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DETOUR: Why does Uma look so “miserable?” —See page 4.

T H U R S D AY

VOLUME 66, ISSUE 52

M AY 2 1 , 1 9 9 8

CSUF has a history of theatrical smut

n HISTORY : Long before

this year’s production of “Romeo and Juliet” there was the 1967 production of “The Beard.” By TRISHA L. SEBASTIAN Special to the Daily Titan

“A lewd, licentious, pornographic stage play was presented in Fullerton last week ...” This sentence could have been written a few weeks ago in the Orange County Register regarding the Cal State Fullerton production of “Romeo and Juliet.” Instead, it was written by Bill Drake,

one-time publisher of the Yorba Linda Star, professing his disgust over a graduate student production of “The Beard” by Michael McClure over 30 years ago. This column sparked debate over what theater professors could and could not show in their classes, culminating in a proposed amendment to the California State Penal Code that would have made showing simulated sex acts in college theater productions a misdemeanor. The controversy erupted on Nov. 15, 1967 after Cal State College at Fullerton theater professor Edwin Duerr’s graduate directing class held three performances of “The Beard.” Drama department policy at the time stated that the

A headline from a Nov. 17, 1967 article in the Yorba Linda Star. Controversy sorrounding the play almost led to legislative action. performances were not open to the public, but that any students who wished to see the performances could view them. These performances were not open to members of the press. Drake, Star assistant editor Barbara J. Machado and her husband George

Machado each received tickets to one of the performances. The following Wednesday, Drake ran his column with an additional admonition against thenpresident William Langsdorf stating that tionable “if he was ignorant of the (objec production), we figure this is no excuse,

I rushed for 1,000 yards for this?

because he should know what’s going on in his college.” Machado acknowledged in her review that “the play was ‘an academic project ... not addressed to prurient interest, and not a public performance.’” Still, Drake pushed in his weekly column for the dismissals of Langsdorf, James Young, former head of the drama department, and Duerr. He stated in the following week’s column, “The moral decay of America is on the move and going at a fast pace that will eventually lead to the fate of Sodom and Gomorrah ...” “This fast pace of moral decay does not need any help from liberal-minded,

free speech advocate professors in our colleges.” Response came in the form of a statement issued by Langsdorf, defending Duerr saying, “Since this was not a public event, but rather a part of a graduate class in drama directing, the content was under the control and supervision of (Duerr). “The administration of the College, the Department chairman, and the faculty member involved join in assuring the community at large that every possible effort will be made to protect the good name of the College and the welfare of the community,” the statement

n GRADUATION: Com-

Wood is Fullerton’s all-time leading scorer and set the NCAA single season assist record by averaging 11.0 per game in the 8283 season. Wo o d a l s o Royce played alongside Michael Jordan on the 1984 Olympic basketball team. He holds the Olympic assist record with 63. John Stockton, the all-time NBA assist leader, was cut from the 1984 Olympic team in favor of Wood as point guard. Wood eventually played for the NBA and is currently calling fouls on NBA stars like Dennis Rodman as a referee. The school’s ceremony will be held at 5 p.m. The public is welcome to attend. Michael Stennis, California Board of Trustees member, will be speaking at the School of Communications graduation on June 1 at 4:30 p.m. The other CSUF schools will have student speakers at their respective ceremonies. Speaking at the School of Humanities and Social Sciences ceremony will be graduate Isabel Apkarian, a criminal justice major with a minor in psychology. She has previously been named to the Dean’s List and has a 4.0 grade average in her major. The ceremony is scheduled for June 1 at 8 p.m. The School of Natural Science and Mathematics student speaker will be Faith Monique “Nikki” Pinkerton. She is a biology major and is graduating with high honors. The ceremony is scheduled for May 31 at 8 p.m. The School of the Arts has four student speakers scheduled for their May 31 ceremony at 4:30 p.m. The students include: Elizabeth Comay, from the Art Department; Jennifer Fagan, from the Dance Department; Christopher Watts, from the Music Department, and Danielle Bisutti, from the Theater Department.

Royce and a ref to give the final farewell mencement ceremonies feature established alumni as well as those on their way to prestige. JASON SILVER

Daily Titan Staff Writer Tennessee Oilers running back Eddie George was on campus Wednesday filming a commercial for Adidas athletic wear. PHOTO BY MYLES ROBINSON

New-hires put under a new policy n POLICY : Academic Sen-

ate passes new method of evaluating newly-hired professors; policy is considered positive by professors. By LAURIE SCHULTZ Daily Titan Staff Writer

A new university policy will change how department colleagues, faculty committees, deans and the president of the university evaluate professors. It will affect the tenure and promotions of newly-hired professors and will take effect in Fall 1999. Underare theevaluated old policyinstatement, fessors the areasproof

teaching, scholarly and creative activity, professional activity and service. The new policy statement will require professors to be reviewed in all these areas minus professional activity. Newly-hired professors must construct a preliminary development plan in their first year of teaching. This plan will outline their goals in the three required categories. They will not be reviewed in their first year, but in their second year they must submit a development plan, which builds on the preliminary schedule. A faculty member mentor who will provide guidance, advice and support to new-hires in the process of preparing their preliminary development plans. Decisions about whether or not a

professor will be tenured will be based on whether the professors did what they said they intended to do, said Mary Watkins, coordinator of faculty affairs and records. “Professors will begin the probationary period (the time before they achieve tenure) of their careers knowing what is expected of them. There should be no surprises,” Watkins said. Prospective new hires are pleased with having the development plan like the idea of setting their own goals and accomplishments, she said. For the last two years, an ad hoc committee in the Academic Senate reviewed the current personnel policy and submitted recommendations for changes. After much debate and revi-

sion, the senate modified these recommendations. President Milton Gordon signed the approved policy in April. John Olmstead, professor of chemistry and member of the reviewing committee, said one of the reasons the senate decided to require a development plan was to reduce the anxiety among the faculty. Many faculty were anxious because they did understand clearly enough what they needed to do to gain tenure, Olmstead said. Olmstead said requiring mentoring was an attempt to formalize what has been done informally in many departments. The amount of mentoring a professor would receive would be tailored to his or her needs, he said. For

see POLICY/ 

It’s that time of the year again. The time of caps and gowns. The time of congratulations and expensive presents. The time for getting on with your life. But first it is time for graduation ceremonies and that means it’s time for speakers and this year’s lineup of commencement speakers includes a former NBA player and current U.S. congressman. U.S. Representative Edward Royce, RFullerton, who graduated from Cal State Fullerton in 1977 with a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration, will deliver the commencement address at the School of Business Administration and Economics ceremony. Royce is currently the chairman of the House Subcommittee on Africa and is the only Republican congressman in Clinton’s delegation. Royce entered politics in 1982 when he was elected to the California State Senate. He has focused on victims’ rights issues including anti-stalking legislation, which he pushed through successfully at the state and national levels. He was praised for authoring the Crime Victims Justice reform ballot initiative which overhauled the California Criminal Code. The ceremony will be held in the Titan Sports Complex at 9 a.m. on May 30. Only guests with tickets will be admitted. For the School of Human Development and Community Service, the cermonial speaker will be Leon Wood, who was inducted into the Orange County Sports Hall of Fame earlier this month. Wood graduated from CSUF in 1984 with a Bachelor of Science in Physical Education.

see PLAY/ 

‘Big change’ in store for Science and Math n FACULTY: Daniel Stalling is installed

as the new assistant dean of Natural Science and Mathematics. By MELISSA MORRIS Daily Titan Staff Writer

With Disney figurines and stuffed animals painted in bold blues and reds decorating his desk, he is anything but the typical introverted scientific-type. Daniel Stalling, the new assistant dean of the School of Natural Science and Mathematics is at Cal State Fullerton to “create a sense of community.” Stalling was recruited in mid-April from USC, where he was assistant director of residential and Greek life. He focused on facilitating student and faculty interac-

tion. In his new position on this campus, Stalling said he hopes to generate more opportunities for student-faculty interaction and strengthen student leadership skills within the School of Natural Science and Mathematics. “My timeline is really to make some big changes over the next two years,” Stalling said, “It’s a good professional challenge for me.” Stalling’s desire to connect people through the development of personal relationships is rooted in his childhood experiences. Stalling’s family owned several transitional homes and boarding care houses for the elderly, in which he spent much time as a child. “Society had sometimes turned its back on these people and a lot of them had a richness of stories to tell,” Stalling said. “Often times we just don’t take the time to get to know one another. If you take the time, you learn so much...

that people are treasures.” Stalling fondly recalls a friend named Fling who influenced him as a young man. “He believed in me,” Stalling said. “It’s that belief in other people; I feed off of that. And I hope I give that to someone in return.” Ben Rogoway, a CSUF student and Stalling’s former co-worker at USC, said Stalling is “a very good leader and very good motivator.” Stalling said to develop leadership skills, students must be involved in campus activities and services. One of his goals is to ensure evening and daytime students equal access to campus services, like Financial Aid. “He has several really good ideas about what he thinks he can do for the (Biology Department),” said Eugene Jones, chair of the department.

Copyright ©1998, Daily Titan

JEFF CHONG/Daily Titan

New assistant dean of the School of Natural Science and Mathematics Daniel Stalling has been described as a “good motivator.”


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A GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING

BRIEFS

Immunity Documentation

The Health Center requires students born after January 1, 1957 must submit proof of immunization. If you have been contacted you must provide records of immunization of measles (Rubeola) and German measles (rubella). Documentation of immunnization to both after 1969 and your first birthday needs to be photocopied and presented in person to the Health Center. A waiver maybe obtained for medical (from CSUF Health Center, Medical Director) or religious reasons (CSUF Vice President of Student Services). Free vaccinations are available in the Health Center on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. You will not be allowed to register for fall semester, 1998 until the requirement has been met. This only applys to those students who have received warning about immunization.

National Buckle-Up Week The California Coalition for Vehicle Choice urges everyone to buckle up in recognition of national buckle-up America week. The coalition is urging everyone to help prevent needless traffic deaths and inuries from not wearing safety belts. The government estimates

POLICY • from

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example, a professor with twelve years experience would probably need less mentoring than a professor who recently finished graduate school. Faculty will be treated more fairly as a result of the new policy, said Professor of economics Jane Hall, who also served on the committee.

that 69% of Americans use saftety belts on a regular basis, however in the last few years the usage rate has remained relatively the same. This leaves roughly 31% of motorists unnecessarily at risk of an injury during an accident due to not wearing a saftey belt. Over 40 states, along with the District of Columbia, have instilled belt laws and many of these states are looking to strengthen their enforcement. The National Highway Traffic Saftey Administration (NHTSA) plans to increase safety belt usage by the year 2005.

All Night Study Program The Titan Student Union is currently open extended hours to help students prepare for upcoming spring semester finals. The “All Night Study” program has been around for more than 10 years during the week before and week of finals in Titan Student Union. The program will run through 11 p.m., May 29. During this time, several lounges and study areas will be available for individuals as well as study groups to work on projects and prepare for finals. The Information and Service Desk, the Mainframe computer lounge and the Games and Recreation area will also extend their hours for late-night customers. Faculty complained that the old policy was too inflexible and had a onesize-fits-all mentality, said Michael Parker, acting chief information/technology officer who also served on the ad hoc committee. By making clearer the standards by which faculty will be evaluated, Academic Senate hopes disputes among many evaluators and professors would be lessened, Parker said.

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The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Tuesday through Friday. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The mail subscription price is $45 per semester, $65 per year, payable to the Daily Titan, Humanities 211, CSUF, Fullerton, CA 92834.

May 21, 1998

THURSDAY

CALENDAR  OF  EVENTS CAPS Stress Management and Test Anxiety in Langsdorf Hall 208 today from 11 a.m. to noon. Associated Student Productions film series presents "The Wedding Singer" in the Titan Student Union Titan Theater tonight at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Admission is free. For more information call 278-3502. A guitar ensemble directed by David Grimes will be held in Little Theatre tonight at 8 p.m. The program includes a variety of duets, trios and quartets as well as works from the full guitar orchestra. Admission is $8 ($5 with advance Titan discount).

Gay Pride Dance in the Titan Student Union Pavilion A on Saturday from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Special guests attending are Jason Stuart, comedian and Anna Rex-C, performer. College identification is required.

at 8 p.m. Ticket prices range from $13-$17 for adults; $11$15 for seniors; and $7-$9 for children. The Curtis Theatre is located at the Brea Civic & Cultural Center.

Pacific Symphony Institute Orchestra is featured in a concert on Saturday, at 4 p.m. in Little Theatre. The concert will be conducted by Elizabeth Stoyanovich and John Alexander. Admission is $13 ($7 with advance Titan discount).

Hatpins, an exhibit exploring feminine fashions in the early 20th century, runs today through May 31 in the Atrium Gallery, University Library. Exhibit hours: Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday noon to 5 p.m.

“The Pirates of Penzance” will be storming the stage of Curtis Theatre through Saturday. Evening performances are Thursday, Friday and Saturday

The Democratic Club of West Orange County will meet on May 27, at the Huntington Beach Central Library, room B at 6:45 p.m. The following

candidates will speak: Wallace Wade, Candidate for Orange County District Attorney; Paul Walters, Candidate of Orange County Sheriff; Mike Carona, Candidate for Orange County Sheriff; Dr. Dave Sullivan, Candidate for Orange County Supervisor. The Southern California Genealogical Society will host its 29th annual Genealogical Jamboree at the Pasadena Center from 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on May 30 and 31. The even is $10 for one day and $15 for both. Over 10 nationally known speakers will be in attendance. For more information call 818-843-7247.

Summer school for scholar or fool? Dear Rebecca,

I feel kind of dumb, but I have a question I don’t want to ask anyone else. I am a Sophomore and I want to hurry and get out of school as quickly as possible, I have thought about summer courses, but they scare me. What if I can’t take the pressure of such an accelerated class or what if I fail the class. Some people have told me to take summer courses, because they are easier and faster, but what does that mean? I would feel really dumb asking this questions to one of me teachers or friends so could you please help me out? —The sophomore

PLAY • from

Dear Sophomore, I am sure you have heard this before, but no question is a dumb question. If you don’t know, you have to ask someone. Now summer school has its pros and cons to it. I spoke to a great number of people that take summer classes and love them and I have talked to people that took a summer class once and swore up and down that never again would they do something so stupid. Let me start with the cons: It is very time consuming, you have a class usually three times a week for three hours a day. So if you have a job it is difficult or if you want a life you don’t get to have one at least for the five weeks of the class. Next, it is very fast paced, so if you take a while to digest a theory or idea you could

be in trouble. You have to be organized, because if you’re not you could have a ton of notes and a ton of information and not know how to apply it. Pros: If you think it is hard, try and remember that you only have five weeks of that. The schedule even labels the classes for you, no one should be taking such an accelerated class if they

purpose of the group was to seek community support in the defense of academic freedom through open letters to the public through the mass media. Several editorials were written by members of Fullerton’s student paper, the Titan Times, and Bill Drake, attacking each other’s views on the situation. In a letter to Drake, the Times wrote, “Manufacturing controversy, egregori-

ously slanting the news and deleting essential facts from a story is an abuse of freedom of the press and a gross disservice to the community.” The whole controversy reached its peak at the Senate sub-committee hearing held Jan. 19-20, 1968. Twentyfive people were subpoenaed, including Drake, the Machados, Duerr, and June Salz-Pollock, chair of the Faculty Council, the predecessor to the Academic Senate. English professor Joan Greenwood remembers the hearings as being purely opportunistic on Sen. Whetmore’s part. “(He was) a right-wing zealot, an abominable person,” she said. She recalls one incident where Sen. Whetmore asked Pollock to read out loud sections of the play which contained questionable language. Green-

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concluded. Drake’s column prompted State Sen. James Whetmore to call for senate hearings to address the legality of the performance. The Star reported on Nov. 29, 1967 that Sen. Whetmore “had requested the legislative council in The same day, Drake deplored student protests in favor of academic freedom, writing, “Since when has the faculty and students gained the right to demand what is taught or presented in one of our colleges?” The students responded by forming the Students United Publicizing Politician’s Opportunistic Retaliatory Tactics (SUPPORT). Dick Bauer, president of the commitee, told The Star that the

Ask and I’ll Tell

Rebecca Sulages

don’t have at least a B average. Some classes suggest an A average. As long as you think you can handle it, try it; you don’t know until you try. If you decide not to, don’t feel bad. Some never take summer classes and they make it out of school. I am sure I can speak for most of the people on campus and say none of us want to be here forever. Most students are not here to make college their career, and although sometimes some feel like they will never get out, most eventually will. So just take it one day at a time and enjoy college; it is an experience many people never even get. Good luck! Everyone this is your last chance of the semester to write to me. BECADEVIL@aol.com wood feels that Sen. Whetmore was just using that opportunity to try to embarrass Pollock, but that Pollock “behaved magnificently.” The Senate sub-committee concluded that if the trustees did not act upon their suggestion, they would enact legislation requiring them to do so. On Feb. 29, 1968, Senate Bill No. 487 proposed that “every student ... and every teacher or school official who knowingly permits ... any simulated act of sexual intercourse or deviate sexual conduct occurring during the course of a play ... is guilty of a misdemeanor.” The bill was amended once before it was passed on May 9, 1968. It then went to the Assembly committee where it died.


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Everybody was kung fu fighting n CLUB: Martial arts enthu-

siasts can involve themselves with CSUF’s first Wushu Club. By JASON M. TAYLOR Daily Titan Staff Writer

Flashing swords. Spinning staffs. Flying jump kicks. No, it’s not the late-night Kung Fu theater; it’s something a little more authentic. These are scenes from a training session of the new Cal State Fullerton Wushu Club. The club, founded in March, has made an effort to bring Kung Fu Wushu—a modern competitionstyle martial art, to CSUF. Wushu training is organized around forms, or dance-like sets of motions outlining a fight against imagined opponents. These forms, called kuen in Chinese, help practitioners condition themselves and also create a graduated path of progress, each form more difficult than the last. Kuen commonly in­corporates a variety of explosive and acrobatic techniques, club president Philip Chen said. These techniques, called sets, command the artist to use his hands or weapons like a staff, spear or sword. There are also forms using a sectional metal chain called a whip-chain. “Wushu is a very flashy style,” said Chen. “It catches peoples’ attention.” Chen, who has been studying Wushu for four years, has been competing fiercly for one year, said that kuen performance takes a great deal of concentration. “It’s almost like mobile medita-

tion,” he said. Wushu in China has a 5,000-year tradition, said Chen. The art has become more sport- and competition-based in recent years, however, it has grown into a popular Asian tournament event. Each province in China fields its own team. The sport is already a component of the Asian Games and is scheduled for inclusion as an Olympic sport in 2004. In the meantime, Chen said, future competitors for those games can stay in practice with an intercollegiate Wushu competition. So far, aside from CSUF, teams have been founded at UCLA, UC Irvine, UC Berkeley, Stanford, Oregon State, Cal State Long Beach and USC. A recent tournament at UC Berkeley drew a crowd of four thousand­­— a crowd that witnessed Chen’s firstplace victory in his category. Jessie Castro, the club’s vicepresident, said that physical fitness is one of the major benefits the sport has given him, but that it can

also be a good way to learn about Chinese culture. For example, he said, several team members traveled to China last summer to train with the Beijing Wushu Team, one of the most well-respected teams worldwide. After their six hours per day of practice, the team visited cultural and historic centers such as the Forbidden City. The team is planning another Beijing trip this summer, Castro said, and is also preparing for an August tournament in Maryland. Chen said he feels the universal appeal of the style is one of its greatest draws. “People of every ethnicity can just come together and have fun,” he said. “It’s really cool to see that.” The Wushu team meets Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in room PE-232A. Each class session costs $3, but the first class is free for first-time students on a trial basis. Classes are open to all.

Members of the Cal State Fullerton Wushu Club practice their fierce martial arts skills. The club is planning a trip to Beijing this summer. PHOTOS BY  JASON TAYLOR


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California State University, Fullerton

Classical

v ut e o l R ion

By MELINDA GANN Daily Titan Staff Writer

A

fter a 20-year prison sentence for petty theft, Jean Valjean (Liam Neeson) reenters the world as a dirty, scathed peasant without morality. Finding shelter in a bishop’s home, Valjean discovers humanity and kindness, yet as much as he tries to change, his blackened past finds him in “Les Misérables.” Written by Victor Hugo, “Les Misérables” has become a staple in literature classes, as well as an enormously successful Broadway musical. This is a tale of social injustice from which people could not liberate themselves in the early 19th century. In many ways, the story is as true today as it was then. Set in 1832, the classic story of Jean Valjean and the obsessive Inspector Javert (Geoffrey Rush) takes place i n lavish, morally-obsessed Paris. Even after serving a prison term, this 19th century society continues to condemn and punish the convict. Valjean finds great refuge in the poor community of Vigau where he reinvents himself. Turning the community into a boom town, Valjean becomes the quiet, humble mayor of the quaint French city. Suddenly his past seeps into the tiny town as Javert becomes Vigau’s head inspector. Javert’s mean and cruel practices capture young, beautiful Fantine (Uma Thurman) who was dismissed from her job for having an illegitimate child. Needing money for the family who raises her daughter, Fantine turns to prostitution. Javert watches in the dark as men attack her, then he arrests her for attempting to defend herself. Like a night in shining armor, Valjean rescues Fantine from the imprisonment of Javert’s unjust arrest. Weakened and desperate, Fantine finds comfort in the home of Valjean who attempts to bring her back to health. As Fantine lays dying, Valjean promises to bring her daughter to see her, but his promise dies in vain when Fantine passes away.

arts arts & & entertainment entertainment May 21, 1998

An all-star cast highlights

Les Misèrables,

the emotional classic without the Broadway glitz

Valjean adopts Fantine’s daughter Cosette (Claire Danes), and they flee to Paris, where they hide in a convent for ten years. Now Cosette is a young woman who desperately wants to leave the convent and enter the modern, exciting world she sees from behind the convent doors. Tormented with his daughter’s unhappiness, Valjean decides to leave the safety of the convent walls to re-enter the dangerous world of Paris where Javert lurks in dark alleys. The scenery is grand and picturesque. Shot mainly in the Czech Republic, early 19th century Paris comes to life on the big screen. Large, ornate buildings line the cobblestone streets, while horse-drawn buggies pass French statues. Performances by Liam Neeson (“Schindler’s List” and “Rob Roy”) and Geoffrey Rush (“Shine”) are outstanding. Both actors display strong and heroic performances on separate sides of the spectrum. Rush’s character is law-abiding but cruel, while Neeson’s character is humble and respectable. They make successful enemies. see LES MIS / 5

(Above) Curious about the world around her, Cosette (Claire Danes) persuades Valjean (Liam Neeson) to leave the confines of the convent walls where they have taken refuge for eight years. (Left) Inspector Javert (Geoffrey Rush, center) leads a throng of French soldiers into a fight to the death on the barricades of Paris. (Inside) Fantine (Uma Thurman), a worker in Valjean’s factory, is dismissed from her job when it is discovered that she has an illegitimate child.

Super Wok & Mid East Deli Take a break from studying and enjoy a great, quick lunch at one of these local eateries.

Restaurant Silver Chopsticks Wok Express & Freshh Donuts

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Well, here we are at the end of the semester, and with the end of this season of Daily Titan production comes an end to my beloved food column. I’ve had a lot of fun separating the grain from the chaff of the local restaurants; perhaps future semesters can include a more thorough and far-ranging search. Today, I include two final restaurants that were hitherto excluded for lack of a common theme. I include them now because they’re good, they’re unusual, and they’re worthy of mention. As a parting gift for my faithful readers, I’ve also included a chart summarizing all ten of this semester’s select eateries, compared by a one to five star system along lines of ambience, food quality, variety, service, and price. My loyal service for this semester is ended, but if I’ve saved just one poor starving

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Siham’s Deli & Mini Mart has a large lunch menu consisting of several Middle Eastern favorites, like humous, falafal and tabouleh. student out there from wasting his or her combinations or design your own, but the food money, I’ve done my job. price may range by up to 50 cents or so. The Super Wok Chinese restaurant, Whatever you get, expect to pay around located at 2445 East Imperial Highway five or six dollars for a dinner-sized plate. in Brea in the Wal Mart shopping center, Soups go for about two or three doloffers its diners a good selection of dishes lars—the hot and sour soup is especially from the fast-Chinese-food paradigm. good, particularly if you like shrimp. Choices include the usual fare, such as The ambience was pleasant and comhoney chicken, chow mein, or barbeque fortable, though a bit diner-like, and beef and pork, available either a la carte the service was quick. My server could or as part of a combination. have been a bit friendlier, though; there’s You can either defer to their choice of see FOOD / 5

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Table Ten Restaurant Big B’s Barbeque

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FOOD • from page 4

something about terse service that puts me on edge. Food quality was good, although not fabulous; I enjoyed the experience overall and I’ll probably go back. Critic’s choice: the honey chicken. My other selection for today, located next to the Lamppost Pizza at 550 N. State College Blvd., is a small middle eastern establishment called Siham’s Deli & Mini Market. This is one of the most unusual and interesting local restaurants I came across in my travels: the deli offers middle-eastern style pita sandwiches as its main fare. Sandwich selections include roasted lamb and chicken, falafel, vegetarian choic-

es, and the specially-seasoned Jerusalem Burger. The occasional day’s special will usually include one type of sandwich, a a drink, and either chips or a baklava (the second of which would be my personal favorite) for about five dollars. Overall, sandwich prices range between $1.95 and $4.55 and include pickles and hot peppers. For a complete meal you can expect to pay around $6.50 unless you’re a light eater. The friendly, pleasant service here won a lot of points in my book; no request I made (and I made quite a few) was treated as an imposition. Like any deli, the ambience is simple but friendly and cozy, leading to an all-around pleasant eating experience. I especially recommend it for lunch. Critic’s choice: souvlaki, followed by baklava.

LES MIS • from page 4

Uma Thurman (“The TruthAbout Cats and Dogs,” “Batman and Robin” and “Pulp Fiction”) gives a heart-wrenching performance of poverty-stricken Fantine. Her intense determination and love for her daughter fights society’s attempt to destroy her. Life imprisonment in a Paris convent seems unbearable for young Cosette. Claire Danes (“My So-Called Life,” “Romeo and Juliet” and “Little Women”) brings an insightful sensitivity and innocence to her role. The only low point of Danes’ performance is during the interaction with her love interest Marius, played by fairly newcomer Hans Matheson. Both Matheson

and Danes seemed unlikely as lovers. Their disinterest with one another comes across the screen loud and clear, and prove to be the slowest scenes in the film. Straying from the original Hugo novel, this version is like the Cliff Notes of motion pictures. In order to fit time constraints, much of the detailed plots and characterization were left scrapped on the cutting room floor. For audience members who have read the novel, there will be a degree of disappointment; Yet, this film serves as a great introduction to a classic piece of literature. Emotional and picturesque, “Les Misérables” is a high quality film. Great acting and a dynamic story transcend time as the two hour performance journeys into the life and times of early 19th century Paris.

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Sports

Thursday, May 21, 1998

TwotitlesforChatham? Steve Chatham experienced being a part of a national championship team as a freshman. Now as a senior, Chatham hopes to lead the Titans to one more title. By BRIAN DIERIEX

Daily Titan Sports Photo Editor As a freshman in 1995, Steve Chatham stood aside some of the Titan greats like Ted Silva, D.C. Olsen, Mark Kotsay and Mark Chavez. And as a freshman, he was initiated by this group of veterans the night before a game at UC Santa Barbara. “They came into my room with clippers in hand and chopped off my hair,” Chatham said. “The next day I came in the seventh inning and the UC Santa Barbara raggers are real smart they knew my nick name and all sorts of stuff, and as soon as I took off my hat this guy said ‘What is it, freshman initiation week?’ and he started going off on me.” Cal State Fullerton blazed past the competition that year to win its third National Championship. Chatham’s role was limited, he played in center-field when Kotsay came in to close out games and he replaced Jeremy Giambi in left field for defensive purposes. Since then Chatham has seen more

Photo by Brian Dieriex

playing time and has steadily improved over his years as a Titan. This year CSUF looks to be headed back to Omaha, and Chatham’s role has changed from a freshman who did not play much, to a senior leader, who could be the key to the Titans’ success. “He’s one of the leaders on our team,” Reed Johnson said. He’s been to Omaha before and everyone looks up to him for that. Everyone wishes they can get there. In 1996, he batted .316 with 13 doubles and 38 RBI. As a junior he upped his average to .341 and had 20 doubles and 51 RBI. He also started every game. An early season slump left him on the bench for the middle half of the season, a

place he was unfamiliar with. He has only started in 27 of the Titans’ 59 games this season. On March 22 he was batting only .262 in 14 starts. “This game is so frustrating that you start wondering why you are playing or if you’re good enough,” Chatham said. “There’s so many ups and downs. If you hit three balls out of 10 you’re making a million dollars in the big leagues, that means your failing seven times. By nature it’s a frustrating game.” Despite struggling, Chatham still garnered respect from his teammates. “We can always rely on him weather he’s starting or pinch hitting,” Johnson said. “He always going to make contact

and hit the ball hard.” A successful stint as a pinch hitter eventually put him back in the starting lineup. “If you stay consistent in everything you do, the results will come,” Chatham said. “When you start changing things and start trying too much, that is when you start faltering.” Titan Head Coach George Horton said he admitted the decision to keep Chatham was difficult. After the New Mexico State series, Chatham helped the Titans come from behind and lead the Titans to victory on April 18. “He’s been sending a lot of signs that he deserves more playing time,” Horton said

see CHATHAM/ 8


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Titan Coach George Horton, Steve Chatham and Aaron Rowand react to a Ryan Moore home run last Saturday.

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Collegiate Baseball Top 25 1. Miami Fla 2. Stanford 3. Wichita State 55-5 4. Florida 5. Louisiana State 6. Southern California 7. Rice 8. Cal St Fullerton 9. South Carolina 10. Florida State 11. Auburn 12. Texas A&M 13. Alabama 14. Oklahoma 15. Washington 16. Tulane 17. Arizona State 18. Clemson 19. Georgia Tech 20. Long Beach State

ESPN/USA Today Poll

46-9 41-12-1 42-15 42-17 40-15 45-15 44-15 42-16 43-16 43-18 43-16 40-18 39-15 47-13 34-21 42-14 38-20 37-20-1

1. Miami (21) 2. Stanford (5) 3. Wichita State (7) 4. Florida 5. Southern California 6. Louisiana State 7. Alabama 8. Auburn 9. Rice 10. Florida State 11. Texas A&M 12. Cal State Fullerton 13. Washington 14. Clemson 15. Texas Tech 16. South Carolina 17. Tulane 18. Oklahoma 19. Baylor 20. South Alabama

46-9 41-12-1 55-5 42-15 40-15 42-17 43-16 43-16 45-15 49-18 43-18 44-15 39-15 42-14 43-18 42-16 47-13 40-18 40-18-1 39-17

from page 6

after the series. “He’s hitting the ball good in practice and when he’s been given a chance in games he’s been successful.” The CSUF outfield is filled with five talented right-handed hitters including Chatham. “We have six quality outfielders and four positions for them,” Horton said. Chatham throws with his left hand, but bats from the right side, which did not help him breaking into the lineup. At the age of six while watching his mother play softball, he was hit by a ball that broke the middle finger in his right hand. “My dad is left handed and he taught me how to throw with my left hand, but I never made the switch to batting from the left side,” Chatham said. Chatham is “en fuego” of late and has finally squeezed his way into the starting lineup, as a result of a Reed Johnsonslump. He upped his average by over 100 points to .372 and five home runs

and 31 RBI. The 5’10” outfielder admits he is not what the scouts are looking for. “I don’t hit for power and I’m not 6’2”, 220 pounds,” Chatham said. “My whole life I’ve been told I could never play pro-ball because of my size. “But I want to play pro-ball,” Chatham said. “I want to prove everybody wrong, I want to do it for myself.” If not the minor leagues, then Chatham plans to start a business or enter the world of Wall Street. “I will get my finance degree and I want to start a business for my day,” Chatham said. “I also want to test my skills in the stock market to keep my competitive juices flowing.” However, as the Titans enter the height of their season there is only one thing on Chatham’s mind. “I want to win the National Championship,” Chatham said. “I came here a winner and I want to leave a winner.”

Titans hit road to Baton Rouge; Harvard first, Louisiana later By BRIAN DIERIEX

Daily Titan Sports Photo Editor Cal State Fullerton has kept the Louisiana State University Tigers in their den in the 90s. The Titans knocked out LSU in the 1994 College World Series with a 20-6 tromping. In ‘92 and ‘95, CSUF won Regionals in Baton Rouge, which kept the Tigers from playing in the CWS. LSU has won the last two CWS. The Titans abundance of left-handed pitching this year could play an important factor for them against LSU, because the Tiger batting order is dominated by left handed hitters. Seniors Benito Flores (12-0, 3.29) and

Erasmo Ramirez (10-5, 3.43) head the list of Titan southpaws. But in their way in the South II Regional, the Titans will battle Harvard University on Thursday afternoon. The Crimson offense is led by David Forst, who is at the top Harvard’s list batting .409 with 39 RBI. Jason Keck is second on the team in batting with a .383 average. Brian Ralph has started in only 26 of Harvards’ 44 games and is batting .373 with nine home runs and 32 RBI. On the mound, Mike Marcucci (7-0, 3.53) and Garett Vail (5-2, 2.34) lead the way for the Crimson.


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