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Vol. 89 Issue 43

April 26, 2011

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EXCLUSIVES dailytitan.com

Is sexting good or bad? Find out what students think about sexting at Dailytitan.com/sexting

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Visiting Vienna, the capital of Austria.....................................4 dailytitan.com The Student Voice of California State University, Fullerton

Wilderness sanctuary caters to students Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary offers large amounts of programs to Cal State Fullerton SABRINA PARK Daily Titan

LUCIO VILLA / Daily Titan Bill Farmer, voice actor for Toonhouse Inc., spoke to a filled theater in his speech titled “Goofin’ My Way Through Life,” where he talked about his love for Disney characters and how he made it in show business.

Comm Week Launches at CSUF

Speaker inspires students with her thoughts on the future of convergent media and what it means to be a journalist

KACIE YOSHIDA Daily Titan

Between classes, a handful of students gathered in the Titan Student Union to hear Comm Week speaker Susan Belknapp’s thoughts on the future of convergent media. With the fate of media in the hands of the next generation of graduates, Belknapp stressed the importance of being a versatile individual who knows the many facets of convergent journalism.

With a degree in film as well as a master’s from USC in screenwriting, Belknapp performed an assortment of jobs including freelancing and even working as a waitress until she stumbled upon her current job as senior writer at Churm Media’s magazine, OC Metro. Located in Orange County, Churm Media produces a slew of magazines, including OC Metro, OC Family, Inland Empire Family, Southland Golf and OC Menus. “Be open to wherever your path takes you,” said Belknapp. “You just never know ... By the time you get hired somewhere, (the job) is often

where you didn’t think you’d end up, but often it’s a place you’ll be happy with.” At Churm Media, Belknapp worked her way up from freelancer to one of the few full-time employees. And while working with the company she has also continued to write screenplays as well as fiction as a freelancer for different companies. “There’s a huge amount of writing that gets done outside of hard news writing. I’m glad I didn’t go down that path,” Belknapp continued. While Belknapp stressed the importance of finding a job that is enjoyable, she highly em-

phasized the importance of finding an internship that is beneficial to furthering one’s career. There are many internships available for those who want to become involved at Churm Media. “If you want to learn a little and get published clips, come intern for us,” Belknapp said. “We need writers all the time and you’ll get a lot of experience ... I promise you’ll be in print by summer.” See MEDIA, page 2

Public relations event teaches about fashion Guest speaker informs PR students how to fashionably prepare for the industry ALNAS ZIA Daily Titan

CAMILLE TARAZON / Daily Titan Titan sophomore Ariel Tsuchiyama went 2 for 5 with three walks at the plate and one assist on the field over the weekend against UC Davis.

‘Tooch’ steps up her game

Softball’s mitt hits for power at the plate with .397 slugging percentage ASHLEY LOERA Daily Titan

Some people choose to create their own destinies. For sophomore Ariel Tsuchiyama, the star catcher of the Cal State Fullerton softball team, her calling came before she was even born. With her parents setting down the groundwork for what would become a lifelong love

affair with softball, a nudge was all she needed. Tsuchiyama was born April 10, 1991, to her parents Troy and Jill Tsuchiyama, who both grew up playing baseball and softball. This pastime was passed down to their soon-to-be superstar softball player Tsuchiyama, who grabbed it with both arms and never let go, according to her father Troy. “She tried other sports and they didn’t satisfy her like softball … It

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blew us away. Her mom and I tried to find other things for her, but she wasn’t having it. Softball was it,” said Troy. Since the age of 6, softball has been it. From recreation leagues to traveling teams, Tsuchiyama did them all, slowly perfecting her skills as she pushed herself to do better. See CATCHER, page 6

Fashion and the public relations industry are both competitive worlds where trends are always changing and reputation is considered the chief asset. Therefore, it is important to understand the essentials of fashion public relations for students before they venture into the field. The members of the Cal State Fullerton Public Relations Student Society of America got an opportunity to gain firsthand information from an industry insider. The Fashion PR event at the TSU Ontiveros hosted by the organization Wednesday invited Erika Klein, founder and owner of Shout PR, to speak to students and inform them about the fashion public relations business. Shout PR has been promoting new and established fashion and lifestyle brands since 1997, with BB Dakota and Whole Foods being some of its clients. “Our members were asking us to invite a fashion public relations person for a long time now

since we’ve had public relations professionals from various fields throughout the semester,” said PRSSA Vice President Cecilia Padilla, 21, a communications major. Klein advised students to build relationships in the field and to take internships seriously. She explained that internships, whether with a small company or a multinational firm, are the best way to land a job. Also the experiences you get from every job can be taken into the next job. “Students should get involved and be ready to move around. Since Orange County does not (have) many fashion PR companies, students should be willing to commute to LA for opportunities,” Klein said. Klein also stated that students looking for a career in this field should have good writing skills and a general knowledge of how the fashion industry works. Being up on fashion trends and having a personal fashion style are always a plus. See FASHION, page 4

With a multitude of on-campus activities to get involved in, programs off Cal State Fullerton grounds can often be overlooked. The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary, a nonprofit nature conservation center located about 30 minutes from campus, was acquired by CSUF between 1968 and 1969 from the San Fernando Audubon Society. It is managed by the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and works closely with the Volunteer and Service Center on campus. The facility features a greenhouse, holding plants native to California, various species of birds, as well as other wildlife. According to Karon Cornell, director of the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary, they are best known for their birds, as there are 73 different species that pass through the facility. “We also have six species of hummingbirds, so we’re best known for our hummingbirds,” said Cornell. While the majority of the animals are free to roam within the conservation area, one of the facility’s favorite residents, a female possum, is kept in a cage so visitors can see her during the day. In addition to the different species of birds, the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is home to other wildlife including cougars, eagles, owls and the facility’s favored corn snake. “Our most popular ambassador is Bob the corn snake and he loves to be handled. He’s about three feet long—a bright, orange, beautiful snake,” Cornell said. Facilities such as the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary are not uncommon among other colleges. “Most other universities have off-site facilities for geology students, geography students, biology students and art students. It’s not just a college research facility and it’s also open to the public—we’re in the AAA book, so we get a lot of tourists. We’re actually quite crowded on the weekends,” said Marcella Gilchrist, the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary’s site manager. See TUCKER, page 2

WHAT’S INSIDE NEWS Two new fast-food restaurants open near CSUF ........................................2 OPINION Recent student protest gives generation a voice ........................................3 FEATURES For Your Health: Preparing for your swimming suit ........................................4 SPORTS Women’s tennis newcomer shows potential ........................................6


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NEWS

April 26, 2011

COMM: Real life experiences ...Continued from page 1 Interns at Churm Media produce the majority of the content provided in the magazines the company produces. With a small staff, they rely heavily on interns to “hit the ground running” with fulfilling interviews and stories. And while fact checking is what interns do most often, Belknapp promised that each intern is assigned a story to report on during the first day on the job. Already early in the week, communications students from all emphases have been crowding the halls of the TSU in search of their Comm Week speakers. “Comm Week has been so helpful and has given me a different perspective on things,” said Ali Soto, a communications major.

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Soto, who also attended the event “Goofin’ My Way Through Life,” went on to say that while some Comm Week events are for pure entertainment, Belknapp made an honest effort to pass on very pertinent information that will help students find jobs. “Comm Week brings in people with real life experience that builds upon what students are learning in classes,” said journalism Professor Marie Logia-Kee. “... And I think it also helps to start making connections with people who are in the industry.” While Comm Week just kicked off Monday morning, there are many events that all students are welcome and encouraged to join. For more information about interning at Churm Media, email Editor in Chief Tina Borgatta at tinaborgatta@churmmedia.com

Afghani Prisoners Escape from Jail

C ommWeek join the conversation

Mike Tharp: Telling stories for a living

Story by Ryan Laskodi

Michael Linder: Making your mark Eric Chambers: Road to success Rob Whitfield: Multimedia reporting

Story by Sabrina Park Story by Sarah Fernandez Story by Amy Leadbetter

Nancy Marmolejo: Marketing and PR

Story by William Chen

ARIANNE CUSTER / Daily Titan Cal State Fullerton’s Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is open to the public and is located on Modjeska Canyon Road in the city of Silverado.

TUCKER: CSUF volunteers preserve the wilderness

FOR THE RECORD It is the policy of the Daily Titan to correct any inaccurate information printed in the publication as soon as the error is discovered. Any incorrect information printed on the front page will result in a correction printed on the front page. Any incorrect information printed on any other page will be corrected on page 2. Errors on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections also will be noted on the online version of the Daily Titan. Please contact Editor-in-Chief Isa Ghani at 657-278-5815 or at execeditor@dailytitan.com with issues about this policy or to report any errors.

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With the grand opening of Sonic, students are overwhelmed with options JARED LUCERO For the Daily Titan

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The Daily Titan is a student publication, printed every Monday through Thursday. The Daily Titan operates independently of Associated Students, College of Communications, CSUF administration and the CSUF System. The Daily Titan has functioned as a public forum since inception. Unless implied by the advertising party or otherwise stated, advertising in the Daily Titan is inserted by commercial activities or ventures identified in the advertisements themselves and not by the university. Such printing is not to be construed as written or implied sponsorship, endorsement or investigation of such commercial enterprises. The Daily Titan allocates one issue to each student for free.

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According to the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary newsletter, the 12-acre facility had 15,000 public visitors and 1,900 college student visitors this past year. As a result of the frequent visitors, the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary has upgraded its facility with the help of community and student volunteers, interns from different academic departments as well as the Girl Scouts of the USA and Boy Scouts of America. “We have new picnic areas and we’re expanding the nature center with hands-on displays. We’re also starting to do guided tours on the weekends for the public,” Gilchrist said. “We’re working on interpretive programs and trail guides and we’re in the process of developing programs where we have nature journals. We’re starting to expand the capabilities of the facility.” The Volunteer and Service Center has continued to play a large part in renovating the establishment over the years, as CSUF volunteers offer their services at the center twice a semester. “We coordinate different community service projects through different programs. One of them is called Proj-

helpers is planting different plants that are native to the area. In addition to the volunteering opportunities offered to students, the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary also hosts different activities. For instance, the facility hosted its third annual Spring Fair and Art Festival April 9 and 10 during their regular hours throughout the day. “We (will) have vendors with the plants along the plant ways. We really combine art and nature,” said Shauna Brady-Hart, resource developer for the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary. “This event is a great way for people to experience art and nature together. There is something for every age.” Because the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is located off campus, the nature conservation center can be forgotten in terms of programs and activities available for CSUF students. Nevertheless, through the Volunteer and Service Center, students can work closely with the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary and use it as an opportunity to get environmentally involved on and off campus. The Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary is open Tuesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is located at 29322 Modjeska Canyon Rd. Silverado, CA 92676. For more information visit TuckerWildlife.org

Fullerton’s burger overload

Jonathan Gibby Mark Samala Johnny Le Lucio Villa William Camargo Jenelle Rensch Steve Sly Patrick Schwarz Jennifer Chung Hannah Dellinger Wes Nease Julissa Rivera Jason Shepard

Copyright ©2011 Daily Titan

...Continued from page 1

ect Earth. One of those that we work with regularly is the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary,” said Amy Mattern, coordinator at the Volunteer and Service Center. The Volunteer and Service Center features events on its calendar that students can sign up for and attend at the sanctuary. “The students really love going there. They clear trails and do some planting, remove weeds and I think they’ve done some painting and repairs,” Mattern said. “We are usually out there for about three hours and they work really hard the whole time to get different projects completed.” Various projects are given to the student volunteers to work on during their time at the facility. “Most of (the projects) are for restoring the buildings and some of them are for more natural restoration. We put native species where they should be and we work on public trails and things of that nature. For example, last time we cleared some debris from where there was fire before,” said Lin Greene, 23, a computer science major and student director at the Volunteer and Service Center. According to Anna Coria, 21, a biology major and student director at the Volunteer and Service Center, a common task given to the student

A “Now Open” sign in front of the newly built Sonic restaurant catches the eyes of passers-by near the intersection of Chapman and Placentia Avenues. A “Coming Soon” sign appears on the intersection of Chapman Avenue and State College Boulevard, this time in the window of a Five Guys Burgers and Fries. With the addition of these two restaurants opening near campus, Cal State Fullerton students never have to worry about going hun-

gry. However, the abundance of hamburger eateries may leave students craving something else–variety. These new restaurants will join the other nearby burger joints, the Habit Burger Grill, In-N-Out, McDonald’s, Jack in the Box and the Carl’s Jr. on campus, all within walking distance of CSUF. Some students are beginning to see the abundance of burger restaurants in and around campus as overwhelming. “There are more than enough burger places within walking distance of CSUF,” said Martin Nguyen, 23, a civil engineering major. “I eat on campus every other day … I never crave burgers.” Others feel CSUF students are lucky to have such a selection. “We literally have all of the fastfood places you can think of in our neck of the woods,” said Thomas Nguyen, 21, a kinesiology major. “(CSUF students) are very fortunate to have many food choices to choose from in a square mile.” Some students would like to have

a healthier selection. But for most college students, cheapest and most convenient wins. “Sometimes you want to eat healthier but you don’t want to pay more,” said Jon Vu, 20, a business major. “So what happens? You eat fast food.” Having a variety of different types of foods is what a lot of students want to see. “Being a Vietnamese American, I (would) like to see some Vietnamese food or even Korean and Indian food,” Thomas said. Students want to have a wide selection of food, but price and convenience take priority in the busy life of a college student. Vu believes being selective with food is not an option for students. “When it comes down to it, it’s all about the money,” Vu said. “It’s here and it’s cheap.” Patricia Laguna, a professor of kinesiology at CSUF, doesn’t see a bright future for students’ health as of now, because “it’s fast, so students will eat it.”

More than 470 inmates at a prison in southern Afghanistan escaped today through a tunnel dug from outside the jail, with many of the escapees being Taliban insurgents. A Taliban spokesperson said it took five months to build the 360-meter tunnel that led into the political wing. According to the spokesperson, over 100 of them were Taliban commanders, while many others were Taliban insurgents. The tunnel was created from a house north of the prison rented by “friends” of the Taliban, and it took prisoners over 30 minutes to walk through to reach the vehicles waiting for them at the exit. The Kandahar governor’s office, where the jail escape happened, said at least 12 have been recaptured, but they are giving no further statement except to say that it was a “disaster.” This is the second major jailbreak in three years at the Kandahar prison. In June 2008, a suicide bomber blew open the prison gates releasing over 900 prisoners and insurgents. A major uproar in violence followed the last prison break. Brief by Ashley Loera

Visionary Alumni Award Ceremony The 18th annual Vision & Visionaries Awards will take place in this Saturday at the Anaheim Marriott, recognizing and presenting awards to eight individuals of Cal State Fullerton. These distinguished alumni will go on to receive the Vision & Visionaries Distinguished Alumni and Honorary Alumni Awards. These individuals include CSUF alumni from a wide variety of disciplines and majors, ranging from the arts to business. David J. Siebels, who graduated in 1975 with a B.A. in music, is now a composer. David L. Riley, who graduated in 1977 with a B.A. in business administration, is now the director of the Orange County Health Care Agency. Paul F. Folino, executive chairman of the Emulex Corporation, which specializes in designing, developing and supplying network products, will receive an Honorary Alumni Award. The ceremonies will also have musical entertainment from CSUF’s Theatre and Dance Department. CSUF’s Office of Major Events has additional information on how to participate in the event. Brief by Christopher Park

National Poetry Month at CSUF In celebration of National Poetry Month, Cal State Fullerton will host a free public event, “Mending the World: Poetry, Activism and Healing,” Thursday featuring discussions from performing artists, creative writing workshops and open poetry readings. The event, held in the Pollak Library Room 130 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., is also in celebration of National Library Week and Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Acclaimed poets Karen An-hwei Lee and Traci Kato Kiriyama will also be reading and discussing their original poems. Traci Kato Kiriyama will be speaking from noon to 12:50 p.m., while Karen An-hwei Lee won’t be speaking until 2:30 p.m. A “World Languages Session,” which is a tribute to the 2010 Nobel Prize-winning poet Liu Xiaobo, will also be held from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. with a musical tribute by student musician Brittany Su. CSUF students, staff and faculty are invited to read their own poetry from 11 a.m. to 11:40 a.m. as well as from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. To participate in the open poetry readings, contact Joy Lambert at 657-2784055. Brief by Ashley Loera


OPINION

April 26, 2011

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Hippie Health by NICOLE FELTON

“How to Live a Greener Life”

Being vegetarian

LUCIO VILLA / Daily Titan

Demonstrate for your education Common Sense by

PETER CORNETT

“Politics for the People” In one of the moments when I was tweeting about events at the recent sit-in at Cal State Fullerton, I had a thought: Profiles are often written of heroes who sacrifice for others, but how can I best describe a group of heroes, ordinary and yet also extraordinary at the same time? Not finding in the English lexicon a suitably glamorous word, I eventually just settled on “demonstrators.” The demonstrators who spent days camped in Langsdorf Hall are heroes in the most literal sense. The belief in their cause, an affordable and quality education for all, was palpable and infused into every discussion or debate that reverberated across the halls of the building. Over the three-day sit-in, these students and faculty trudged from meeting to meeting, bearing the same bleary-eyed, determined expressions that were evident on the faces of Allied soldiers in old World War II videos. Because our university is located in the heart of the conservative Orange County, many of the comments made on news websites were predictably hostile toward the participants of the demonstrations. Posts containing words such as “parasites” and “freeloaders” were casually intermingled with the occasional statement expressing support for event participants.

If these students were simply demanding government handouts, as it may seem to be one of the skewed perceptions of the event, I would not dare invoke the label of “hero.” I consider these students and faculty heroes because of the reason why they were so persistent in their demands for an accessible, quality education. In one of the meetings in which university administrators were refusing to sign the Declaration to Defend Public Education, a frustrated student interjected with, “My brothers. I’m doing this for my brothers.” The room then erupted with statements such as, “I have a daughter. I want her to be able to afford college.” No, these demonstrators were not the selfish, parasitical freeloaders the contemptible stereotype suggests; they were heroic activists, each and every one of them, fighting for future generations of Californians. Make no mistake, this demonstration was both a plea for support and a request for more resources. After days of sleeping on stonecold floors, demonstrators finally received support from CSUF President Milton Gordon in the form of a signature on their Declaration to Defend Public Education. What is left, dear readers, is for more admittedly scarce state

resources to be allocated toward higher education. This end, I believe, should be supported by both conservative Republicans and liberal Democrats. I am a conservative Libertarian myself, but I can see (even in purely free-market terms) the obvious need to invest in the same people who will one day be running the country. As a society, we can take one of two approaches toward public higher education: either it is an investment we will make in our children or we will just say “screw it, every man for himself!” The minds of our sons and daughters are a non-renewable resource of incalculable value; I see no reason why the prison system is a better investment. Investing in the future of their children is something parents of college students instinctively understand. However, they were the only group that was conspicuously absent among the ranks of the demonstrators. Why?

Last semester I wrote about the vegetarian diet and the benefits that come along with it. I hope this article will be able to answer a few questions and help people understand that adapting to vegetarianism provides benefits that can be sometimes overlooked. Yes, I am a vegetarian, which may lead to a biased opinion, although research backs up the benefits of being a vegetarian. I understand that it can be hard for people to exclude meat from their diet, especially because denying yourself something can be one of the most difficult tasks in your life. On the flip side, I personally don’t feel I am denying myself anything, simply because it is helping me to be a healthier person. On a daily basis I am questioned on my choice of being a vegetarian. “But… you can’t eat In-NOut!” Being a vegetarian doesn’t mean the joy of eating is sucked out from your life. In fact, I enjoy eating a grilled cheese at In-NOut, and yes, it tastes just as good, if not better than a cheeseburger. I have even found that some restaurants provide an entire section of their menu to vegetarian options. The population seems to be catching on to this new trend and this couldn’t come at a better time. My reasons for becoming a vegetarian include animal rights, environmental health and my own personal health. Personally, I became turned off when I found out some of the meat I was eating was filled with antibiotics and hormones. I highly suggest watching the movie Food, Inc., which exposes the truth behind the meat industry. Recently, there has been a lot of new evidence praising both vegan and vegetarian diets. The Oxford Dictionary defines both vegetarian and vegan diets: Vegetarian: a person who does not eat meat or fish, and sometimes other animal products, especially for moral, religious or health reasons. Vegan: a person who does not eat or use animal products. According to Neal Barnard, M.D., every five years the Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated and issued by the Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. The new guidelines, which were updated Jan. 31, emphasize vegetarian and vegan diets. The guidelines show how vegetarian-style eating patterns are associated with overall better health

such as lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, lower total mortality and lower blood pressure. Although the guidelines do not specifically state that a reduction of animal products in your diet will provide you with better health, they do suggest Americans should reduce the amount of saturated fats and cholesterol, which translates to most meat products. The vegan diet is the more beneficial of the two since it excludes all meat products. Being vegan has been associated with obesity and diabetes prevention. For some, excluding meat from their diet is not an option and if you fall under that category, increasing plant-based foods in your diet would be most beneficial to your health. This doesn’t mean that you can praise your “meat lovers” pizza because it has tomato sauce on it. There are many ways you can incorporate veggies into your diet. For example, making a side salad along with your meal at dinner will incorporate one to two servings of vegetables. You might find that you enjoy eating “the veggie way” more than you expected. I know when I started to explore the vegetable section of the super market, I found foods I didn’t even know existed. I even realized I liked some vegetables I had sworn off because I wasn’t familiar with them, such as beets and fennel. If you are interested in trying to become either a vegetarian or vegan, challenge yourself to change your eating habits and eventually your lifestyle. Take it one step at a time, set a goal and work toward it. When I first decided to become a vegetarian I gave myself four months to experiment and if I decided it wasn’t right, I would start eating meat again. I was nervous that I wouldn’t get enough protein, so I allowed myself to eat fish every once in a while. I gradually stopped eating fish and by the fourth month I no longer had any meat cravings. It has been almost exactly a year since I made my decision to adopt the vegetarian life, and I can say that I do not regret it at all. There have been nothing but positive outcomes from this decision. I would highly suggest that you at least incorporate one night in the week that is designated to a vegetarian meal. Happy eating! Peace, love and recycle!

LUCIO VILLA / Daily Titan

According to an Associated Press-Viacom poll, 60 percent of college students receive financial support from their parents. With costs rising as accessibility plummets, parents of students in the higher education system should be marching right alongside their children. I suspect that with ever-worsening austerity measures continually being excreted out the door of the state legislature, it will not be uncommon to see established office workers, engineers and salespeople actively involved in demonstrations on the side of students and faculty. Until that day, fellow intellectuals, march on! Demonstrate for your education, demonstrate for your future, but most importantly, demonstrate why the citizens of the great state of California should invest in you. Just as it was with the Founding Fathers, signing a declaration was not the end goal in and of itself, but it still was an important first step in the creation of a better world.

LET TERS TO THE EDITOR The Daily Titan welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must include the sender’s first and last name. Students must include their majors, and other writers must include their affiliation to the university, if applicable. The Daily Titan reserves the right to edit letters for length, grammar and spelling. Send letters to Isa Ghani, the Editor-in-Chief, at DTEditorInChief@gmail.com.

Literature of Life by KURT TELLEZ

“Read ‘em and Weep”

Langsdorf Lounge The few, the proud that “misbehaved” Tile mattress for the unshaved Hope for a future left to save And all for one man’s autograph Fingerprinted and photographed It could have been their epitaph Appalling actions they allow But a small handful didn’t bow They walk among the masses now Everyone loves to bitch and moan I need a job and to pay my loan Biggest picture so left alone They’re making sheep out of all of us The next of kin under the bus Seems we’ve a few things to discuss Go to school and get a real job Price of things could make a man sob Fuck that scheme! Think I’ll join the mob! It’s enough to drive you insane! We just want something in our brain! Gordon let it not be in vain! dailytitan.com/opinion


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FEATURES

April 26, 2011

Visiting Vienna’s nightlife hot spots Cal State Fullerton makes a visit to the capital of Austria to view tourist hot spots as well as hidden gems

...Continued from page 1

CARMEN VARNER Daily Titan

Massive churches. Luxurious palaces. Shiny jewels. Colorful sunsets. Divine cuisine. Sounds like heaven, right? Almost. It’s Vienna. The city Vienna is the capital of Austria, a cool country that borders Germany and Italy. Austria is a German-speaking land, so I literally understood nothing. The city was clean, historically rich and overall a beautiful travel destination. The language The only word of Deutsche I knew before I went to Vienna was “danke,” which means thank you. My German did not improve whatsoever after arrival, but at least I seemed polite. The language barrier wasn’t an issue, as I spent most of my time traipsing the city and its plethora of museums. The hostel Should you ever find yourself in Vienna, stay at the Schweizer Pension, a cute little hostel. The rooms were clean and elegant, not at all as vomit-inducing as other hostels I’ve been to. Each morning, there was a scrumptious breakfast of bread, jam, granola, yogurt, various fruit preserves and cheeses, along with some type of juice, coffee or tea. The best places to visit Sisi Museum - This housed the grandiose gowns, pretty parasols and jaw-dropping jewelry that once belonged to Sisi, the former empress of Austria. Sisi’s collection of personal items and journal entries would make any girl envious of her luxurious lifestyle. However, she was eventually assassinated with a stab to the heart. I never wanted to forget the experience, so I bought a fabulous pair of Sisi-inspired earrings from the museum’s gift shop. They receive con-

FASHION: Event informs students how to dress

CARMEN VARNER / Daily Titan St. Stephen’s Cathedral, an enormous Gothic church, houses gargoyles amidst its intricate architecture that has been blackened overtime by soot from the candles lit there daily.

stant compliments, will forever remind me of Vienna and are made of Swarovski crystal. Definitely one of the best purchases I have ever made. St. Stephen’s Cathedral - This Gothic church was so enormous, I failed to get the entire structure from top to bottom in a photo. The outer architecture was intricate and blackened over time by soot. Gargoyles perched at the top of the cathedral, fending off evil. The inside was like something out of a movie. The carved stone walls were sky high. Sculls, saints and confession booths were prevalent. Jesus and Mary peered down at me through many paintings. Hundreds of candles lit by those who prayed earlier in the day flickered gently. You don’t have to be Catholic to be swept away by the art, history and splendor

of such an old establishment. Imperial Apartments - Austria’s capital is home to many extraordinary palaces, such as the Imperial Apartments, which housed the royal Austrian family for 600 years. Each room amazed me with excessive amounts of decorations, furniture and rooms; they were gigantic and so ritzy. The rooms were lavishly decorated, some had gold-infused wall paintings, wall-to-wall murals and giant crystal chandeliers. The nightlife Vienna really struck a chord with me because it had an engaging night life, unlike humdrum Fullerton– where your only option is the bar, which is rather unfortunate if you’re under 21. In the city’s downtown were

Courtesy of Flickr user HTB

For Your Health: Ready for bikini season by MAHSA ZOJAJI

As the sun kisses our skin for just a moment, women on campus enter panic mode. As if juggling the last few weeks of school, work and our social lives wasn’t challenging enough, we now have to take on yet another task. Yes, ladies, it’s time to prepare for bikini season. But before you bend over backward, here are some easy tips to shed the pounds before the season begins. “It takes a lot of planning and preparation. You can’t expect to be bikini ready in less than four weeks,” said James Maynard, a kinesiology major and a personal trainer at the Titan Recreation Center. “You want to make sure you have a good mixture of cardio and good resistance training.” According to Maynard, the fastest way to shed the pounds would be to combine cardio and weights in one workout session. The quickest way to shed the weight is to work the hardest. With everything going on in our daily lives, it may be difficult to get to the gym three times a week. But it’s not about the time put in, it’s about the intensity. “It doesn’t matter how many times a week you work out,” Maynard said. “It’s about giving it 110 percent every time you do.” Spending time on cardio as well as spending time on your big muscle groups, such as doing squats, sit-ups and pushups, will increase your chances of showing results more quickly. Changing up your workouts will benefit you in the long run. “If I’m doing a really hard workout three times a week with cardio resistance, I’ll throw

in different kinds of training, like a spin class,” said Sarah Duncan, a senior kinesiology major. Also, it is important to incorporate weights in your workout sessions. Maynard reminds us that grabbing light weights won’t do much in helping you get bikini ready. He explains that women fear the more weight they take on, the more muscular they will look, and that is not the case. “It doesn’t matter how much weight you lift, it’s about repetition,” Maynard said. “Twelve to 15 reps is the magic number of 4 to 7 sets.” Ideally it’s recommended to break up the workout into two parts, with the first session focusing on your cardio and the second focusing on building body strength. Along with the workout sessions, it is also important to watch what you eat while preparing for bikini season. “It’s all about burning the amount of calories you take in so your body doesn’t retain the fat,” Duncan said. Do not refrain from eating meals throughout the day. Indulge in three or more small portions a day that include high protein, low carbohydrates, low fat and of course, water is essential. “I try to cut out as much carbohydrates that I can,” said Mary Zadeh, a junior business major. “I usually just stick to salads with grilled chicken and refrain from soda.” Snacking on fruits and vegetables every two hours is a way of obtaining natural carbohydrates and would help increase your chances of high metabolism, enabling you to shed the weight more rapidly.

Contact Us at dtfeaturesdesk@gmail.com

nightly viewings of piano concerts projected onto huge screens; hundreds flocked each night to get a seat and view the pianist work his or her magic on the enormous screen. To be honest, I hated the piano concert; classical music is not my thing. But I did fall in love with the lively night scene. There were food booths and people chatting everywhere. Youth and grandparents alike came out at night. The night was always bustling; the murmur of voices remained constant. P.S. The drinking age in Vienna is 18. The lesson Both the obvious and minute details and destinations are key to enjoying any trip abroad. Visiting tourist hot spots is a must

for first-time travelers, but it is imperative to take in the little things as well. Of course I’ll remember the jumbo palaces and churches. But I’ll never forget getting lost in the palatial gardens with my sister, partaking in a photo shoot with the shrubbery to pass the time. I’ll recall swinging in a kid’s playground, holding my dress down so it wouldn’t fly up for all the Viennese high school boys playing basketball to see. I’ll envision memories of a yodel session followed by a film under the stars on a cold evening. The glow-in-the-dark stars handed out after the nighttime film remain stuck on my bedroom wall, glowing of Vienna as I close my eyes to sleep each night.

When asked about the importance of ethics in the public relations business, she said integrity is an important principle she always upholds. “It is never about lying,” Klein said. Students and board members present at the event found her presentation quite helpful and were impressed by her personality. “Erika was very friendly and I liked how she was willing to share her contacts with the students,” Padilla said. “Personally, I am not interested in fashion public relations, but I am sure the others got to learn about the whole process of fashion PR. The presentation seemed to be quite useful,” said PRSSA Advocacy Director Simon Oh, 22, a communications major. “We try to offer a diversity of speakers at our meetings to help our members,” said PRSSA President Christa Keizer, 21, a communications major. “A lot of students wanted to have a fashion PR expert because I think TV shows like The Hills made fashion really exciting.”

ALNAS ZIA / Daily Titan Erika Klein, founder of Shout PR, coached PR students on their fashion decisions and answered questions after.


dailytitan.com

6

SPORTS

April 26, 2011

CATCHER: All-around leader looks to help Titans get back to NCAA Tournament form

Men’s Lacrosse Defeats Biola

...Continued from page 1 And as she jumped head first into the sport she’d grown up with, her family jumped right in with her. Games every weekend and distant tournaments were the norm, as Tsuchiyama’s family adapted to their daughter’s way of life. “My dad was president of the league and we would haul my brother and sister around to all the tournaments and it took over all of our lives growing up,” said Tsuchiyama, 20. Progressing into higher levels of travel ball even took her to matches in different states, making family life hectic but exciting for the Tsuchiyamas. Playing all four years on the Sonora High School Raiders softball squad, Tsuchiyama knew that a college scholarship was the next step in her softball career. So she sent hundreds of letters to various colleges around the country asking for scouts to come check her out. She was then contacted in her junior year by scouts from schools such as CSUF, Ohio State, Northwestern University and San Diego State. From her high school team, she was one of the first to receive many scholarship offers and be committed so early. She traveled around the country with her family to check the potential college candidates, going everywhere from Washington to Minnesota to choose the place she would spend the next four years of her life. But from the beginning, the choice to come to CSUF had been an easy one. Growing up as a batgirl for the Titan softball team, having coaches mentor her and the close proximity to her family made it the obvious choice. “(CSUF) was really kind of an easy choice for me because I’ve grown up around here … So I kind of felt at home,” Tsuchiyama said. The prestige and fame of CSUF’s softball team didn’t hurt either. With a team that holds a national championship and makes it to postseason almost every year, joining the ranks of the elite Titans was something she had dreamed about. “I have a lot of pride for it. It feels

DTSHORTHAND

The Cal State Fullerton men’s lacrosse club won its final game of the regular season on the road, 15-8, over the Biola Eagles Wednesday. The Titans (9-5, 3-1) jumped out to another quick start in the game against Biola and claimed a 7-1 lead at the end of the first quarter. They caged two more goals in the second and took the lead at halftime, 9-2. To close out an impressive regular season, the Titans scored six more goals in the final quarters to claim the road win over the Biola Eagles (7-9, 3-2). The CSUF men’s lacrosse club will begin the playoffs with a home game Saturday against Pepperdine. The game will start at 1 p.m. at Titan Track. The Pepperdine Waves went 5-4 overall and 3-2 in divisional play. Pepperdine and CSUF also shared a common opponent in the Concordia Eagles, who beat the Titans by a single goal (13-12) and beat Pepperdine by a final score of 11-4. If the Titans win Saturday against Pepperdine, they will likely get a chance of revenging their lone divisional defeat of the season in a probable matchup against Concordia in round two of the Southwestern Division II Conference playoffs. CAMILLE TARAZON / Daily Titan Titan sophomore catcher Ariel Tsuchiyama has started in all 38 games this season and has accrued 20 assists with only one error from behind the plate for a .994 fielding percentage.

good to know that other teams respect us and know who we are. They want to come play us and that’s the cool part about it,” Tsuchiyama said. The team and its players only continue to grow. One of the highlights of last season was beating the University of Texas, one of their biggest non-conference rivals. And this year Tsuchiyama not only connected with her pitching staff on a deeper level, but also hit the team’s first home run in Big West play this season. But this deep connection with the

team comes at a price, just as any other campus sport entails. With time only for practice, games, and homework, Tsuchiyama understood the commitment she made from the beginning. “It’s been the biggest part of my college life ... there isn’t much room for anything else and if there is [I’m] too tired to do it,” Tsuchiyama said. The team continues to grow because of deep bonds off the field, which instills trust on the field, according to Tsuchiyama. With the

teammates spending all their free time when not practicing by hanging out together, they have become a unified body that works together flawlessly. “It’s pretty fun, no one really has any problems with each other, but we know when it’s time to get serious and we do a really good job at it … There’s just this great chemistry,” Tsuchiyama said. Titan Head Coach Michelle Gromacki adds that their unity is also attributed to the Tsuchiyamas’ lead-

ership skills, which are essential to her position as catcher. Comparing her to a sponge that wants to soak everything up, Gromacki describes Tsuchiyama as very eager to learn. “She’s determined to be the best and has high expectations for herself. The team really responds to her too; she gives the players around her confidence,” said Gromacki, two-time Big West Conference Coach of the Year. Tsuchiyama hopes to continue playing softball even after college,

Brief by Jeff Prenovost

but also sees herself going into the medical field, which could collide with her time to play. But as a sophomore, she has much time to contemplate the details of her future. For now, she looks forward to the last two years on the softball team and the many memories she will make with her second family at CSUF. Next up for Tsuchiyama and the Titans, they will host the Pacific Tigers for a three-game set at Anderson Family Field, starting with a doubleheader Saturday at 2 p.m.

Set it, serve it, ace it One of two freshmen tennis stars, Megan Sandford strives for greatness MARIBEL CASTANEDA For the Daily Titan

New school, new classes, new friends and trying to fit in are just a few things a freshman faces. If those aren’t stressful enough, add tennis and you have the life of Megan Sandford. The Cal State Fullerton women’s tennis team welcomed Sandford from Orange Lutheran High School to the tight-knit group with open arms. Sandford, who has an overall singles record of 9-21, has been a positive addition to the team with her bubbly personality and hard work habits. The 19-year-old, who is an undeclared major and lives in the dorms on campus, said the team has been very helpful and nice through her transition. “It is hard for a freshman to make a big impact,” said Titan Head Coach Bill Reynolds. Reynolds said freshmen don’t have enough experience to compete with women who have four or five years of college experience. However, the lack of college experience does not deter Sandford, it only makes her work harder. “She is usually the first one out there before matches, hitting with our assistant coach (Ruya Inalpulat) and sometimes the last to leave,” Reynolds said. Juggling classes and practices is no easy task. Sandford has been doing well in dealing with the pressure of collegiate sports and academics by maintaining a 3.0 GPA. Sandford sums up her success to two main factors: study hall and good time-managing skills. “It is very difficult. After practice you’re tired and you have to go do schoolwork. So you just have to manage your time,” said Sandford. Most freshmen are singles players. The junior tournaments don’t offer much doubles play in younger years, so freshmen have a lot to learn. Sandford and her doubles partner, freshman Morgan McIntosh, are no exception. Sandford and McIntosh, who have a 1-7 Big West record and are 4-18 overall, have been improving throughout the season. The two have known each other for years and have a good friendship. But on the court, both have had to get used to playing as a solid unit. Contact Us at dtsportsdesk@gmail.com

CAMILLE TARAZON / Daily Titan Titan freshman Megan Sandford looks to score a point in one of her grueling matches.

“We’ve taken a lot of losses, but toward the end of the year we started to grow more as a team and learned each other’s strengths,” said McIntosh. Sandford has had to rise to the challenge of the higher, more competitive level of college tennis. Traveling is no hard task for Sandford, who loves it and has experienced it from a young age. Competing in tournaments and venturing with her father has prepared her to balance both academics and bouncing from place to place. Competing with top-ranked opponents such as Pepperdine is another story. Sandford, who admits it is hard work, said every year they play them and every year they will continue to improve. It is all about working through it. “They are a good school, but we are good too,” Sandford said. Anyone can see the women’s tennis squad is working hard in practice at Titan Courts every day from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The practices are more structured and demand more hours and dedication than most programs. It is difficult balancing a rigorous schedule of tennis and school, but Sandford is loving every minute of it. “The teachers are the best. They are very helpful and supportive. They understand that I am balancing two things plus a full schedule,” Sandford said. With all the hard work and dedication required, it is Sandford’s love of the game that keeps her going back to the courts. “I love the feeling of hitting a great shot. And also the competitiveness of

being on the court sweating, working hard and knowing that I accomplished something great that day,” Sandford said. Sandford discovered that sports opens the door to social life on campus, especially for freshmen. “It is easier to get integrated into the school when you play a sport because you have teammates that are older than you who have done it before and also you meet girls in study hall who are also freshmen and going through the same thing,” Sandford said. Sandford could not have gotten to where she is now without the support of her family, who have yet to miss a match. Mark and Julie Sandford, her parents who live in Orange Park Acres, were thrilled to learn Sandford would be attending a school so close to home. Sandford said her parents have always been encouraging in her career in tennis; her dad is like a second coach and her mom is her best cheerleader. “Megan is contagious. She is off the cuff, but intense. She has a good sense of humor. She is honest, does not mind working hard and you can count on her,” said Julie Sandford. Sandford came with high recommendations from her teaching pros after leading her high school to the Trinity League title and nabbing a spot to compete in CIF finals her senior year as the No. 2 singles player. Reynolds looks forward to a good solid four years from her. “I knew that she was kind of a diamond in the rough and that she definitely had potential to improve. And she is already showing that,” Reynolds said.


7

April 26, 2011

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Sudoku

Sudoku brought to you by dailysudoku.com

5 1 9 6 7 2

1 7 2 9 6 4

6 4 1 5 2 8

2 3 6 8 9 1

2 1 4 6 9 3 8 7 5 7 5 6 1 2 8 3 9 4 Daily Sudoku: Sat 2-Oct-2010

9 3 2 4 7

9 3 5 2 8

6

4 6 7 6 2 9

1

4 3 1 6

How To Play: Each row must contain the numbers 1 to 9; each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9: and each set of boxes must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

(c) Daily Sudoku Ltd 2010. All rights reserved.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) You may recall a dream about something extremely old. Ancient objects or symbols may reflect the need to research and understand your roots.

Daily Sudoku: Sat 2-Oct-2010

7 5 3 4 8 6

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Thoughts race as you evaluate new data. You didn’t anticipate an important development that could change everything. Assess well before taking action.

9 1 6 6 3 5 7 6 2 9 6 1 9 4 4 2 8 7 5 3

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You may feel anxious about career goals. Pay attention to the mood. You discover that the worry isn’t yours. Help someone else to lighten it.

8

(c) Daily Sudoku Ltd 2010. All rights reserved.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) An older associate takes some of your work, so that you can spend time with family. Use the time to regroup and rethink a long-term decision. Change is good.

4 3

9 8 5 1 3 7

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Internal dialogue provides you a different point of logic. Harmony is the goal, and assertive energy is required to achieve it. Imagine freedom.

4 7 3 2

5 1

3 6 7 2 4 9

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Questions arise in your work that only you can answer. Don’t depend on others. Use your own imagination to cast light directly on the problem.

3 9 4 2

9

8 9 4 3 1 5

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Your self-esteem lies in the balance while you wrestle with an associate’s question. The group needs to address the situation, to discover workable choices.

2

very hard

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Don’t let your impulsive ideas carry you off task. Instead, harness that imagination to make ordinary processes more fun. Best results show when you focus wit and energy.

3

6 8 2 9 1 4 5 3 7

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Someone in your household is over-thinking today’s schedule. You may need to just get started before figuring out the finishing touches.

7

6

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Gemini (May 21-June 21) You’re nearing the finish line. All the pieces are there before you, and all you need is to put them together and add a glamorous final touch.

(c) Daily Sudoku Ltd 2010. All rights reserved.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Sticking to a practical plan presents problems. Others in the group just want to play. Bribe them if you must, to get the job done. Promise entertainment later.

Daily Sudoku: Sat 2-Oct-2010

Aries (March 21-April 19) You could obsess over the details of your partner’s situation, or instead redirect that energy toward your own to-do list. This gets more accomplished.


April 25 - May 1, 2011 Visit: http://communications.fullerton.edu/commweek

MONDAY 4.25

Monday April 25

10 AM

Room: Ontiveros AB “Multimedia Reporting for WebFirst Publication” Rob Whitfield Breaking News Videographer/ Reporter The Orange County Register Host: Professor Beth Georges

10 AM

Room: Hetebrink AB “Road to Success: Making a Difference in the Entertainment Industry” Eric Chambers Executive Producer, Host, and Writer Freelance Host: Professor Brent Foster

11 AM

Room: Ontiveros C “It’s Not How Good You Are, It’s How Good You Want to Be” Panel: Timothy Pagano & Heather Davis Consultant Hat Trick Inspirations Host: Professor Jenny Schroeder

11 AM

Room: Bradford AB “Taking Conflict Head On” Student Showcase Host: Professor Bob Emry

11:30 AM

Room: Tuffree AB “Marketing and PR in a Social Media World” Nancy Marmolejo Founder Viva Visibility Host: Professor Doug Swanson

Noon

Room: Ontiveros C “It’s Not How Good You Are, It’s How Good You Want to Be” Panel: Timothy Pagano & Heather Davis Consultant Hat Trick Inspirations Host: Professor Jenny Schroede

Noon

CSUF Quad Comm Week Kick-off Event Medieval Times

1 PM

Room: Alvarado A “Social Media Intelligence Extracting Business Intelligence from the Fire Hose of Conversations” Sally Falkow Social Media Strategist PRESSfeed, The Social Media Newsroom Host: Professor Diane Witmer

2:15 PM

Room: Alvarado A “Social Media Intelligence Extracting Business Intelligence from the Fire Hose of Conversations” Sally Falkow Social Media Strategist PRESSfeed, The Social Media Newsroom Host: Professor Diane Witmer

2:30 PM

Room: Titan Theatre “Goofin’ My Way Through Life” Bill Farmer Voice Actor Toonhouse, Inc. Host: Professors Rosanne Welch and Heather Osborne-Thompson

2:30 PM

Room: Ontiveros C Panel: “Write and Rewrite: The Art of Screenwriting and Editing” Robert Hoffman Freelance Editor Ryan Rowe Freelance Screenwriter Host: Professor Pat Verducci

2:30 PM

Room: Pavillion A “From Topeka to Tokyo to Tikrit: Telling Stories for a Living” Mike Tharp Executive Editor Merced Sun Star Host: Professors Love, Clanin and Longshaw

3 PM

Room: Pavillion B “Inside the TV Industry: CSUF Alumni Stories” Panel: Stephanie Miranda News Producer KGTV & KZSD (abc 10 News) Karyn Wulbrun Executive Director of Talent E! Entertainment Television Phil Blauer Reporter/Anchor KFMB TV CBS 8 Scott King Photographer/Editor Fox News Channel Following at 4:30 PM Room: Hetebrink AB SPECIAL EVENT TV News Reception

SPJ Member Mixer (By Invitation Only) Host: Professor Beth Georges and Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ)

4 PM

Room: Ontiveros AB Panel: “Harassment: Current Perspectives and Implications” Susan Leavy Coordinator, Prevention of Crimes Against Women CSUF Women’s Center and Adult Reentry Center Rosamaria Gomez-Amaro Director California State University Fullerton Diversity and Equity Programs Host: Professor Toya Wyatt

4 PM

Room: Pavillion A “From Topeka to Tokyo to Tikrit: Telling Stories for a Living” Mike Tharp Executive Editor Merced Sun Star Host: Professors Love, Clanin and Longshaw

4 PM

Room: Pavilion C “Fade To Black: The Need for Film Preservation” Theo Gluck Director, Library Restoration and Preservation The Walt Disney Studios Host: Professor Ricardo De Los Rios

4 PM

Room: Alvarado B “Managing Crisis Communications” Geoff Mordock Senior Vice President Fleishman-Hillard Host: Professor Diane Witmer

4:15 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “Preparing for a Media Career” Susan Belknapp Managing Editor OC Family/Churm Publishing Host: Professor Maria Loggia-Kee

5 PM

Room: Pavilion B SPECIAL EVENT US Premiere of RPM Miami Come Meet the Cast Sponsors: MUN2 Network and Entertainment and Tourism Club Host: Professor Henry Puente

6:30 PM

Room: Marriott Hotel SPECIAL EVENT ETC Industry Mixer Sponsor: Entertainment & Tourism Club

7 PM

Room: Ontiveros AB “An Inside Look Into Advertising Photography” Dana Hursey Owner Dana Hursey Photography Host: Professor David DeVries

7 PM

Room: Alvarado B “Is Public Relations Dead?” Beth Quezada Assistant Vice President Echo Media Group Host: Professor Doug Swanson

7 PM

Room: Ontiveros C “Making Your Mark in the New Media Landscape” Michael Linder Broadcaster, Journalist KVB.FM Host: Professor Holly OcasioRizzo

7 PM

Room: Bradford AB “The Magic Continues at Disneyland Resorts” Matt Prince Sr. Manager, Executive Communications Disneyland Resort Host: Professor Andi Stein

7 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “Concert Industry 101: Marketing and PR in Today’s Society” Panel: Vanessa Kromer Senior Director of Publicity Nederlander Concerts Derek Schaefer Tour Marketing Director at AEG Live/ Concerts West AEG Live Host: Professor Robert Wheeler

8 PM

Room: Irvine Campus-215 “How to Break into the Entertainment Field” Laarni Dacanay Diversity Communications Specialist NBC Universal Host: Professor Debra Conkey

TUESDAY 4.26

Tuesday April 26

10 AM - 9 PM AdCon Day SPECIAL EVENT 10 AM

Room: Titan Theatre AdCon “View Award Winning Advertising Film – “ART & COPY” Speaker: Michael Nadeau, Film Producer Host: Professor Kuen-Hee Ju-Pak Sponsor: AdCon

10 AM

Room: SGMH-1113 “A Day in the Life of a Speech Pathologist” Esther Lee Speech Pathologist South Coast Therapy Host: Professor HyeKeung Seung

11:30 AM

Room: Tuffree AB “The Life, Work, and Legacy of Boris Karloff ” Sara Karloff Owner Karloff Enterprises Host: Professor Gloria Monti

11:30 AM

Room: Bradford AB “How to Become a Sportswriter” Bill Plunkett Angels Beat Writer The Orange County Register Host: Professor Robert Quezada

Noon

Room: Pavilion A AdCon Luncheon Sponsor: AdCon8 (By Invitation Only)

1 PM

Room: Pavilion B AdCon “Insights on the Creative World” Serafin Canchola Creative Director of Fusebox LA Hosts: Professors Kuen-Hee JuPak, Carolyn Coal, Carrie Perry & Chris Medina Sponsor: Ad Con

1 PM

Room: Pavilion C “From Student Life to ‘THE SURREAL LIFE” Cris Abrego Co-Founder 51 MINDS ENTERTAINMENT, LLC Host: Professor Ed Fink

1 PM

Room: Alvarado AB “For the Love of Broadcasting” Beverly White Reporter NBCLA Host: Professor Irv Cueva

1 PM

Room: Gabrielino “Voices for Justice! More than 200 Years of Newspaper for, by and About Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans and Native Americans in the U.S.” Felix Gutierrez Professor of Journalism and Communication University of Southern California Host: Professor Henry Puente

2:30 PM

Room: Pavilion B AdCon “Advertising Panel” Hosts: Professors Carrie Perry, Robert Wheeler & Robert Sage

2:30 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “The Life, Work, and Legacy of Boris Karloff ” Sara Karloff Owner Karloff Enterprises Host: Professor Gloria Monti

2:30 PM

Room: Bradford AB “Social Media Then, Now & Next” Ted Nguyen Public Communication Manager Orange County Transportation Authority Host: Professor Dennis Gaschen

2:30 PM

Room: Pavilion C “CSUF Meets Wall Street Journal” Alexandra Berzon Reporter Wall Street Journal Host: Professor Jason Shepard

2:30 PM

Room: Ontiveros C “Media Ethics in the Newsroom” Dennis Foley Editor Orange County Register Host: Professor Tom Clanin

4 PM

Room: LH- 307 “The ‘Ever Evolving’ Technology in Social Media” Ian Hamilton Technology Reporter OC Register Host: Professor Nancy Snow

11 AM

4 PM

Room: Pavilion B AdCon New Media Workshop Panel Presenter: Noam Dromi, Consultant, Alcon Entertainment

4 PM

Room: Gabrielino “Tips for Writing Television and Movie Storytelling” Michael Hernandez Story Analyst NBC Universal Host: Professor Bill White

4 PM

Room: Ontiveros AB “Media & the Laws of the Land, ‘A Changing Landscape” Dennis Hernandez Of Counsel Luna & Glushon Law Firm Host: Professor Henry Mendoza

4 PM

Room: Hetebrink AB “From Dorm Room to Executive. How to Make it in an Online Market” Jermaine Griggs Founder Hear and Play Music Group Host: Professor Robert Wheeler

5:30 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “The Life, Work, and Legacy of Boris Karloff ” Sara Karloff Owner Karloff Enterprises Host: Professor Gloria Monti

5:30 PM

Room: Pavilion B AdCon Launch Party Guest Speaker & Logo Awards Presentation Host: AdCon8

7 PM

Room: Bradford AB “The Making of L.A. Radio News” Chris Little News Director, KFI AM640 Clear Channel Communications Host: Professor Robert van Riel

7 PM

Room: Titan Theatre ETC Alumni Panel Panelists: Al Nassar, Disney; Julie Guevara Susan G. Komen Foundation Mai Vo Carnegie Mellon University Peter Paul Bautista Storyboard Artist Host: Professor Puente Sponsor: Entertainment & Tourism Club

7 PM

Room: Pavilion A AdClub 9th Annual Creative Competition Sponsors: AdCon & Student Chapter AdClub

7 PM

Room: Gabrielino “How to Read a News Photograph” Michael Shaw Publisher Bag News Notes Host: Professor Christine Burrough

7 PM

Room: Ontiveros C “Covering Breaking News: From Murders to Fires to Kidnappings” Salvador Hernandez Crime/Breaking News reporter The Orange County Register Host: Professor Vik Jolly

7 PM

Room: Alvarado A “Blogging Hollywood: The New Basics” Joal Ryan Journalist E! Online, The Los Angeles Times, Public Radio Host: Professor Anne LaJeunesse

8 PM

Room: TSU Underground Campus Pub SPECIAL EVENT Poetry Slam 7 PM sign-up in the Pub Program begins at 8 PM Sponsor: SOAR-ICC

WEDNESDAY Wednesday April 27

4.27

9 AM

Room: Hetebrink AB “Why You Need Social Media to Grow a Business” Rajeev Kapur Founder and Chief Wala Greenwala Host: Professor Gerald Wright

9 AM

Room: Bradford AB “What is Your Motivation?” Student Showcase Host: Professor Bob Emry

Room: Pavilion C SPECIAL EVENT Communications Internship Fair Sponsors: Career Center & College of Communications

11 AM

Room: SGMH-1502 “The First Amendment on the Front Lines - Speech Rights in Legal Context” Kevin Vick Of Counsel at Bostwick & Jassy LLP Bostwick & Jassy LLP Host: Professor Genelle Belmas

11:30 AM

Room: Bradford AB “A Career in Communication: Importance of Communication in the Workplace” Patrick Patterson Director, Marketing Communications Beckman Coulter, Inc. Host: Professor Noorie Baig

12:30 PM

Room: Gabrielino SPECIAL EVENT Toastmasters Int’l Showcase Coffee & Networking with Professionals

1 PM

“Career Focus: Refine Your Speaking Skills” Presenters: Bob Stuart, Rachel Richardson, Eydie Esgana Sponsor: College of Communications

1 PM

Room: SGMH-1502 “From Phonograph to Facebook and How Media Shape the Rhetoric of Presidents and Those Who Aspire to the Job” Kathleen Hall Jamieson Professor of Communications & Director Annenberg Public Policy Center, University of Pennsylvania Host: Professor Nancy Snow

2:30 PM

Room: Alvarado A “From the Court Room to the Classroom. How to Make an Effective Oral Presentation” Mark E. Edwards, Esq. Western State University of Law Host: Professor Tiffani J. Smith

2:30 PM

Room: Titan Theatere “Social Media and Resporting” Robert Hernandez Web Journalist/Assistant Professor of Professional Practice USC Annenberg School of Jounalism Host: Professor Holly OcasioRizzo

4 PM

Room: Humanities-110 “It’s More Than Just a Sign” Panel: Elliot Light Vice President of Sales & Marketing PSB Integrated Marketing Russel Wright Brand Architect Freelancer Host: Professor Carolyn Coal

4 PM

Room: Bradford AB “Behind the Scenes at People Magazine” Elaine Aradillas Staff Writer People Magazine Host: Professor Holly OcasioRizzo

4:30 PM

Room: Pavilion B SPECIAL EVENT Dean’s Open House “Welcome Reception with Dr. William Briggs” College of Connunications Sponsor: College of Communications RSVP at http://www.fullerton. edu/commweek/2011-rsvp/

7 PM

Room: Humanities-110 “How Mobile Media is Used” Daniel Rhodes Vice President, Public Relations Global Results Communications Host: Professor Jeffrey Brody

7 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “Behind the Shades: Corporate PR at Oakley” Scott Cobett Corporate Communications Specialist Oakley, Inc. Host: Professor Andi Stein

7 PM

Nixon Presidential Library & Museum SPECIAL EVENT “What Presidential Rhetoric Conceals & Reveals” Professor Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Director,

Annenberg Public Policy Center, University of Pennsylvania Hosts: Professors Anthony Fellow & John Reinard Sponsor: Departments of Communications and Human Communication Studies

7 PM

Room: Pavilion A SPECIAL EVENT “Comm Soirée” PRSSA Professional Mixer Sponsor: Public Relations Student Society of America Student Chapter Admission: $10

7 PM

Room: Irvine Campus- 203 “Branding and Flagship Retail” Jeff Roberts Vice President Volcom Host: Professor Robert Wheeler

7 PM

Room: Hetebrink AB “The Psychology of Advertising: The Flex Your Power Campaign” Renee Fraser CEO Fraser Communications Host: Profesor Gail Love

7:30 PM

Room: Alvarado AB “Old Media in a New Media World” Jim Rainey Columnist LA Times Host: Professor Mel Opotowsky Thursday April 28 THURSDAY

4.28

10 AM

Room: Ontiveros A “Leadership Development” Student Showcase Host: Professor Bob Emry

10 AM

Room: Hetebrink AB “My Love Affair with Charlie Sheen” David Whiting Editor at Large OC Register Host: Professor Dennis Gaschen

11:30 AM

Room: Hetebrink AB “My Love Affair with Charlie Sheen” David Whiting Editor at Large OC Register Host: Professor Dennis Gaschen

1 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “First Person” Anne Opotowsky Freelance Writer Host: Professor Mel Opotowsky

1 PM

Room: Pavilion B “Changing Hollywood: An Overview of Independent and Studio Filmmaking” Ken Golde Producer, Screenwriter, Director Fire Breathing Dragon Entertainment Host: Professors Ed Fink & Diane Ambruso

1 PM

Room: Pavilions C “Burning Questions” Frank Snepp Journalist (Former CIA Analyst) NBC Universal Host: Professor Jeffrey Brody

2:30 PM

Room: Bradford AB “Gang Culture” Curt Levsen Officer (Retired) Whittier Police Department Host: Professor Jason Teven

2:30 PM

Room: Alvarado AB “Hidden Messages in Television?” Panel: David Brownfield Senior Vice President of Current Programs CBS Brian Lowry Writer Variety Host: Professor Philippe Perebinossoff

3 PM

Room: Ontiveros A “T.V. News Reporting for a Major Market” Don Guevara Reporter KTLA Host: Professor Brent Foster

4 PM

Room: Irvine Campus-207 “Is Public Relations Dead?” Kim Sherman Founder and President Echo Media Group Host: Professor Doug Swanson

4 PM

Room: Ontiveros BC “From Brand to Agency: Tales from the Trenches” Randy Lopez Director of Account Services Johnson Gray Advertising, Inc. Host: Professor Pete Evanow

4 PM

Room: Tuffree AB “Public Relations and Why it is Needed” Ashton Maxfield Senior Public Relations Manager Sole Technology Host: Professor Robert Wheeler

5 PM

Room: Hetebrink AB “Catch the “Big Fish” in Public Relations” Greg Fischbein President of Contiki Holidays US Contiki Holidays US Host: Professor Carol Ames

7 - 9 PM

Room: Pavilion A SPECIAL EVENT “Project Vietnam Showcase & Reception” Host: Professor Jeffrey Brody & Dean William Briggs Sponsor: College of Communication

7 PM

Room: Irvine Campus- 203 “Scary Monsters, Super Freaks, and New Journalists: How to Make Your Writing Jump Off the Page.” Mike Sager Writer at Large Esquire Host: Professor Vik Jolly

7 PM

Room: Bradford AB “So You’ve Graduated, Now What?” Panel: Bram Makonda Search Engine Optimization Content Writer WebMetro Davis Barber Publisher, FullertonStories.com Davis Barber Productions, Inc. Jim Delulio President and Founder PR Talent Host: Professor Steve Scauzillo

FRIDAY 4.29

Friday April 29

7 PM

Room: Goodwin Baseball Field Doubek VIP Suite SPECIAL EVENT Alumni Baseball Game - Comm Week Task Force Reunion Sponsor: College of Communication Alumni Chapter

SATURDAY

Saturday April 30

4.30

Noon

Room: Titan Theatre – Island SPECIAL EVENT “The Argument’ TV Pilot Screening Forensics Reception” Panel: Scott Carter Executive Producer Efficiency Studios Steve Skrovan Executive Producer/Writer Host: Professor Jon Bruschke & CSUF Forensics Program

7 - 10 PM

Room: Pavilion ABC SPECIAL EVENT NSSLHA’s Casino Night Sponsor: National Student Speech - Hearing - Language Association (NSSHLA)

Add us on Facebook: Facebook.com/ CSUFcommweek11 Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ CSUFcommweek *Programs and events are subject to change.

*All events take place in the Titan Student Union unless otherwise noted.


Daily Titan April 26, 2011