the Almost Acoustic Christmas show at the Universal Ampitheater last December. It appears that KROQ, like their band line-up, just doesn’t have much creativity left to make shows worth attending all day. Incubus on the other hand, a band with such bottled-up intensity and built-in genius talent to be categorized in three different music genres, will soon rule the world of music and will create a legacy worth following.

Bubble Boy bounces through controversy nPROTEST: New film by a Disney affiliate is accused of making fun of children with Immune Deficiency. By Kathleen Gutierrez

Daily Titan Detour Editor Hollywood director Blair Hayes makes no excuses for his latest movie “Bubble Boy,” the film which the Immune Deficiency Foundation is boycotting and begging Touchstone Pictures to pull

from theaters. “We try to be offensive to everybody,” Hayes said matter-of-factly. He looked over at producer Beau Flynn who nodded. “Exactly,” he said — and smiled. “Bubble Boy,” a self-discovery film about young Jimmy Livingston’s (Jake Gyllenhaal) first experience in the world, has very little to do with the immune deficiency disease. Other than an explanation for his need to live in a germ-free world originally, the disease is no longer an issue for the film. “We don’t ever make fun of the

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Jake Gyllenhaal plays young Jimmy Livingston in Bubble Boy.

disease,” Gyllenhaal said about his character. “These people have obviously never seen the movie because the boy is the hero. The people who make fun of him in the movie are idiots. They are shown to be stupid people.” Taking the Offensive Bubble-bashing is the most harmless of all sight-gags in the film, especially when a Hindu man plows into a cow with his ice cream and curry truck, Asians are considered screaming and unintelligible madmen, and Jewish people are money-hungry kidnappers. Flynn, who came up with the concept for “Bubble Boy,” said, “I am Jewish, and I felt okay making fun of myself.” He said that he feels it would not be a comedy if it didn’t shake things up a bit. “It’s meant to make people think about how absurd these stereotypes really are,” he said. Mommy Dearest Swoozie Kurtz plays Jimmy’s mother, an overbearing Christian woman who teaches him that the outside world is a horrible place. She teaches him that sterility and isolation are the only ways to remain safe under the watchful eye of God. “It was so different and the most deranged role I’ve ever played,” Kurtz said. “She wants to Purelle and Lysol and sterilize everything in his life.” Kurtz said the plastic world that Jimmy lives in was tough to work around. Actors often discuss breaking the third wall in a performance, but breaking the plastic wall was a different story. “I tried to use it,” she said of the plastic. “My character had this longing to hold her little boy. She

Bubble Boy (Jake Gyllenhal) and Slim (Danny Trejo) go for a ride. never got to breast feed him, or through Vegas while on the way to change his diaper.” Niagara Falls. When Jimmy goes out in search “It was funny. I would be driving of a different life, his mother does with him (Gyllenhaal) on the back everything she can to find him and of the motorcycle and people partying on the strip would ask, ‘hey protect him from the outside. All what is that?’ And I’d yell back, she wants to do is be his mother. ‘It’s National Bubble Week!’” “She was still wanting to hold “And they’d all celebrate. As far him even though he was 16-yearsas I know they’re still celebrating,” old,” Kurtz said of her character. he said with a laugh. “We had a good time.” El Vato Loco The man that moves the film The Girl Next Door along both literally and figuratively Marley Shelton plays the role is Slim, a Mexican biker played by of Chloe, the girl next door and Danny Trejo. Jimmy’s true love. “I didn’t even want to do the “It was impossible to make this movie,” Trejo said. “I looked at it movie with a straight face,” she and said, Bubble Boy? Who in the said. -“I laughed out loud when I hell would give me a movie called read this script. I mean, why don’t Bubble Boy?” we all have a sense of humor about “And then my kids read it. My ourselves?” son Gilbert read it and said, Dad, Shelton befriends Jimmy when this is funny! You gotta do this.” all the other kids in their Palmdale Trejo got the part of Jimmy’s neighborhood stay away. friend and the man that drives him

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In the process she develops a genuine love for him but knows they cannot be together-because he lives in a bubble. So she decides to marry someone else instead, which is where the story really takes off. Life in a Bubble Bubble Boy is a silly, yet dark, comedy about finding one’s true identity. No one is what he or she seems and none of this movie is to be taken seriously. Gyllenhaal’s performance as the wide-eyed, slightly tweaked Jimmy Livingston is a perfect fit. His squawky speech, angled hairdo and insatiable thirst for a life experience makes Bubble Boy a heartfelt and heroic film. It is a film absolutely worth seeing. It is a film where the geek might actually get the girl, and glorifying the misunderstood is not so offensive after all.


Tuesday, August 28, 2001

The Daily Titan Well, our summer vacation is over – it’s supposed to be anyway. For the freshman and transfer students out there, Cal State Fullerton is a brand new adventure. It is a new school with new people and a different environment. But for others, like us on the newspaper staff, we have been at CSUF, or various other collegiate institutions for a while now. So there are many things that we know about the school that the new students don’t. Did you know that CSUF is Kevin “I was in ‘Waterworld’” Costner’s Alma Mater? Were you aware that CSUF was an activist school in the early 1970’s? There were sit-ins, riots, arrests, major harassment by the campus police, and an unwelcomed visit by then-California Governor Ronald Reagan. The future president was greeted by students signaling to him that they think he is number one, but with the middle finger. (See: commfaculty.fullerton.edu/woverbeck/dtr1.htm) The school’s mascot is an elephant, yet we are called Titans. The baseball and softball teams at CSUF are perennial powerhouses. We have a stripper/runner at our school that made national news last semester – relax guys, she doesn’t strip while she runs. Our school is represented in Major League Baseball by a number of players, including Phil Nevin and Mark Kotsay who both play for the San Diego Padres.

Other than that our athletic teams are not much to talk about. The school president is Milton Gordon. His office is on the top floor of Langsdorf Hall in case you ever have the urge to talk campus policy with him. CSUF has been in the news lately – our faculty seems to be prone to sexual harassment suits. Other than the sexual harassment cases, CSUF is a good school with highly regarded faculty. There are professors from the best schools in the nation – Harvard, Princeton, Stanford, CSUF, etc. We would like to give the new people on campus some good advice that will help you get through their time at CSUF. • Become friends with your computer, you will need it to do your assignments and you can’t have it break down on you. • Do your research from home with all the tools that are available in the library. Go to library.fullerton.edu and follow the directions that will get you connected to the library’s proxy server. • Use stack parking in parking lot “A.” You will not have to drive around for a half-hour before you find a parking spot. • Get to know your professors. They may be able to help you out in your future career. • Stay focused and do not take any unnecessary classes. You do not want to be in school for six years. Something left off the list is to read The Daily Titan. We’ll do our best to keep you informed.

EDITORIAL

Protect your privacy and your dignity Kathleen Gutierrez

My best friend Jaime called me on my cell phone and rather rudely inquired whether I was on the Internet. When I replied that, no, I was driving on the 91 freeway, she said, “Okay, then we have a problem.” It turns out that I, like many others, had been sabotaged. Someone else was using my America Online screen name and there was nothing I could do about it. This person sent sexually explicit instant messages to everyone on my buddy list, including co-workers, record executives, journalists, family and friends. I was horrified. How could this have happened? I signed on to my mother’s account and in essence talked to myself (italicize) for about ten minutes before I confronted the punk. The person refused to

sign off and then changed my password on me so I couldn’t sign on to my account. I didn’t have any enemies; at least none that I knew of, and I was having trouble knowing that someone was out to get me. There are programs known as “Trojan horses” that are embedded into other files, mostly pictures sent through e-mail. When one of the pictures is opened, the imbedded program filters through your computer, finds your password and e-mails it to whoever originally sent the file. Every time you change your password, another e-mail is sent to that person telling them of the alteration. It has nothing to do with friends or enemies. Trojan horse programs are indiscriminate. Being a poor college kid, I never bothered to update my virus scanner on

my home computer. It is bad enough I have the Atari 2600 of personal computers, but not having that virus protection made my computer even slower than normal. It also caused all sorts of malfunctions. But I cannot stress enough how important it is to scrounge for a few weeks and just get the virus scan. It would have saved me from this awful occurrence. Never, I repeat NEVER, save your password onto a computer — even your home computer. Create a code name for yourself in case you think someone is tapping into your account. And also change your password every three to six months. My code name was Buford. It means nothing, and that is exactly why I used it. If I signed on, my friends had to ask

me for the password. If I did not reply “Buford,” they knew I was not online. It was a very simple interim salvation from Hackers-ville. I sent out an apology e-mail to everyone, as I have Daily Titan contacts listed as well as my bosses at my internship and my professors. Luckily they all understood and did not take offense to the instant messages. In regard to passwords, think of something you feel represents you, then take the antonym. If you are always happy, try using ‘sad.’ Or better yet, ‘Melancholy’ or ‘embittered.’ Whatever password you use, make sure that you clear it from any computer when you are done. The computers on campus tend to lock your password in automatically, and that can give anyone access to your personal e-mail account without your knowledge.

America Online said they were unable to tell me what city my screen name was logged on in, just that it wasn’t my home computer. They were also able to change my password provided I prove myself by giving them the personal information congruent with my account information. They also sent me an e-mail explaining step-by-step how to remove trojan horses from your hard drive. It worked and I have not had any occurrences since. Make sure that back-to-school list includes Norton Anti-virus, Virus scan, or some derivative that will protect your screen name, e-mails, and life in general from being taken from you. - Kathleen Gutierrez is the Daily Titan Detour Editor

Intern/Politician sex: A no-win situation position, and of Levy, but that negates Levy of any responsibility or choice. There is no denying that women are attracted to men of power but to say that Condit’s power was too much too resist is simply ridiculous. Levy is a 24-year-old woman, not a ten-year-old child. She is more than old enough to be in control of whom she engages in a relationship with and based on Levy’s conversations with family members, it is logical to assume that Condit did not force himself upon her. The relationship was one that was entered into willingly because it is what she wanted. It is critical of Levy to assume that she was powerless to the desires of the congressman. Why must we always look for someone to blame? Why not give credit to Levy and not assume that she was taken advantage of because the romance has been negatively interpreted? Many women seem to consistently battle between being in control and playing the victim. They will make a decision, proudly claiming it to be their own. Yet when things go badly they are quick to say that they are not the ones to blame. So now these women, and many men, are attempting to protect Levy by making her out to be this type of woman. A woman who is weak,

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and succumbs to the dominant male, unable to choose for herself. It is not practical and it is not fair. However Levy did make a choice and she choose to be with congressman. Rather than being critical of Condit for an alleged misuse of power, it seems ones’ anger would be better placed towards the pair for ignoring Condit’s 34-year-marriage. She is a young single woman who knowingly pursued a married man and Condit was more than happy to oblige. During his interview, the congressman refused to elaborate on the details of his relationship with Levy “out of respect for his family.” Where was that respect when he began an affair with the intern? Fault Condit for a dramatic lack of judgement. Fault Levy for an irresponsible decision. Yet do not be fooled into believing that the congressman was too powerful for the poor feeble intern to resist. If women want more respect from men they must first have a greater respect for themselves. It’s that simple.

Many women seem to consistently battle between being in control and playing the victim.

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In an effort to boost his failing political career, Democratic congressman Gary Condit sat with Connie Chung Thursday to discuss, among other things, his Melanie relationship with Bysouth missing intern Chandra Levy. Despite previously admitting to a relationship with Levy, Condit would only go so far as to say the two were “close.” We all know better than that. With an all too familiar ring, the Condit-Levy affair reminds us once again that workplace romance can unfortunately extend to politicians and interns. Regardless of what has happened to her, and who is responsible, it is definite that an affair took place between Levy and Condit. But is anyone at fault for the relationship? Did the twenty-something intern overwhelm the innocent married man with her sexual demands until he could no longer resist? It’s doubtful. Did the sharp, debonair congressmen avidly pursue Levy until she was blinded by his power and prestige? I don’t think so. These are two consenting adults who chose to engage in a relationship with one another. He knew she was an intern half his age. She knew he was a married politician. It may be easy to assume that Condit took advantage of his political

-Melanie Bysouth is the Daily Titan Sports Editor

Internships are intended to be a vehicle for college students to gain valuable “real world” experience for use in a student’s future professional life. However, the Jonathan media frenzy surHansen rounding the stories of Chandra Levy and Monica Lewinsky have altered the perception of the lowly intern and raised some serious ethical questions regarding sex in the workplace. Sexual attraction and relationships in the workplace are common, but I feel that those in a position of power should shoulder most of the burden when these relationships occur. In my opinion, it all boils down to power. Power and politics are seductive, luring an estimated 20,000 young people to Washington each year. These interns handle the grunt work in the trenches of our government, answering phones, fetching coffee or taking notes at congressional hearings – all necessary tasks to keep our government moving. In return for performing these menial tasks, interns obtain access to the most powerful people in the country. Sometimes the power of a superior can be attractive and working long hours can fuel a relationship that crosses ethical lines. I feel that the person in power should be held more responsible

because of the power he is able to offender will not be re-elected. exert over an intern or employee. I understand that being consentBy power I mean being able to ing adults, both Levy and Lewinsky determine the duties of a subor- were consenting adults who knew dinate. In general, it is wrong for what they were getting into. They a supervisor to enter into a sexu- both knew they were entering into al relationship with anyone who relationships with married men works for him. Who’s to say that and for that both parties share the a rebuffed advance might not war- blame. rant more time licking stamps or However, elected officials should sealing envelopes as opposed to be held to a higher ethical standard, more glamorous jobs? That is a danger in any office and are most at fault when these romance and why “fishing off the relationships occur. The only way company pier” is usually discour- to punish the offenders is by not re-electing them. aged. Also, where are interns supposed - Jonathan Hansen is the Daily to go if something goes wrong? Titan Asst. Sports Editor Rep. Scott McInnis from Colorado has proposed that a rule be adopted in Congress to prohibit sexual relationships between interns and members of the house. Shouldn’t wedding vows and personal values be enough? A rule is not the answer and we as the voters should be the ultimate judge by electing only those politicians we feel have demonstrated high personal values that they will take with them on the job. We, as voters, should make the rules by voting politicians out of office who display low ethics and who abuse the power entrusted to them. Voters should send a clear signal that improper sexual relationships with subordiASSOCIATED PRESS nates will not be tolerated and will guarantee that the Gary Condit is infamous for his relationship with missing intern Chandra Levy.

Letters to the Editor Policy Letters to the Editor should be brief and are subject to editing. They should also include a signature and telephone number.

Editorials are the opinion of the editorial board, comprised of the Executive Editor, News Editors and section editors.

Columns are the personal opinion of the writer. They do not reflect those of the university, the faculty, or the student body.

Letters can be addressed to The Daily Titan, College Park 670, CSUF, Fullerton, CA 92834 E-mail: dailytitan@yahoo.com.


Tuesday, August 28, 2001

MAYRA BELTRAN/Daily Titan

Patrick Boone chants in Thai before an older monk. Part of his experience at the temple included learning several others, each one used specifically for different occasions.

Journey to the

As his classmates at Balboa Elementary school spent their summer riding razors, playing tag and watching television, Patrick Boone walked in the robes of a Buddhist novice

Story by Samantha Gonzaga Daily Titan Managing Editor

over his robes and bare right shoulder. He wavered between slumber and full consciousness, allowing the melody to lull him. His head dipped as his eyes began to droop. The novice recovered with a jerk, his back straightening sharply. Pa tisa’mkhaa yoniso pi n dapaata’m pa tise vaami, Neva davaaya na madaaya na ma n danaayaa na vibhuusanaaya, Yaavadeva imassa kaayassa thitiyaa yaa panaaya vihi’msuparayitiyaa Brahma cariyaanuggahaaya…

Araha’m sammaa-sambuddho bhagavaa. Buddha’m bhagavanta’m abhivaademi… The Blessed One is worthy and rightly selfawakened. I bow down before the awakened, Blessed One… Hands clasped together at the forehead, six heads lowered and touched the hardwood floor. At the far right corner the novice, Patrick Boone, dipped a second too late. The 9-yearold tried to synchronize with the others as they bowed three more times. Each time, he is a fraction of a breath too late. He looked both frustrated and tired. The rhythm of the chanting changed, becoming more melodious as it made the transition from salutations to reflections:

MAYRA BELTRAN/Daily Titan

Energy and playfulness have been listed as one of Patrick’s most outstanding personality traits.

Pa tusa’ nkhaa yoniso ciivara’m pa tisevaami, Yaavadeva siitassa pa tighsstaaya, U nhassa pa tighaataaya, Da’msa-makasa-vaataatapa-siri’msapa-sam phassaana’mpa tighataaya… Considering it thoughtfully, I use the robe, Simply to counteract the cold, To counteract the heat, To counteract the touch of flies, mosquitoes, wind, sun and reptiles… The boy shivered and pulled his shawl tighter

of

Considering it thoughtfully, I use alms food, Not playfully, nor for intoxication, nor for putting on bulk, Nor for beautification, But simply for the survival and continuance this body, for Ending its afflictions, for the support of the holy life…

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Patrick, though proficient in Thai, stopped time and time again, the esoteric words unfamiliar and unheard of to him. Likewise, the booklet he read from can be unfathomable; his knowledge of the language’s cursive script was limited. The monk next to him shook his leg in quiet attention, urging his hand to lift the dropped booklet. He obeyed, stifling a yawn. Accustomed to waking at nine during the summer, Patrick found himself committed to spending this particular summer in the company of these quiet men. While his classmates ride bikes and watch television, he passes his time

tending the stretch of land behind the temple and meditating. Patrick remained awake for the duration of the morning, pushing his mind to gaze inward. “This is how I find the Buddha inside me.”

Living as a novice “When I meditate, I try to find a picture of the Buddha in my mind,” Patrick said. “At first it’s small, a small blue picture. Then it gets big. Then small, then big. It fills my head.” Patrick is referring to an exercise he was given upon arriving at the temple. He was taught to concentrate on an image of serenity, the Buddha. The act of enlarging and minimizing it in his mind was a first in a series of activities aimed to show him how the mind, in a peaceful state, can see the physical world with detached clarity. By eliminating distractions that muddy judgement, according to Hongratana, he can act rightly and positively. But before Patrick can master that, he still needs to contend with his own over-exuberance. “He needs to find the focus,” Hongratana said. As active as Patrick is, he is close-mouthed when it comes to talking about himself. A contradiction extends itself to those wishing to know him. He simply deflects the attempt, or only provides very little information that pertains more to the less personal. The path of his journey can be caught so briefly; sometimes it is with a comment or action, other times through the observations of others. Either way, his innermost ruminations are solely his own. That privacy is protected by the distance the temple’s residents. Different degrees of respect

I use the robe sim-

ply to counteract

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At the Suddhavasa Temple, the day begins before the sun rises over a flat, brown horizon. At four a.m., monks and its lone novice awakened to an unusual Southern California chill. Fog swathed the one-level house they lived and meditated in, rendering it invisible at the cul-de-sac of Fleming Street. Half an hour later, six bodies were seated on the floor, eyes half-lidded as the order’s head monk, Phramahasakchai Hongratana, began the morning chant. Five other voices followed suit, higher and younger voices harmonizing with Hongratana’s baritone.

the cold, to counteract the heat...


PERSPECTIVES lessons he was taught in real life. He has yet to decide if he wants to dedicate himself to be a monk for life. It is a part of Thai tradition to have boys devote time at a temple to experience what it is like to be a monk. “It allows one to glimpse into another life,” said Hongratana. “It has been said that to know simplicity and humility, one must learn to walk during a part of a man’s life as a monk.” This is but one of the traditions that Patrick is being introduced to. Born in Thailand, Patrick arrived in the United States when he was one years old. Some traditions have escaped him, one of them being the practice of “Dana,” or giving. Hongratana described an act of Dana in Thailand known as “pindabat” — alms giving. “Monks do not beg, you must understand,” Hongratana explained. In Thailand, monks travel the streets with food-bowls, accepting what people put in them. It is an opportunity for laypeople to obtain good merits. Pindabat is done is silence. In return for the people’s generosity, monks are often available for spiritual advice and Buddhist teachings. In the United States, however, it is something that Wat Suddhavasa’s neighbors do not understand. “The sight of us in our robes, walking down the street with bowls is not acceptable here,” Hongratana said. “Police might be called on us.” So instead, the people go to them. The temple gets visitors who bring food and flowers, while monks dispense advice. Patrick’s mother Uraiwan made the flower arrangements that decorate the altar of

MAYRA BELTRAN/Daily Titan

Patrick converses with monks visiting from Thailand. Buddha. For the duration of his time as a novice, Patrick was not allowed to touch his mother. A single mother, Uraiwan worries that his assimilation with American culture would dilute his ties to Thai tradition. His restlessness and inability to concentrate partly influenced his stay at the temple. “Control,” Uraiwan said, “through self-discipline is something that can help him throughout his life. It will help him stay out of trouble, help him stay good. It will make him a good man when he grows up.” Kit explained: “A lot of people misunderstand the concept of control. Control is not about hurting the body. If one is meditating, and finds that they need to relieve themselves or get a drink of water, they can do so. The

During his time as a novice Patrick was not allowed to touch women, including his mother Uraiwan.

body is a vessel, an extension of the dhamma. To deprive it is to hurt it.” “Similarly, control is something that begins with the mind,” he continued. “I can sit —” he gestures to the leg tucked beneath him and the other slightly bent at his side — “because the stillness in mind is carried out by my body.”

Returning home Uraiwan can still recall the sirens that wailed in the Long Beach, Calif. neighborhood they used to reside in. Fearful, she would find it hard to go back to sleep. On top of the other worries was the fear of seeing her son grow up to become a gangster. Although Long Beach was a beautiful city, it also had a less flattering side:

MAYRA BELTRAN/Daily Titan

Following morning chants and meditation Patrick’s day continues with temple and garden chores aimed to calm the mind.

one that fed Uraiwan’s anxieties and inevitably forced her to move inland. “I didn’t want Patrick to grow up in that kind of surroundings,” she said. For now, he doesn’t have to. Mid-June came with the promise of Patrick’s return home. Though Uraiwan was there for Patrick’s initiation as a novice, she was not present when he was offered back as a layperson. The ceremony was smaller, more intimate, Kit described. Patrick chanted alone as he faced the altar of Buddha while the monks watched quietly. It provided a way for the novice to show what he has learned and what he vows to do after living at the temple. Hongratana blessed him as he finished, the novice robes taken away. At last, Patrick and Uraiwan can embrace. Patrick’s summer ended so early as a result of his elementary school’s yearround-operation scheduling. The schoolyear resumed early, and Patrick found himself with only a few days to readjust to life back home. “He ate a lot that night,” Uraiwan reminisced with a hint of a smile. “I was so, so happy to see him.” He was too. “It’s good to be home,” he said simply. Patrick would also be reunited with his class, quizzes and homework at Balboa Elementary School. Uraiwan has high hopes for Patrick, and sees intelligence displayed time and time again through the way he voraciously reads the his science books and the way he spoke. Only one problem cropped up time and time again, according to her: his lack of concentration. His homeroom teacher, Saba Khoury, agrees, but says that for now, Patrick is just doing average in class. “He can be above average,” Khoury said. “He does extremely well in standardized tests. But he only does half his homework.” Another thing that struck Khoury was the way Patrick interacted with the other children. Patrick, as articulate and active as he is, can still find himself isolated from others. “He has friends,” Khoury said. “About five of them are in the afternoon program and they help him with homework. But for the most part, he’s on his own. He’s a likable kid, who is a good storyteller.” But that doesn’t seem to perturb Patrick, who can be particularly choosy about who he deems his friends. Yet, the same restlessness seemed to linger as he interacted

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9

with the others. It would take much to get him to sit still enough to resume his homework, in spite of the efforts of three homework buddies. Did he take anything with him from Wat Suddhavasa? “I don’t know,” he shrugged, a bit uncertain. Watching him when he is alone dispels that moment of hesitation. Although he is still easily distracted by the activity of others, when by himself, the novice can still be seen. In an afternoon of assembling model cars at school, he moved only enough to slide pieces together. Quiet. Contemplative. Patient, as a teacher’s assistant showed him a better way of gluing the small parts together. As the other children chased and yelled, there was something eerie and at the same time correct about the way Patrick remained still. “I’m focusing,” he murmured very softly as his car’s roof fitted over its cage.

A lot of peo-

ple misunderstand the concept of control.

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affect the dynamics of the temple. Wat Suddhavasa — “wat” means “temple” in Thai, and “Suddhavasa” is its name — gives shelter to Hongratana, Patrick, three other monks and a nun. Novices find interactions limited. For instance, in the presence of other older monks, Patrick is to sit separately from them during the day’s two meals, because of his status. When greeting a respected older monk, the novice must bow his head slightly, hands clasped with the upright tips of his fingers level with the forehead. Though they are eager to help him, Patrick is still on his own and set apart, with no other novices to share his lessons with. Sometimes, Patrick finds company with one of the temple’s younger monks, 24-year-old Satra Net Kit. The two share an interest in science, a topic that fuels lengthy talks as the novice does his chores. Kit is also aware and watchful of Patrick, in terms of his progress and the inner discipline he has yet to achieve. But his over-exuberance wasn’t intentional. According to Kit’s observations, Patrick just couldn’t help it. “He is nine,” he said. “But at the same time, we try to teach him how to be still. It’s not just in the physical sense that a person can be still.“ “The body follows the mind,” he continued. “But it’s only when the mind is devoid of distractions. Part of training it is realizing what distraction is and what can be done to eliminate it.” In hopes of curbing his restlessness, Patrick was initially taught how to meditate in sessions lasting up to five hours. The monks and his mother hope that Patrick is able to apply the

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

Control is not about hurting

Fortune

“I see a change in him,” Uraiwan said. “I see it, I hear it. I feel it.” It would be easy to make the assumption that her observations are blinded by love. But as gentle as Uraiwan is, it is also easy to see where Patrick gets his mischievous side and playfulness. These days Patrick’s hours at home appear more disciplined, she said. He has been consistent with doing his homework, and doesn’t banter with her as much when she asks for help around the house. He even waters the house’s potted plants the way he did with the temple’s pumpkin patch: slow and measured. Uraiwan is a great believer in will. “He’s come a long way,” she said. “I know that he won’t be afraid to go farther. One time he told me that he will take care of me when he gets older and stronger.” She laughed breathlessly. “It can be that he is living up to his name,” she continued. Perhaps. Patrick’s name and surname are a combination of his parents’ names. The Westernized last name that he and Uraiwan share is actually a root of his father’s last name, who Uraiwan is separated

MAYRA BELTRAN/Daily Titan


Tuesday, August 28, 2001

Season impressive for nBASEBALL: Titans leave College World Series early yet 2001 offers much for team and coach to be proud By Melanie Bysouth

Daily Titan Sports Editor The 18th of May might have meant the end of the semester for most Cal State Fullerton students but for the members of the 2001 baseball team, things were just getting started. In the weeks that followed, the Titans would face various adversaries and challenges and would experience great success and defeat. Although CSUF would not be named NCAA champions, mid-May to mid-June in the year 2001 was an amazing time in Titan baseball history. It was Friday, May 18 when a 166 victory against the Cal State Long Beach 49er’s clinched a share of the Big West championship for the then

fourth-ranked Titans. On Saturday the tables were turned and CSUF fell to the 49er’s, 17-6. But Sunday saw the Titans victorious as they ended the series with a game three score of 10-5. Next up would be the NCAA regionals. When the NCAA announced the new rankings on May 21, much to their surprise, the Titans were overjoyed to learn that they were seeded number one. This meant they were considered the best team in collegiate baseball and the favorites to win the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. Round one of the NCAA baseball championships began for the Titans at home. With 10 runs in the second inning, CSUF dominated Temple, 17-3. On May 26, in front 3,338, the largest crowd in Titan baseball history, the top-seeded team thumped Arizona State, 13-3 on their way to the regional championship game. While the Los Angeles Lakers were relishing in their four-game sweep over the San Antonio Spurs, the Titans were celebrating their 92 triumph over Texas Tech. The

win gave CSUF their 11th NCAA regional title and a spot in the super regionals. After a brief rest, the Titans returned to competition on the first of June for a three-game series against Mississippi State. With yet another high scoring game, CSUF dominated game 1, 13-2. Once the Titans had won game 2, 9-3, there was no need for game 3 and bags were packed for the trip to Omaha. Preparing for a possibly hostile crowd, CSUF arrived in Omaha not knowing how soon they may be facing hometown favorite Nebraska. That moment came sooner than excepted as the Titans began their first day of tournament play facing the local team. Yet it was the Titans who claimed victory as they edged the Cornhuskers, 5-4. On Sunday, June10, while the National Hockey League’s Colorado Avalanche celebrated winning the Stanley Cup, CSUF was preparing for their second game of the tournament. Although tied at the end of regulation play, the Titans would fall in the 10th, losing to the Stanford

Cardinal, 5-2. Fortunately for CSUF it was not yet time to go home but after falling to the Cardinal, the Titans found themselves in a place they thought they would never be: the loser’s bracket. To stay alive, it was imperative that they beat Tulane on June 12. And that they did. Overwhelming the fifth-seeded Tulane, 11-2, CSUF avoided an early plane ride home. Next up they would once again face the Stanford. The game would be their last. It took less than three hours for Stanford to eliminate the Titans, 41. With their season over, the Titans returned to California. It was a season CSUF closed with a 48-18 record. It was a season that saw 10 players drafted by the major leagues. It was a season that boasted four All-Americans and the All Big-West Conference Pitcher of the Year. It was a season to be proud of. DAVID RIVERA/Daily Titan

2001 was a storybook season for senior and pitcher Kirk Saarloos

Expectations are high for current athletic seaBy Jonathan Hansen

Daily Titan Asst. Sports Editor Looking for a sporting event at Cal State Fullerton this Fall? Here are the four choices the University has to offer.

Women’s Soccer

NAME OF PHOTOGRAPHER/Daily Titan

This is where the cutline goes, however long you would like it :)

The Cal State Fullerton women’s soccer squad will look to improve upon last year’s 8-12 record overall and 3-5 conference record by combining veteran experience with young talent. Only three seniors were lost from last year’s squad and the Titans will look to senior and first team all-conference midfielder Tennli Ulicny for valuable leadership and experience. Defenders sophomore Danielle Turnquist and junior Leah Sims will shore up the Titan defense this season. Freshman Kellie Cox looked impressive in the team’s intrasquad game by racking up nine points and could prove to be a potent offensive weapon for CSUF in the coming weeks. The Titans will open the regular season Sept. 1 as host of the fourteam FILA Classic. The tournament will feature No. 2 ranked UCLA and No. 3 ranked University of Portland, as well as the University of Denver. Following that will be a tough

season featuring three teams, U of P, UCLA and San Diego, which advanced to the NCAA Women’s College World Cup last season. Combined, these three teams posted a 42-18-1 overall record and a combined 17-5 record in conference play.

Women’s Volleyball

Three returning seniors will look to lead the way for the Cal State Fullerton women’s volleyball in 2001. Co-captains Katie Crawford and Be Holcombe and all-conference outside hitter Megan Sabo-all seniors-will provide the experienced nucleus around which the Titans hope to improve upon last year’s 9-20 overall record and 3-13 conference mark. Last season, Sabo became the first Titan to record both 400 kills and 400 digs in the same season. Crawford, who missed all of the 2000 season due to shoulder surgery, will provide some valuable experience. CSUF is hoping freshmen Carley Dial and Vanessa Kelterborn will step up and make an immediate contribution as well as provide the Titans with some much-needed defensive support. The Titans, and tenth year head coach Mary Ellen Murchison, will begin the season at home against Manhattan College August 31 as

part of the Titans’ Four Point Classic tournament. CSUF will be close to home for most of the season as their schedule features 18 games at Titan Gym.

Men’s Soccer

The Cal State Fullerton men’s soccer team has big shoes to fill. In the off-season, the Titans lost career scoring leader and the Pacific Division of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation player of the year, Duncan Oughton, who was drafted in the first round of the Major League Soccer draft. The Titans finished last season with a 15-6-1 record, a season which included an at-large berth into the NCAA tournament. Coach Al Mistri will begin his 21st year in the CSUF program and will have more time to focus on the men after turning over the coaching reigns of the women’s team. Mistri has guided the Titans to five trips to the NCAA championships in the past eight years. Joining Mistri on the coaching staff will be former Titan AllAmerican Eddie Soto. Soto, 28, played for the Titans from 1992-1994 and graduated in 1996 with a degree in kinesiology. He scored 38 goals and totaled 96 points, both of which were school career records until broken just last season. Soto still hold the single-season

record for goals with 18 in 1994. He was selected a second-team All-American in 1992 by the National Soccer Coaches Association and earned honorable mention from Soccer News in 1993 when he led the Titans to the ‘Final Four’ of the NCAA tournament.

Cross Country

Following an off-season that was full of publicity, the Titan men’s and women’s cross-country team hopes to let their runners do most of the talking this season. The Titan men’s team finished fifth in the Big West Conference last year, as well as posting a 15th place finish in the NCAA Division IX cross country championships. Sophomore Bryce Lighthall looked strong in the pre-season alumni meet and could be a leading contributor all year long. Last season, the women’s team finished eighth in the conference, 22nd in the NCAA’s and will rely on Lakeysha McClenton and Danielle Hernandez, who posted strong results last season and who have looked good early on. The Titans open the 2001 season September 1, when they play host to the annual Jammin’ Invitational at Carbon Canyon Regional Park. CSUF will take on Stanford, UCLA, Long Beach State and several other local colleges and universities in the season’s first event.


4 Tuesday, August 29, 2000

SPORTS


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

L.A. Galaxy extinguishes Fire at CSUF

Titan women’s soccer enjoys but emphasized one specifically. He made the team commit to disallowing the opposition to score early. The Titans (8-12 last season) committed by shutting out the Roadrunners in the first half and limiting their firsthalf shot attempts to only four. Freshman forward Kellie Cox blistered a left-foot shot from inches inside the penalty area past the By Jeff Benson outstretched goalkeeper. Midway Daily Titan Staff Writer through the first half, Fullerton had a 1-0 edge. Women’s soccer head coach Ali Midfielder Erica Jacalone followed Khosroshahin admits to being “new in the second half with a goal-scoring at this.” He’d been an assistant under header off of a Danielle Turnquist former CSUF head coach Al Mistri corner kick. for four years, yet he’d never expeAfter Bakersfield forward Carrie rienced winning with a team of his Montague’s long cross shot brought own. the game within one, a well-struck That may only make him more ball ricocheted off of Fullerton goalanxious to succeed in his fledgling keeper Julianna Elliott’s fingertips. season at the CSUF helm and to pick She recovered quickly, however, and up his first career win. With a young smothered the ball amidst a barrage squad that features only three return- of scrapping feet to preserve the vicing starters, Khosroshahin said he’s tory. taking his new job very seriously. Fullerton committed 20 fouls to “ We ’ r e Bakersfield’s ready to play eight, but none s o m e b o d y, ” facilitated any Khosroshahin goal-scoring said. “We’re sequences. tired of playThis was ing each other. the last exhibiWe’re ready tion game for to start kickthe Titans, who ing somebody Friday squared else.” off in an interHis team did squad Blueexactly that, White scrimresponding mage. with a victory Cox had four Sunday night in goals and two a 2-1 exhibition assists in a 6sweat-soaker 3 Blue win. at Cal State Forward Kim Bakersfield. Houg had two “Ali”, as he goals for the is modestly White squad, referred to, had while midfieldpressed several ABIGAILE SIENA /Daily Titan er Tennli Ulicny points in a pre- Preseason finds CSUF women in and forward game speech M i c h e l e first ever meeting with Bakersfield to the team, Bannister

21

nSOCCER: Titan Stadium hosts Major League Soccer competition as professional sports make quick visit to Fullerton en route to championships

nPRESEASON: Roster filled with young players proves to be successful for Coach Khosroshahin

By Tim Gillett

Special to the Titan

ABIGAILE SIENA /Daily Titan

Titan Blue and White face off during intra-squad scrimmage

had one apiece for their opposing sides. With three shots on goal and several near-breakaway opportunities, fleet-footed Cox is developing into a scoring menace. With the two assists Friday and numerous setup opportunities Sunday, she’s showing that she can pass as well. “I like to take advantage of the opportunities I see and be a wellrounded player,” Cox said. “I try to look up top and look for anyone who talks to me.” This kind of communication is a key fundamental of Khosroshahin’s game plan. He said in a post-game discussion that he expects his team to call out to each other more often, rather than relying on him for the answers. He acknowledged that the team’s play, however, lived up to his expectations. “I think we did well, but we could have performed a little better,” Khosroshahin said. “They were nervous. But I’d give the team a C for

the night. A win is a win, any way you can take it.” Khosroshahin says the team needs to work on making more efficient choices and quicker decisions, including opening up channels, pace on the ball, and play in transition. An unwanted theme for the Titans in their preseason practices has been the abundance of nagging injuries. “We have a lot of injuries, so we even have some of our guys playing,” said midfielder Kelly Keohen, who Friday was nursing a sternum injury. “But this year we’re going to be the best we’ve ever been. It’ll be worth watching.” Keohen played as a substitute in Sunday’s game, and like several others, is expected to play this weekend in Fullerton’s tournament, the FILA Classic, Khosroshahin said. On Saturday, Fullerton opens its regular season at 5 p.m. against Denver, who was 11-6-3 last year. On Monday at 1 p.m., they run with perennial powerhouse Portland, who finished 18-4 a season ago.

The Los Angeles Galaxy’s veteran defender Alexi Lalas scored the golden goal against the Chicago Fire in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup semifinal in overtime at Titan Stadium Wednesday. The Galaxy now advances to the final for the first time in their history. These two teams met last year in the semi-final stage with the opposite result. Chicago scored in extra time to advance and eventually win the tournament. This year the Galaxy and Lalas proved to be too hot for the Fire to handle. The goal came in the fourth minute of overtime when Lalas headed the ball past Chicago goalkeeper Zach Thornton at the far post. “It’s euphoria, it’s a climax like no other and you kind of lose your senses,” said Lalas about his golden goal in a post game interview. It was served to Lalas from a corner kick delivered by fellow team member and New Zealand international Simon Elliot. Lalas did not start the game, but was substituted into the game in the 77th minute replacing Orange County native Danny Califf. The game started fast and was attack oriented, but soon settled into a strategic match of carefully orchestrated assaults at both ends of the field. The second half saw clutch saves made by both goalkeepers. Chicago’s DaMarcus Beasley took a well-placed shot that was good enough for the goal, but L.A.’s Kevin Hartman was equal to it producing a fantastic leaping save. It took a fully extended diving save by Zach Thornton to keep the Galaxy’s number 25, Martin Quijano,

from scoring just moments after the Beasley blast. The goalkeepers were the silent heros of the game, both with solid performances. “The win is great. It is great for the Galaxy to get ourselves into a championship game,” said Galaxy Head Coach Sigi Schmid. “It was one of those games that had a lot of chess on the field. There was a lot of thinking and a lot of tired bodies, but you saw a great tactical soccer game.” The Galaxy will next face the New England Revolution, who recently defeated Washington D.C. United, in the final October 27 at a site yet to be determined.

LOS ANGELES GALAXY Kevin Hartman, Adam Frye, Danny Califf (Alexi Lalas ‘77), Greg Vanney, Ezra Hendrickson, Simon Elliott, Peter Vagenas, Mauricio Cienfuegos, Sasha Victorine, Cobi Jones, Marvin Quijano (Isaias Bardales Jr. ‘63). CHICAGO FIRE Zaach Thornton, C.J. Brown, Carlos Bocanegra, Evan Whitfield, Diego Gutierrez, Chris Armas, Jesse Marsch, Peter Nowak, DaMarcus Beasley, Dema Kovalenko, Hristo Stoitchkov (Sergi Daniv ‘16[Eric Wynalda ‘80]).

Game Statistics Total Shots Shots on goal Saves Fouls

Galaxy

Fire

13 7 3 12

10 3 5 17


Tuesday, August 28, 2001

Season impressive for nBASEBALL: Titans leave College World Series early yet 2001 offers much for team and coach to be proud By Melanie Bysouth

Daily Titan Sports Editor The 18th of May might have meant the end of the semester for most Cal State Fullerton students but for the members of the 2001 baseball team, things were just getting started. In the weeks that followed, the Titans would face various adversaries and challenges and would experience great success and defeat. Although CSUF would not be named NCAA champions, mid-May to mid-June in the year 2001 was an amazing time in Titan baseball history. It was Friday, May 18 when a 166 victory against the Cal State Long Beach 49er’s clinched a share of the Big West championship for the then

fourth-ranked Titans. On Saturday the tables were turned and CSUF fell to the 49er’s, 17-6. But Sunday saw the Titans victorious as they ended the series with a game three score of 10-5. Next up would be the NCAA regionals. When the NCAA announced the new rankings on May 21, much to their surprise, the Titans were overjoyed to learn that they were seeded number one. This meant they were considered the best team in collegiate baseball and the favorites to win the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. Round one of the NCAA baseball championships began for the Titans at home. With 10 runs in the second inning, CSUF dominated Temple, 17-3. On May 26, in front 3,338, the largest crowd in Titan baseball history, the top-seeded team thumped Arizona State, 13-3 on their way to the regional championship game. While the Los Angeles Lakers were relishing in their four-game sweep over the San Antonio Spurs, the Titans were celebrating their 92 triumph over Texas Tech. The

win gave CSUF their 11th NCAA regional title and a spot in the super regionals. After a brief rest, the Titans returned to competition on the first of June for a three-game series against Mississippi State. With yet another high scoring game, CSUF dominated game 1, 13-2. Once the Titans had won game 2, 9-3, there was no need for game 3 and bags were packed for the trip to Omaha. Preparing for a possibly hostile crowd, CSUF arrived in Omaha not knowing how soon they may be facing hometown favorite Nebraska. That moment came sooner than excepted as the Titans began their first day of tournament play facing the local team. Yet it was the Titans who claimed victory as they edged the Cornhuskers, 5-4. On Sunday, June10, while the National Hockey League’s Colorado Avalanche celebrated winning the Stanley Cup, CSUF was preparing for their second game of the tournament. Although tied at the end of regulation play, the Titans would fall in the 10th, losing to the Stanford

Onward and

Cardinal, 5-2. Fortunately for CSUF it was not yet time to go home but after falling to the Cardinal, the Titans found themselves in a place they thought they would never be: the loser’s bracket. To stay alive, it was imperative that they beat Tulane on June 12. And that they did. Overwhelming the fifth-seeded Tulane, 11-2, CSUF avoided an early plane ride home. Next up they would once again face the Stanford. The game would be their last. It took less than three hours for Stanford to eliminate the Titans, 41. With their season over, the Titans returned to California. It was a season CSUF closed with a 48-18 record. It was a season that saw 10 players drafted by the major leagues. It was a season that boasted four All-Americans and the All Big-West Conference Pitcher of the Year. It was a season to be proud of. DAVID RIVERA/Daily Titan

2001 was a historic storybook season for the Titan baseball.

Kirk Sarloos Pitcher

Aaron Rifkin First Baseman

Upward

Ten Titans drafted by the Major Leagues

Mike Rouse Shortstop Brett Kay Catcher

Shawn Norris Third Baseman Shane Waroff Pitcher

Jon Smith Pitcher

3rd Round

Houston Astros

4th Round

N.Y. Yankees

5th Round

Toronto Blue Jays

8th Round

N.Y. Mets

9th Round

Montreal Expo

13th Round

Arizona Diamondbacks

16th Round

Pittsburgh Pirates*

Robert Guzman Outfielder 18th Round

David Bacani Second baseman 22nd Round Mike Nunez Pitcher

Free Agent

Minnesota Twins N.Y. Mets N.Y. Yankees

*Smith, a President’s Scholar, opted not to sign

Expectations are high for current athletic seaBy Jonathan Hansen

Daily Titan Asst. Sports Editor Looking for a sporting event at Cal State Fullerton this Fall? Here are the four choices the University has to offer.

Women’s Soccer

LORRAINE DOMINGUEZ/Daily Titan Titan women’s volleyball hopes to improve upon last season with a trio of seniors leading the way.

The Cal State Fullerton women’s soccer squad will look to improve upon last year’s 8-12 record overall and 3-5 conference record by combining veteran experience with young talent. Only three seniors were lost from last year’s squad and the Titans will look to senior and first team all-conference midfielder Tennli Ulicny for valuable leadership and experience. Defenders sophomore Danielle Turnquist and junior Leah Sims will shore up the Titan defense this season. Freshman Kellie Cox looked impressive in the team’s intrasquad game by racking up nine points and could prove to be a potent offensive weapon for CSUF in the coming weeks. The Titans will open the regular season Sept. 1 as host of the fourteam FILA Classic. The tournament will feature No. 2 ranked UCLA and No. 3 ranked University of Portland, as well as the University of Denver. Following that will be a tough

season featuring three teams, U of P, UCLA and San Diego, which advanced to the NCAA Women’s College World Cup last season. Combined, these three teams posted a 42-18-1 overall record and a combined 17-5 record in conference play.

Women’s Volleyball

Three returning seniors will look to lead the way for the Cal State Fullerton women’s volleyball in 2001. Co-captains Katie Crawford and Be Holcombe and all-conference outside hitter Megan Sabo-all seniors-will provide the experienced nucleus around which the Titans hope to improve upon last year’s 9-20 overall record and 3-13 conference mark. Last season, Sabo became the first Titan to record both 400 kills and 400 digs in the same season. Crawford, who missed all of the 2000 season due to shoulder surgery, will provide some valuable experience. CSUF is hoping freshmen Carley Dial and Vanessa Kelterborn will step up and make an immediate contribution as well as provide the Titans with some much-needed defensive support. The Titans, and tenth year head coach Mary Ellen Murchison, will begin the season at home against Manhattan College Aug. 31 as part

of the Titans’ Four Point Classic tournament. CSUF will be close to home for most of the season as their schedule features 18 games at Titan Gym.

Men’s Soccer

The Cal State Fullerton men’s soccer team has big shoes to fill. In the off-season, the Titans lost career scoring leader and the Pacific Division of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation player of the year, Duncan Oughton, who was drafted in the first round of the Major League Soccer draft. The Titans finished last season with a 15-6-1 record, a season which included an at-large berth into the NCAA tournament. Coach Al Mistri will begin his 21st year in the CSUF program and will have more time to focus on the men after turning over the coaching reigns of the women’s team. Mistri has guided the Titans to five trips to the NCAA championships in the past eight years. Joining Mistri on the coaching staff will be former Titan AllAmerican Eddie Soto. Soto, 28, played for the Titans from 1992-1994 and graduated in 1996 with a degree in kinesiology. He scored 38 goals and totaled 96 points, both of which were school career records until broken just last season. Soto still hold the single-season

record for goals with 18 in 1994. He was selected a second-team All-American in 1992 by the National Soccer Coaches Association and earned honorable mention from Soccer News in 1993 when he led the Titans to the ‘Final Four’ of the NCAA tournament.

Cross Country

Following an off-season that was full of publicity, the Titan men’s and women’s cross-country team hopes to let their runners do most of the talking this season. The Titan men’s team finished fifth in the Big West Conference last year, as well as posting a 15th place finish in the NCAA Division IX cross country championships. Sophomore Bryce Lighthall looked strong in the pre-season alumni meet and could be a leading contributor all year long. Last season, the women’s team finished eighth in the conference, 22nd in the NCAA’s and will rely on Lakeysha McClenton and Danielle Hernandez, who posted strong results last season and who have looked good early on. The Titans open the 2001 season September 1, when they play host to the annual Jammin’ Invitational at Carbon Canyon Regional Park. CSUF will take on Stanford, UCLA, Long Beach State and several other local colleges and universities in the season’s first event.


SPORTS

Tuesday, August 28, 2001

L.A. Galaxy extinguishes Fire at CSUF

Titan women’s soccer enjoys but emphasized one specifically. He made the team commit to disallowing the opposition to score early. The Titans (8-12 last season) committed by shutting out the Roadrunners in the first half and limiting their firsthalf shot attempts to only four. Freshman forward Kellie Cox blistered a left-foot shot from inches inside the penalty area past the By Jeff Benson outstretched goalkeeper. Midway Daily Titan Staff Writer through the first half, Fullerton had a 1-0 edge. Women’s soccer head coach Ali Midfielder Erica Jacalone followed Khosroshahin admits to being “new in the second half with a goal-scoring at this.” He’d been an assistant under header off of a Danielle Turnquist former CSUF head coach Al Mistri corner kick. for four years, yet he’d never expeAfter Bakersfield forward Carrie rienced winning with a team of his Montague’s long cross shot brought own. the game within one, a well-struck That may only make him more ball ricocheted off of Fullerton goalanxious to succeed in his fledgling keeper Julianna Elliott’s fingertips. season at the CSUF helm and to pick She recovered quickly, however, and up his first career win. With a young smothered the ball amidst a barrage squad that features only three return- of scrapping feet to preserve the vicing starters, Khosroshahin said he’s tory. taking his new job very seriously. Fullerton committed 20 fouls to “ We ’ r e Bakersfield’s ready to play eight, but none s o m e b o d y, ” facilitated any Khosroshahin goal-scoring said. “We’re sequences. tired of playThis was ing each other. the last exhibiWe’re ready tion game for to start kickthe Titans, who ing somebody Friday squared else.” off in an interHis team did squad Blueexactly that, White scrimresponding mage. with a victory Cox had four Sunday night in goals and two a 2-1 exhibition assists in a 6sweat-soaker 3 Blue win. at Cal State Forward Kim Bakersfield. Houg had two “Ali”, as he goals for the is modestly White squad, referred to, had while midfieldpressed several ABIGAILE C. SIENA /Daily Titan er Tennli Ulicny points in a pre- Preseason finds CSUF women in and forward game speech first ever meeting with Bakersfield. M i c h e l e to the team, Bannister

21

nSOCCER: Titan Stadium hosts Major League Soccer competition as professional sports make quick visit to Fullerton en route to championships

nPRESEASON: Roster filled with young players proves to be successful for Coach Khosroshahin

By Tim Gillett

Special to the Titan

ABIGAILE C. SIENA /Daily Titan

Titan Blue and White face off during intra-squad scrimmage. had one apiece for their opposing sides. With three shots on goal and several near-breakaway opportunities, fleet-footed Cox is developing into a scoring menace. With the two assists Friday and numerous setup opportunities Sunday, she’s showing that she can pass as well. “I like to take advantage of the opportunities I see and be a wellrounded player,” Cox said. “I try to look up top and look for anyone who talks to me.” This kind of communication is a key fundamental of Khosroshahin’s game plan. He said in a post-game discussion that he expects his team to call out to each other more often, rather than relying on him for the answers. He acknowledged that the team’s play, however, lived up to his expectations. “I think we did well, but we could have performed a little better,” Khosroshahin said. “They were ner-

vous. But I’d give the team a C for the night. A win is a win, any way you can take it.” Khosroshahin says the team needs to work on making more efficient choices and quicker decisions, including opening up channels, pace on the ball, and play in transition. An unwanted theme for the Titans in their preseason practices has been the abundance of nagging injuries. “We have a lot of injuries, so we even have some of our guys playing,” said midfielder Kelly Keohen, who Friday was nursing a sternum injury. “But this year we’re going to be the best we’ve ever been. It’ll be worth watching.” Keohen played as a substitute in Sunday’s game, and like several others, is expected to play this weekend in Fullerton’s tournament, the FILA Classic, Khosroshahin said. On Saturday, Fullerton opens its regular season at 5 p.m. against Denver, who was 11-6-3 last year. On Monday at 1 p.m., they run with perennial powerhouse Portland,

The Los Angeles Galaxy’s veteran defender Alexi Lalas scored the golden goal against the Chicago Fire in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup semifinal in overtime at Titan Stadium Wednesday. The Galaxy now advances to the final for the first time in their history. These two teams met last year in the semi-final stage with the opposite result. Chicago scored in extra time to advance and eventually win the tournament. This year the Galaxy and Lalas proved to be too hot for the Fire to handle. The goal came in the fourth minute of overtime when Lalas headed the ball past Chicago goalkeeper Zach Thornton at the far post. “It’s euphoria, it’s a climax like no other and you kind of lose your senses,” said Lalas about his golden goal in a post game interview. It was served to Lalas from a corner kick delivered by fellow team member and New Zealand international Simon Elliot. Lalas did not start the game, but was substituted into the game in the 77th minute replacing Orange County native Danny Califf. The game started fast and was attack oriented, but soon settled into a strategic match of carefully orchestrated assaults at both ends of the field. The second half saw clutch saves made by both goalkeepers. Chicago’s DaMarcus Beasley took a well-placed shot that was good enough for the goal, but L.A.’s Kevin Hartman was equal to it producing a fantastic leaping save. It took a fully extended diving save by Zach Thornton to keep the Galaxy’s number 25, Martin Quijano,

from scoring just moments after the Beasley blast. The goalkeepers were the silent heros of the game, both with solid performances. “The win is great. It is great for the Galaxy to get ourselves into a championship game,” said Galaxy Head Coach Sigi Schmid. “It was one of those games that had a lot of chess on the field. There was a lot of thinking and a lot of tired bodies, but you saw a great tactical soccer game.” The Galaxy will next face the New England Revolution, who recently defeated Washington D.C. United, in the final October 27 at a site yet to be determined.

LOS ANGELES GALAXY Kevin Hartman, Adam Frye, Danny Califf (Alexi Lalas ‘77), Greg Vanney, Ezra Hendrickson, Simon Elliott, Peter Vagenas, Mauricio Cienfuegos, Sasha Victorine, Cobi Jones, Marvin Quijano (Isaias Bardales Jr. ‘63). CHICAGO FIRE Zaach Thornton, C.J. Brown, Carlos Bocanegra, Evan Whitfield, Diego Gutierrez, Chris Armas, Jesse Marsch, Peter Nowak, DaMarcus Beasley, Dema Kovalenko, Hristo Stoitchkov (Sergi Daniv ‘16[Eric Wynalda ‘80]).

Game Statistics Total Shots Shots on goal Saves Fouls

Galaxy

Fire

13 7 3 12

10 3 5 17


2001 08 28