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Portland, Maine. Yes. News is good here! THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 2013

VOL. 5 NO. 106

PORTLAND, ME

PORTLAND’S DAILY NEWSPAPER

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A Portland police cruiser rolls on a car-packed Eastern Prom Wednesday during the Optimist New England Championship Regatta, which brought in hundreds of sailing fans. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

Regatta avoids the potholes of Eastern Prom parking — Paving, street sweeping suspended for sailing event; page 8 ‘Stella!’ Legislator’s car booted outside hill coffeeshop; page 9 Reward offered in Portland pawn shop burglary — See page 3

In the garden — See Karen Vachon’s column, page 4

The Bates Dance Festival steps out — See page 6


Page Page 22 — — THE The PORTLAND PORTLAND DAILY Daily SUN, Sun, Thursday, Thursday, August August 8, 8, 2013 2013

Early Welles film found

(NY Times) — In 1941, Orson Welles made his debut as a feature film director with “Citizen Kane,” a fact well known to everyone who has ever taken Film 101. But Welles’s first professional encounter happened three years before his Hollywood debut, in the form of about 40 minutes of footage intended to be shown with “Too Much Johnson,” a revival of an 1894 farce that Welles intended to bring to Broadway for the 1938 season of his Mercury Theater. Welles never quite finished editing the large amount of footage he shot for “Too Much Johnson,” and when the show folded out of town, after a disastrous preview in Stony Creek, Conn., he set the film aside and forgot about it. Sometime in the 1960s, as Welles told Frank Brady for an article in the November 1978 issue of American Film, he came across the material again, in his villa in Spain. “I screened it, and it was in perfect condition, with not a scratch on it. It had a fine quality. Cotten was magnificent, and I immediately made plans to edit it and send it to Joe as a birthday present,” Welles said Regrettably, while Welles was away for an acting job, a fire destroyed the villa and most of its contents. “Too Much Johnson,” which had been shot on highly inflammable nitrate stock, had apparently been lost to the ages. “Too Much Johnson” has reappeared in the warehouse of a shipping company in the northern Italian port city of Pordenone, where the footage had apparently been abandoned sometime in the 1970s.

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Home of Cleveland kidnapper demolished

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CLEVELAND — (NY Times) — The Cleveland house where three kidnapped women were raped and tortured for nearly a decade was demolished by the city on Wednesday as part of a plea agreement that sent their abductor, Ariel Castro, to prison last week for life. Observers of the demolition included one of the victims, Michelle Knight, center, who released yellow balloons to remember

other kidnapping victims yet to be rescued. The demolition, which took about an hour and a half, was greeted by cheers from a group that included one of his victims, Michelle Knight, who spoke briefly before the work began and released a batch of yellow balloons to remember other kidnapping victims yet to be rescued. “Why it was important to be here today is because no one was there for me when I was

missing,” said Knight, 32, who the Cleveland police have acknowledged spending relatively little time looking for because they believed she had moved away from the area. The two-story white house at 2207 Seymour Street, which since the women’s rescue had been fenced in, its windows and doors boarded over, had already become a draw to the curious, with motorists driving slowly past day and night, according to residents and the police.

Obama cancels Putin meeting Yemen, on alert for terrorism, claims it foiled a Qaeda plot as Snowden adds to strains

WASHINGTON (NY Times) — President Obama has canceled a planned summit meeting with the Russian president, Vladimir V. Putin, officials said Wednesday, a response to frustration at the Russian government for refusing to send Edward J. Snowden, the fugitive intelligence analyst, to the United States to face charges of leaking national security secrets. The move is also a reflection of growing tensions between the two countries on a series of other issues, including Putin’s continuing support of President Bashar al-Assad of Syria. In a statement, the White House said the president had decided to post-

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pone the summit meeting between the two leaders after concluding that there had not been enough progress made on the “bilateral agenda” to make a meeting worthwhile. “Given our lack of progress on issues such as missile defense and arms control, trade and commercial relations, global security issues, and human rights and civil society in the last twelve months, we have informed the Russian government that we believe it would be more constructive to postpone the summit until we have more results from our shared agenda,” Jay Carney, the White House press secretary, said in a statement.

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SANA, Yemen (NY Times) — Yemeni security officials said Wednesday that they had foiled an audacious plot by Al Qaeda to seize an important port and kidnap or kill foreigners working there, but the claim aroused some skepticism among Yemenis and independent terrorism analysts. The foiled plot did not appear to be related to the threat that has led to the closing of embassies here and elsewhere. A day after the United States and Britain moved to withdraw personnel from Yemen in response to concern over the possible terrorist threat, Yemen’s capital was in a state of high alert, with jet fighters soaring overhead and many streets barricaded. Intercepts of secret correspondence between Ayman alZawahri, the leader of Al Qaeda, and Nasser al-Wuhayshi, the leader of the Qaeda affiliate in Yemen, inspired deep concern inside the American government about a possible terrorist plot by the group. American government officials said that Zawahri used the communication to urge the Yemeni militant leader to carry out a large terrorist attack.

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Reward offered in Portland pawn shop burglary By Craig Lyons THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A Portland pawn shop is offering a reward to help apprehend the people who burglarized the store earlier in the week. Coastal Trading and Pawn is offering $500 to anyone who might have information that leads to the arrest of two people who broke into the store early Monday. The Portland Police Department released a surveillance video clip Wednesday that shows two subjects inside Coastal Trading and Pawn, located in Union Station Plaza, as the subjects jump the sales counter and make off with two duffel bags of merchandise. Police released the video, via Facebook, to see if anyone saw anything in the area of the store around the time of the robbery or can identify the two subjects in the video, who both wore masks during the burglary. The case remains under investigation. One of the subjects was wearing a red shirt over a black hooded sweatshirt, and the other wore a black shirt over a light-colored hooded sweatshirt and dark pants. The burglars broke in through the front door, according to police, and signs of forced entry were found. The video shows the two people ripping the display case doors off the hinges before loading the items into duffel bags. After less than two minutes, the video shows the two burglars leaving through the front door. Police say the subjects made off with jewelry and small electronics. The crime occurred at 2:17 a.m. on Monday, police reported. Anyone with information about the robbery is

The Portland Police Department released a surveillance video clip Wednesday that shows two subjects inside Coastal Trading and Pawn, located in Union Station Plaza. This screen shot shows the suspects after they have climbed over the counter to burglarize the pawn shop. (COURTESY IMAGE)

asked to contact the Portland Police Department at 874-8533 or Det. Kelley Gorham at 874-8933. Community members may submit tips by going to the Portland Police Department website: www.

portland-police.com and clicking “Submit an Anonymous Crime Tip.” Finally, anonymous phone tips can be left on the police department’s Crime Tip line: 874-8584.

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Montreal Maine, Atlantic Railway files for bankruptcy in U.S. court Daily Sun Staff Reports The Montreal Maine and Atlantic Railway has filed for bankruptcy protection in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Maine, following the rail catastrophe and derailment at Lac-Mégantic, Québec on July 6. Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Canada Co. announced Wednesday that it filed a petition seeking relief under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act in the Superior Court of Québec in Montréal, and at the same time, Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway, Ltd. filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code. MMA Canada also announced that Richter Advisory Group agreed to act as the court-appointed monitor of the Canadian company. “It has become apparent that the obligations of both companies now exceed the value of their assets, including prospective insurance recoveries, as a direct result of the tragic derailment at Lac-Mégantic, Québec on July 6th, and a process under Chapter 11 and the CCAA is the best way to ensure fairness of treatment to all in these tragic circumstances,” Edward Burkhardt, chairman of the board of both companies, said in a press release. Furthermore, he said that “MMA wishes to continue to work with the Québec Ministry of the Envi-

ronment, the municipality of Lac-Mégantic, and other government authorities in the continuing environmental remediation and clean-up as long as is necessary, and will do everything within its capacity to achieve completion of such goal.” The company advised that essential rail services will continue at all stations in Québec, Maine and Vermont subsequent to the court filings (with the exception of Lac-Mégantic itself), and that service to industries at Lac-Mégantic could be restored as soon as the authorities allow such service and to the level that they consider appropriate. The companies currently employ 85 people. Employees of both companies who provide continued services will receive their wages and benefits under the laws of both the United States and Canada, the press release stated. Late Wednesday afternoon, after the Maine Department of Transportation confirmed the bankruptcy filing in Maine, Governor Paul LePage released a statement regarding the filing: “Maine DOT will vigilantly and actively participate in the bankruptcy and in any related proceedings before the Surface Transportation Board to protect the public interests of the State of Maine and its citizens and the rights of shippers to receive service. It is critical that shippers have accessibility to the rail lines, which provide great economic benefit to our state. The LePage Administration is committed to ensuring safe, continuous rail operations within the State of Maine for the benefit of shippers, the business community, and the citizens of the State of Maine. In addition, MaineDOT has and will

continue to consult and work with the Federal Rail Administration in this situation.”

Memorial Bridge ribbon cutting today U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., will join officials from New Hampshire and Maine for a Memorial Bridge ribbon cutting ceremony today at 11 a.m., Shaheen announced. Shaheen will also participate in a ceremonial walk across the bridge from Kittery to Portsmouth. Shaheen worked closely with members of the Maine and New Hampshire delegation to secure $20 million in federal funding to construct the new lift bridge. New Hampshire officials said the bridge connecting Portsmouth, N.H., and Kittery across the Piscataqua River  was to be opened prior to Thursday to motor vehicle, bicycle and pedestrian traffic once final testing was completed. Keith Cota, chief project manager of NHDOT, in a recent interview by Deborah McDermott of the Portsmouth Herald, called it a “grand feat that Archer Western and design partner HNTB Inc.” were on track to complete the bridge within two weeks of deadline. The Aug. 8 celebration was planned to highlight the historical link between Portsmouth and Kittery, with a procession across the bridge and a ceremonial ribbon-cutting by former Portsmouth Mayor Eileen Foley, who was 5 years old when she cut the ribbon at the original Memorial Bridge opening on Aug. 17, 1923. 


Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Reince is right

WASHINGTON — Reince Priebus says a lot of goofy things, but the chairman of the Republican National Committee has a point. Films can dramatically alter the way famous people are viewed, making them cooler, more glamorous, more sympathetic — and the reverse. Clever filmmakers can offer up delicious soufflés of propaganda and storytelling, putting a new imprint on the historical The New record. Priebus has complained to York Times NBC and CNN executives about plans for what he calls Hillary Clinton “puff pieces” while Hillary is “on the dance floor.” The NBC entertainment division is doing a four-hour mini-series starring Diane Lane, and CNN Films is producing a documentary to be shown in theaters next year directed by Charles Ferguson, who won an Oscar for “Inside Job,” his scorching 2010 documentary on Wall Street. Priebus says the films would be political ads “masquerading” as unbiased productions. He should know, since Republicans popularized full-length attack films, sliming the Clintons and Obamas. (In the 2008 documentary “Hillary: the Movie,” produced by the conservative Citizens United, one woman claimed the Clintons put a hit out on her cat.) NBC is planning to make the mini-series soon, before Hillary formally announces, so that the network doesn’t run into problems with less scintillating rivals demanding equal time. Priebus says that shows “a guilty conscience.” You need look no further than “The Queen” — Helen Mirren’s Oscar-winning turn as Queen Elizabeth — to see how reputations can be burnished. After Princess Diana’s death in 1997, the royals

Maureen Dowd –––––

see DOWD page 5

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Tales of the garden Here we are in the more relaxed days of summer. It’s a peacefulness that doesn’t involve kicking back. Rather, I’m doing more. And it feels so good. It isn’t revolutionary. Rather, it’s simple; it’s bringing back memories, and it’s connecting me with relatives; some whom have long since passed. To what, should credit be given? Very simply: It is my garden. Amid a slew of zucchinis Better with (some of which came from my farm share), cherry tomatoes, Age parsley, sage, rosemary, and raspberries; flanked by an abundance of Black Eyed Susan’s and soon to bloom, sunflowers — I’m reminded of the abundance present right here in my backyard. What will I do with those ten zucchinis? I’m awakened, that this beauty should be both shared and celebrated. What better way? A garden party; or two, or three! Outside entertaining has proved itself to be simple. I’ve had three parties last week. At one of them, my uber healthy friends, noted an especially healthy weed growing in my garden. Before I knew it, my garden was weeded, and my friends where fighting over who would be first to harvest the next round. Wild!! My love for gardening has grown over the years. Growing up on a farm and having vegetables and flowers grown all around me, it was the only thing I knew. Want corn for dinner? Put the pot of water on to boil; and then go pick and husk the corn — that’s how it worked. Further out in the fields were rows

Karen Vachon –––––

My dad would seek solace pruning my bushes and hurling a shovel. Determined that, at the very least, I should have the infamous low maintenance Hostas and day lilies — in one way, shape, and form, clearly I was destined to have a garden, as long as Dad occasionally came around. and rows of calendulas. I have very vivid memories of my grandmother, in the fields in her beige wraparound skirt, picking and bunching orange and yellow pungent calendulas to sell on the stand. Beyond the calendula field was the black berry patch. And that would be my first job: I vaguely recall that it may have been 25 cents/pint box (nicely rounded, my grandmother would say) that I was paid for that prickly and bloody job. As is often the case by the time I went to college, and beyond — gardening was furthest from my mind. I had absolutely no interest, and told friends and family so. Once married, I was grateful for my parent’s visits. My dad would seek solace pruning my bushes and hurling a shovel. Determined that, at the very least, I should have the infamous low maintenance Hostas and day lilies — in one way, shape, and form, clearly I was destined to have a garden, as long as Dad occasionally came around. Still, for me, weeding, mulching, separating was nowhere on my radar screen. Rather, it very much was: Where’s Dad when the garden needs tending?! By 1995, my husband and I were living in Switzerland with our two young children. As is typical, see VACHON page 5


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 5

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‘Little did I know this garden would change my view and attitude’ VACHON from page 4

and my heart was warmed. I felt my grandmother’s presence and smiled. “Yes, grammy: next year, I will be planting calendulas in my own garden!” And, Grammy — by the way, we have been monitoring the blackberries along the walking paths. They’re just about ready. Waste not, want not: The ten zucchinis have been put to good use too. Next party: a baby shower. Zucchini quiche and zucchini bread are on the menu; proof that while life goes on; in some strange way, the future and pass merge. I’m amazed I’ve been able to get all this done: gardens, parties, work, and play. (Perhaps the weed genies are sneaking in too?) I feel relaxed and peaceful; grateful that my garden has brought me to this place.

(Karen Vachon is a Scarborough resident. She is a licensed health and life insurance agent and active community volunteer. To follow her on Facebook, go to: http://www.facebook.com/karenvachonhealth.)

living in a different culture heightens your awareness. I duly noted the Swiss love and sanctity for their gardens; their frugality to waste nothing; combined with efficiency of space, sparked an appreciation and love for gardening that I would come to see in a whole new light. The message: It was time to grow up in more ways than one! I returned to the U.S. with a Swiss package of Black Eyed Susan’s, spiraling sticks, and cement cast window boxes. That was 16 years ago. It’s like time has stood still. The Black Eyed Susan’s are abundant and going strong; the window boxes and spiral sticks are still in place. Vertical gardening, combined with a coexistence of vegetables and flowers gives me joy in the fun and fruitfulness of my back garden. My house sits on the corner of Higgins Beach’s most busy intersection. A big fir tree on the corner, once blocked the corner and provided privacy. I was bummed when CMP demanded the tree come down. A new garden was born. Little did I know this garden would change my view and attitude. Now the steward of a very exposed and inviting corner to Higgins Beach, I’m in my garden daily in the summer. As is typical with a flower garden (I’ve come to learn), picking is good! The more picking, the longer your garden will last. Care of your garden is not only care for your soul; it feeds your ego, too! Passersby constantly comment. Some acknowledge the hard work, others admire the beauty, still more, express their gratitude. I’ve come to realize that if I’m having a bad day; the place to go is my corner garden; I can’t ever go there and leave without being lifted up. It’s a conversation piece; it builds community; it feels good! Last week, I made my weekly visit to pick up my farm share. Cutters are available to go out in the fields to pick herbs and flowers. I noted the scent of those musky pungent calendulas. I grabbed my cutters and picked the flowers — coming straight from work, I was in pumped sandals, and “I’ve come to realize that if I’m having a bad day; the place to go is my corner garden; I can’t ever go there and leave without being lifted up,” the columnist wearing a beige skirt. I felt a chill says. (KAREN VACHON PHOTOS)

Hillary tries awkwardly to airbrush her history, but everybody can use some professional help DOWD from page 4

were seen as bloodless ice cubes, and there were questions about the viability of the monarchy. But when the sympathetic movie came out in 2006, the queen’s popularity soared. Peter Morgan, the British screenwriter of “The Queen,” acknowledges he played “a small part” in that. “When people sobered up from the week after Diana’s death, a lot of them felt pretty silly,” he told me. “The royal family behaved badly, but we behaved worse, millions of people who knew nothing about Diana holding her up as a patron saint. “The surprise in the movie was, oh, the queen is quite an emotional woman. We connected to her terrible loneliness, a privileged person living in vast houses, a woman who was making mistakes, getting lost, missing steps, getting confused. It was endearing.” Morgan, who rooted for Hillary against Barack Obama in 2008 and still feels “pretty sure she’d be a great president,” doesn’t think there’s much potential for dramatically revising her image. “The horse has bolted in terms of original thought,” he said. “You can only further consolidate stuff we already know.”

Consolidation, however, can still be brutal. Julianne Moore’s Emmy-winning performance in “Game Change” solidified Sarah Palin’s reputation as an emotionally erratic dunce. Palin attacked the “proleftist, pro-Barack Obama machine there at HBO.” Moore and Palin aside, often when someone is portrayed by a popular actor — consider Robert Redford as Bob Woodward — some of the glamour seeps into the subject. And Diane Lane is a very alluring actress. Hillary tries awkwardly to airbrush her history, but everybody can use some professional help. By the time Hollywood is finished, Hillary could be fighting critics with the sexy charm and kickboxing skills of Catwoman. Of course, Priebus being Priebus, he went on to say something goofy, petulantly threatening to cut NBC and CNN out of Republican debates if they don’t cancel their Hillary shows by Aug. 14. After his 2012 autopsy, the R.N.C. chief said that there should be fewer Republican debates (so the candidates have fewer chances to self-destruct, as Rick Perry did, or self-deport to the right, as Mitt Romney did). So maybe he’s just trying to kill two birds with one stone. But that just made the Republicans look as though they were running around stamping their

feet because they don’t have any leaders outside New Jersey anyone wants to see a movie about — let alone two. They are wasting time trying to stop Obamacare, and being led around by the nose by the cretinous Ted Cruz. The Clintons, working hard to cast themselves as models of civic virtue, are upset at scandals rippling through their world. The Virginia gubernatorial race of their pal and former fund-raiser, Terry McAuliffe, has been roiled by the revelation that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating GreenTech, the electric-car firm he co-founded. And there’s the potboiler in New York, where Clinton pet Huma Abedin props up digital dog Anthony Weiner as he talks about “Medicare for all New Yorkers” while his former sexting partner, Sydney Leathers, pops up in a satirical porn film. “We are a hundred miles from that race, and everyone understands that we are not going to be involved,” Bill Clinton told CNN, explaining that they can’t support Weiner because they are friends with some of his rivals. He diplomatically left out the part about how, also, they can’t stand Weiner. But, fortunately for Hillary, Reince Priebus is working hard to make her look more important.


Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

Meredith Lyons (front) and other dancers from the Bates Dance Festival perform at Think Tank in Portland as part of August First Friday Art Walk (TIMOTHY GILLIS PHOTO))

Bates Dance Festival tapping into state’s multicultural scene

Manager: Burgeoning Somali population in Portland, Lewiston adds diversity By Timothy Gillis

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The Bates Dance Festival visited the August First Friday Art Walk, moving in space at the Think Tank on Congress Street. Meredith Lyons, admissions director and operations manager for the Bates Dance Festival, brought some dancers down with her. She was getting to know Portland after her move here three months ago from Philadelphia, checking out what this city had to offer by way of a local dance scene. “Officially, I have a place in Portland, but I haven’t been able to be there because I’m always here,” she said of her work in Lewiston with the Bates Dance Festival, which is 31 years old, and attracts dancers from all over the world to Bates College each summer. Lyons has been a student and worked for the festival in the past, but this was her first year in her new roles. The six-week dance program begins with three weeks of a youth programming. During this time, the camp is open to Maine kids only, ages 6 to 17. And the Youth Arts Program offers more than dance. “They do dance theater, art, music,” said Lyons. “It’s an amazing arts program, happening at the same time that this professional program is going on. The majority of these students are able to go with financial assistance. It’s a great way to give back to the Maine community and give them an education that they are not possibly getting at their school programs. Teachers come here from all over the world, the top teachers of the field of whatever they are teaching.” She cited a burgeoning Somali population in Portland and Lewiston as adding a diversity to the dance instruction this year. “We get a lot of kids off the streets,” she said. “We

get to see them dancing — 60 such kids, with 175 professional students and 30 faculty.” Lyons received her master’s degree in fine art for dance teaching and choreographer from Smith College. She will be a faculty adjunct professor at Colby College and Bates, and is also one of the guest choreographers for the Bates dance show in the fall. “I wear a couple of hats,” she said. “Basically, I’m a dance educator, choreographer, and a performer ... and now an administrator.” She was drawn to the festival by a local legend. Laura Faure, who has been with the program for more than 25 years, is said to be widely sought out in the dance community. “A lot of dance companies have come through her,” Lyons said. “She has spent a lot of time and energy to build and grow them. A lot of dancers have come here as students, and she’s helped mentor and support them through the ‘new and emerging’ program and also presents big name dance companies each weekend. Choreographers come here to recruit their dancers.” The Bates Dance Festival takes over the college during the summer, but it’s a welcomed invasion. “We use all their spaces and convert spaces into studios,” Lyons said. “Also for dancers from Chicago, London, and San Francisco, it’s nice to be here in Maine.”

The Bates Dance Festival The festival will showcase “Different Voices,” featuring new and emerging choreographers, today and Friday, Aug. 8 and 9, at 7:30 p.m. at the Shaeffer Theater at Bates College in Lewiston. The Festival Finale, a student and faculty performance, is Saturday, Aug. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Alumni Gym.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 7

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————

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEWS BRIEFS–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Maine Turnpike launches push to promote E-ZPass; more than 148,000 Maine accounts sold Daily Sun Staff Reports The Maine Turnpike, which adopted E-ZPass in 2005, has seen steady use of the electronic toll collection system following last year’s increase in tolls, officials reported. “We currently have 148,996 Maine E-ZPass accounts and 214,344 Maine E-ZPass transponders (windshield tags). There can be multiple transponders on one account — up to four. We’ve sold 26,487 transponders since the November 2012 toll increase (just over 2,900 per month) as users attempt to benefit from lower toll rates,” reported Dan Morin, public relations manager and legislative liaison for the Maine Turnpike Authority. Last Saturday, Aug. 3 marked the 20th anniversary E-ZPass. On that day in 1993, toll facilities in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania formed the E-ZPass Interagency Group. The Maine Turnpike used a system called “Transpass” starting in 1997, until the state adopted E-ZPass in 2005.   Most Maine E-ZPass trips are cheaper than cash, Morin said. Every trip between Exit 45 (Maine Mall Road) and Exit 52 (Falmouth Spur) is 50 cents if using a Maine E-ZPass for toll payment. The cash rate is $1. Those who travel the Turnpike between those two exits for their daily commute receive a 50 percent discount by making 40 one-way trips a month (20 round-trips). The toll then becomes only 25 cents per one-way trip — or 75 percent below the cash rate, Morin said. In June, 27,360 Maine E-ZPass users received the 50 percent frequent travel discount — another 10,923 received a 25 percent discount from the Maine E-ZPass rate by making between 30-39 oneway trips (15 to 19 round-trips), Morin reported. “The cash tolls went up in a number of locations ... but the E-ZPass only went up a penny a mile,” Morin said in an Aug. 1 interview. “The toll increase for E-ZPass customers wasn’t that much. ... We thought that that was manageable,” he added. The Turnpike moved away from Transpass, its electronic toll collection system from 1997, “once EZPass began spreading in these other states ... I think Maine kind of saw the writing on the wall, saw a handful of states getting together on this one method to pay,” Morin explained. It costs four times less to collect tolls electronically vs. cash, Morin said. He said 17 percent of operating costs are the result of manual collection of tolls. The Maine Turnpike Authority, a quasi-state agency created by the Maine Legislature in 1941, plans to begin a promotion push for E-ZPass to help inform the public of its benefits, Morin said. For more about E-ZPass, visit http://www.maineturnpike.com/Home.aspx.

Traffic flows on the Maine Turnpike at Cumberland last weekend, when back-ups were reported especially near York. “We have a tremendous amount of out-of-state traffic every summer, more than 50 percent of our tolls are paid by out-of-staters every year,” said Dan Morin, public relations manager and legislative liaison for the Maine Turnpike Authority. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

Eid-al-Fitr prayers at Portland Expo this morning, Islamic Society reports The Islamic Society of Portland has announced that the location of this year’s Eid-al-Fitr prayers will be the Portland Expo Building this morning. Initially, the exact location wasn’t known, as it differed depending on what day Eid fell on, the group reported. Since Eid falls on a Thursday, the prayers will take place at the Exposition Building on 239 Park Ave, the group reported. Prayer will start at 9 a.m. At the end of Ramadan, Muslims participate in a three-day celebration called Eid al-Fitr (the Festival of Fast-Breaking). Any questions can be directed to Mohamud Barre at 233-6014.

Steep Falls woman seriously hurt in I-295 crash at Bowdoinham Maine State Police say a woman was seriously injured when her car overturned along Interstate 295 in Bowdoinham Tuesday evening. Mona Lee Kelley, 56, of Steep Falls was taken to Central Maine Medical Center in Lewiston with multiple injuries, State Police reported. Troopers

said her car overturned in the median along the southbound lane and she was thrown from the vehicle.   The crash took place shortly after 6 p.m., as troopers began looking for the car after several motorists had called State Police saying the car was being driven erratically and had earlier struck a guard rail in Gardiner without stopping, according to a state press release,

Every Tues. Night is Benefit Night at Flatbread Join us from 5-9pm

Tuesday, August 13th $3.50 will be donated for every pizza sold.

Benefit:

Portland Veterans Acupuncture Clinic

72 Commercial St., Portland, ME

Open Sun. thru Thurs 11:30am–9:00pm, Fri. & Sat. 11:30am–10:00pm


Page 8 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

ABOVE: Today is the final day of the Optimist New England Championship Regatta, which brought hundreds of sailing fans to the Eastern Prom and Cutter Street. BELOW: The city fielded questions about lack of enforcement of “no parking” signs on the Eastern Prom. City officials said street sweeping was suspended and parking allowed during the regatta. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTOS)

Regatta avoids potholes of Eastern Prom parking By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

When hundreds of young sailors and their families converged on the Eastern Prom this week for a regional regatta, one question had to be answered: Where would they all park? Then, throw in street paving that would have closed off the Eastern Prom in the area of Cutter Street, and possible street sweeping by the city, and it could have been anything but smooth sailing. “We got it straightened out,” said Alicia Mooradian, regatta chair for SailMaine, host organization on Wednesday afternoon. Today is the final day of the Optimist New England Championship Regatta, a qualifier for a national event. SailMaine, a grassroots-focused nonprofit organization formed to support sailing in Maine, likened the departure of so many visitors to a “grand exodus of opti sailors and their boats.” An estimated 310 children along with their parents and their siblings arrived for the regional regatta, some from across the world, Mooradian said. “We’re appreciative of the city and the surrounding neighborhood. It’s a great resource,” she said, referring to the East End launch site off Cutter Street. Organizers of the regatta alerted participants that the Eastern Prom would remain open to the public and gave parking guidelines. “Our venue is a public park, so we need to keep it open to the public as much as possible,” read a link at SailMaine’s regatta website, http://www. sailmaine.org/optinewenglands/Regatta_Info/index. html. “Parking is available above the park on the adjacent streets. We know this is a huge inconve-

nience, but appreciate your cooperation.” Little did participants know how much more complicated the parking situation could have been. On July 25, the Friends of the Eastern Promenade issued a newsletter, which included updates on Maine Department of Transportation road work on the street overlooking Casco Bay. The newsletter noted that “the Eastern Promenade roadway is undergoing preparations for paving earlier than anticipated. Glidden Excavating & Paving is the contractor for MDOT on this paving job which is linked with the work being done to realign the Cutter Street entrance to the Park. ... The existing crosswalk at Cutter St is 100 ft in length — the longest in the city. Narrowing the pavement in this area will improve sight lines and make crossing the road safer for pedestrians. Realignment work is expected to take approximately 2 weeks. Paving

crews will then return in August to do the actual paving of the E. Prom roadway.” Mooradian said Glidden Excavating & Paving agreed to postpone paving to allow regatta participants to park along the Eastern Prom. “They decided not to pave during this Marshall week so we could actually park on the street,” she said. “It would have been closed this week.” The contractor did them a favor and postponed the job, Mooradian said. Matthew Day, a resident on the Eastern Prom, said he had a hard time sorting out what kind of parking restrictions were in place. He pointed out signs that specifically indicate “no parking” except in a few hours on Tuesdays, from 8 a.m. to noon. “I just said, ‘There’s all these cars illegally parked, and I almost got hit by a car,” he recalled of a conversation he had with city officials. City Councilor David Marshall confirmed he heard concerns about the parking situation, and he said he talked to the parking director, John Peverada, “and he explained a little bit of what was going on.” Generally, on Mondays and Tuesdays, the city restricts parking on the oceanside of Eastern Prom for street sweeping, but the street sweeping was suspended to allow parking on the side away from houses, where the least amount of disruption would occur, Marshall explained. Mooradian said participants in the regatta enjoyed themselves and relished a chance to see the state. “Most of these people have not been to Maine, and they were really excited to be here,” she said.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 9

Legislator finds her car booted outside Munjoy HIll coffeeshop By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Maine Rep. Diane Russell, D-Portland, got the boot on Wednesday, but not from voters. The popular Munjoy Hill legislator instead found her midnight blue 1991 Ford Mustang convertible, lovingly named Stella, booted by the city’s parking division. “Boot of shame. Happy Birthday me,” she lamented on Facebook. An afternoon stop outside Hilltop

Coffeeshop left Stella with an expensive set of “handcuffs,” Russell said of the parking device that immobilizes vehicles. “I was meeting with someone to go over some projects I have ... I’m doing legislative work,” Russell explained. “I squeezed in front, and apparently I parked in the no parking zone, and apparently my nose was sticking in the crosswalk,” she said. “I earned it,” Russell admitted, but she couldn’t help but wonder at the

Maine Rep. Diane Russell, D-Portland, shared this image of a warning of a “boot” device on her car. (COURTESY PHOTO)

–––––––––––––––––––––– WHAT’S IN A NAME? –––––––––––––––––––––– Back by popular demand, What’s in a Name? will profile business names in and around Greater Portland weekly. Letterpress Books Northgate Plaza Auburn Avenue Portland By Natalie Ladd THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Bakshoian, Osborn’s goal for the 864 square foot space is, “...to be the best possible bookstore to our community. We’re going to have readings and author signings and story time. We’ll be working with teachers, too.” So why start a new book store in a North Deering shopping plaza over the convenience of Amazon or Kindle? “It’s just nice to browse and be able to pick up so many different new books and read the covers,” Karen Bakshoian said, “We want to share staff picks, and be a community place children can feel the books, too.” And the name? “We wanted to go for the vintage aspect that’s so popular right now,” Osborn said. “Sort of ‘vintage meets modern in New World printing’ or something like that. I’m a fan of letter press machines and the term is back in vogue with greeting cards and stamping.”

There is no website or phone number and the windowed storefront is completely hidden from public with sheets of brown paper and blue tape. A sign printed in Ben Franklin font saying “Letterpress Books, Opening Soon ...” gives no hint that frantic sanding of drywall is taking place behind the scenes. Slated to open the first week of October, Letterpress Books will be a family-owned and operated, full service store offering new volumes, best sellers, classics and a large children’s section. Owner Katherine Osborne, 42, is no stranger to the stacks having 24 years of book buying and selling experience, most recently for 10 years as manager of the former Books, Etc. on Exchange Street. Partnering with her mother and stepfather, Karen and John Paul A sign on the window at Northgate. (NATALIE LADD PHOTO)

timing. “Come on, two days from my birthday!” Russell said in an interview, “It was my fault, and that’s the bottom line. It was my fault, the guy was good natured, I just wish it wasn’t my birthday Maine Rep. Diane Rus- week.” sell, D-Portland, is shown The boot came at a constituent event in into play because Portland. (FILE PHOTO) Russell said she

had $140 worth of unpaid tickets to the city. With a $50 charge for Wednesday’s infraction, the total bill came to $190 to have the boot removed, she said. “I don’t know how it got to be that,” Russell said of her backlog of tickets. If anything, the incident shattered a common stereotype about legislators, that they often enjoy preferential treatment, especially forgiveness of parking tickets, Russell said. For the recently acquired car that Russell has mentioned on her Facebook page, the Portland legislator had one conclusion. “Stella does not like to be handcuffed,” she said.


Today’s Birthdays: Actor Richard Anderson is 87. Actress Nita Talbot is 83. Singer Mel Tillis is 81. Actor Dustin Hoffman is 76. Actress Connie Stevens is 75. Country singer Phil Balsley is 74. Actor Larry Wilcox is 66. Actor Keith Carradine is 64. Movie director Martin Brest is 62. Radio-TV personality Robin Quivers is 61. Actor Donny Most is 60. Rock musician Dennis Drew is 56. Actor-singer Harry Crosby is 55. Rock musician The Edge (U2) is 52. Rock musician Rikki Rockett (Poison) is 52. Rock musician Ralph Rieckermann is 51. Country singer Mark Wills is 40. Actor Kohl Sudduth is 39. Rock musician Tom Linton is 38. Singer JC Chasez is 37. Actress Lindsay Sloane is 36. Actress Countess Vaughn is 35. Actor Michael Urie is 33. Tennis player Roger Federer is 32. Actress Meagan Good is 32. Britain’s Princess Beatrice of York is 25.

DAILY CROSSWORD TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

by Lynn Johnston

on your side and will be there when and if you ever need them. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Don’t waste your breath explaining yourself. You can’t tell people what to think about you. What you say won’t matter. But what you inspire others to say about your message will matter. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Hitchhikers walking toward their destination are more likely to be picked up than those standing in one place with a sign. Move toward your purpose, and someone is likely to give you a ride. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You have an extensive list of things you need in order to tackle a project. Rip that list in half, and things will work out even better. Also consider how some people get by in life without many “essential” things. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Aug. 8). The restlessness you feel at the top of this new cycle quickly fuels an adventure that spans over the next seven weeks. You’ll thrive in a nontraditional setting in September. Public position is featured in November; you’ll obtain something that will be handed down to future generations. December brings creative rebirth. Taurus and Aries people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 5, 39, 4, 20 and 3.

by Paul Gilligan

ARIES (March 21-April 19). When it happens easily, you usually take it as a sign that it was meant to be. Of course, there’s a difference between “easy” and “automatic.” What happens automatically could just be a bad habit. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Readers are leaders. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always go both ways. If your leader today isn’t up on the latest literature in your area of interest, time will be wasted. Do your own research. Don’t take anyone’s word for granted. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Being aware of others will be tough if you’re dealing with too much personally. That’s why it’s never selfish to take excellent care of yourself. Move commitments and clutter from your schedule to spend time nurturing yourself. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You don’t have to be graceful, artful or precise about it -- just get it done. The obstacles you overcome today will have a story of woe to tell once you’re done with them! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You’ll like the exclusivity of today’s arrangement. Your Pulitzer Prize-winning sign mate Russell Baker noted, “People seem to enjoy things more when they know a lot of other people have been left out of the pleasure.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Today has that road-trip feel: life blurring by and you trying to capture pieces of it from a rolleddown window. Of course, you could always pull over and stop awhile. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Mental escape is not quite as relaxing as physical escape, but when you’re as committed and busy as you are today, it will have to do. At least you can visit that happy place in your mind as often as possible. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). A fascinating person doesn’t just talk to you; this person finds a way into the conversation and under your skin. You’ll be challenged and moved by the interaction. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You have advocates, not that you need defense or are trying to inspire passion in your devotees. But still it’s nice to know that people are

By Holiday Mathis

by Jan Eliot

HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34 35 36 37

ACROSS Instrument for an angel Eyeglasses, for short Havana’s land Corrupt Necklace bead Willing to listen and reconsider Popular flower Numerical comparison “The __ of the Rings”; Tolkien trilogy Cardigan Bouncy That woman Drop in on See eye to eye Fleur-de-__; iris Written slander __ off; irritated Pale Install new shoe bottoms Hotel

38 40 41 43 44

54 58 59 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

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1 2

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45 46 47 48 50 51

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 33 35 36

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abbr. Actor Romero Fail to keep up Hates Spanked Bit of hamster food 47 Pea casing 49 Buckets 50 Student at West 38 39 42 44 46

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

Point Gray wolf Once again Greenish blue Long story Ore deposit Breakfast order Look for Wedding words

Yesterday’s Answer


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 11

––––––– ALMANAC ––––––– Today is Thursday, Aug. 8, the 220th day of 2013. There are 145 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On August 8, 1963, Britain’s “Great Train Robbery” took place as thieves made off with 2.6 million pounds in banknotes. On this date: In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte set sail for St. Helena to spend the remainder of his days in exile. In 1911, President William Howard Taft signed a measure raising the number of U.S. representatives from 391 to 433, effective with the next Congress, with a proviso to add two more when New Mexico and Arizona became states. In 1937, during the Second Sino-Japanese War, Japan completed its occupation of Beijing. In 1942, during World War II, six Nazi saboteurs who were captured after landing in the U.S. were executed in Washington, D.C.; two others who’d cooperated with authorities were spared. In 1945, President Harry S. Truman signed the U.S. instrument of ratification for the United Nations Charter. The Soviet Union declared war against Japan during World War II. In 1953, the United States and South Korea initialed a mutual security pact. In 1968, the Republican national convention in Miami Beach nominated Richard Nixon for president on the first ballot. In 1973, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew branded as “damned lies” reports he had taken kickbacks from government contracts in Maryland, and vowed not to resign — which he ended up doing. In 1974, President Richard Nixon announced his resignation, effective the next day, following damaging new revelations in the Watergate scandal. In 1978, the U.S. launched Pioneer Venus 2, which carried scientific probes to study the atmosphere of Venus. In 1993, in Somalia, four U.S. soldiers were killed when a land mine was detonated underneath their vehicle, prompting President Bill Clinton to order Army Rangers to try to capture Somali warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid. In 2007, space shuttle Endeavour roared into orbit with teacher-astronaut Barbara Morgan on board. Ten years ago: The Boston Roman Catholic archdiocese offered $55 million to settle more than 500 lawsuits stemming from alleged sex abuse by priests. (The archdiocese later settled for $85 million.) Five years ago: China opened the Summer Olympic Games with an extravaganza of fireworks and pageantry. A charter bus crashed near Sherman, Texas, killing 17 members of a Vietnamese-American Catholic group en route to Missouri. One year ago: Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi fired his intelligence chief for failing to act on an Israeli warning of an imminent attack days before militants stormed a border post in the Sinai Peninsula and killed 16 soldiers. Misty MayTreanor and Kerri Walsh Jennings of the United States became the first three-time gold medalists in Olympic beach volleyball history, beating Jennifer Kessy and April Ross 21-16, 21-16 in the allAmerican final.

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 8:00

Dial 5

CTN 5 Poet

8:30 Rotary

AUGUST 8, 2013

9:00

9:30

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Cumberland County

Access

Voices

9

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10

MPBN Make Southwest Florida is uneasy about her as-

Charlie Rose (N) (In Stereo) Å

11

WENH

PBS NewsHour (In Stereo) Å

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WPXT New info about the cure Model A model thinks

6 7 8

13 17 24

Hollywood Game Night News Tonight The competition grows Show With intense. (N) Å Jay Leno News 13 on FOX (N) Dish Nation The Office (N) Å “Company Picnic” Jimmy Rookie Blue Andy and WMTW Nick share an intimate News 8 at Kimmel 11 (N) Live (N) moment. (N) Å Maine Auto King Paid Prog. Paid Prog.

Makers: Women Who

Call the Midwife Jenny Acadia Always

(In Stereo) Å Member Favorites

signment. Å

The Vampire Diaries

America’s Next Top

is revealed. Å The Big Two and a Half Men Å WGME Bang Theory WPME White Collar Å DISC Spawn of Jaws: Shark

about quitting. Å Big Brother Competing for head of household. (N) Å White Collar Å Sharkpocalypse (N)

30 Rock (In 30 Rock Stereo) Å “Pilot” Å

Paid Program

TMZ (N) (In Stereo) Å

Elementary “The Long Fuse” Sherlock investigates a explosion. Law Order: CI

WGME News 13 at 11 (N) Explore

Late Show With David Letterman Sunny

Alien Sharks (N) Å

Shark After Dark LIVE

Movie: ››› “Twister” (1996) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton.

25

FAM Twister

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USA NCIS “Devil’s Triangle”

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NESN MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Kansas City Royals. (Live)

28

CSNE Fame

Burn Notice (N)

On, Water Octane Academy

Graceland “Bag Man” Sports

The 700 Club Å Covert Affairs Extra

SportsNet Sports

Red Sox SportsNet

30

ESPN NFL Preseason Football Cincinnati Bengals at Atlanta Falcons. (N) Å

SportsCenter (N) Å

31

ESPN2 Little League Baseball

Nation

33

ION

Criminal Minds

Little League Baseball Criminal Minds

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Good Luck Jessie

34

DISN Movie: “Teen Beach Movie” (2013)

35

TOON Incredible Regular

King of Hill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy Å

NICK Teenage Mutant Ninja

Full House Full House Full House Full House Friends

36 37

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Nation

Criminal Minds

MSNBC All In With Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow Show

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The Last Word

Friends

All In With Chris Hayes

38

CNN Anderson Cooper 360

Piers Morgan Live (N)

Anderson Cooper 360

Erin Burnett OutFront

40

CNBC American Greed

American Greed

American Greed

Mad Money

The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)

41

FNC

43

TNT Castle “Linchpin” LIFE Project Runway Å

44

Hawaii Five-0 “Pilot”

Greta Van Susteren

The O’Reilly Factor

Hawaii Five-0 “Ohana”

Perception Å

Project Runway “Tie the Knot” (N)

Supermarket Superstar Double

47

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48

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49

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52

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Panic 9-1-1 Å

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Housewives/OC

Happens

Property

Frasier

Frasier

Frasier

55

HALL Movie: “A Taste of Romance” (2011) Teri Polo.

56

SYFY “Independence”

57

ANIM River Monsters: Unhooked “Killer Catfish”

Man-Eating Super Croc River Monsters

58

HIST Pawn

Hatfields & Hatfields & Pawn

60

BET

61

COM Chappelle Chappelle Sunny

Sunny

Tosh.0

Anger

Anger

Wilfred (N) Wilfred

Wilfred

Jay & Bob

Raymond

Raymond

King

King

King

King

Big Bang

Big Bang

Sullivan

Big Bang

Conan (N) Å Movie: “Predator”

62 67 68 76 78 146

Pawn

Movie: “Invasion Roswell” (2013) Premiere. Pawn

Pawn

Movie: ›‡ “Crossover” (2006) Premiere. Å

›› “Just Go With It” TVLND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy FX

Frasier

TCM Movie: ›››‡ “Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ” (1925)

BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS

1 7 11 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 27 29 31 32 35 38 39 41

Pawn

Movie: “Streets” (2011, Drama) Meek Mill. Å Tosh.0

Cops Å iMPACT Wrestling (N) (In Stereo Live) Å SPIKE Cops Å Movie: “Eat Pray Love” (2010, Drama) Julia Roberts, James Franco. ›› OXY

DAILY CROSSWORD

“Species: Awake”

ACROSS Stands for art Partially carbonized vegetable matter Philandering scoundrel Superfluous Date or room opener Wonder Fried-foods restaurant Obese Purpose Greater omenta Barely manage Savior Lustrous reflection All over again Sheltered side Of a subset Porter Vocalized grunt Atlanta university Promise of payment letters

Daily Show Colbert

“Dick & Jane”

“Student Prince-Old Heidelberg”

42 Combined 45 Friday or York, for example 48 Spherical vegetable 49 Gullet 50 Disunite 53 Soul of the artiste 57 Muck 58 In advance 60 Call for urgent assistance 61 Soul singer Rawls 62 Cookout spot 66 Orbiting loc. 67 Key pie ingredient 68 Of bears 69 Bishop’s jurisdiction 70 Baseball’s Slaughter 71 Makes into law 1 2 3

DOWN J. __ Hoover Eagle’s home Arrests

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 24 25 26 28 30 32 33 34 35 36 37 40

Memorable time period __ Angeles Undercover agent Storybook bear Sufficient Kwajalein or Eniwetok, e.g. Capable of being bent and shaped Self-service eatery No longer asleep Discourage Piercing cry Hip dude E.T. craft Made a miscalculation Vast expanse Agitate a liquid Have a late meal Braggart’s problem Steak restaurant “Don Juan” poet Mighty long time Boring routine Second spin?

43 44 46 47 49 50

Orchid necklace Comestible Freon or neon & so forth Dynamic leader? Jamaican citrus fruits 51 Hangman’s knot 52 Series of links 54 Meat jelly

55 Indicate soundlessly 56 Adlai’s 1956 running mate 59 Lincoln and Fortas 63 Can. province 64 Coffee server 65 Continental NASA equivalent

Yesterday’s Answer


Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS • CALL 699-5807

DOLLAR-A-DAY CLASSIFIEDS: Ads must be 15 words or less and run a minimum of 5 consecutive days. Ads that run less than 5 days or nonconsecutive days are $2 per day. Ads over 15 words add 10¢ per word per day. PREMIUMS: First word caps no charge. Additional caps 10¢ per word per day. Centered bold heading: 9 pt. caps 40¢ per line, per day (2 lines maximum) TYPOS: Check your ad the first day of publication. Sorry, we will not issue credit after an ad has run once. DEADLINES: noon, one business day prior to the day of publication. PAYMENT: All private party ads must be pre-paid. We accept checks, Visa and Mastercard credit cards and, of course, cash. CORRESPONDENCE: To place your ad call our offi ces 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 699-5807; or send a check or money order with ad copy to The Conway Daily Sun, P.O. Box 1940, North Conway, NH 03860. OTHER RATES: For information about classified display ads please call 699-5807.

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Granny To Shower Dear Trying: There are kind ways to tell her. Grandma likely doesn’t notice her body odor. You need to let her know, nicely, that she needs to be more thorough. You can offer to help her shower; you can contact the Visiting Nurse Association (thevnacares.org) or hire a nurse’s aide to come regularly; you can discuss the possibility of remodeling her bathroom to make it more accessible; you can look into a transfer bench that lifts her into the tub area; you can bring her to your place if it has a shower stall or even to your local health club. Also, please check to be sure her laundry is getting done. (Offer to do it for her.) Finally, your family might want to discuss with Grandma the possibility of moving into a senior facility that is set up to alleviate such limitations. Dear Annie: I read the letter from “Depressed in Hiding,” the 16-year-old high school girl who is depressed and anxious and has resorted to self-harm. She is afraid to tell her parents because she believes they will hate her. My heart goes out to her. I, too, have battled depression and was afraid to seek help. It’s too easy to feel that no one will understand and they might even be angry. But the truth is, admitting you need help is one of the most powerful things a person can do and is the first step in getting better. People DO understand. If she is having suicidal thoughts, I strongly suggest she ask her parents to bring her to the local emergency room, where she could be seen by someone right away. Sweetie, you are not alone! -- Sherry in Montreal Dear Sherry: We appreciate that so many of our readers wrote to support this young woman and offer words of encouragement. To all of our Muslim readers: Happy Eid.

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dear Annie: I am a 20-year-old college student and live at home during the summer with my mom and stepdad. The problem is, my stepdad makes me uncomfortable. He is a porn addict. He leaves girlie magazines all over the house and downloads porn on our home computer. As if that isn’t awkward enough, he is always looking at my body. He also checks out my sisters. It is so unnerving that I refuse to wear shorts around him. Worst of all, I can’t wear a swimsuit, knowing he will be gawking at me. I can’t go a day without worrying that he is ogling me. What can I do? -- Not So Home Sweet Home Dear Not: What a charming father figure you have. Is your mother aware that her husband checks you out and makes you uncomfortable? She should know. In the meantime, spend as little time around him as possible. Don’t sunbathe in the backyard. Go to a friend’s house or to the local pool or beach. If you catch him staring at your body, confront him directly and tell him to stop. Also, talk to your sisters about his behavior and make sure they are OK. Don’t be afraid to speak up on their behalf. Dear Annie: My grandma is 84 years old and still able to live independently. I spent time in her home a few years ago and discovered that she no longer showers because she is afraid of slipping. It also is too hard for her to step over the lip of the bathtub. She even bought a shower stool, but for whatever reason, she doesn’t use it. Instead, she cleans herself with a rag and soap. Grandma has a distinct body odor that is getting progressively worse, and it’s hard to be close to her. I think she’d want to know this, but I don’t want to hurt her feelings. Is there any way to politely tell her? -- Trying To Get

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 13

Higher costs seen for some in Congress on health plans By Robert Pear THE NEW YORK TIMES

WASHINGTON — Older members of Congress and those who smoke, like Speaker John A. Boehner, could be facing much higher health insurance premiums under a new official interpretation of President Obama’s health care law. The administration said Wednesday that the government would continue contributing to the cost of health benefits for lawmakers and thousands of Congressional employees, but that they would have to buy coverage as individuals through new statebased markets known as insurance exchanges. Federal workers, including lawmakers, now generally get coverage through the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, the nation’s largest employer-sponsored health insurance program. Under some of the most popular health plans, the government contributes $5,000 a year for individual coverage and $11,000 for family coverage. The 2010 health care law generally requires members of Congress and employees in their “official offices” to get coverage through the exchanges. The purpose was to make sure lawmakers understood the benefits and burdens of the law, as experienced by many of their constituents. In the federal employee program, people in the same health plan generally pay the same premiums, regardless of their age or place of residence. However, for health plans sold on the exchanges, premiums can vary, based on a person’s age, tobacco use and place of residence. A person like Mr. Boehner, who turns 64 in November, might be charged three times as much as a 23-year-old. And as a smoker, he could be charged up to 50 percent more than a nonsmoker of the same age.

Even before the implications of this provision became clear, Mr. Boehner strenuously opposed the law, on the ground that it was driving up costs for consumers and employers, and he has led efforts to repeal it. The United States Office of Personnel Management issued a proposed rule on Wednesday that would end coverage under the federal employee program for lawmakers and many of their aides on Dec. 31. “These proposed regulations implement the administrative aspects of switching members of Congress and Congressional staff to their new insurance plans — the same plans available to millions of Americans through the new exchanges,” said Jonathan Foley, director of planning and policy at the personnel agency. In 2009, Mr. Obama said: “If you like your health care plan, you’ll be able to keep your health care plan, period. No one will take it away, no matter what.” But that assurance does not apply to Congress. The law requires members of Congress and many of their aides to get their employer-based coverage through exchanges. The administration said this means the exchange where a lawmaker or an aide resides. Thus, a caseworker in the district office of a House member from Chicago might enroll in a health plan offered on the Illinois exchange, while the chief of staff in the lawmaker’s Washington office might sign up for a plan in Virginia, and the scheduler in the same office might enroll in a plan in Maryland. The proposed rule includes a surprise for lawmakers. They will generally not be able to get into or return to the Federal Employees Health Benefits

Program when they retire. “Members of Congress and their staff who purchase health insurance coverage on the exchange will be eligible to carry that coverage, with the government contribution, into retirement,” the personnel agency said. But, it said, lawmakers and aides “who retire with exchange plan coverage are not eligible for Federal Employees Health Benefits plan coverage in retirement.” Congressional aides said they would urge the administration to change this provision before it takes effect. The federal employee program has decades of experience providing benefits to retirees, but the new exchange plans were conceived mainly for people under 65 and have no experience coordinating benefits with Medicare. The proposed rule allows lawmakers to decide which aides work in the “official office” of a member of Congress and must therefore go into the exchanges. The nonpartisan Congressional Research Service has said that the law appears to exempt people who work for Congressional committees and in leadership offices, like those of the speaker and the majority and minority leaders of the Senate and the House. But the administration said “there is not an existing statutory or regulatory definition” of a lawmaker’s official office. And it noted that some aides split their time between a lawmaker’s personal office and committee offices. Unwilling to make these delicate decisions, the administration said that lawmakers were best equipped to determine “whether particular individuals are employed by the official office” and must go into the exchanges. The personnel agency said it “will not review or overturn these determinations.”

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEWS BRIEFS–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Pingree displeased with decision to not fix USS Miami submarine Daily Sun Staff Reports

U.S Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-Maine, said she is disappointed that the U.S. Navy has opted to not to repair the fire-damaged USS Miami. The Navy cited budget constraints and uncertainty related to the sequester that led to the deci-

sion to decommission to submarine, which was involved in an arson fire at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard last year. “I am deeply disappointed by the decision not to repair the Miami,” Pingree said, in a statement. “It is shameful that this ill-conceived law has contributed to the loss of work at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. I know the men and women at the yard in Kittery would have not only repaired the Miami but made it better than it was before the fire. They deserved the chance to do that work and the Navy

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needed that ship. It’s outrageous that that the yard won’t get the chance to put the Miami back in service because of sequestration.” Pingree voted against the Budget Control Act, which created the sequester mechanism, according to a press release.

On Sept. 8, Victoria Mansion to present its first-ever Victorian Fair On Sunday, Sept. 8, Portland’s Victoria Mansion will present its first-ever Victorian Fair, managers of the historic site reported. An outdoor learning event in the style of a 19th century fair, the event will offer both children and adults the opportunity to experience, experiment with and interact with technologies, arts and customs of the mid-to-late 1800s. The event will include a broad variety of exhibitors, including a reenactment of a Civil War encampment, Victorian songs performed in period costume by an a capella group, blacksmithing demonstrations, historic woodworking, tintype photography, theatrical performances, music, and period knitting lessons, along with other exciting surprises. Constructed in 1858, Victoria Mansion is one of America’s finest surviving examples of architecture and interior design from the mid-nineteenth century. Its opulent original interiors and furnishings by renowned designer Gustave Herter remain more than 90 percent intact, according to a Victoria Mansion press release. “We’re really looking forward to this event,” said Victoria Mansion director Tom Johnson. “The Mansion is internationally known for its collections, but as a house museum we rarely get to offer visitors the chance to handle the historic objects or experience them from a tactile point of view.” The Victorian Fair will run from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sept. 8 at Victoria Mansion, 109 Danforth St., Portland. Admission is free for children accompanied by an adult, and $10 for adults. Admission for college and graduate students is $5 with schoolissued ID.


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––���––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Thursday, Aug. 8 Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 44th Annual Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show, Aug. 8-11, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Where else can you see their work and talk to over 250 talented Maine Artisans? Only at Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show in the State. Join us for four full days in August at the Cumberland Fairgrounds. Admission: $4. Tickets at: door. Email: info@ unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Web: www.unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show, featuring many talented Maine Artisans selling their handcraft products. Rain or Shine. Ample Free Parking. Youth Crafters — Here is your opportunity to show your craft. On Saturday, August 10 from 9-5 you will be able to rent table space for only $10.”

A Path of Stars:A Celebration of Cambodians in Maine

10:30 a.m. to noon. Children’s Room, Portland Public Library. “Author/Illustrator Anne Sibley O’Brien and cultural consultants, Veasna and Peng Kem, will share the book ‘A Path of Stars’ and host activities including drawing the lotus, sharing Cambodian food, writing in Khmer, storytelling and a performance by the Portland Cambodian Dance Troupe.” For more information: www.imyourneighborportland.org. http://www.portlandlibrary.com

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

2:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org/2013season/joseph

‘Romeo and Juliet’ in the park

6:30 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet” — Shakespeare in the Park, Fenix Theatre Co. is proud to present William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. through Aug 10 in Deering Oaks Park All shows are free to the public. “We are a group of artists dedicated to staging the classics of theater in the most compelling and relevant manner for the audience of today. Fenix Theatre Company exists to provide the southern Maine community access to free classical theater in the beauty of Deering Oaks. We thrive on the unique collaboration between audience and performer found in outdoor theater. We value showcasing the passion and brilliance of local artists.” http://www.fenixtheatre.com/#!

Eastern Promenade Concert Series

7 p.m. Friends Of Eastern Promenade Concert Series, sponsored by the Friends of Eastern Promenade and area businesses. Concerts last approximately one hour. Please note: Due to Fort Allen Park undergoing renovations, concerts this summer are held at Fort Sumner Park, North Street (in case of inclement weather, concert canceled). Thursday, Aug. 8, 7 p.m. Sly Chi (Funk Soul & R&B); Thursday, Aug. 15, 7 p.m. The Kenya Hall Band (Funk / NeoSoul); Thursday, Aug. 22, 7 p.m. North of Nashville (Outlaw Country/American Roots); Thursday, Aug. 29, 7 p.m. Maine Marimba Ensemble (Zimbabwean Music). http://www.portlandmaine.com

Live Music and Making a Difference in South Portland

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Summer Benefit Concerts: Live Music and Making a Difference. By coming to these concerts you will be making a difference in someone’s life. Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thornton Heights United Methodist Church 100 Westbrook St., South Portland. Charities sponsoring the events: Aug. 8: Performer — Dave Shaffer and others; charity — Veterans of Foreign Wars; Aug. 15: Performer — Joe Farren, Stepping Stones: MAPS Shelter Services of Women and Child; Aug. 22: Performer — Lighthouse Jubilees; charity — STRIVE. Suggested donation of $5 at the door and all the proceeds go to these charities.”

‘The World Before Her’ at PPL

7:30 p.m. “‘The World Before Her,’ a documentary film by Nisha Pajhuja, at Portland Public Library for Summer POV Documentary Films series. “‘The World Before Her’ is a tale of two Indias: In one, a small-town girl competes in the Miss India pageant. In the other, a militant woman leads a fundamentalist Hindu camp for girls.” Rines Auditorium, Portland Public Library, 5 Monument Square, Portland, 871-1700, www.portlandlibrary.com

‘Mary Poppins’ in Brunswick

7:30 p.m. “‘Mary Poppins,’ Disney’s family classic filled with magic, music, dance and flying! Maine State Music Theatre, Brunswick. $52 to $59. Msmt.org.” Wednesday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Friday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 7-24.

On Saturday, Aug. 17 at 7.30 p.m., the Downeast Brass will perform in concert at Deertrees Theatre in Harrison. For details, visit http:// www.deertreestheatre.org. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Bach, Anna Weesner, and Chausson: PCMF

8 p.m. Portland Chamber Music Festival. Summer Season Concerts, Aug. 8–17 Twentieth Anniversary Gala Concert​ . “We welcome our Twentieth Anniversary Season with music of J.S. Bach, who ushered in the great chamber music era that followed. The performance of his Sonata in D major marks the happy return to PCMF of both violist Jessica Thompson and harpsichordist Peter Sykes after their absences last summer. 2013 Resident Composer Anna Weesner of the University of Pennsylvania faculty also joins us to introduce her riveting duo for violin and cello. The program concludes with our first-ever performance of the lush “Concert” of Chausson, featuring violinist Jesse Mills and pianist Rieko Aizawa of the Horszowski Trio as soloists.” University of Southern Maine, Abromson Center, 88 Bedford St., Portland, http://www.pcmf.org. For tickets: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/350122. www. pcmf.org

Friday, Aug. 9 Mayor Brennan at superintendents retreat

8:30 a.m. Superintendent’s Leadership Conference and Retreat for principals and other administrators in the Portland Public Schools concludes. “Portland Mayor Michael Brennan will give the keynote address on the final day of the week-long conference. He will discuss some of his educational initiatives, such as Growing Portland and Portland ConnectED. He also will talk about the importance of community involvement in helping to ensure that all Portland students graduate prepared for college and careers.” Mayor Brennan will speak on Aug. 9 at 8:30 a.m. The McKernan Center on the campus of Southern Maine Community College. The theme of the retreat is Leadership Excellence Across the District (L.E.A.D.).

Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 44th Annual Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show, Aug. 8-11, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Where else can you see their work and talk to over 250 talented Maine Artisans? Only at Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show in the State. Join us for four full days in August at the Cumberland Fairgrounds. Admission: $4. Tickets at: door. Email: info@ unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Web: www.unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show, featuring many talented Maine Artisans selling their handcraft products. Rain or Shine. Ample Free Parking. Youth Crafters — Here is your opportunity to show your craft. On Saturday,

August 10 from 9-5 you will be able to rent table space for only $10.”

Chamberlain Days in Brunswick

10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pejepscot Historical Society’s Chamberlain Days in Brunswick. Aug. 9-11. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. “This year’s Chamberlain Days (a biannual event) will be particularly robust as PHS marks the Civil War Sesquicentennial, including the 150th anniversary of Brunswick’s own Joshua Chamberlain’s distinguished service at the Battle of Gettysburg. Guests will be invited to explore the encampment of Civil War reenactors on Brunswick’s downtown mall, to enjoy presentations on Civil War history and performances of Civil War music and readings, to follow knowledgeable guides on history walking tours, and to bid on Civil War art and artifacts at a Saturday afternoon auction. The keynote address, featuring Harriet Beecher Stowe and the ‘Lane rebels,’ will be delivered by Scott Reynolds Nelson, Legum Professor of History at the College of William and Mary. A downeast reception will be held at the Captain Daniel Stone Inn on Saturday evening. All reception guests will be entered into a prize raffle. Pejepscot Historical Society is pleased to present Chamberlain Days 2013 on the same weekend as Bowdoin College’s Civil War Alumni College, and invites guests to partake of both events. As part of the Chamberlain Days festivities, Bowdoin will open the Harriet Beecher Stowe house to visitors, allowing a rare peek at the home where Stowe began writing Uncle Tom’s Cabin. For further details and registration information, please visit www.pejepscothistorical.org.”

Saint Joseph’s hosts Summer Day open house

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. “The Office of Admission at Saint Joseph’s College will host its Summer Day open house for prospective students to tour the campus and learn more about the College’s academics, admissions and financial aid options, and student life opportunities. A barbecue will be provided in the College’s cafeteria, Pearson’s Café. The open house runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Harold Alfond Center at the College’s campus on Sebago Lake in Standish.” For more information and to register, call 1-800-338-7057 or 893-7746, or email admissions@sjcme.edu. For more, visit www.sjcme.edu.

Susan Lebel Young at the Portland Public Library

noon to 1 p.m. Susan Lebel Young, “Food Fix.” Portland Public Library, Friday Local Author Series held from noon to 1 p.m. in the Main Library’s Meeting Room 5. http://www. portlandlibrary.com see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013— Page 15

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

‘Mary Poppins’ in Brunswick

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “‘Mary Poppins,’ Disney’s family classic filled with magic, music, dance and flying! Maine State Music Theatre, Brunswick. $52 to $59. Msmt.org.” Wednesday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Friday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 7-24.

‘Romeo and Juliet’ in the park

6:30 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet” — Shakespeare in the Park, Fenix Theatre Co. is proud to present William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. through Aug 10 in Deering Oaks Park All shows are free to the public. “We are a group of artists dedicated to staging the classics of theater in the most compelling and relevant manner for the audience of today. Fenix Theatre Company exists to provide the southern Maine community access to free classical theater in the beauty of Deering Oaks. We thrive on the unique collaboration between audience and performer found in outdoor theater. We value showcasing the passion and brilliance of local artists.” http://www.fenixtheatre.com/#!

27th annual Saint Peter’s Four Mile Road Race

7 p.m. “A scenic downtown race over the Eastern Promenade in beautiful Portland, Maine. The first 200 runners who register to race receive a singlet and all are entered into a postrace raffle. Race proceeds benefit St. Peter’s Church. The race is only the beginning of the annual Saint Rocco’s Italian Street Festival taking place Saturday and Sunday evenings with games of chance, Italian food (especially the homemade cookies), music, and fun. Make a weekend out of it and help support a great cause. — See more at: http://mainetrackclub. com/ai1ec_event/st-peters-road-race/?instance_id#sthash. QxjLnac4.dpuf.” For runners who want to avoid race day rush you may register and/or pick up your packet Thursday, August 9th between 5:00 p.m. and 6:55 p.m. at Maine Running Company (New Location: 309 Marginal Way) - See more at: http://mainetrackclub.com/ai1ec_event/st-peters-roadrace/?instance_id#sthash.QxjLnac4.dpuf. Kids race start time: 6:30 p.m. (no T-shirts). $15 preregistration or $20 on race day for 4-miler; $5 for kids’ run - See more at: http://mainetrackclub.com/ai1ec_event/st-peters-road-race/?instance_ id#sthash.QxjLnac4.dpuf

C. J. Box and Paul Doiron

7 p.m. Brown Bag Lecture Series with C. J. Box and Paul Doiron, ‘The Highway/Massacre Pond,’ special day and time of Friday, Aug. 9, 7 p.m., Rines Auditorium, Portland Public Library. http://www.portlandlibrary.com

Celebration of Life and Faith

7 p.m. Cathedral Church of Saint Luke, Portland, Friday, Aug. 9, at 7 p.m. Festive Duet Program; Organ Duet, Albert Melton, Randall Mullin; Organ Duet, Albert Melton, Mark Thallander; Two Piano Concerto, Lars Gjerde, Darlene Matrone; Pianists, Thomas Matrone, Conductor; Vocal Duets, Scott Perkins, Tenor, Chris Thompson, Baritone; DaPonte String Quartet, Ferdinand Liva, Lydia Forbes; Kirsten Monke, Myles Jordan, Karol Bennett. Saturday, Aug. 10, 7 p.m. Encore Music Creations, Brett Alan Judson, Lars Gjerde, Scott Perkins. Sunday, Aug. 11, at 7 p.m. Festival Choir, Brass Ensemble, Percussion, Thomas Matrone, Albert Melton, Brett Alan Judson, Festival Organist, Darlene Matrone, Festival Pianist, Scott Perkins, Wendell Scott Purrington, Chris Thompson, Soloists, Mary Carol Kennedy, Flutist, Lars Gjerde, Pianist, Terrie Harman, Mark Thallander, Organists. www.markthallanderfoundation.org. http://cathedralofstluke.episcopalmaine.org/index.html

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

8 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org/2013season/joseph

Saturday, Aug. 10 Bike MS: Great Maine Getaway

7:30 a.m. “The 29th annual Bike MS: Great Maine Getaway, to be held Aug.10-11, will be moving to Biddeford, one of Maine’s finest coastal destinations. During this two-day ride, cyclists will experience the beauty of Maine’s southern coastline, including an up close look at ‘Walkers Point,’ the summer home of President George H.W. Bush. With the University of New England as our host for the weekend, you’ll be treated to priceless views of the Atlantic Ocean as you begin and end your ride Saturday and Sunday. UNE even has their own private beach to take in a sunrise or

enjoy after your ride. Whether you’re looking for a destination weekend away with friends or family, you are an experienced cyclist or a novice, we have a great choice of routes for you ranging from 25 to 100 miles. Rider checkin begins Friday night with accommodations available at UNE. You can also just join us bright and early Saturday morning before hitting the road. When you return, enjoy the festivities with food, music and massage. The fun continues Saturday evening with an awards ceremony and dinner. On Sunday enjoy a full breakfast and then head out for another beautiful ride. When you return, top off a great weekend with a Maine lobster at our traditional Lobster Bake.” http://bikemam.nationalmssociety.org/site/TR/Bike/ MAMBikeEvents?fr_id=19743&pg=entry

Orr’s & Bailey Islands Fire Dept. yard sale, auction

8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Orr’s & Bailey Islands Fire Department Annual Yard Sale and Auction. “Come participate in a unique community tradition as the The Orr’s & Bailey Islands Fire Department holds its annual auction and yard sale on August 10 and 11 at the fire station at 1600 Harpswell Islands Road, Route 24, Orr’s Island. A giant yard sale and silent auction will run from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The live auction of antiques and other donated items will begin at 10 a.m. on Sunday, with preview and registration beginning at 9 a.m. Breakfast and lunch will be available both days. All proceeds benefit the Orr’s & Bailey Islands Fire Department, which serves Orr’s, Bailey and part of Great Island in Harpswell. For more information, or assistance in donating items, please call 833-5405 on weekends.” www.obifd.org

Southern Maine Pagan Pride Day

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The 10th Annual Southern Maine Pagan Pride Day event will take place Saturday, Aug. 10 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Allen Avenue Unitarian Universalist Church at 524 Allen Avenue in Portland. “Southern Maine Pagan Pride Day is just one part of the Pagan Pride Project that features hundreds of Pride events all over the world, joining thousands of Pagans together to celebrate diversity within spirituality and bringing awareness about the peaceful paths of Paganism to all who want to participate. The Pagan Pride Project is a non-profit organization whose mission is to foster pride in Pagan identity through education, activism, charity, and community. Each Pagan Pride event is required to collect food donations for a local charity. SMPPD’s chosen charities this year are Project FEED in Portland (www.projectfeed.org), in partnership with Allen Avenue Unitarian Universalist Church, and the Pet Food Pantry at the Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland (www.arlgp.org). ... SMPPD will feature workshops on various topics, live performances, vendors, a Harvest Ritual, and the first annual Bardic Competition. Activities for children will be presented throughout the day, as well. ... A complete schedule of events is available at www.mainepaganprideday.org.”

Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 44th Annual Cumberland Arts & Crafts Show, Aug. 8-11, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Where else can you see their work and talk to over 250 talented Maine Artisans? Only at Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show in the State. Join us for four full days in August at the Cumberland Fairgrounds. Admission: $4. Tickets at: door. Email: info@ unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Web: www.unitedmainecraftsmen.com. Maine’s largest Arts & Crafts Show, featuring many talented Maine Artisans selling their handcraft products. Rain or Shine. Ample Free Parking. Youth Crafters — Here is your opportunity to show your craft. On Saturday, August 10 from 9-5 you will be able to rent table space for only $10.”

Chamberlain Days in Brunswick

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Pejepscot Historical Society’s Chamberlain Days in Brunswick. Aug. 9-11. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9; 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. “This year’s Chamberlain Days (a biannual event) will be particularly robust as PHS marks the Civil War Sesquicentennial, including the 150th anniversary of Brunswick’s own Joshua Chamberlain’s distinguished service at the Battle of Gettysburg. Guests will be invited to explore the encampment of Civil War reenactors on Brunswick’s downtown mall, to enjoy presentations on Civil War history and performances of Civil War music and readings, to follow knowledgeable guides on history walking tours, and to bid on Civil War art and artifacts at a Saturday afternoon auction. The keynote address, featuring Harriet Beecher Stowe and the ‘Lane rebels,’ will be delivered by Scott Reynolds Nelson, Legum Professor of History at the College of William and Mary. A downeast reception will be held at the Captain Daniel Stone Inn on Saturday evening. All reception guests will be entered into a prize raffle. Pejepscot Historical Society is pleased to present Chamberlain Days 2013 on the same weekend as Bowdoin College’s Civil War Alumni College, and invites guests to partake of both events. As part of the

Chamberlain Days festivities, Bowdoin will open the Harriet Beecher Stowe house to visitors, allowing a rare peek at the home where Stowe began writing Uncle Tom’s Cabin. For further details and registration information, please visit www.pejepscothistorical.org.”

Donations & Family Fun Day with Bob’s

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Bob’s Discount Furniture invites area residents to its South Portland, Maine, furniture store on Saturday, Aug. 10, for a day of free family fun. During the event, Bob’s will show its appreciation for the community’s support by presenting checks totaling $11,500 to seven local schools and two local nonprofit groups as part of the company’s Outreach program. Cathy Poulin, Bob’s public relations director, will present a total of $7,000 to seven area schools to support their arts and education programs. These funds are made possible by customer donations through collection jars at the cafes located in all Bob’s stores, which offer free refreshments (including gourmet coffee and cookies) to all Bob’s shoppers. She’ll also present $3,000 to LaDawn Therapeutic Riding Center and $1,500 to The Center for Grieving Children. LaDawn Therapeutic Riding Center will offer pony rides for children. Kids entertainment, including balloons, face painting and inflatable moon bounce and basketball games, will be available at no charge. ‘Heavenly Skies & Lullabies’ book giveaway. Complimentary refreshments will be served at the store’s cafe. The festivities will start with a 10 a.m. donation presentation and continue until 2 p.m.” Free, Bob’s Discount Furniture, 333 Clarks Pond Parkway, South Portland.

Adoptable Dogs in Biddeford

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Animal Welfare Society Mobile Adoption Team will visit PetSmart, 208 Mariner Way in Biddeford Crossing with adoptable dogs from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Animal Welfare Society. www.animalwelfaresociety.org, 985-3244, ext. 117, or PetSmart at 283-6546.

Maine Wildlife Park Pow Wow

noon. “The Maine Wildlife Park in Gray has scheduled their very popular annual Pow Wow for Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 10 and 11. There will be several new features at this year’s event. The Host Drum will be the Burnurwurbskek Singers and the Flute Player will be the well-known Joseph Firecrow. Grand Entry will occur at noon each day, again with our resident live Bald Eagle participating. The Penobscot tribe, together with the Mi’kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, and Abenaki Indians, were once members of the old Wabanaki Confederacy. The Abenaki” and ‘Wabanaki’ have the same Algonquian root, meaning ‘people from the east.’ There are approximately 3,000 Penobscot Indians now, most of whom live in Maine.” See www.mainewildlifepark.com for details.

The 88th annual St. Peter’s Italian Bazaar

5 p.m. to 10 p.m. “Nearly 6,000 cookies, close to 300 sheets of pizza and an assortment of other Italian dishes and delicacies are sure to please an expected crowd of over 20,000 people at this weekend’s 88th Annual St. Peter’s Italian Bazaar, scheduled for Saturday and Sunday (August 10-11) at the corner of Federal and India Streets in Portland. ... The old-fashioned neighborhood street festival, a celebration of heritage, family and faith, is held in the middle of August each year to commemorate the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Feast of Saint Rocco. It begins with Saturday evening Mass followed by a procession during which the statues of Saint Rocco and the Blessed Mother are carried into the street. The Bazaar, which raises money for St. Peter Parish, also features traditional carnival games, live music and the famous ‘greased pole’. The goal is to climb to the top of a metal flagpole which is covered in axle grease. The thrilling scene always draws a huge crowd of amazed spectators. Here is the schedule for the 88th Annual St. Peter’s Italian Bazaar: Saturday, August 10 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Sunday, August 11 4 p.m.-9 p.m. (Food available at 1 p.m.). The 27th annual St. Peter’s Four Mile Road Race is set for Friday night. To register, log on to: http://mainetrackclub.com/ai1ec_event/stpeters-road-race/?instance_id.”

Love On The Run at Deering Oaks

6 p.m. “Come celebrate at the Love On The Run — a run for adventurous singles and fun loving couples. This non-timed event is your chance to enjoy the social side of running, without any pressure from the clock. Love On The Run is an exciting chance for singles to make a connection, and for couples to rekindle their romance. It starts and finishes at University of Southern Maine’s Sullivan Gym and follows a 5k course that winds through Deering Oaks Park and the surrounding neighborhoods. There will be a fabulous post-run party at to keep the fun going long after crossing the finish line! American Heart Association Maine Chapter is the race beneficiary.” University of Southern Maine, 66 Falmouth St., Portland. $25 before the event, $30 on event day. www.loveontherun5k.com see next page


Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Thursday, August 8, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ues. Saturday, Aug. 10, 7 p.m. Encore Music Creations, Brett Alan Judson, Lars Gjerde, Scott Perkins. Sunday, Aug. 11, at 7 p.m. Festival Choir, Brass Ensemble, Percussion, Thomas Matrone, Albert Melton, Brett Alan Judson, Festival Organist, Darlene Matrone, Festival Pianist, Scott Perkins, Wendell Scott Purrington, Chris Thompson, Soloists, Mary Carol Kennedy, Flutist, Lars Gjerde, Pianist, Terrie Harman, Mark Thallander, Organists. www.markthallanderfoundation.org. http://cathedralofstluke.episcopalmaine.org/index.html

from preceding page

‘Romeo and Juliet’ in the park

6:30 p.m. “Romeo and Juliet” — Shakespeare in the Park, Fenix Theatre Co. is proud to present William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. through Aug 10 in Deering Oaks Park All shows are free to the public. “We are a group of artists dedicated to staging the classics of theater in the most compelling and relevant manner for the audience of today. Fenix Theatre Company exists to provide the southern Maine community access to free classical theater in the beauty of Deering Oaks. We thrive on the unique collaboration between audience and performer found in outdoor theater. We value showcasing the passion and brilliance of local artists.” http://www. fenixtheatre.com/#!

Truth About Daisies on Peaks Island

Vivaldi’s ‘The Four Seasons’ and Ravel with PCMF

7 p.m. Portland Chamber Music Festival Pre-Concert Lecture with Professor Dan Sonenberg, 7 p.m. Concert at 8 p.m. “Violinist Frank Huang, Concertmaster of the Sailboats bob in Casco Bay. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO) Houston Symphony, is the featured soloist includes only the mystery show and the cruise. Cash bar in Vivaldi’s ‘The Four Seasons.’ Mr. Huang, who returns to and food court available on the boat. For tickets, go to PCMF for his third summer, was the winner of the Naumwww.mysteryforhire.com. For info: 998-2472 burg and Hannover International Violin Competitions — and we can’t wait for you to hear him play this true masterpiece 4Elements of Hip Hop arts festival of the Baroque period. Earlier in the evening, we bring you 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. “Port Veritas hosts its sixth annual Ravel’s ‘Mother Goose Suite,’ in this intimate arrangement 4Elements of Hip Hop arts festival. The evening includes for strings and piano. We also introduce the winner of our performances by local musical acts: Violently Ill, Immense sixth international Composers Competition, chosen from Porpoise, and Twins Aries, as well as live graffiti art this year’s field of 175 applicants. Abromson Center, Unidemo’s, Bboys & DJ’s and is hosted by Chicago based versity of Southern Maine, 88 Bedford St., Portland. http:// and nationally touring spoken word poet Billy Tuggle, and www.brownpapertickets.com/event/351344 or www.pcmf. a few surprise special guests! Merch and Art raffles and org auctions as well! This is an all ages event, $7-$10 at the door (sliding scale).” Rising Tide Brewing Company, 103 Pirate Mystery Cruise in Naples Fox St., Portland. 7 p.m. Mystery for Hire presents “Who Killed Jolly Roger?” — A Pirate Mystery Cruise, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the Causeway in Naples. Tickets are $29.95 per person which

Celebration of Life and Faith

7 p.m. Cathedral Church of Saint Luke, Portland, contin-

7:30 p.m. Truth About Daisies — Ronda Dale, Sheila McKinley, Doug Swift — with special guest: Brad Strause. Fifth Maine Regiment Museum, 45 Seashore Ave., Peaks Island; $12 per person. “Truth About Daisies features songwriters Sheila McKinley and Doug Swift, as well as the beautiful harmonies and bass riffs of Ronda Dale. The band thrives on vocal harmonization and a wide palette of songwriting, ranging from folk to reggae, ballads to rock jams. Special guest Brad Strause joins the group with his brand of contemporary folk music. The Fifth Maine Regiment Museum is a nonprofit museum and cultural center housed in the 1888 Fifth Maine Regiment Memorial Hall.”

‘Mary Poppins’ in Brunswick

7:30 p.m. “‘Mary Poppins,’ Disney’s family classic filled with magic, music, dance and flying! Maine State Music Theatre, Brunswick. $52 to $59. Msmt.org.” Wednesday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Thursday 7:30 p.m.; Friday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Sunday 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Aug. 7-24.

L.L.Bean free concert by Guster

7:30 p.m. “This alternative rock band has become famous for its original lyrics, complex vocal harmonies and often humorous live performances.” L.L.Bean Discovery Park, 95 Main St., Freeport. Free. www.llbean.com/summer


8 8pds