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W E D N E S D AY

VOLUME 66, ISSUE 51

M AY 2 0 , 1 9 9 8

Brad Kanal is graduating college having learned many lessons—among them,

Learning To Slow Down By JULIE HARDEN Daily Titan Staff Writer

He sits at his desk puzzling over a Rubik’s cube. As the teacher drones on, he shifts the colored squares into almost unsolveable sequences. Click. Click. Click. Then, after only 30 seconds of playing, he destroys the combinations, pulling the squares apart from their core. Click. Click. Click. He snaps them back into place, with each of the six colored rows perfectly aligned once again. He returns his attention to the teacher but cannot concentrate on the lesson. Minutes later, he strolls out of class, only to return after half the lecture has already been taught. Again, he struggles to follow along but cannot focus or sit still. While some describe Cal State Fullerton communications major Brad Kanal as “ultraweird,” “overwhelming” and “off the wall,” most fail to realize he has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), not ants in his pants. A neurobiological, development disability characterized by inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness, ADHD is an invisible disability that impacts 3 to 6 percent of the American population, according to the national ADHD organization. CSUF Learning Disabilities Specialist Debra Fletcher described ADHD as “having 37 channels on all at once, where you can’t focus on the one you want or block out the ones you don’t.” A recent Louisiana Associated Psychological Services study revealed almost half of ADHD children repeat a grade at least once and 10 to 35 percent never complete high school. The same study also found 5 percent of individuals with ADHD complete college, making Kanal, 27, a statistical minority; he will graduate this June. From an early age, Kanal had difficulty following directions and completing assigned tasks. “Since kindergarten, I’ve always been

told, “You don’t listen, you don’t listen,’” he said. “I could never follow instructions in class, I could never follow the t e a c h e r. W h e n everyone else was making progress, I wasn’t.” A single cause for ADHD has not been conclusively proven, though it is believed to be caused by either genetics, head trauma or brain damage by toxins like lead and alcohol. Kanal said he believes he was born with the disability, yet he was not diagnosed until an economics professor at Fullerton College noticed he displayed symptoms similar to her ADHD daughter. That was seven years ago, however, when ADHD was not recognized as an adult disability. It had been previously limited to children, as it was believed that adolescence would cause the symptoms to go away. Only recently did psychologists understand that close to 70 percent of individuals with the disorder carry symptoms into adulthood. Like many people with ADHD, Kanal

World fashions fit cultural flairs

n CULTURE : A fashion show

displays the influence of different cultures on the way we dress. By MELISSA MORRIS Daily Titan Staff Writer

Imagine a delicate white shirt swept close to the bronzed skin of a Mexican male. Envision yourself in Japan’s national costume, the kimono, as winds pull the loose-fitting silk tight around your skin. Translucent shirts of thin cotton and kimonos are fashion reflections of a culture. Fashion connections are made between almost every culture around the world. In the United States, a nation that houses hundreds of cultures, there are many types of fashion. At a recent fashion show hosted by Sistertalk, one of two Black groups

AIDSWalk sponsorship approved n AS : After much debate, the

Board of Directors decides to sponsor a CSUF team for the AIDS fundraiser. By JASON SILVER Daily Titan Staff Writer

JEFF CHONG/Daily Titan

is impulsive, impatient, often restless, easily distracted, talks excessively and struggles to sustain attention. Such behaviors increase the risk for impaired educational and job per-

formance, decreased self-esteem, social problems and family difficulties. Kanal began college 10 years ago and

see ADHD/ 

It seemed a request for sponsorship of AIDSWalk Orange County would fail to be approved at the Associated Students Board of Directors meeting Tuesday, but a controversial last minute vote assured the money. The vote in question involve a request by the Student Health Advisory Committee for $1,500 dollars to be used for participation in the event, which will be held on June 7. It would cost $1,000 to pay for T-shirts and bussing, with $500 going directly to AIDSWalk Orange County to serve as sponsorship for the CSUF students participating as part of the university team. AS President Heith Rothman said he saw the sponsorship as a dangerous precedent to give money to an off-campus event. “I think the event is an extremely worthwhile cause, but once you sponsor it, you open the door to do it for anything else,” Rothman said. “This is a bad path to start going down. We could burn out our entire contingency fun on sponsorships alone.” Rothman said he is not completely opposed to sponsorships but that the board needs a policy to discuss how to award sponsorships. Evan Mooney, a representative from the School of the Arts, said the money for sponsorships could be controlled. “This is an important proposal and it does open a door, however it does not open a door that can not be monitored,” Mooney said. After deliberating the issue, School of Business Administration and Economics representative Casey Gilley made a motion to amend the proposal to exclude the $500 for sponsoring the event but paying the other $1,000. At first it appeared the ammendment passed on a 5-4-1 vote. But John Beisner, the University President’s representaive, recalled a rule from parliamentary procedure and,

see AS/ 

Public Safety chief to retire

n POLICE : Bill Huffman

on campus, event coordinator Jer Mara Davis said, “I think every culture has their own flavor as to what they wear. When an African-American goes to a party or church, we go all out. It’s clothes, accessories, attitude— everything,” Davis MARY LOU GLINES/Daily Titan said. Maurice Orr and Takisha Williamson command the “African-American catwalk during “Images in Mahogony. ” women are more curvaceous, and that can Lee also commented that Korean be a problem trying to Americans are more likely than other find clothes,” Davis added. Other than fit and attitude, color people to wear bright colors, like is an important element to various orange and yellow. Not only color, but utility, is cultural fashions. Korean-American psychology important to Mexican culture. Chimajor Simon Lee said of Korean - cano Studies Professor Isaac CardeAmerican fashion, “They go a little nas said in the hotter regions of more extreme in what they wear.” see FASHION/ 

announces his retirement after 19 years of catching campus crooks. By NICK BRENNAN Daily Titan Staff Writer

Eight months from now, he will no longer be catching criminals. His time will be spent catching and releasing fish. Trout throughout California. Maybe some marlin in Mexico. After 19 years as Cal State Fullerton Public Safety Chief, Bill Huffman is retiring. “I am ready to retire now and the safety pension plan matures at 55 years old,” Huffman said as to why he is leaving. His career began 33 years ago. After completing law enforcement classes at Fullerton College, he decided he wanted to be a police officer. Huffman then worked as

Deputy Sheriff in Santa Barbara for four years. But things are not quite the same as they were when he began his career. “People were much more friendly when I got in the business,” Huffman said. “The world has changed dramatically. It keeps getting tougher and tougher.” When Huffman entered law enforcement, police had just started being required to read people their Miranda Rights. Since he began, the nature of jails has changed dramatically, he said. Back then, low-level thieves and those caught for forging checks were locked up. “Today only the worst criminals end up in prison,” Huffman said. “The number of hardened criminals is shocking.” In the past those caught driving on a suspended license received a six-month-stint in jail, Huffman said. Now they are ticketed, have their car impounded and released. The jails are too crowed for all

coming soon to a theater near you:

CSUF Productions

Preview on page 8.

Copyright ©1998, Daily Titan

Huffman criminals, he said. As easy as the job may have seemed to be in the past, it was not.

see HUFFMAN/ 


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A GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING

BRIEFS

Immunity documentation

The Health Center requires students born after January 1, 1957 to submit proof of immunization. Those who have been contacted must provide proof of immunization of measles (Rubeola) and German measles (rubella) to the Health Center. A waiver may be obtained for medical reasons (from CSUF Health Center, Medical Director) or religious reasons (from CSUF Vice President of Student Services). Free vaccinations are available in the Health Center on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 to 11 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Registration for the fall 1998 semester will be blocked for students who were notified of the requirement by mail and have not yet provided proof of immunization.

National Buckle-Up Week The California Coalition for Vehicle Choice urges everyone to buckle up in recognition of national buckle-up America week. The coalition is urging everyone to help prevent traffic deaths and injuries from not wearing safety belts. The government estimates that 69 percent of Americans use saftety belts on a regular

FASHION • from

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Mexico, such as the state of Veracruz, thin cotton in shades of white and cream, “are an adaption to the region.” New York-based Vicnet, a project on cultural heritage said color is also valued in Japanese culture. Kimonos, introduced to Japan more than 1,200 years ago by Buddhist monks, are

basis. This leaves 31 percent of motorists at a greater risk of injury during an accident. Over 40 states and the District of Columbia have safety belt laws, and many of these states are looking to strengthen their enforcement.

A trip to the mechanic ranks up there with paying taxes or having a root canal performed, simply because it can be painful to both the wallet and one’s emotional well-being. In fact, taking the car into the repair shop is more frightful than a root canal because no one knows whether or not the car needs that expensive job the mechanic suggests. Fears can now be put away, according to the Fullerton MultiService Center. The center plans to head up a program to create a place for car owners to receive advice on the problems their cars are having. The Center’s special free program will hold a meeting at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday with guest speaker Erik Anderson. He is manager of the Fullerton College automotive shop, and an auto repair instructor with more than 20 years experience. For more information, call the center at 738-6305. colored differently according to age group. Women and young girls are more likely to wear patterned or vividly-colored kimonos, whereas older women typically wear kimonos in darker hues of navy and grey. When Japanese men wear kimonos, conservative fabrics in darker shades of color are selected. However, fashion “could also be religious,” Julia Adams, a 21-yearold junior child development major, said.

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Editor 5813 News Sports/Photo

278278-5814 278-2991

WEDNESDAY

CALENDAR  OF  EVENTS CAPS Stress Management and Test Anxiety will take place today in Langsdorf Hall 208 from 3 to 4 p.m. and on Thursday from 11 a.m. to noon. Mind Driver will play live today in the Becker Ampitheater at noon. Admission is free and there will be giveaways. Associated Student Productions film series presents “The Wedding Singer” in the Titan Student Union Titan Theater at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Admission is free. For more information call 278-3502.

A guitar ensemble directed by David Grimes will be held in Little Theatre on Thursday at 8 p.m. The program includes a variety of duets, trios and quartets as well as works from the full guitar orchestra. Admission is $8 ($5 with advance Titan discount).

Pavilion A on Saturday from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Special guests attending are Jason Stuart, comedian and Anna Rex-C, performer. College identification is required.

An end of the year pizza party for the Teaching Ombudsman Action Program will take place at noon in Humanities 123 on Friday.

The Pacific Symphony Institute Orchestra is featured in a concert on Saturday at 4 p.m. in Little Theatre. It will be conducted by Elizabeth Stoyanovich and John Alexander. Admission is $13 ($7 with advance Titan discount).

A Gay Pride Dance will be held in the Titan Student Union

“The Pirates of Penzance” will be storming the stage of

OFF-BEAT OFF-BEAT

Curtis Theatre through Saturday. Evening performances are Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Ticket prices range from $13-$17 for adults; $11$15 for seniors; and $7-$9 for children. The Curtis Theatre is located at the Brea Civic & Cultural Center. Hatpins, an exhibit exploring feminine fashions in the early 20th century, runs through May 31 in the Atrium Gallery, University Library. Exhibit hours: Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday noon to

Jay Vales Vales

Auto repair program planned

The

Nathan Orme Joe Chirco Jeff Tracy Stephen Rubin Denise Carson Annette Wells Dena Fargo Keith Mason Erin Whiteside Kerry Murray Gina Alexander Erick Wong Jeff Chong Brian Dieriex Steve Muise Lori Anderson Sheryl Tebelin Maryanne Wardlaw Barbara Chen Veronica Duran Heather Leonard Rachel Ng Jeffrey Brody

May 20, 1998

Executive Editor Business Manager Advertising Sales Manager News Editor Asst. News Editor Asst. News Editor Advertising Production Mgr. Opinion Editor Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editor Detour Editor Perspectives Editor News Photo Editor Sports Photo Editor Internet and Graphics Editor Internet Editor Advertising Production Asst. Production Manager Copy Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Copy Editor Faculty Adviser

Main Design Advertising Fax

278-2128 278-5815 278-3373 278-2702

The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Tuesday through Friday. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The mail subscription price is $45 per semester, $65 per year, payable to the Daily Titan, Humanities 211, CSUF, Fullerton, CA 92834.

ADHD • from

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has spent his last four years studying public relations at CSUF. His disability affected his school performance so much that he was on academic probation for three semesters. Kanal rebounded in the spring of 1997, however, with the help of prescribed medicine Dexedrine and made the Dean’s List with straight “As.” “College is hard for everyone but having ADHD makes it so much harder,” said Fletcher, Kanal’s counselor from Disabled Students Services. “Invisible disabilities like ADHD appear to be more of a barrier to success than for people with obvious disabilities because when people can’t see a problem, they expect you to act a certain way. They don’t understand why you can’t perform certain tasks.” Kanal’s disability has prohibited him from performing to his full ability at work. Co-worker Doug Borkman said, “Brad is easily distracted. It’s hard for him to stay on task many

times because he gets stressed out easily and hates being interrupted.” Kanal’s social relationships have also been damaged by his disability. “I know I can be annoying by the way I act with my idiosyncrasies,” he said. “Sometimes it can be difficult to get along with me because I talk about 20 different things at one time. But I talk so fast because I have so many things going on in my mind. What people need to remember is that deep down inside I have a heart.” Childhood friend Robert Masca defended Kanal throughout high school in Toronto from people who thought he was “crazy, wacko and missing a few screws.” “Brad is the type of guy who’s on drugs without taking drugs,” Masca said. “This guy does whatever comes to his head—crazy, daring things without even thinking about the consequences.” Including jumping from a second story classroom window when he needed a walk, as Kanal said he has done.

Disability specialists recommend individuals with ADHD take medication and learn coping skills and adaptive behaviors to live successfully with their disability. The most popular medicine used to improve concentration is Ritalin. Although classified as a stimulant, Ritalin has the opposite effect on hyperactive individuals as it calms them down. In the past five years, the use of Ritalin has more than doubled nationally. In 1997, 11.4 million Americans used the medication to help them function normally. However, a backlash against the “overprescribing” of the drug has occurred. Even the United Nations is concerned about Ritalin being passed out like candy. In a 1995 report, the U.N. International Narcotics Control Board noted a huge increase in the use of Ritalin in the United States, five times more than in the rest of the world. The report warned that if present trends continue, as many as 8 million American children could be taking Ritalin by the year 2000.

Ritalin is only one of the 15 medications Kanal has tested throughout the years. It was first prescribed for his hyperactivity at the age of 14. “Ritalin helped me get better grades but the side effects outweighed the grades,” he said. Kanal has experienced such side effects as paranoia, irritability, hallucinations, nausea, weight fluctuations, depression, excitability and insomnia from prescribed medications. “I would get major paranoid on Ritalin,” Kanal said. “I used to be scared that everyone would make fun of me or look at me in a strange way. It got so bad that I wanted to jump in front of buses.” Though he occasionally takes prescription medication to help him focus while studying, Kanal has shifted to alternative homeopathic remedies, which are greatly diluted doses of either herbs, minerals or botanical substances. “Homeopathy is a last resort for someone who hasn’t found improvement elsewhere. It allows you to live

see ADHD/ 


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John Koziel, an 81-year-old graduating art student, went through a lifetime before pursuing his love for painting. By NICK BRENNAN Daily Titan Staff Writer

When he brought home his first painting, he received a kiss from his wife. “I thought, ‘If this is what I get, why not continue painting,’” John Koziel said. Koziel is a student. An 81-yearold student who is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts this semester. Ever since he was a child Koziel liked to draw whatever he saw. “If I saw a cow I would draw it,” he said. Growing up in Poland, Koziel’s teacher told him to draw what he saw while looking into a kaleidoscope. “The only problem was the school was so poor, we did not have kaleidoscopes,” he said. “We had to use our imaginations.” To save paper, Koziel drew six different pictures on one page. The instructor showed Koziel’s drawing as an example of imagination and talent.

The six different drawings cluttered the page, he said. It would be years before he could continue his art. “My mother said art was a trade for beggars,” Koziel said laughing. “She told me to learn a trade.” Following his mother’s advice he became an apprentice in a machine shop, which led into a career in the Polish Air Force. “I started flying gliders but that did not last long,” he said. “I tried to show off and climbed as high as I could.” Koziel got too high and ended up crashing the glider. That was the end of his flying career for a while; he was discharged in 1938. Three days before World War II broke out, he was called back to duty because he was still in the reserves. During this stint in the armed forces, he was sent to a Romanian prison camp. While in camp, he received false papers and a false name so he could escape. Disguised as a student he set out across the field to escape.

JEFF CHONG/Daily Titan

John Koziel’s paintings include a portrait of himself in a traditional Polish costume. “There was a barbed-wire fence I had to cross,” Koziel recounted. “I knew I could crawl under the fence and then all I had to do was jump across a ditch.” He made it under the fence but

misjudged the ditch and jumped into it. The guard heard him. Shots were fired but Koziel was not injured. “I sat in that ditch freezing for over an hour until the guards changed,” he said. “I returned to the barracks and

that was the end of escaping for me.” Over the next few years Koziel made his way to France, joined the French Air Force and later evacuated to England. In 1940, he tried to go to England he started on one ship but ended up having to switch to another. Once again Koziel was a lucky man. The ship he was previously on was bombed later that night. In England, he joined the Air Force and taught pilots. Then, in 1948, he was able to join his father and brother in America. Once in Chicago luck shined on him again. He met his wife, who is also Polish. After six months of they were married. While in Chicago he worked for Tucker cars as an inspector. There he was not so lucky. Three days later he was laid off. In 1955 he and his wife moved to California and he worked for Boeing. Koziel retired in 1984 and once again took up painting after talking to a woman at his church. With her encouragement he took classes at Fullerton College and Cal State Fullerton. Now his home is filled with paintings. Self portraits, paintings of family members and landscapes fill his Placentia home. “I like painting portraits,” he said. “I paint pictures of my family to give to them so one day they will have something to remember me by.”

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with Rothman’s concurring recollection, informed the board that Yvonne Lara, as board chair, could vote no to cause a tie and kill an ammendment. After a tense minute of mulling over the decision, Lara voted against the amendment, thereby sentencing it to death with a tie. Then the board voted on the original proposal which passed 4-3-3. Some board members did not see the sponsorship as creating a precedent. “If we sponsor a sorority why shouldn’t we sponsor the AIDSWalk as well. I don’t think there’s any problem spending $500 dollars sponsoring the AIDSWalk,” said Paul Trieu, representative from the School of Natural Science and Mathematics. Charles Darke, Director of the Student Health Advisory Commitee, said 45 students voluteered for the event after only one day of signing people up on campus. Darke said he was pleased with the board’s decision. “This is the first time students have taken lead on sponsoring such an extremely worthwhile event,” Darke said.


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HUFFMAN • from

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Huffman has been through some tough times. In the early 1970s while working at UC Santa Barbara as a sergeant, he was about 100 yards from a Bank of America as students burned it down. “At that time, B of A represented the system,” Huffman said. “It was not just homeless and thugs who were involved in protesting. College students were getting in on it too.” Many people saw the system as bad and thought tearing it all down and starting all over was OK, Huffman said. During the same time, the Cambodian War and Vietnam War were erupting and the Chicago Seven had just protested the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. “It was really ugly,” he said. “You were automatically discriminated against as a whole for being a police officer. You lost your identity.”

May 20, 1998

WEDNESDAY

To help improve the image of police officers at the time, some departments traded in the traditional uniforms for blazers and ties. But Huffman never did. His belief: if you are in trouble and looking for police, you will look for a uniform, not someone in a blazer. Throughout his career, Huffman looked at his job as social work, not as arresting people. To him an arrest was the last resort. There were even days when he debated whether or not to go to work due to society’s turmoil. But he stuck to it. Huffman attributes his continuation in his career to getting his college degree, changes in society and believing he had more to offer. The chance for advancement and being able to make an impact on the organization he worked for also convinced him to stay. After working at UC Santa Barbara, Huffman transferred to UC Davis as a sergeant and worked there for a few years. Between working at UC Davis and coming to

CSUF, Huffman worked at UC San Diego and UC Santa Cruz. During his stint at CSUF, he has seen many changes within the department. When he arrived, the first thing he did was get rid of hats as part of the uniforms. “I hate hats,” Huffman said. “Baseball hats or any kind of hat. But now (officers) want them back. It goes in a circle I guess.” He also brought shorts to the uniform for officers. Other changes to Public Safety were the California Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (which helps officers check for stolen vehicles and missing and wanted persons, among other things) and police packaged cars. Previously the cars used were civilian cars retrofitted with police items. However, worrying about police cruisers and campus criminals will soon be a thing of the past. Now Huffman will spend warm winters

fishing in Mexico and traveling in the summer. Destinations will include the United States, Canada and Alaska. At this time he and his wife plan to move out of the state. However, they have no idea where they will settle down. He also hopes to spend one season in Australia or New Zealand. Besides fishing in Mexico, Huffman also enjoys fly fishing and real fishing throughout California in Mammoth Lakes, Lake Crowly, areas of Northern California and Bend, Ore. He does not have any plans as to what will happen during his retirement. That is still eight months away and things have not slowed down enough around the office for him to plan his retirement.

ADHD • from

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your normal life as you process emotional change,” said Kanal’s naturopathic doctor, Peter Sutherland. Sutherland began treating Kanal in September of 1997 with Lachesis, made from snake venom, to pacify his talkativeness, repetition, constant jumping from subject to subject and emotional intensity. “When I first met Brad he couldn’t even finish a sentence,” Sutherland said. “He would jump to the next thought, whatever came to his mind then. He would start a sentence and explain what he meant by the first half of the sentence, then he would go half-way through again and explain what he meant by that sentence.” Kanal also follows such intervention strategies as scheduling regular physical exercise, eliminating negative self statements, avoiding alcohol

and maintaining a sense of humor. “This guy has an amazing memory. He remembers things from 1979 that I don’t even remember,” Masca said, after recalling how Kanal can receite Masca’s high school locker combination. No matter what the challenge, Kanal refuses to let his disability serve as an excuse and lives by a John Wooden saying: “Never let what you can’t do affect what you can do.” Through it all, Kanal has kept everything in perspective. “Maybe I was born with this for a reason. Everyone has weaknesses and this is one of the them,” he said. But Kanal knows there is more to life than having ADHD. “Even though ADHD is a part of me,” Kanal said, “it doesn’t define me.”


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Behind the scenes of a student film Story & photos by Jeff Chong

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oll sound ... speed! Roll camera ... speed! Scene one, take one... action! With these words, students of the Cal State Fullerton advanced film production class are hard at work on one of their current productions, “Trixie, Don’t Go.” The film, starring Tara Buck and Jim Finnerty, is about Trixie, a young woman who is about to move in with her boyfriend, Edward. Her best friend, John, does not approve and tries many different things to dissuade her from moving in with him, including singing reworked Beatles songs. Throughout the film, there are numerous small scenes in which the characters reveal their thoughts to and about each other and Trixie’s situation. “Trixie, Don’t Go” was written and directed by S. Dylan Kirkland, a senior majoring in communications-TV/Film. “I sat down with a few characters in mind, friends of mine that I based the characters on, and I just kind of saw what happened,” he said. “Some of the things that happened

in that story are based on things that happened to me.” Each spring semester, the advanced film production class, taught by Bob Davis, produces about two short, 16-millimeter films, anywhere from 5 and 20 minutes in length. The films are completely written and produced by the students. “Anyone who wants to direct or write is given the opportunity to present a script at the beginning of the semester. Those are then pitched to the class and the class votes on

which projects they wish to produce,” Davis said. About ten scripts were pitched to this semester’s class. Kirkland’s script was one of two chosen for production. The other was “Black and White” by Kathi Kelly. The class then divided into two crews of about 10 people each, casting was done and each crew set to work filming for several long weekends. “We had a very grueling shooting schedule,” said Kirkland. “At one point we shot for 36 hours straight. There were very, very unpleasant conditions and the crew still worked hard.” Many of the scenes had to be re-shot because of a faulty camera lens, but eventually the shooting was finished. “In the end, I was very happy with the production crew,” he said. The film is now in the editing stage, which is done completely on computer instead of the old cut-and-splice method. Kirkland expects the film to be completed sometime during the summer and ready for viewing shortly after. “I’m hoping that something can be arranged next fall with AS Productions, and then we can have a viewing of some Titan shorts in their theater,” Kirkland said.

Above: Gavin Wynn checks the position of a shot. Far left: Jeff Wright synchronizes the sound to a videotape copy of the film transferred to a computer disk on a Media 100 computerized film editor. This system generates a list of cuts that correspond to numbers on the film, which the film processor will later print from. This is the first time the film department has edited a film electronically. Left: Jeff Wright and Ryan Taverney adjust sound levels. A small Walkman-sized digital recorder has replaced the huge Nagra reel-to-reels previously used in film production.


Sports

Wednesday, May 20, 1998

NCAA Division-I baseball regional pairings Atlantic I (May 21-24) at Coral Gables Fla.

Midwest (May 21-24) at Wichita, Kansas

Atlantic II (May 21-24) at Tallahassee, Florida

South I (May 21-24) at Gainesville, Florida

1 Miami (Fla) (46-9) vs. 6 Bowling Green (34-19) 2 South Carolina (42-16) vs. 5 Florida International (40-22) 3 North Carolina (39-21) vs. 4 Texas Tech (43-18) 1 Florida State (49-18) vs. 6 Liberty (32-27) 2 Auburn (43-16) vs. 5 Rutgers (32-14) 3 Delaware (43-8) vs. 4 Oklahoma (40-18)

Central (May 21-24) at College Station, Texas 1 Rice (45-15) vs. 6 Oral Roberts (44-18) 2 Texas A&M vs. 5 N.C. Charlotte (43-17) 3 Washington (39-15) vs. 4 Mississippi State (37-20)

East (May 21-24) at Clemson, South Carolina

1 Southern Cal (40-15) vs. 6 Fordham (27-18) 2 Clemson (42-14) vs. 5 The Citadel (36-22) 3 Va. Commonwealth (44-13) vs. 4 South Alabama (39-17)

BRIAN DIERIEX/Daily Titan

The Titans begin the NCAA Regional Playoffs May 21 at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. No. 2 seed Cal State Fullerton plays No. 5 seed Harvard.

1 Wichita State (55-5) vs. 6 SE Missouri State (32-22) 2 Georgia Tech (38-20) vs. 5 Oklahoma State (38-19) 3 Arizona State (34-21) vs. 4 Arkansas (37-19) 1 Florida(42-15) vs. 6 Monmouth (N.J.) (30-19) 2 Wake Forest (42-21) vs. 5 Illinois (39-19) 3 Baylor (40-18-1) vs. 4 Richmond (40-15-1)

South II (May 21-24) at Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1 LSU (42-17) vs. 6 Nicholls St. (28-32) 2 Cal State Fullerton (44-15) vs 5 Harvard (34-10) 3 Tulane (47-13) vs. 4 Southwestern La. (39-20)

West (May 21-24) at Stanford, California

1 Stanford (41-12-1) vs. 6 Loyola Marymount (33-21-1) 2 Alabama 943-16) vs. 5 Minnesota (45-13) 3 Long Beach State (37-20-1) vs. 4 North Carolina State (39-21)


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Perspectives

Wednesday, May 20, 1998

~ PARA LOS NINOS ILSA VISITS DEVOTES SOME TIME TO  NEEDY ORPHANS IN ENSENADA • STORY AND PHOTOS BY FRANK DIAZ •

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er name is Dulce. It means “sweet” or “candy” in Spanish. Dwarfed by the 15-foot high swing overhead, she huddles quietly on the seat, barely moving amidst the frenzied play around her. Using one of the few English words she knows, she softly murmurs, “Push? Push?” Failing to get a response, she struggles out of the sling and walks off. “She really wasn’t talking when I first approached her,” says CSUF student Rosanna Valenzuela. “She was standing by herself. So I just approached her and I asked her if she wanted to come for a walk with me. So we started walking. “I braided her hair, read her a story in Spanish, played basketball. I walked around holding her hand, pushed her on the swing and played tag with a little boy.” Valenzuela smiles, “What’s nice is that we’ve been watching the kids grow up and they’ve been watching us and they remember us.” The scene is a rural orphanage near Ensenada. The grounds are hard packed dirt and concrete. This is the sixth year the Independent Latino Student Association has visited the orphanage, played with the children and taken donations. Previously, another Ensenada orphanage at Christmas time. Last year, two members got separated from the caravan and accidentally discovered El Sauzal. Since then, they’ve added a second yearly trip and now come here in late Spring. Two small boys scamper down the dusty slopes to the waiting cars, glistening eyes shielded from the harsh sunlight by mahogany faces. Stopping mere inches from the arriving visitors, they tremble like anxious little puppies; innate shyness combatting their curiosity. Josue, the smaller, hides behind Oscar. Oscar beams. Josue looks at his feet. Both are six years old. The young people continue getting out of their cars, milling without purpose. After 150 cramped and dusty miles

they’re not quite sure what they should do. For some, it’s their first time here. Finally, a faceless voice from the edge calls out, “Let’s start taking this stuff up. It goes in the back, by the kitchen.” Finding guidance, the crowd of Cal State Fullerton students start unloading food, clothes and toys. A Safari line, bent under sacks of donations, winds its way up the sun baked slope to the main building. On the periphery, quiet but impatient children wait for the adults to finish, eager for the play to follow. Chores done, club members form impromptu groups with children. Younger kids point to the swings, asking to be pushed. Older ones swarm visitors, asking questions about life in the states. A reed thin boy struts down the hill, a soccer ball clutched protectively under his arm like a prized trophy. Beaming, he triumphantly delivers the prize to a waiting group. Within minutes, the quiet concrete pad becomes a swirl of activity with competing soccer and basketball games. At one end, club members mix with kids - the local cheering club. To the side, away from the frenzy, tiny feet kick out fifteen feet over the air, owners laughing and cheering as visitors push them higher and higher on the swings. Jerry Correa, leader of the group that left Fullerton Friday night explains why he originally started visiting the orphanage. “It seemed like something interesting to do,” Correa says. “They don’t have a lot of the stuff we have because they don’t have any parents. They don’t get to see much of the outside world and interact.” What Correa thought would be interesting proved invigorating instead. “I was mostly playing soccer with the kids,” Correa says. “I was talking to a couple of little boys. They asked me about sports; basketball, baseball, soccer. They asked me for pointers on shooting. A little boy asked how he could do it better so I showed him. I was playing for a good three

“They come here out of need. Children who aren’t needy don’t come here.”

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hours.” “They wore me out,” Correa admits. On the hilltop by the main buildings overlooking the playing fields sits a large man in a baseball cap. Like the ultimate umpire overseeing all the games at once, he keeps a watchful eye on the activity below. In dark, dusty pants, short sleeves and shoes scuffed by wear, he doesn’t seem very businesslike. The children call him “papa.” He and his wife founded the orphanage over 30 years ago. Ramon Espinoza smiles tightly when speaking about El Sauzal’s past. When he grins, teeth darkened by years of tobacco chewing match the leathery lines of his face. That harsh visage softens when he talks about the hundreds of kids he’s “fathered.” Once homeless babies, some have grown to attend the university, sent there by Espinoza and his wife. “We started with very little. Just a space for a chapel and one room, an area about 30 feet by 20 feet,” he says, about El Sauzal’s beginnings in 1964. “We had 26 kids in one room. It was the living

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area, the sleeping area and the kitchen. My family and I had to work to help out. because we didn’t know very many people that could help us. We looked for a way to do it.” At its start, the orphanage was a few miles south of Ensenada, on property the Espinoza’s rented in the town of El Sauzal. After the first five years, the property was sold and the Espinozas resettled near the village of San Antonio de Las Minas, a few miles northeast of Ensenada. They’ve been there ever since. From humble beginnings at the new site — it originally consisted of only two buildings funded by the Espinozas’ delivering bricks and water to the local residents — it has grown to several structures and is licensed by the state for 50 children. Its monthly budget exceeds $6,000. Over the years El Sauzal has managed to thrive only by becoming the beneficiary of American patrons ranging from organized church and civic groups to concerned teenagers and even individual children, donating materials, time and effort on the children’s behalf. “There are two dormitories,” Espinoza says, “for girls under 10 and for girls over

11. They’re on the second floor. The same for the boys. They’re separated by the same age.” The facility has slowly grown over the years, Espinoza says. “We have a dental clinic, an infirmary and an office for the doctor. We have some medicines, the most indispensable.” He adds that the doctor only comes once a month. “Besides orphaned kids, we have kids who were abandoned by their parents,” Espinoza says. But Espinoza ‘s voice grows somber as he adds that more than just orphans arrive at El Sauzal. “We have abused kids. We have some kids who are very ill and no one can help them.” Espinoza looks at the children playing below, squinting, brows furrowed. “They come here out of need. Children who aren’t needy don’t come here.” El Sauzal doesn’t confine its activities to just needy children who come to stay. They also help neighborhood children with food, clothing, medicines and even tuition for school. “We have a family of five whose mother committed suicide and their father’s an alcoholic,” Espinoza murmurs. “We try

to help them. We try to give them what they need.” Below, the children continue playing with the visitors. Enthralled in the games, they forget their “need” for the moment. A soccer ball careens from one end of the field to the other. Children yell, scream, and exuberantly dash between the legs of young men and women three times their size, in chase of the elusive ball A young boy, Raul, crouches while waiting for the ball to come downfield. His dark, slender face mimics the intensity of a jaguar eyeing its prey. His only purpose in life to pounce on the ball when it comes near. Near the tumultuous activity, a quieter scene takes place. Dulce, engulfed in a hot pink sweater despite the heat, lies cradled in Valenzuela’s lap. Tiny and petite, like a sleeping kitten, she almost purrs. Valenzuela’s voice becomes soft when she talks about meeting Dulce. “I really don’t know her past or where she came from. I just wanted to include her,” she says. “That’s why we come down here. If she’s just going to remember the one day that someone came down and played with her that’s what it’s all about.”

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