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T H U R S D AY

VOLUME 66, ISSUE 24

MAR. 26, 1998

Labels paint a picture but not a heritage By DEBORAH REGIUS Daily Titan Staff Writer

Understanding someone’s background is the key to eliminating cultural ignorance. Chicano Studies intends to ensure non-prejudice attitudes through educating students about cultural labels. Isaac Cardenas and Dagoberto Fuentes from the Chicano Studies Department, opened a discussion about “Labels” with the students of Independent Latino Student Association. The association was created as a sup-

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DIVERSITY: Professors remove the face of labels by developing an understanding of cultural backgrounds.

port system for Latinos on campus. This foundation has built a home away from home. Yesterday they gathered to talk about the labels that confront each one of their lives. The diverse sub-culture has formulated various labels to separate each other’s ethnic descent. “As long as you know where you come from and know what your heritage means, a label should be irrelevant,” Cardenas said to students. “Labels” is an issue of identity of the history and culture of a person’s heritage,

Cardenas said. It is a contemporary issue and depends on how Latinos respond to it. In 1929 an organization known as the League of United Latin American Citizens was established. In 1960, LULAC raised the question of what they should call themselves. LULAC’s purpose is to help people gain U.S. citizenship and to teach kids English, with the adjustments in schools, Fuentes said. The term Chicano emerged in the 1960s, immediately arousing debate and

reaction from people. This period introduced people to a “strong sense of security and identity,” Fuentes said “Some people don’t want to identify with their roots,” Fuentes said. For instance, if a person from Mexico with a decent of Indian and Spanish don’t want to identify with the lower economic status of Mexico, he said. The term Chicano was traced back to the founding of Mexico. Chicano can hold two different meanings: people of Mexican descent born in America and a

political term in favor of changing social movements. When asked what exactly the proper term aside from Hispanic, Chicano, and Latino was, Cardenas responded, “The proper term is whatever you want to call yourself and how you feel about yourself. “ “As long as you know what it means to be the heritage you are and where you come from that matters. “The proliferation of terms used embraces a certain function and were

bers have complained that rewards by merit is not a problem but the requirements are not clear and objective enough. By JOAN HANSEN Daily Titan Staff Writer

RON SOLIMAN/Daily Titan

Heady potatoes promote good teaching • By Joe Florkowski • n graduate school, Kevin Colaner swore that he would never take a job where he could not display Mr. Potato Head on his desk. Fortunately for him, as assistant Dean for Student Affairs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department, he can display the over 50 Mr. Potato Head toys and merchandise that he has collected over the years. Colaner’s fascination with Mr. Potato Head mirrors America’s own recent rediscovery of the popular children’s toy. After tasty vegetable’s role in “Toy Story”, Mr. Potato Head re-emerged on the national scene, allowing today’s children an opportu-

nity to play with a toy their parents might have once owned. Hasbro, the toy company giant that produces Mr. Potato Head, made a special edition just for the movie. Mr. Potato Head continued to stay in the spotlight last year when Burger King used the toy’s national appeal to launch their new french fries partly by using Mr. Potato Head as a prize in their kid’s meals. Mr. Potato Head’s role as a national spoke spud for Burger King is not his first public relations role. In 1987, the toy was used in an American Cancer Society campaign, which necessitated Hasbro to get rid of the pipe that was included with Mr. Potato Head.

Mr. Potato Head was created by George Lerner, a New York designer. Hasbro bought the rights from Lerner to Mr. Potato Head in 1952. In 1953, Mrs. Potato Head was created to give Mr. Potato Head a female companion. The original Mr. Potato Head was made up of only 20 plastic pieces, and did not have a body, as it does now. In fact, children had to supply their own potato, or if they wanted, substitute some other fruit or vegetable in place of the potato. It was in 1964 when Mr. Potato Head got the plastic body that he is known for now. Colaner recently obtained three of the Mr. Potato Head see POTATO/ 

CSU faculty members continue to fight for what they deem a fair contract regarding pay and working conditions. But so far union negotiators for California Faculty Association and the CSU Chancellors Office are miles apart on several issues, including professors workload, merit, pay and salaries. Some professors remain skeptical as to what changes CSU would make in mandatory faculty workload. Currently professors are required to teach 12 units along with three units of committee or service work per semester. Local CFA president G. Nanjundappa said CSU would rather regulate the number of students professors teach, not the number of units they teach. “CSU wants to play the numbers game without regard for the quality of education for our students,” said Nanjundappa. “Faculty want to better balance the number of students for education quality.” He said this issue is important considering that the California Education Technology Initiative, if adopted, will change student and teacher ratio. “Mass-produced learning hinders student preparation for careers,” Nanjundappa said. “Technology that minimizes interaction between professor and student reduces the quality of education.” Another issue gone unsettled regards the salary difference between CSU and other equivalent universities. Management Science professor Barry Pasternack said his department lost a qualified applicant to University of Florida when that university reportedly offered him $10,000 more per year than CSUF. “I believe our salaries are the biggest

Women discuss different ways to heal their souls n HEALING: A self-help work-

shop at the Women’s Center focuses on how to help people balance their lives both emotionally and physically. By LAURIE SCHULTZ Daily Titan Staff Writer

An old American Indian proverb says, “Our body is like a house, which is made up of rooms. For our well-being, we must walk through each room every day.” Sherry Bene Stevens used the saying as a metaphor in a self-help workshop held Tuesday at the Women’s Center. Entitled “Creating a Healing Attitude,” the seminar focused on drawing from “four corners” of

the human mind to develop a healthy and positive demeanor. Stevens specializes in marriage, child, and family counseling, and works at the counseling and psychological center. She used a triangle to represent the four areas she described as the areas people need to balance in their lives. The foundation of people’s lives encompasses the spiritual, making it the base of the triangle. On each side of the triangle were the physical and emotional elements of peoples’ lives. The mental portion of people’s lives made up the triangle’s apex. She asked the six women attending the workshop to draw a circle with lines coming from it. For each line, she asked the women to think of a role they played in their life and decided which category of their lives this role would fit. For example, the role of a student

would most likely fit into the mental aspect of a person’s life, she said. She helped the women to think of ways they could adjust their time so that they could be using each “portion” of their life equally. This was one of the many self-help tools she suggested the women use to achieve healthier, more harmonious lifestyles. These tools have helped her rise above difficulties in her own life “In the last two years, in my immediate family, there have been two deaths, one birth, one major heart surgery and I’ve even had surgery myself. I’m not the only person that has had many things happen to in this period of time. This is life. “ Stevens said. She also recommended a process called visualization to the women. “Instead of saying ‘I never have enough money,’ see yourself in the things you want. Copyright ©1998, Daily Titan

see DIVERSITY/ 

Faculty voices dissatisfaction n MERIT: Faculty mem-

Various incarnations of Mr. Potato Head take center stage on spud collector Kevin Colaner's desk in Mc Carthy Hall.

needed to understand the complexity,” Cardenas said According to an article “Stuck on Labels” Leo Estrada contends that the proliferation of terms used to describe ethnicity must be equally functional. “Some terms are more applicable to a particular situation or audience than others,” Estrada said. “I wouldn’t be worried about being offended because I know my roots,” Cardenas added, when asked what label would offend him.

I’ve already pictured myself in an Infinity,” she said. She advised others to keep a “gratitude journal.” She keeps her journal by her pillow as an incentive to write three positive aspects of her day every night before she sleeps. “It might be that the traffic wasn’t so bad on the 5 freeway or that I saw a beautiful flower today. It can be small things. This reminds us that things aren’t so bad and we are creating our own attitude.” Repitition of positive messages was another tool, she said. “Instead of saying to yourself ‘I wish I could lose 5 pounds,’ say to yourself ‘My body is healthy, I give my body only healthy food and I take care of my body. ‘Your head can’t tell fact from reality. It believes what it is told.” She demonstrated how a drum, used often

see HEALING/ 

Sherry Stevens shows how the vibrational therapy drum can help relax the body during the Healing seminar held at the University Hall. DORATI KHAN /Daily Titan

concern,” said Pasternack. “At 7.4 percent below comparable institutions, my department especially, has a hard time recruiting faculty.” CSU has said they would like to close that gap within two years. Another bargaining issue relates to the faculty retirement program which allows retired professors to teach part-time for eight years after retirement. CSU would reduce that time to two years although the union states that the program saves CSU money and students benefit from professors’ years of experience. The merit pay program, a thorn in the side of the union, would be expanded by CSU while the union would like to end it altogether. Faculty have complained that rewards by merit is not a problem but the requirements are not clear and objective enough. “Personally I have nothing against merit pay but if the goal is to increase productivity it does not accomplish this, it creates descent,” said Pasternack, the criteria and goals should be clearer. Governor Wilson’s adamant support of merit pay led one professor to suggest looking at an alternative rather than eliminating the program. But Nanjundappa told the faculty that a merit program already exists. “Professors are hired on merit, they receive tenure on merit and promotions on merit, it does not need expansion,” Nanjundappa said. Terry Jones, CFA statewide president, said that serious bargaining has only begun but stands behind Cal State Fullerton’s faculty concerns. He said CFA is adamantly opposed to the senior faculty part-time program being reduced from seven to five years because they valuably serve the university. Jones added that if CSU does not close the salary gap, quality of education will suffer since faculty will go elsewhere for higher salaries. “In some communities professors cannot afford to live in neighborhoods where they work and commute long distances to the university,” Jones said. “They look for

see WORKLOAD/ 


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A GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING

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Department of Music

‘Love Songs from a Tenor’ with Mark J. Goodrich, a singer in faculty recital, which will be presented April 17 at 8 p.m. in the Recital Hall. The recital will include a sequence of songs on love by Goodrich. Goodrich joined the music faculty in 1992, but before his arrival he had performed numerous operatic roles including Fenton in ‘Falstaff.’ He has worked with opera director Cynthia Auerbach and performed at the Aspen Music Festival as a soloist. Tickets are available at the Performing Arts Center box office for $8; $5 with Titan Discount. For more information call 278-3371.

The Idea Made Physical An exploration of materials in today’s art display will be in the Main Art Gallery, Visual Arts Complex from April 13 through May 13. The works will comprise of a variety of traditional and non-traditional materials such as light, water, air and paint. The exhibition will include the works of five artists in which they each explore the potential of the materials they used. The artists of the works include Ginny Bishton, Carl Cheng, Thomas Emde (Germany), Marilla Palmer (New York) and Ross Rudel. Admission is free but a donation of $3 is suggested. For more information contact Marilyn Moore, Main Art Gallery at 278-7750 or Elizabeth Champion, School of Arts at 278-2434.

Communications Week ‘98 The 20th Anniversary of Com-

munications Week, a week of events including speakers and activities dedicated to furthering the professionalism and network of communications students on campus. The events will have professionalists from the industry speaking on all different aspects of communications including advertising, public relations, journalism, TV-Film, photocommunications, speech disorders, and speech communications. Communications Week will take place April 27-May 1. Admission is free and word has it some professors are giving students extra credit for those who attend sessions. Potential speakers may include Oliver Stone; James Cameron, “Titanic” director; Vicki Vargas, NBC; Michelle Gomez-Ruiz, KTLA; Joseph Correl, political advocate; and many other professionals. The communications office will update the status of the speakers as they are booked. For more information call Lori A. Walker-Guyer, Assistant Dean of Communications at 278-7083.

Revival of Graphic Design Club Yes, the Graphic Design Club is back in creative business. On the first and third Wednesday of each month a formal meeting will be held. On the second and fourth Wednesday of each month an informal meeting will be open to hang out and do lunch together. The club will provide networking, real world applications, ways of improving the Graphic Design Department as a whole and eventually start a student business. The club is free now but future costs for speakers and trips may arise. The meetings will be on Wednesdays at noon in the

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Nathan Orme Joe Chirco Jeff Tracy Stephen Rubin Denise Carson Annette Wells Dena Fargo Keith Mason Erin Whiteside Kerry Murray Gina Alexander Erick Wong Ron Soliman Brian Dieriex Steve Muise Lori Anderson Sheryl Tebelin Maryanne Wardlaw Barbara Chen Veronica Duran Heather Leonard Rachel Ng Jeffrey Brody Editor 5813 News Sports/Photo

278278-5814 278-2991

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The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Tuesday through Friday. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The mail subscription price is $45 per semester, $65 per year, payable to the Daily Titan, Humanities 211, CSUF, Fullerton, CA 92834.

March 26, 1998

THURSDAY

CALENDAR  OF  EVENTS Department of Music’s Wind Ensamble will hold a concert Friday at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre. Tickets are on sale at the Performing Arts Center box office for $8; $5 with Titan Discount (student, senior or CSUF ID). For more information contact Elizabeth Champion, School of Arts at 278-2434. “Does Jesus Change Lives?” a lecture and music from the band Revelation will be held in Titan Student Union

Pavilion C today at 7 p.m. There will be free pizza for those in attendence. TV taping of “Kings of Queens,” will be held on Friday at 5 p.m. Carpool to the event will meet in front of Titan Student Union Pavillion. Contact Leticia Robles at 5902260. “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” will be presented at the Curtis Theatre located at

the Brea Civic & Cultural Center Saturday through April 5. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for children 12 & under and may be purchased by phone, mail, fax or in person. For ticket reservations or for more information call 990-7722. Giant Used Book Sale will be sponsored by the Fullerton Public Library on Friday, April 3 from 1-4 p.m.; Saturday, April 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, April 5 from 1 to 4 p.m.

The three day event will be held at the Fullerton Library. For more information contact Abbie Macy, at 529-3559. Eating Disorders, a confidential discussion group meeting at 5 p.m. every Monday in Langsdorf Hall room 208, for the university community. Group provides support for the difficult and challenging recovery of anorexia and bulimia.For more information call 278-3040 or 278-3928.

Interpreting mixed messages have heard silence is golden, but not for me, it means death of the advice columnist. Boy oh boy you guys are tough. What do I have to do to get a response from everyone out there. I was thinking it is not very fair of me to ask for you to trust in me without telling you a little about myself. I want you to know I don’t give advice from my experience alone, but have various sources to pull from. So let me tell you about myself. You already know my name. I am in my 20s, like most of the students at Cal State Fullerton. I am married and have a son. I worked full-time for six years out of high school and I have been a full-time college student for two years. I am a double major in sociology and political science. I will eventually teach and counsel. I love work-

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kits from the ‘50s, which he feels makes him a “real” collector now. Colaner’s office is littered with Mr. Potato Head merchandise. T-shirts, watches, and Burger King toys line Colaner’s walls and shelves. Colaner’s collection began with a single Mr. Potato Head that he carried around with him throughout his career. Colaner’s collection began to expand shortly after he started at Cal State Fullerton three years ago.

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better working conditions elsewhere.” Other issues gone unsettled include benefits for domestic partners, increasing maternity leave time off and creating,

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Latino is a good word to use. It’s an umbrella term more appropriate for a mixed audience, Cardenas said. “How to refer to an individual is knowing your audience,” Cardenas said.

ing with people (i.e. my job or school). Any advice I have will not be mine alone, but a collective collaboration of my ideas and the ideas of some of my professors. If I do not agree with one of them, I will let you decide which advice to follow by listing both of the opinions. What I found interesting was the people who remembered my e-mail address from memory long after having read the paper at school. For those people, “Yes you did remember my e-mail address correctly”. Now it is time for those same people along with the rest of the campus to start writing for advice. Let us begin with my first letter.

and he loves me. We talk about marriage some, but he always cuts the discussion off after saying you are the only one I can imagine myself being with. So why would he just stop talking about marriage? What should I do? Confused.

Dear Rebecca, I have been dating my current boyfriend for about nine months. I am 23 and he is 29. I love him very much

Dear Confused, I talked to many married people of all ages to see what they would say. The answer that seems to best fit the question is, if a partner tells you that you are the one , you can only trust that statement, but how do you feel? Does this sudden change make you feel uncomfortable. If you really love him and believe in him I say wait for him. But please be aware that I base my answer on an openly communicative relationship. If you do not

“I was in an antique store in Orange when I saw two from the 70s and I knew I should buy those,” Colaner said. From there, his collection grew to include such items as: a Mr. Potato Head magnet set; a Mr. Potato Head made in Mexico, which has pieces that are not removable; and a Mr. Potato Head lawn sprinkler. Colaner admitted that he may use his collection to bring students into his office and advise them about resources available to them. “I use it as a way to let students know that I have the largest Mr. Potato Head collection, definitely on campus, maybe the world, maybe the Western

United States, so they should come in and see it. A lot of students will come in under the auspices of just wanting to see it, and while they’re here, maybe they’ll eventually have a question about a resource or who should they contact regarding something,” Colaner said. Mr. Potato Head has yet to emerge as a cult hit, such as “Star Trek” or “The X-Files”, but there are a few devoted fans who have dedicated web pages to their favorite vegetable. Colaner does not know anyone who collects Mr. Potato Head or any clubs, but he believes they are out there. “When I go into antique shops, I

and administrative position for department chairs, which would eliminate their protection under union contracts. The union strongly opposes this rolechange for department chairs. Jones said negotiations will continue next week. Calls to the chancellor's were not immediately returned. “I chose Chicano to signify pride and heritage, a movement to make social and political change. My interest lies in bringing more Latinos to Cal State Fullerton.” He added, “My mission is to include the community in mainstream of our society, for social and political change. My only concern is terms to divide ourselves against it.”

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by the Veterans Administration, could relieve tension by its vibrations. She blew bubbles and said how this helped her cope after her surgery. “You may think this is for children. This is standard equipment at my house,” she said. Stevens also said laughing was another therapeutic tool, adding that merely feeling the movement of muscles while laughing could ease tension in a person. She also said physical exercise and massage were other tools.

Ask and I’ll Tell

Rebecca Sulages

have a good communication line open get some kind of help (i.e. pre-marital counseling). The couples that have been married over 25 years tell me that if there is no communication, there is no relationship. Everyone have a great spring break and be safe. Please drop off your questions at Humanities 213 or e-mail me at BECADEVIL@aol.com. always put my name on a list to have them call me. There are people, but I don’t know them personally. I’d love to meet them and find out what they have,” Colaner said. Colaner said he doubts there is much more Head merchandise for him to go after. “Well, now that I have these old ones, I’m pretty happy. I feel that it moved me from a guy who has a bunch of toys to an official collector,” said Colaner, “A couple of people on campus have encouraged me to enter this in competition in the Orange County fair.” Elaine Rosas, a senior who participated in the workshop, said she concentrates on the spiritual, emotional, and mental portions of her life and neglects the physical aspect. ”I can’t accomplish as much,” she said, “I lack energy and feel drained.” Rosas added that she already employs listening to music, one of the many different tools recommended by Bene. An international business major at the workshop said she would like to be more spiritual and read the Bible more. She said exercise, also suggested by Bene, helps her as well. “It helps me emotionally. It clears my head of all the garbage,” she said.


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Sports

Thursday, March 26, 1998

Coaches fill gaps with signings n RECRUITS: Murchison

and Mistri are both optimistic about new recruits who recently signed to be Titans for the fall. By ERIN WHITESIDE

Daily Titan Sports Editor The athletic department may not be getting its fitness center, but coaches and teams are still looking toward the future. Three fall sports announced signings for the next year in volleyball and men’s and women’s soccer. Head Volleyball Coach Mary Ellen Murchison filled her setting gap after freshman Carolyn Kittell transferred to the University of Oklahoma after the season, when she signed Krista Charles, a 5’8” setter from Utah Valley College. “We already know that she is a terrific

setter,” Murchison said of Charles. “She is a very good athlete, she has mental toughness and is a team player. The most important thing if you are going to have success, is that whoever leads the offense must be a team player.” The Titans also filled their need for outside hitting by signing four players from that position in Alisa Geddes (San Pasqual), Oge Fitz (Oakgrove), Linda McCullagh (Santa Margarita) and Megan Sabo (Mater Dei). The other player signed was Yvette Ornelaz, a defensive specialist from Highland. Men and women’s soccer head coach Al Mistri said he was also very pleased with his recruiting class. He announced the signing of five players on the men’s side. Mistri expects two of those five, Ray Ramirez (defender, Don Lugo) and Rigo Pardo (midfielder, Etiwanda) to make immediate impacts.

“Ray Ramirez will help fill an important gap in our defense,” Mistri said. Mistri will also get the opportunity to coach the son of one of his former players at Damien High School in Jose Dumond. Dumond’s father also played for Cal Stae Fullerton in the early 1970s. For the women, Mistri said he was excited about the signing of goalkeeper Tiana Webb from St. Lucy’s in Glendora. Goalkeeping was a sore spot for the Titans last year, and Mistri said he thinks Webb can alleviate some of that pressure. “She is a physically good athlete and I think (Goalkeeper Coach Bob Ammann) will coach her into shape. We needed someone, and we got it in her.” The Titans also snagged two other freshman in Jen Mercurio, a defender from Edison, and Valentino McKaffey a striker from Diamond Bar.

Plain and simple. When I heard the overwhelming results for the fitness center referendum vote, where the no vote annihilated the yes’s, I saw a vision of this school. And what flashed in front of my eyes was not that of a forward-looking four-year institution, but that of a run down, old, dusty-looking ghost town. When the fitness center proposal was shot down, this school suffered in a world of hurt, losing more than just a quality building on campus. While students gained absolutely nothing, Cal State Fullerton took a giant step backward. In essence, no one, not the students, faculty, alumni or even this school gained a darn thing. Instead, the school will start losing,

and it starts with what kind of student’s, faculty, even grants and money that we can attract to this school. What kind of quality professor’s and students in the future are ever going to want to be part of a school that does not even take pride in itself? What quality individual would want to be a part of this University when he or she can be part of the progressive UC Irvine or Long Beach State right down the road? By not passing the fitness center referendum, this University has condemned itself to living in the realm of second-best compared to everyone else. And it’s not just the apathetic student population that is to blame. It’s Associated Students, for not taking the time to

BRIAN DIERIEX/Daily Titan

Titan Head Volleyball Coach Mary Ellen Murchison signed five new recruits, including a new setter.

Things must change before CSUF withers away Erin Whiteside hen I woke up this morning, I choose something dark to wear to school. Maybe I needed a black armband instead. That would have been the only true way to appropriately mourn for a school, where students who attend seem more than happy to let it just wither away, falling farther and farther behind its competition where it will eventually die.

appropriately draft together a proposal that would appeal to the student population. As much as I would have absolutely loved this proposal to pass, I am not completely blinded by passion that I missed the problems with the issue. Three hundred dollars per year is a lot to ask of the average student, although I will still maintain that the benefits far outweigh the costs. I still believe in leaving things better off when you leave than how they were when you came. People before us paid for the Student Union, however, today’s students, thankless for that, returned the favor by leaving nothing to our future, with the exception of a new sign or coffee shop here or there.

And then, as a basketball player myself, I shake my head in disgust. The quality people in the athletic department and recreation offices deserve better. Instead, apparently we didn’t care enough, because enough people did not vote. I don’t know if athletics had enough yes votes to overtake the two thousand negative people, but we could have tried. As one gymnast told me perfectly, how else will we get the things we want of we don’t do anything about it? I still maintain that the fitness center and other new, renovated state of the art buildings are vital to the survival and improvement of this school. I can only hope that AS will draft a new plan, and that students will take on the honor and sense of pride in making

this a better place by our actions. People say they will never come back here after they graduate. But not me. I’ll come back, perhaps for alumni games, perhaps as a guest speaker in one of my journalism classes. I want to be proud to tell people where I attended school. I don’t want to say I went to Fullerton, the old run down ghost school.


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March 26, 1998

THURSDAY

R o a d s

ive years ago, Chris Dade and Chris St. Clair started a journey together. They became roommates, teammates, friends and evolved into two of the Titans’ most recognizable basketball players. But their journey together has come to an end and the two Titans will now part their separate ways. “They’ve been mainstays of the program for the past four years,” Titan Head Coach Bob Hawking said. “They are positive guys who lead by example.” Sophomore Ike Harmon said Dade has been the leading scorer for the Titans, while St. Clair has been the motor of the team, but both have been extremely worthy leaders. “They have had to be better than everybody else every day,” Harmon said. Five years ago, the two Titans began their journey at Cal State Fullerton, each one facing his own struggles, celebrating his own triumphs and evolving into his own leader...

s his senior year came to a close, St. Clair found himself with a handful of choices on where to continue his basketball career in the college ranks. Boise State, UC Irvine, San Diego State and Cal Poly Pomona all showed an interest in the Sonora stand-out that led his team to a league championship. “At first Fullerton wasn’t too interested,” St. Clair said. “I had an offer from Irvine on the table and actually thought I was going to go there.”

But St. Clair opted for CSUF because he knew the staff through a family friend and thought it would be a good place to play. St. Clair played in all but one game his freshman season as a Titan, averaging about 15 to 20 minutes of play per game. As time elapsed, he saw more playing time and became the Titans’ No. 2 scorer, averaging 10 points per game. St. Clair redshirted the following year after suffering a serious knee injury, which required reconstructive surgery to replace a torn anterior cruciate ligament. “It really didn’t bother me too much redshirting because then I could finish with Devaughn (Wright) and Dade,” St. Clair said. After his knee surgery, St. Clair came back and hit his stride. As a junior, he played in all 27 games and started the last 22 of them. Hawking said St. Clair’s three-point shooting improved that year, but he will always remember his performance against the UC Santa Barbara Guachos. Within two minutes of the start, St. Clair took an elbow to the nose that sent him off the court with blood pouring everywhere. “Many guys would not re-enter at that point,” Hawking said. “But he went back in and ended the evening with 23 points and went six for nine from the three-point line.” Hawking added that St. Clair has been a dedicated player and an easy guy to coach.

“He’s a quiet guy, but he leads by example,” Hawking said. “He’s been responsible for running our team.” St. Clair finished his season with a career total of 185 threepointers which places him second all-time amongst Titan three-point shooters. y the sixth grade, Dade was already known as “the little Dennis Rodman” on the playground court. Although he spent most of his youth on the baseball fields, Dade found his calling on the basketball court. Dade split time playing at both the point and shooting guard positions at El Camino High School, but earned the Avocado League’s Most Valuable Player and CIF Player of the Year as an off guard. Dade’s athleticism and 58 percent shooting performance from the floor led El Camino to the San Diego CIF Division II Championship and earned him recognition to colleges throughout the country. Princeton, Cornell, San Jose State and the University of Washington all showed interest in Dade, but the talented athlete enjoyed the personnel at CSUF and opted to sign as a Titan on his father’s advice. Dade redshirted his freshman year to recover from a wrist injury suffered during high school, but stepped in during his sophomore year to appear in all 27 games. “More than anything, we’ve given him the major responsibility of marking the opposing teams’ most outstanding perimeter shooter,” Hawking said.

Chris St. Clair and Chris Dade, teammates for five years, see their paths diverge as they finish their time as Titans. Story by Kerry Murray Photo Illustration by William Vasta Hawking said Dade consistently played solid defense, but also was an obvious offensive threat as well. Dade stepped into the No. 1 position for career three-point field goals, ending his Titan career with 191. Dade was also named to the All-Big West honorable mention both last year and this year. “Game in and game out he rose to the challenge,” Hawking said. “He never backed down.” ow that their Titan careers are over, the jerseys hung up, the practices and games through, Dade and St. Clair both look ahead to the future. St. Clair said he will graduate this spring with a BA in political science, but does not know where he will go from there. “I’d like to play overseas, but I have not had any offers yet,” St. Clair said. Dade said he plans to sign with an agent immediately and also try to play overseas for a few years or maybe even take a crack at the NBA. “If I really do have that shot, then I’m going to take it,” Dade said. For five years, Dade and St. Clair witnessed the program evolve from a 6-20 team their freshman season to a team that advanced to the Big West semifinals this season. “It’s been quite an interesting ride at Fullerton,” Dade said. “I’ve learned a lot of things.” And now, after five years, this Titan journey has come to an

end. Next destination ... still unknown.


Detour

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California State University, Fullerton

arts arts & & entertainment entertainment March 26, 1998

Fading

Colors

Despite the controversial book’s best-seller status, the movie “Primary Colors” seems a little watered down By JEREMY SCHERER Daily Titan Staff Writer

“Primary Colors” starts off bright, but the colors begin to fade by the second act. The one thing that seems to be missing in the latest of the John Travolta comeback pictures is objectivity. This film seems to be slanted way too far in the look at many controversial topics of today’s society. If society deems a subject negative or positive, director Mike Nichols seems to hold the topic in that light and only let the audience see it in that way. As many people know, “Primary Colors” is taken from the supposedly fictionalized book of the same title written by an author that called himself Anonymous. Anonymous was guessed to be an insider from the Clinton campaign camp due to the negative information that was put in the novel about the current head of the United States. Anonymous turned out to be a reporter from the Boston area named Joe Klein that was discovered after a large scale search and ended being caught through his daughter’s bragging at a respected private elementary school. The book was considered a piece of fiction, but when compared to the events in the Clinton campaign the case was a little too close to call, according to the Clinton administration. The book was published and due to the public’s curiosity of who Anonymous was and the ties to the president, the book was a huge success, riding on top of the New York Times’ bestseller list for a few months. Hollywood noticed the success of the book and just like any popular book, the film version had to be made. Nichols, the respected screenwriter and director, and his former comedy partner, Elaine May, have taken the task of making “Primary Colors” into a digestible two hour comedy/drama for the common masses. Nichols has gathered a large pool of talent that includes Travolta, Billy Bob Thornton, Kathy Bates, Emma Thompson and the new young Sidney Poitier , Adrian Lester. Though Travolta gets top billing as presidential candidate Jack Stanton, the real star of this film is Lester. The story follows Lester as Henry Burton, a young campaign advisor that is struggling to find a candidate that he can support and actually believe in and the struggle to get that candidate into the Oval Office. Strong performances are turned in by Bates, Thornton and Lester. Bates turns in her best performance since “Misery” as an uncontrollable campaign aid whose job is to protect the candidate from scandal. Bates is her typically loud cocky self who breezes through scenes and takes them over, leaving little for the other actors to do or say. Thornton portrays a self-described redneck that is a sexist pig with his heart in the right place. After years of struggling in low budget films Thornton is capitalizing on his success from “Sling Blade,” which he wrote and directed, and seems to be picking roles that are well suited for him. Primary Colors takes many of today’s social issues and deal with them in an almost checkpoint way. First, “politics are dirty,” but their are a few candidates that want to help. The second topic is adultery. “Adultery is bad,” the film says, but can be dealt with in a few scenes and then pretty much ignored. The third point of the film is “drugs are bad.” If a person does drugs they will ruin their life and not amount to much unless they were taken in small doses during the 1970s. see COLORS / 5

A Breathing Room of Her Own With honesty and confrontation, Kristin Donner bares her soul in her solo exhibit “Breathing Room” By JOE FLORKOWSKI Daily Titan Staff Writer A man holds his lifeless lover in his arms. A nude woman gasps for air. Jesus’ bloody crucifixion. These are not images for the faint of heart. These paintings and photo mural are the work of Kristin Donner, a Cal State Fullerton art major, who features these works in her solo exhibit, “Breathing Room.” The exhibit is on display at the MainFrame Gallery through April 3. The three works above: “The Fall,” “Breathing Room” and “For You” deal with darker themes than the other paintings in Donner’s show. “For You” shows an arm on a wooden board with a gaping hole in the wrist. The hole is dripping blood, and in the corner of the picture the edge of a crown of thorns can be seen. It is Donner’s most recent work. She said she wanted to do something religious for a long time and admitted that some people find it kind of gory. “It’s very confrontational. I wanted to take that angle because so many times when you see a portrayal of Jesus, it’s very angelic and picture perfect. I wanted to throw it into everyone’s face, and just say, look, this is dealing with death and a lot of pain, and it communicates to the viewer that Jesus went through all that suffering for us,” Donner said.

“The Fall” is the only photo mural in the display. It is actually a photo mural of a three-dimensional collage, using real leaves and magazine images for effect. The photo mural shows a nude man holding another nude man who has just passed away. “It deals with issues of homosexuality in our society and homosexuality in mythology, as well. If you look closely, the figure in the center is cupid and his lover. He has just passed away, which is where ‘The Fall’ comes in,” Donner explained. “Breathing Room” was Donner’s first painting of a human being, and features a woman drowning. For Donner, the painting helped her get over some things she was going through. “I was going through some personal issues at the time and I was moving past some stuff and moving on. This was my way to say ‘I was drowning for a while’ and now I’m fine,” Donner said. In “Reach” a pair of hands emerges from the dark, heading towards the light. “It deals with moving forward and looking towards a bright future,” Donner said. Donner said that she also pushed her limit on this painting, and blended colors, being more free with the paint. Donner’s piece “Thirsty” is an appropriate name for a still life painting that features a teakettle, a wine bottle, and a carafe. “Thirsty” was one of Donner’s first paintings, produced in one

of her first art classes on campus. “It’s probably my most detailed work that I have in the show here,” Donner explained. Oil bars were used on Donner’s piece “Naissance.” Oil bars are used in a style similar to finger painting, which makes this an unusual piece for Donner. She said that this piece, like “Reach” also resulted from being pushed to go further by her professor. “Naissance” is translated from the French, meaning “rebirth.” The painting, for Donner, deals with women being at the center of all life. “It’s kind of an empowering piece. I can tough it out. If I have obstacles I can overcome them,” Donner described the painting. Donner started oil painting in 5th grade, but left art in high school when she got into music. She rediscovered painting again in general education classes and soon art became Donner’s major. Donner hopes to teach at the university level one day, and wouldn’t mind seeing her work displayed internationally. “Painting is something I can imagine myself doing for the rest of my life,” she said. Donner is having a reception for her six works on Saturday, March 28 from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the MainFrame Gallery, which is located inside the Titan Student Union.

RON SOLIMAN/Daily Titan

Kristin Donner stands before her piece “For You.” The CSUF art major’s exhibit “Breathing Room” will continue through April 3 in the MainFrame Gallery in the Titan Student Union.


March 26, 1998

5

Detour

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Check In

Neutral Milk Hotel combines real life and emotions on their latest release “The Aeroplane Over the Sea.” By JEREMY SCHERER Daily Titan Staff Writer Neutral Milk Hotel’s new album “The Aeroplane Over the Sea” should be checked into. “Aeroplane” is Neutral Milk Hotel’s follow up album to 1995’s “On Avery Island,” both released on Merge records. Neutral Milk Hotel is not full of lighthearted empty songs lamenting over the loss of the girl that works at Hot Dog on a Stick. “Aeroplane” is a themed album that is based around three subjects; The loss of Jeff Magnum’s brother at a young age, his divorce and new found outlook on religion. Neutral Milk Hotel is the latest group to release an album from the Elephant 6 family. The family is a loose group of friends that record together and have formed a company that really does not exist to help get the word out about each other’s projects. Magnum is the foundation of Neutral Milk Hotel. Though he uses a few friends from the Elephant 6 family like Robert Schneider of Apples in Stereo or Julian Koster of the Music Tapes, Magnum is responsible for the bulk of the album’s writing. Magnum has made the most personal record to date of the family. Many of Magnum’s songs consist of him singing and playing acoustic guitar on the new album. A few fans were worried that after the instant accessibility of “On Avery Island” new fans would not be able to get into “Aeroplane.” After one listen these fans were shown to have no worries. Songs like “Holland, 1945,” “The King of Carrot Flowers parts one, two and three” or “Communist Daughter” lend themselves to open ears with no resistance at all. The album’s highlight is “TwoHeaded Boy Pt. Two” Though part one is a brilliant track , part two seems to dive into Magnum’s emotionally

scarred psyche as he, in disgusting detail, relates the images of his lost brother that float around in his head. The track seems to be done in one take as Magnum releases the years of hidden guilt and frustration that have built up. It is personal songs like this that make the album such a joy to listen to. These songs seem to open up the authors and let them share a small bit of their pain and helps others to know that they are not alone if they share personal experiences.

COLORS • from page 4

Point number four. “AIDS is very sad.” If a person is infected with the virus then people should feel sorry for them but should not worry because they will be fine

if taken care of. One of the reasons that “Primary Colors” may seem a little too positive is

the fact that Nichols is a personal friend of Clinton, or maybe it is due to Clinton’s connection to many powerful people in Hollywood. Either way “Primary Colors”

1998 03 26  
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