Page 1

Gwaro

Scarborough man found guilty of elevated aggravated assault in trial for Portland woman’s beating — Not guilty of attempted murder; page 3

Portland, Maine. Yes. News is good here! Tuesday, July 30, 2013

U.S. Sen. Angus King assessed See Robert Libby column, page 4

VOL. 5 NO. 100

PORTLAND, ME

PORTLAND’S DAILY NEWSPAPER

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Housing a possibility for former Nathan Clifford School — City receives two proposals; see story, page 8

Outdoor lovers dodge the heat — See the story, page 8 Festival of Nations See photos, page 9

Bird talk featured at Maine Historical Society See the Events Calendar, page 13

The public can explore Scarborough Marsh by canoe, like this couple did last weekend. Regular outings are offered by Maine Audubon. The center at Scarborough Marsh will feature a Friday, Aug. 2 sunset canoe tour, and a Sunday, Aug. 4 early-morning canoe tour. People are “celebrating” their chance to go outside on lower-humidity days, said Kara Wooldrik, executive director of Portland Trails, another group seeing continued interest in recreation and education. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)


Page July 30, 30, 2013 2013 Page 22 — — THE The PORTLAND PORTLAND DAILY Daily SUN, Sun, Tuesday, Tuesday, July

Wet summer swamps South’s farms

FORT VALLEY, Ga. (NY Times) — Peaches, the gem of the Southern summer, are just not so sweet this year. The tomatoes in Tennessee are splitting. Tobacco in North Carolina is drowning. And watermelons, which seem as if they would like all the rain that has soaked the South, have taken perhaps the biggest hit of all. Some watermelon farmers in South Georgia say they have lost half their crop. The melons that did survive are not anywhere as good as a Southern watermelon ought to be. “They are awful,” said Daisha Frost, 39, who works in Decatur, Ga. “And this is the time of year when they should be the bomb.” Day after day, the rains have come to a part of the country that relies on the hot summer sun for everything from backyard-tomato sandwiches to billions of dollars in commercial row crops, fruit and peanuts. While the contiguous United States as a whole is about only 6 percent above its normal rainfall this year, Southern states are swamped. Through June, Georgia was 34 percent above normal, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Climatic Data Center. Both South Carolina and North Carolina were about 25 percent above normal. Alabama’s rainfall was up 22 percent. The weather is a particular shock because more than two-thirds of the region was abnormally dry or suffering a drought last year. Although the total cost to farmers has yet to be tallied, agricultural officials in several states in the Deep South predict severe losses this year that could be in the billions of dollars. “Nobody’s ever seen it this wet this long,” said Randy Ellis, a Georgia farmer who grows wheat and watermelons, the latter of which end up at East Coast grocery stores. He usually he pulls about 60,000 pounds of melons from an acre of land. This year, he said, he barely got 30,000 pounds. What is worse, the cooler, rainy weather meant the crop was ready after the important Fourth of July window, when prices are at their peak. Standing water has made cornfields look like rice patties in some parts of the rural South. Mold is growing on ears of corn, and in some fields entire stalls have toppled. Late blight, a fungus-like pathogen, is creeping into tomato fields early and with unusual vigor.

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Wave of car bombs kills dozens in Iraq ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– WORLD/NATION–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

BAGHDAD (NY Times) — A surge of violence in Iraq continued Monday when 15 car bombs killed at least 50 people and injured more than 100, according to security officials. Ten of the bombings were in Baghdad, mainly in Shiite neighborhoods. The targets included a hospital, a restaurant and markets. At least 34 people were killed and more than 100 were wounded, the authorities said. Officials in the Shiite-led government of Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, fearing that even more devices could be detonated, tightened security in Baghdad. Long lines developed at vehicle checkpoints as the security services searched cars for explosives. Since the start of Ramadan on July 10, coordinated bombings and other attacks

have intensified. That has revived fears that Iraq could return to the levels of sectarian violence seen over the last decade, after the American-led invasion in 2003. While the violence is below the levels of the peak of the insurgency in 2006 and 2007, when the country moved to the brink of civil war, bombings remain common. As many as 700 people are believed to have been killed this month. Militants among the minority Sunnis have been emboldened by the civil war in neighboring Syria, where the Sunni majority has been trying to overthrow the government of President Bashar al-Assad, which is dominated by his Alawite sect, an offshoot of Shiism. The Iraqi Interior Ministry issued a state-

ment urging resistance to the attackers’ efforts to feed sectarian divides, plunge the country into chaos and paralyze civil life. Without going into details, it warned that the attackers were able to mount such coordinated assaults because they had political and sectarian support. In Kut, southeast of Baghdad, two car bombs exploded near a bus station, leaving six people dead and about 20 injured, according to a medical official. One of the wounded, Ali Numan, 33, said: “We got wars from Saddam, we got tanks and rockets from the Americans, and now with Maliki we have car bombs every day. Nothing has changed in Iraq, and nothing will change. People die every day.”

Detroit looks to health law to ease costs (NY Times) — As Detroit enters the federal bankruptcy process, the city is proposing a controversial plan for paring some of the $5.7 billion it owes in retiree health costs: pushing many of those too young to qualify for Medicare out of cityrun coverage and into the new insurance markets that will soon be operating under the Obama health care law. Officials say the plan would be part of a broader effort to save Detroit tens of millions of dollars in health costs each year, a major element in a restructuring package that must be approved by a bankruptcy judge. It is being watched closely

by municipal leaders around the nation, many of whom complain of mounting, unsustainable prices for the health care promised to retired city workers. Similar proposals that could shift public sector retirees into the new insurance markets, called exchanges, are already being planned or contemplated in places like Chicago; Sheboygan County, Wis.; and Stockton, Calif. While large employers that eliminate health benefits for fulltime workers can be penalized under the health care law, retirees are a different matter. “There’s fear and panic about what this means,” said Michael Underwood, 62, who

retired from the Chicago Police Department after 30 years and has diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Mr. Underwood, who says he began working for the city when employees did not pay into future Medicare coverage, is part of a group suing Chicago over its plan to phase many retirees out of city coverage during the next three and a half years. “I was promised health care for myself and my wife for life,” he said. Unfunded retiree health care costs loom larger than ever for localities across the country, and the health law’s guarantee of federal subsidies to help

people with modest incomes afford coverage has made the new insurance markets tantalizing for local governments. A study issued this year by the Pew Charitable Trusts found 61 of the nation’s major cities wrestling with $126 billion in retiree health costs, all but 6 percent of that unfunded. “The Affordable Care Act does change the possibilities here dramatically,” said Neil Bomberg, a program director at the National League of Cities. “It offers a very high-quality, potentially very affordable way to get people into health care without the burden falling back onto the city and town.”

On gay priests, Pope Francis asks, ‘Who am I to judge?’ ROME (NY Times) — Striking a breathtakingly conciliatory approach to a hotbutton issue that has divided Catholics, Pope Francis on Monday said that he would not judge priests for their sexual orientation. “If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?” Francis said, according to media reports. His comments came in an unprecedented 80-minute news conference with reporters on his plane returning from a papal visit to Brazil for World Youth Day, in which he spoke openly about everything from the troubled Vatican Bank to the greater role that he believed women should have in the Catholic Church.

His predecessor, Benedict XVI, who retired in February, wrote a Vatican document that said that men with “deep-seated homosexual tendencies” should not become priests. During his papal trips, Benedict responded only to a handful of preselected questions from reporters. Reporters on the plane said that the pope had been candid and high-spirited and did not dodge a single question, even thanking the person who asked about reports of a “gay lobby” inside the Vatican, and about Italian press reports that one of the advisers he had appointed to look into the Vatican Bank had been accused of having gay trysts. Francis said he had investigated the

reports and found them groundless. He added that while such a lobby would be an issue, he did not have anything against gays and that their sins should be forgiven, media reports said. He said that while homosexuals should be treated with dignity, using sexual orientation for blackmail or pressure was a different matter. However, nothing in what he said suggested acceptance of anyone, priest or otherwise, engaging in homosexual acts. The pope also told reporters that while Pope John Paul II had definitively closed the door to female priests, Francis sought a “theology of women” and a greater role for them inside Catholic life, according to The National Catholic Reporter.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 3

Gwaro found guilty of elevated aggravated assault in trial for Portland woman’s beating By Marge Niblock

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A jury on Monday found Eric Gwaro of Scarborough not guilty of attempted murder, which was the most serious charge in the trial stemming from an attack on a Portland woman who was left brain damaged, but he was found guilty of elevated aggravated assault, aggravated assault and violation of conditional release. The elevated aggravated assault charge carries a penalty of up to 30 years. The jury in the case of Gwaro’s trial deliberated for less than an hour on Friday before being sent home by Judge Joyce A. Wheeler. They resumed their deliberations on Monday morning and at 10 a.m. notified the judge that they were ready to return to the courtroom with their verdict. After the foreman announced the verdict, the jury was polled individually on each of the four charges. Defense attorney Daniel Lilly told the court that Gwaro should be entitled to bail, since he’d been on bail earlier, with more serious charges pending. Prosecutor Meg Elam said bail should be denied because Gwaro has been convicted of a crime with the potential for a significant sentence. She also wants a psychological evaluation done for presentence purposes. Judge Wheeler seemed to feel that was a reasonable request, and she stated, “The behavior shown in the video (from the Big Apple gas station) is very troubling to the court.” Lilly spoke to media representatives outside of the courthouse and said, “We’re pleased that the elephant in the room — the attempted murder charge — is gone.” He said he’s going to consider whether they want a bail hearing and said, “An appeal will be filed after sentencing.” The Gwaro trial spanned most of last week and featured graphic testimony about the beating of Sherri York last Aug. 30. The last day of testimony on Friday brought the 28-year-old defendant to the stand. Gwaro admitted to having an alcohol problem, and said, “Once I have one I can’t stop drinking until I have no more money or I pass out.” The man

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who readily agrees that he’s a “binge drinker” had been working as a bartender at the Inn by the Sea in Cape Elizabeth. On the night of the crime, Gwaro said that he’d finished work at around 10:30 or 11 that evening after starting at 2 p.m. He was trying to get some of his coworkers to join him at the Spring Point Tavern in South Portland to have some Gwaro beer. He said he’d purchased a pitcher of beer and when no one showed up he drank the pitcher himself. Gwaro then detailed a list of other bars that he stopped at after driving to Portland. He said it was his practice to “barhop” sometimes after work. He started at Sangelos, then Styxx, where he met Charles Bunting and the two of them went to Asylum and then to Binga’s Stadium. He recounted all of the drinks consumed at each location and stated when he was downstairs at Binga’s, “I know that I was drunk.” Gwaro seemed to have selective memory in his relating of events, saying, “Sometimes I black out; physically, your body’s there but mentally it’s not there.” After leaving Binga’s at closing he exchanged phone numbers with Bunting, then he said: “Next thing I remember I’m getting pulled over by the cops.” Gwaro said he had no memory of being at the Preble Street Resource Center until he heard the testimony in court the other day given by Hannah Emery. Then he “remembered peeing and an interaction with someone. I was definitely drunk,” said Gwaro. When Gwaro first saw York at the Big Apple he had an interaction with her before the police pulled him over in response to the call they’d received about his activity at the Resource Center. Officer John Roberts had previously testified that after stopping Gwaro because of Emery’s call to the police, he allowed Gwaro to leave after speaking

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with him because he didn’t see any signs of intoxication. In Gwaro’s initial contact with York, after she’d gotten into his vehicle, he started a conversation and asked if she’d like to go to Bunting’s home. Her response was, “If your friend’s going to be there, he has to pay also.” Gwaro told her he had no money. He said he was surprised that York thought this would be an exchange of sex for money. He said he told her that’s not why he’d picked her up, and her response was, “My time is money.” Gwaro stated that York then grabbed a handful of money from the console and jumped out of his vehicle. He said he was “shocked, angry, embarrassed, and confused.” He denied hitting her in the face, saying he was driving around looking for her, and then he later saw her back at the Big Apple. Gwaro said he never intended to murder York and he didn’t want to hit her. He just wanted his money back. But he admitted when he saw her back at the Big Apple he grabbed her by the back of her shirt. He said, “I picked her up and asked her, ‘Where’s my money?’ I hit her. I pick her back up and hit her again, and asked, ‘Where’s my money?’” Gwaro didn’t recall any kicking. Under Elam’s cross examination, Gwaro admitted, “I was looking to have fun.” When she asked him what the term “bust a nut” meant, referring to earlier testimony, he said, “Have sex.”

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Eric Gwaro said he never intended to murder Sherri York and he didn’t want to hit her. He just wanted his money back. But he admitted when he saw her back at the Big Apple he grabbed her by the back of her shirt. He said, “I picked her up and asked her, ‘Where’s my money?’ I hit her. I pick her back up and hit her again, and asked, ‘Where’s my money?’” Gwaro didn’t recall any kicking, he said during testimony Friday.

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Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

––––––––––––– COLUMNS –––––––––––––

The dreamtime

The idea that techno-industrial society is headed toward a collapse has become very unpopular the last couple of years. Thoughts (and fears) about it have been replaced by a kind of grand redemption fantasy that bears the same relation to economics that masturbation has to pornography. One way to sum up the current psychological state of the nation is that an awful lot of people who ought to know better don’t know their ass from a hole in the ground anymore. We’re witnessing the implosion of the American hive mind. This is what comes of divorcing truth from reality, and that process is exactly what you get in the effort to replace authentic economic activity with accounting fraud and propaganda. For five years, the Federal Reserve has been trying to offset a permanent and necessary contraction of techno-industrialism by ––––– lobbing mortar rounds of soKunstler.com called “money” into its crony “primary dealer” banks in order to fuel interest rate carry trades that produce an echo in the stock markets. An echo, let us be clear, is the ghost of something, not the thing itself — in this case: value.

James Howard Kunstler

see KUNSTLER page 5

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–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– COLUMN ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Reforming a century of legislative abuse When Angus King was elected to represent Maine in the United States Senate, many of us hoped it would provide a new dynamic in the gridlocked world of Congress. As we approach the first turn we have been encouraged by the demeanor of our junior senator and the articulate responses Senator King has offered to all the microphones stuck under his mustache. He is lighthearted, optimistic, and even jovial with great admiration for his colleagues and great appreciation for how he has been welcomed to the club. We are fast approaching a moment when “Whose Side Are You On?” will be the background music that must be faced. Senator King’s apparent embrace of banking reform by advocating a twenty-first century Glass-Steagall Act that would separate depository banks that most citizens rely on for commercial lending from investment banks that organize investment capital for risky ventures seems a solid start to the reform minded legislation that most populist economists believe is needed. To his credit Senator McCain

Robert Libby –––––

One Man’s Island did learn from his involvement in the Keating Five scandal of deregulation of savings and loans institutions in the 1980s. Smart economy watchers like Hugh Magbie and other bloggers have been calling for the reinstitution of Glass-Steagall type regulation for quite some time. I will be following the progress of this proposed legislation with avidity. It should be revealing to see the machinations of the financial lobby sycophants trying to make this reformist idea disappear. If a student wants to study the textbook example of how corporate interests dismantled an effective regulation just study the demise of the original Glass-Steagall Law culminating with the financial industry backed GrammLeach-Bliley Act of 1999.

Senator King has also been outspoken in his desire to see Senate rules modified to limit the obstructionist use of the filibuster making virtually every action of the senate require a sixty vote majority to act. He has spoken in support of the recent compromise that continues the easy implementation of the filibuster provision with a pledge by the minority leadership to advance the president’s cabinet nominations. The compromise does not address judicial appointments even though President Obama has not been able to name a single appointment to the Second District Court of Appeals in five years as president. Today after six months of waiting for senate confirmation Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy will make her first public speech as Administrator. When she speaks at the Harvard Law School, she is expected to confirm her commitment to advancing the administration’s Climate Action Plan to reduce harmful emissions into the atmosphere. see LIBBY page 5


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 5

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

One in 15

It was nearly 100 years ago that Estelle Lindsey was the first woman elected to serve on the Los Angeles City Council. It was 60 years ago that 22-year-old Roz Wyman was the youngest person elected to serve on the Los Angeles City Council. By the 1990s, one-third of the city council — five of 15 — was comprised of women. Today, it is one in 15. And that’s an improvement over last week — before Nury Martinez won a special election and became the only woman on the council. No woman ever has served as mayor of Los Angeles. This year saw the first woman to make it to a runoff. She lost. Los Angeles is 54 percent women. Its city council is 93 percent men. What is wrong with this picture? Why aren’t people standing up and demanding an answer? Oh, there have been a few articles since people woke up and realized the clock had been turned back a century, but most of them could have been written decades ago. Why no women? Because of the difficulties of raising money, some people say — this in a city with a system of public financing in city races (although of course

Susan Estrich –––––

Creators Syndicate private money still matters). Because women are more policy-oriented than power-oriented, some people say — but of course, the council does do policy, and LA is a weak mayor/strong council system. But in my own informal survey, when I bring it up, people mostly shrug or roll their eyes. Who knows? And, maybe, who cares? Does it matter that there is only one woman in the room? Having been the only woman in various rooms for the past few decades, I’m sure of the answer to that one. It does matter. I don’t pretend that all women think alike, that only a woman can represent other women, that men can’t possibly understand. But as Martinez’s own background makes clear, each of us brings our own experiences to the decisions we make and the positions we take, including experiences shaped by our gender. Under attack in the campaign for

not taking a strong enough stand against child sex abuse by a teacher while she was serving on the school board (neither she nor anyone else knew about it), Martinez responded by making public something she did not tell her own parents until she was in her 20s: that she herself was the victim of abuse as a child at the hands of a neighbor. It also matters because politicians are role models and because the city council can be a key stepping stone to higher office. The newly elected mayor, Eric Garcetti, previously served on the council. There are lots of reasons not to run for office, but they apply equally to men. Sadly, it is still true that women running for elective office have a much easier time convincing voters to elect them to legislative positions than to executive positions. The old stereotypes about women not being “tough enough” or decisive enough, about not being “CEO” material, stereotypes that continue to plague women in corporate America (even those who are leaning in so far they are on the verge of falling flat), have long had their parallels in politics. So it’s no surprise, on that score, that California has two women senators but has never had a woman gov-

The old stereotypes about women not being “tough enough” or decisive enough, about not being “CEO” material, stereotypes that continue to plague women in corporate America (even those who are leaning in so far they are on the verge of falling flat), have long had their parallels in politics. ernor; that neither of our two largest cities has ever had a woman mayor; that women hold on so tightly (myself included) to the possibility that Hillary will run again in 2016 and finally crack the cement ceiling at the top. If not Hillary, who? And what does that say? We are supposed to be long past the old “years of the woman” that dominated the ‘80s and ‘90s, where during each cycle we would say, “This is it.” It wasn’t. It still isn’t. And if we don’t take notice, Los Angeles may not be the only place where we’re heading backward instead of forward. (To find out more about Susan Estrich, visit www.creators.com.)

The main task before this society is to change the way we live KUNSTLER from page 4

The permanent contraction of techno-industrialism is necessary because the main fuel for running it has become scarcer and rather expensive, too expensive really to run the infrastructure of the United States. That infrastructure cannot be replaced now without a great deal of capital sacrifice. Paul Krugman — whom other observers unironically call Dr. Paul Krugman, conferring shamanic powers on him — wrote a supremely stupid op-ed in The New York Times today (“Stranded by Sprawl”), as though he had only noticed over the past week that the favored development pattern of our country has had adverse economic consequences. Gosh, ya think? Meanwhile, the public has been sold a story by nervous and wishful upholders of the status quo that we have no problem with our primary resource due to the shale oil and shale gas bonanzas that would make us “energy independent” and “the world’s leading oil exporter — Saudi America!” A related story along these lines is the imminent “American industrial renaissance.” What they leave out is that, if actually true, it would be a renaissance of robots, leaving the former (and long ago) well-paid American working class to stew in its patrimony of methadrine, incest, and tattoo “art.” To put it as simply as possible, the main task before this society is to change the way we live. The necessary changes are so severe and represent so much loss of previous investment that we can’t bring ourselves

to think about it. For instance, both the suburbs and the big cities are toast. The destiny of the suburbs is to become slums, salvage yards, and ruins. The destiny of the big cities is to become Detroit — though most of America’s big cities (Atlanta, Houston) are hybrid monstrosities of suburbs and cities, and they will suffer the most. It is not recognized by economic poobahs such as Dr. Krugman and Thomas Friedman that the principal economic activity of Dixieland the past half century was the manufacture of suburban sprawl and now that the endeavor is over, the result can be seen in the millions of unemployed Ford F-110 owners drinking themselves into an incipient political fury. Then where will the people live? They will live in smaller cities and cities that succeed in downsizing sharply and in America’s currently neglected and desolate small towns and upon a landscape drastically refitted for a post-techo-industrial life that is as far removed from a Ray Kurzweil “Singularity” fantasy as the idea of civic virtue is removed from Lawrence Summers. The people will live in places with a meaningful relationship to food production. Many of those aforementioned swindled, misled, and debauched lumpen folk (having finally sold off their Ford-F110s) will eventually see their prospects migrate back into the realm of agriculture, or at least their surviving progeny will, as the sugar-tit of federal benefits melts away to zero, and by then the population will be much lower. These days, surely, the idea of physical labor in the sorghum rows is abhor-

rent to a 325-pound food-stamp recipient lounging in an air-conditioned trailer engrossed in the televised adventures of Kim Kardashian and her celebrated vagina while feasting on a KFC 10-piece bundle and a 32 oz Mountain Dew. But the hypothetical grandkids might have to adopt a different view after the last air-conditioner sputters to extinction, and fireants have eaten through the particle-board floor of the trailer, and all the magical KFC products recede into the misty past where Jenny Lind rubs elbows with the Knights of the Round Table. Perhaps I wax a little hyperbolic, but you get the idea: subsistence is the real deal-to-come, and it will be literally a harder row to hoe than the current conception of “poverty.” Somewhere beyond this mannerist picture of the current cultural depravity is the glimmer of an idea of people behaving better and spending their waking lives at things worth doing (and worthy of their human-ness), but that re-enchantment of daily life awaits a rather harsh work-out of the reigning deformations. I will go so far to predict that the recent national mood of wishful fantasy is running out of gas and that a more fatalistic view of our manifold predicaments will take its place in a few months. It would at least signal a rapprochement of truth with reality.

tributions for the 2014 elections, it seems the time for effective action is rapidly passing. Despite the Maine Law Court ruling that the National Organization for Marriage must reveal their contributors in the Equal Marriage Referendum of 2010, this has still not been made public. I guess it’s true that reforming a century of legislative abuse isn’t going to happen overnight. If

you have hopes for immigration reform, sensible gun control legislation, or reinstitution of discrimination protection for voting rights, don’t hold your breath. Rome wasn’t built in a day.

(James Howard Kunstler is the author of several books, including “The Long Emergency,” “The Geography of Nowhere” and “The Witch of Hebron.” Contact him by emailing jhkunstler@mac.com.)

U.S. Sen. Angus King ‘lighthearted, optimistic, and even jovial’ LIBBY from page 4

Finally Senator King told a public audience in early February that he was working with a group in the senate that was crafting a transparency disclosure law that would curtail the anonymous distribution of political campaign funds that so affected the election cycles of 2010 and 2012. As individuals have started amassing campaign con-

(One Man’s Island columnist Robert Libby of Chebeague Island is a teacher, writer, organic gardener, executive director of the Maine Center for Civic Education.)


Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– PORTLAND POLICE LOG––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Daily Sun Staff Report (Portland Police Department arrest log, July 21 to July 26)

Sunday, July 21 12 a.m., Shamus Mickie O’Connor, 32, of address unknown, was arrested for assault on Portland Street by Officer Andjelko Napijalo. 1 a.m., Melissa Keroack, 22, of Falmouth, was arrested for operating under the influence on Fore Street by Officer Dan Aguilera. 1 a.m., Sierrha Dawn Frisbie, 21, of Portland, was arrested for violation of conditional release and violation of bail conditions on Woodford Street by Lt. Clifford Strout. 5 a.m., Stephanie Kay Clark, 28, of address unknown, was arrested on a warrant for receiving stolen property on Weymouth Street by Sgt. Timothy Farris. 10 a.m., Abdalla Hamed Dud, 27, of address unknown, was arrested for operating without a license, operating after suspension, improper plates/ alteration of plates and failure to register motor vehicle on Oxford Street by Officer Andjelko Napijalo. 7 p.m., Ryan O’Leary, 33, of address unknown, was arrested on a warrant for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Park Avenue by Officer Eric Johnson. 11 p.m., Jarrod Reynolds, 30, of address unknown, was arrested for aggravated assault on Congress Street by Officer Thomas Kwok.

Monday, July 22 1 a.m., Derinda Jean Ramsey, 43, of Portland, was arrested for assault on Cumberland Avenue by Officer Christopher Kelley. 7 a.m., Christopher Mark Stafiej, 34, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Portland Street by Officer Andjelko Napijalo. 10 a.m., Gerald Lee Tucker, 33, of Portland, was arrested for assault on Portland Street by Officer Andjelko Napijalo.

10 a.m., Mark Ray Fowler, 19, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Forest Avenue by Officer Sara Clukey. 11 a.m., Joseph Peare, 19, of Portland, was arrested for criminal threatening and criminal mischief on Ocean Avenue by Officer Michael Galietta. 2 p.m., Roy William Presby, 48, of address unknown, was arrested for public drinking on Fore River Parkway by Officer Thomas Reagan. 3 p.m., Robert Yankowsky, 37, of Portland, was arrested on a warrant for operating after suspension on Forest Avenue by Officer Matthew Morrison. 4 p.m., Paul Andrew Green, 36, of Portland, was arrested on a warrant for assault on Auburn Street by Officer Thomas Reagan. 4 p.m., Edward Corbett, 32, of address unknown, was arrested for public drinking on Cutter Street by Officer Brent Abbott. 9 p.m., Gregory McLeod, 41, of address unknown, was arrested for public drinking on Congress Street by Sgt. Timothy Farris. 9 p.m., Tova Langley, 27, of South Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer and failure to give correct name/ date of birth on Concord street by Officer Evan Bomba. 10 p.m., Andy Allen Nickerson, 51, of Portland, was arrested on a warrant for unlawful trafficking in drugs on Oxford Street by Officer Thomas Reagan.

Tuesday, July 23 12 a.m., Adrian Tereda Williams, 30, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Forest Avenue by Officer Thomas Reagan. 12 a.m., Amber Elizabeth Randall, 23, of Portland, was arrested for assault on Falmouth Street by Officer David Hemond, Jr. 1 a.m., Farah Mohmad Abdirizak, 22, of address unknown, was arrested for refusing to submit to arrest or detention on Mayo Street by Officer Robert Miller. 1 a.m., Christopher Larochelle, 32, of Portland, was arrested for theft of services on Moulton Street by Officer Terrence Fitzgerald. 1 a.m., Nelsoun Banga, 18, of Portland, was arrested on a warrant for unlawful sexual contact on Oxford Street by Officer Vincent Rozzi. 1 p.m., Ryan Warren O’Leary, 33, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Forest Avenue by Officer David Argitis. 4 p.m., Kristen Shipp, 34, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Forest Avenue by Officer Matthew Rider. 4 p.m., Ed Darcy, 45, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Chestnut Street by Officer Joseph Jaynes. 5 p.m., Wayne Cousino, 50, of address unknown,

was arrested for obstructing public ways on St. John Street by Sgt. Robert Martin. 5 p.m., Louis McAfee, 24, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Chestnut Street by Officer Martin Ney. 5 p.m., Joseph Herrick, 25, of Portland, was arrested for violation of conditional release on Chestnut Street by Officer Joseph Jaynes. 7 p.m., Benjamin Chiasson, 26, of Portland, was arrested for operating under the influence on Preble Street by Lt. Glen McGary. 7 p.m., Theron Fidian, 40, of Casco, was arrested for unlawful possession of scheduled drugs on Congress Street by Officer Laurence Smith, Jr. 9 p.m., Audria Ariza, 26, of Camden, was arrested on a warrant for operating without a license on High Street by Officer Erik Richard.

Wednesday, July 24 12 a.m., James Becker, 39, of address unknown, was arrested for assault on Bramhall Street by Officer Ryan Gagnon. 7 a.m., Christopher Tucker, 22, of Brunswick, was arrested for criminal trespass on Bramhall Street by Officer John Morin. 11 a.m., Michael Lavoie, 44, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Congress Street by Officer James Keddy. 1 p.m., Lisa Marie Powers, 47, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Commercial Street by Officer James Keddy. 2 p.m., Shawn Terry Currier, 35, of Portland, was arrested for theft of services on St. John Street by Officer John Morin. 2 p.m., Joelle Stacy Leeks, 45, of Yarmouth, was arrested for unlawful trafficking in drugs on Mayo Street by Officer Anthony Ampezzan. 5 p.m., Joshua Allen Bubier, 23, of Portland, was arrested for criminal threatening with a dangerous weapon on Wilmot Street by Officer Joseph Jaynes. 6 p.m., Stanley Kelley, 63, of address unknown, was arrested for public drinking on Oxford Street by Sgt. Robert Martin. 6 p.m., Matthew Ryan Fournier, 32, of Portland, was arrested for public drinking on Preble Street by Officer Brent Abbott. 9 p.m., Walter Raymond Stover, 22, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Stevens Avenue by Officer Jacob Titcomb. 10 p.m., Ven Ten, 34, of address unknown, was arrested for public drinking on Forest Avenue by Officer Nicholas Gowen.

Thursday, July 25 1 a.m., Haider Wari, 37, of Portland, was arrested for misuse of the 911 system on Forest Avenue by Officer Laurence Smith, Jr. 12 p.m., Timothy Michael Catruch, 20, of Portland, was arrested for theft by unauthorized taking or transfer on Monument Square by Officer Daniel Knight. 8 p.m., Wyatt Bowman, 56, of Portland, was arrested for criminal trespass on Portland Street by Officer Thien Duong. 9 p.m., Andrea Nicole Atkinson, 25, of Portland, was arrested for assault on Mellen Street by Officer Nicholas Gowen. 11 p.m., Dalton James Remington, 19, of Portland, was arrested on a warrant for criminal trespass on State Street by Officer Jay Twomey. 11 p.m., Khadar Ismail Adaweh, 38, of Portland, was arrested for operating under the influence on Park Avenue by Officer Nicholas Gowen.

Friday, July 26 2 a.m., Ashley Violet Virgilio, 21, of Cape Elizabeth, was arrested for operating under the influence on Park Street by Officer Erik Richard. (Information furnished by the Portland Police Department.)


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 7

Traffic on Congress Street, Capisic Street and Johnson Road affected by projects Daily Sun Staff Report A variety of road and utility work will affect traffic in Portland this week. Congress Street traffic, westbound from Valley to St. John, will be detoured today from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. as crews continue to make repairs associated with a recent water main break, according to Michelle Clements with the Portland Water District. To avoid delays, commuters are urged to seek alternate routes. Traffic will be slowed on Capisic Street in Portland, from Colonial to Macy, on Wednesday, July 31, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. as crews assess a possible water main leak, Clements said. Alternating one way traffic through the construction zone will slow traffic. The city of Portland reported that NEUCO, the contractor for Unitil, the natural gas utility for Greater Portland, will be working on the gas main at the intersection of Johnson Road and Congress

Street this week. The work will take place between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. daily and will be completed by Friday, Aug. 1, the city reported. Outbound traffic from Portland on Congress Street will need to bear right onto Outer Congress Street; drivers will not be able to bear left onto Johnson Road. Drivers headed to the Jetport Access Road, Time Warner Cable, the Maine Mall and other businesses in that area should proceed past Unum and take Skyway Drive back to Johnson Road, the city advised. Inbound traffic from Outer Congress Street will not be able to take a right turn at Johnson Road. Drivers headed to the Jetport Access Road, Time Warner or other businesses in that area should take Skyway Drive. Johnson Road will remain open to inbound (towards Portland) traffic only. Jetport Access Road and City Line Drive traffic will be able to make right-hand turns onto Johnson Road. Flaggers and Portland Police will be in place for the duration of the project, the city reported.

Defense attorney: ‘We’re here to take our medicine’ TRIAL from page 3

When asked why he was so shocked about what York had said to him, his response was, “Because I don’t pay for sex.” Elam began her closing argument saying, “Eric Gwaro didn’t get what he wanted so Sherri York had to pay. He went out that evening to ‘bust a nut.’” She related how York had come back to the Big Apple after leaving in Gwaro’s vehicle. At that time she had a puffy eye and some money. Elam then told how Gwaro had been driving around to find York, wanting to get his money back. She said he then locked his car in front of 104 Washington Ave. and looked for her on foot. When he found her again at the Big Apple she ran from him, but he caught her and dragged her out of the parking lot. Elam said, “Her injuries were from being kicked. He had no injury to his hand. He had blood on the right shoe of a right-handed guy. He kicked with the right. He stomped with the right.” Elam said Gwaro claims not to remember what happened when he got past the Cumberland Avenue garage. She said, “He remembers aggravated assault but not attempted murder and elevated aggravated assault.” She then stated, “Mr. Gwaro acted intentionally that night.” Lilly’s closing argument attacked the use of the word “stomp,” because he said using the word “stomp” is “pure speculation.” Attempting to discredit the use of that word by certain witnesses in the trial, he stated: “All of this ‘stomping’ is good theater but is not supported by evidence.” Lilly said, “This case is overprosecuted or we wouldn’t be here.” He stated, “The prosecution wanted to throw the book at him. The state is charging three crimes for one event. He did it. We’re here to take our medicine. He didn’t intend to murder her. He wanted his money back. My client has said he accepts responsibility.” Lilly said he was not disputing “this terrible crime. He’s guilty of aggravated assault and violation of bail conditions.” Lilly exhorted the jury to come back with a not guilty verdict on the elevated aggravated assault charge because references to the “shod foot,” being an old soft sneaker does not qualify as a dangerous weapon. He urged them to return a not-guilty verdict on the attempted murder charge because he told them “voluntary intoxication is a defense to a specific-intent crime.” He said, “We’re not arguing for acquittal in this case. We’re arguing for justice. He’s been overcharged.” Elam began her rebuttal to Lilley’s closing argu-

ment by stating, “There was evidence of kicking and stomping.” Elam said, Gwaro picked York up and hid her so no one could find her, with her blood on the plants where she was found. She stated, “Let’s leave her there. If they don’t find her they can’t fix her; they can’t save her.” She said, “This is about what Eric Gwaro chose to do — intentionally — what he chose was meant to cause her death.” After explaining the law applicable to the case, the judge sent the jury out to begin deliberating. There was less than an hour before the court had to close Friday, so the jury was then excused and told to be return Monday morning to complete their work. The four charges the jury had to consider were: attempted murder; aggravated elevated assault; aggravated assault; and violation of bail conditions. Gwaro has been in jail since police saw him on the street at 1:40 a.m. in November, when they knew he had a 7 p.m. curfew as part of his bail conditions.

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Page 8 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Outdoor lovers sidestep the worst of July heat By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Lunchtime runs became less and less popular during mid-July’s record-breaking heat and humidity, but outdoor enthusiasts found ways around this summer’s swampy heat, recreation and conservation groups reported. “It seems like people are being smart out on the trails and going out earlier in the morning and waiting until it cools off late in the afternoons,” said Kara Wooldrik, executive director of Portland Trails (http://trails.org/programs), a nonprofit urban land trust that maintains a 50-mile network of trails in Greater Portland. On Monday, Portland Trails encountered a different weather obstacle: Cloudiness forced the postponement of a “Star Trek” star-gazing event until Wednesday at 8 p.m. Portland Trails has teamed up with Ed Gleason of the University of Southern Maine Southworth Planetarium for these events, which features a 45-minute program at the planetarium and then a jaunt outdoors to admire the stars. Another three or so are planned this summer and fall, Wooldrik said. Michael Cempa, meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said Monday’s clouds presented a different picture around Sebago Lake, where thunderstorms generated the threat of lightning and high winds. At 7 p.m. at 21 Red Hawk Drive in Windham, near Roosevelt Trail, a lightning strike to the back yard blew out power, according to emergency communications. A series of frontal systems over the

past few days have brought erratic weather. This pattern has come on the heels of a sweltering mid-July stretch that peaked with a record-breaking 95-degree high temperature on Friday, July 19. This daily record high broke the old record of 94 degrees set on that day in 1982, the weather service reported. “We got stuck in a little pattern where we were getting the heat coming in, now we’re into a more changable pattern,” Cempa said. Another front should pass by Tuesday morning, and pleasant weather should prevail during the balance of the week, Cempa said. A possible warm front could bring humidity by the weekend, but nothing comparable to the mid-July conditions, he said. On Monday, 75 degrees was the high and the low was 60 degrees. Last week ranged in the 70s for the most part, starting with a high of 75 degrees on Sunday, July 21; continuing with a couple of forays into the 80s, on July 24 (86 degrees) and July 27 (81 degrees); but settling into a high of only 68 degrees on Sunday, July 28. In mid-July, outdoors groups warned against exposure, and the city even circulated a warning to watch for signs of heat stroke and other weather-related ailments. Wooldrik said trail users have proven adaptable, saving their trail running for after work instead of during lunchtime when the heat peaked. People are “celebrating” their chance to go outside on the lower-humidity days, Wooldrik said, whether it’s on foot or on bicycle —

The public can explore Scarborough Marsh by canoe and enjoy bird-watching. Canoe trips proved popular even in the mid-July heat, Maine Audubon reported. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

Portland Trails has teamed up with Eastern Mountain Sports of South Portland (http://www.ems.com/home/ index.jsp) for mountain bike rides on trail networks. Michelle Smith with Maine Audubon (http://maineaudubon.org/events) said the public has taken the heat of July in stride when enjoying the outdoors programs of the local centers. Maine Audubon offers day camps every day at Gilsland Farm in Falmouth and a variety of events,

including moonlight canoe trips, at Scarborough Marsh. “It’s definitely been a little bit hotter at the marsh, but once people get out in the canoes, there’s a little bit of a breeze,” Smith said, recalling midJuly’s balmier conditions. Upcoming highlights for Maine Audubon include a puffin cruise on Saturday, Aug. 3 at New Harbor; and a bald eagle cruise planned in September at Merrymeeting Bay, Smith noted.

Housing a possibility for former Nathan Clifford School By Craig Lyons THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The future of the now-vacant Nathan Clifford School could likely be housing based on the redevelopment proposals submitted to the city. The city received two responses for the request for qualifications that sought preliminary development ideas for the century-old school building. Both responses were for housing developments, one from Community Housing of Maine and the other from the Developers Collaborative, according to Jeff Levine, director of the Department of Planning and Urban Development. The RFQs received by the city will still need to go through a screening process before more thorough proposals are put together. The preliminary proposal from Community Housing of Maine, which recently marked the opening of Elm Terrace on High Street, presented the idea of converting the building into affordable housing, according to Levine. The proposal would tentatively create 60 housing units for working families, and retain the park and playground for public use. Developers Collaborative’s proposal would convert the school building into 17-19 apartments with an additional three to eight units of new construction elsewhere on the grounds, according to Levine. The plan would create a

The city received two responses for a request for qualifications that sought preliminary development ideas for the former Nathan Clifford School. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

community space on the ground floor of the school building. The Nathan Clifford Reuse Advisory Task Force developed the possible guidelines and criteria for the reuse of the school building, and were used in the RFQ process. The group’s recommendations — which were accepted by the City Council — encourages the city find future uses that are either education or research oriented; community uses; incorporate publicly-accessible

open space or play areas, low-impact commercial or institutional uses; or a creative mixed-use development. Underlying the encouraged uses is the see that a future development works within the school’s current R5 zoning designation, though other proposals will still be considered. Levine said both submissions are solid proposals and seemed responsive to the work on the reuse guidelines that has been done to date. Even though the RFQ only gener-

ated two proposals, Levine said, that’s not atypical. “It’s pretty typical to get this kind of response from an RFQ,” he said, and the process usually lets developers air out ideas without creating detailed plans. With the two proposals in hand, the city will now use an internal screening committee to review the submissions, according to Levine, and determine what the process will look like transitioning into a request for proposals. Levine said the city wants to move quickly through the process but do it in a thoughtful way, with an RFP being done sometime in the fall. The city’s Historic Preservation Board made a recommendation last Tuesday to designate the now vacant school as a local landmark. To be accepted as a local landmark, the City Council will need to approve the designation. Designating the school as a local landmark was a component of the recommendations made by the task force, which also created a series of guidelines for redevelopment of the property. The city is also seeking the school be added to National Register of Historic Places. Being added to the national register would make the building eligible to historic preservation tax credits as redevelopment at the building looms.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 9

Annual Festival of Nations delights visitors to Deering Oaks Park The 11th annual Greater Portland Festival of Nations brought food and music to Deering Oaks Park on Sunday. Started by Shalom Odokara, the Greater Portland Festival of Nations has become a family favorite, organizers noted. LEFT: Ahmad Audai (left) and Ghassan Hassoon dished out food at the booth for Haggarty’s Brit-Indi Cuisine of Forest Avenue. They served a steady stream of customers. BELOW MIDDLE: A booth for Mizizi Design Handcrafted African Gifts featured colorful beadwork. BELOW BOTTOM: Crowds browse the booths, which ranged from a yoga tent to foods from a variety of countries. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTOS)


Today’s Birthdays: Actor Richard Johnson is 86. Actor Edd “Kookie” Byrnes is 80. Blues musician Buddy Guy is 77. Singer Paul Anka is 72. Jazz musician David Sanborn is 68. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is 66. Actor William Atherton is 66. Blues singer-musician Otis Taylor is 65. Actor Frank Stallone is 63. Actor Ken Olin is 59. Actress Delta Burke is 57. Actor Richard Burgi is 55. Actor Laurence Fishburne is 52. Actress Lisa Kudrow is 50. Actress Vivica A. Fox is 49. Actor Terry Crews is 45. Actor Simon Baker is 44. Movie director Christopher Nolan is 43. Actor Tom Green is 42. Rock musician Brad Hargreaves is 42. Actress Christine Taylor is 42. Actor-comedian Dean Edwards is 40. Actress Hilary Swank is 39. Olympic gold medal beach volleyball player Misty MayTreanor is 36. Actress Jaime Pressly is 36.

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by Lynn Johnston by Paul Gilligan

the person who is the most respectful, warm, open and direct. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). People just don’t listen well. Your intent ears, rapt attention and open heart are a rarity. People will come out of the blue with their stories and feelings because they sense that you genuinely care. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You want more out of love than to live a parallel life with another without really connecting on many levels. Communication is the key to a flourishing love life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’re a realist. You know that nothing is perfect. It is human nature to be compelled by the thrill of victory and also intrigued by the agony of defeat, which hangs, inevitably, behind images of perfection. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (July 30). Conservative financial choices prove that you’re responsible. (Insert yawn here.) This year you’ll prove that you’re creative and daring with the confidence to act on your big ideas. You’ll form an alliance in August. September brings a meaningful new relationship. You’ll show your influence in November. Pisces and Aries people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 15, 1, 11, 10 and 18.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19). You are not in the mood to lock horns over anything -there’s no reason good enough. You’ll get some flack from loved ones, but you’ll shrug it off without harboring long-standing resentments. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Keeping things simple is not so easy for highly intelligent and complicated folks. That’s why when a simple plan goes without a hitch today, it’s a cause for celebration. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You can’t argue with happiness -- or you could, but happiness would win, so why bother? You may not want something to make you this happy, but you can’t help that it does, so just go with it. Revel. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Jean-Paul Sartre wrote, “Hell is other people.” Today you might agree, although not across the board. You would add the word “certain” after “is” because of one particularly maddening individual. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Feeling that you must be perpetually nice and attractive to others is a recipe for depression. You’ll seize the opportunity to be yourself, no frills, and have a blast with it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Because they are so self-involved, children sometimes have trouble matching the tone of their physical and social environment. The one who is not a child and yet still has trouble with this is similarly self-involved. Be forewarned. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll land in the right place at the right time. The question is: Do you also have the right attitude? You’ll be thrown a rare opportunity -- this is a test. Take the ball and run the distance. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Those who are especially capable of a task will not study it closely or work hard to understand and master it. That’s why the best teachers are people who themselves have struggled with the subject and overcome obstacles. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’ll be perusing a scene with a choice about with whom to connect. The most powerful person in the room isn’t who you think it is. Seek out

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Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 34 35 36 37 38

ACROSS Youths Strike noisily Foul film Villain Bridal path Additionally Smokey or Yogi Phys. therapy Gas or coal, for example Asner and Kennedy Ghoulish Faux __; social blunder Not smashed Monastery That girl Ross or Rigg Chums Mr. Rickles Diminish Long __; in the distant past Entertained sumptuously

40 41 43 44 45 46 47

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Is able to Population count Peg for Els Bull: Sp. Firstborn of two Cow’s remark “Sweet __ From Pike” Toil Caspian or Red Tinier __ land; arrived the shore Sharpen Jefferson’s VP __ Burr Bee colony Trip __; stumble on Thick slices “__ go bragh!” Church seats Uptight __ on; trust

1 2

DOWN Part of the ear Elderly

32 33 35

48 50 51 54 58 59

10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 31

Sketch Latin shawls Hospital sections Hurries Bit of soot Noisy shouting Shish __; BBQ favorite Hunting expeditions Black card Drug addict Internal spy Sunbeam Gave up land Hatch or Boxer Quickly Baked doughnutshaped roll Hair color Member of the swine family Noted English racecourse Approaches Rile __ Moines, IA

36 38 39 42 44 46

Actor Majors Of the countryside Zodiac lion Actor Peter __ Instructor Sense of selfesteem 47 Actress Arthur 49 “Beauty and the __”

50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 60

Good judgment Small store Relocate Once more Steals from Bring on board Wicked Declare untrue Galloped

Friday’s Answer


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 11

––––––– ALMANAC ––––––– Today is Tuesday, July 30, the 211th day of 2013. There are 154 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On July 30, 1863, American automaker Henry Ford was born in Dearborn Township, Mich. On this date: In 1729, Baltimore, Md. was founded. In 1864, during the Civil War, Union forces tried to take Petersburg, Va., by exploding a gunpowder-filled mine under Confederate defense lines; the attack failed. In 1918, poet Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant in the 165th U.S. Infantry Regiment, was killed during the Second Battle of the Marne in World War I. (Kilmer is perhaps best remembered for his poem “Trees.”) In 1932, the Summer Olympic Games opened in Los Angeles. In 1945, the Portland class heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine during World War II; only 316 out of some 1,200 men survived. In 1953, the Small Business Administration was founded. In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a measure making “In God We Trust” the national motto, replacing “E Pluribus Unum” (“Out of many, one”). In 1963, the Soviet Union announced it had granted political asylum to Harold “Kim” Philby, the “third man” of a British spy ring. In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Medicare bill, which went into effect the following year. In 1975, former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumed dead, his remains have never been found. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush took personal responsibility for the first time for using discredited intelligence in his State of the Union address, but predicted he would be vindicated for going to war against Iraq. Iraq’s U.S.-picked interim government named its first president: Ibrahim al-Jaafari, a Shiite (SHEE’-eyet) Muslim from a party banned by Saddam Hussein. Sun Records founder Sam Phillips, who discovered Elvis Presley, died in Memphis, Tenn., at age 80. Five years ago: President George W. Bush quietly signed a housing bill he’d once threatened to veto; it was intended to rescue some cashstrapped homeowners in fear of foreclosure. Amid corruption allegations and his own plummeting popularity, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert (EH’-hood OHL’-murt) announced he would resign. Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic (RA’-doh-van KA’-ra-jich) was extradited to The Hague to face genocide charges after nearly 13 years on the run. Republican Party stalwart and onetime U.S. ambassador to Britain Anne Armstrong died in Houston at age 80. One year ago: Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney, on a visit to Israel, outraged Palestinians by telling Jewish donors that their culture was part of the reason Israel was more economically successful than the Palestinians. American teenager Missy Franklin won the women’s 100-meter backstroke before Matt Grevers led a 1-2 finish for the U.S. in the same men’s race.

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48

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76 78 146

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DAILY CROSSWORD BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS

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attachments Tongue-lash Do in a dragon Square peg Daisy of Dogpatch Parasites on people 53 Wherefores’ partners 55 Org. of Penguins 45 46 47 50 52

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Friday’s Answer


Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dear Annie: My niece is transgender (she’s a boy who wants to be a girl). She needs to take a hormone blocker, and it costs a fortune. Insurance won’t pay for it, so the whole family is chipping in. My brother-in-law doesn’t make much money, and he’s lazy. My parents paid most of their bills when they were first married, and they are giving my niece so much money that we cannot have our annual vacation. My parents will be giving them more money in a few months. Meanwhile, my niece gets everything she wants. My mother recently bought her a $200 outfit for her birthday. I suggested she get something less expensive because she is already paying a fortune for the hormone blocker. My parents now can’t send me to the university of my choice, so I have to opt for community college. I worked like a horse to get straight A’s, but still didn’t qualify for a scholarship big enough to cover the cost of the university. Taking out a loan is out of the question, because my parents won’t co-sign, and the bank won’t give me one without it. I think my sister should sell her jewelry to pay for the drugs, and she and my brother-in-law should downgrade to a smaller home if they need the money. My mother says I’m being selfish. Am I? -- Missing Out Dear Missing: This is your parents’ money. They can choose to give more to your sister (and her child), rather than pay for an expensive university education for you. We realize this isn’t fair, but it serves no purpose to build up resentment. You can get a perfectly good education at a community college for a fraction of the cost, and if you still want to attend a four-year university, you can look into transferring in two years, and research scholarships, grants and loans that may be available then. Your parents obviously believe your sister needs this money more than you do, which also means they feel you are

responsible and motivated and will do OK without their help. Please prove them right. Dear Annie: This is for “Puzzled in Gary, Ind.,” who wondered why her senior age and white hair were attracting unwanted flirtation from lesbians. I, too, have a full head of white hair and just turned 59. I also happen to be a lesbian, so I believe I have the authority to speak to her concern. I don’t believe it’s her white hair that is causing the unwelcome attention. It’s more about posture, physical carriage and style of clothing that projects a certain “gay-dar” (gay radar). She shouldn’t change her hair color over this, but perhaps a more feminine hairstyle and wardrobe would make a difference. But you’re right, Annie. Flirting is not a sign of endangerment. -- Pomona, Calif. Dear Pomona: We appreciate the backup. Read on for more: From Florida: As I have aged, I also notice that white men don’t apparently find me sexy or relevant anymore. Thank heavens Hispanic and black men and lesbians still think I’m as cute as a button. I’d forget how to flirt if it weren’t for them. I’m strictly straight and happily married, but still find it a tremendous compliment when someone chats me up a bit. Santa Cruz: Speaking as a white-haired lesbian with all the “inside” knowledge available, I can only wish the rumors were true. Maybe she could give me some pointers. California: As a straight, older widow, I am confused by this, as well. After I stopped wearing my wedding ring, I began wearing rings on other fingers and learned that this is a “lesbian symbol.” How would I know this? I don’t grill people about their sexuality and don’t enjoy having to explain mine, which invariably requires mentioning the loss of my dear husband. I’m beginning to wonder whether I need to wear a fake wedding ring.

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 13

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Tuesday, July 30 Arthritis Foundation speaker in New Gloucester

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Amber Wolfe, from the Arthritis Foundation, will be presenting a free workshop for farmers, gardeners, agricultural workers, healthcare professionals and the general public. Topics will include information on arthritis as a disease, treatment and pain management options, sources of joint stress and pain on the farm, operation changes, modifications to farm equipment and assistive technology tools. Specific segments on gardening and rural youth will also be discussed. Pineland Farms Conference Center, Room A, 15 Farm View Drive, New Gloucester.

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

Medical Cannabis Users Over 60 group

5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Medical Cannabis Users Over 60 — Community Group, 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. July 30, Aug. 28, free, at Integr8 Health at 170 U.S. Route 1, Suite 200, Falmouth. Limit: 30 people. ”A casual gathering for discussion and community-building with guided discussion by patient Bill Krantz. Our goal is to have this even monthly.” https://www. facebook.com/Integr8HealthLLC

‘Living Downstream’ screening, discussion

6 p.m. “‘Living Downstream’ is an award winning film based on the acclaimed book by ecologist and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber, documenting her work to raise awareness about toxic chemicals in our environment and their impacts on public health. The film follows Steingraber’s year-long journey across North America as she breaks the silence about cancer and its environmental links. A Q&A and panel discussion on current issues and ways to get involved will follow with our experts-in-residence: Dr Steve Feder, President of the Maine Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics; Gail Carlson, PhD, Colby College Professor of Environmental Studies; Emily Postman, Environmental Health Strategy Center. The event is free but we’d like to know who is planning to attend.” Portland Public Library, Meeting Room 5. For more information contact: Rumbie Gondo outreach@preventharm.org; or call 313-7084

Wednesday, July 31 Roxana Robinson at the Portland Public Library

noon to 1 p.m. Roxana Robinson, author of “Sparta,” Rines Auditorium, Portland Public Library. “Roxana Robinson’s new book, ‘Sparta,’ has just been released. In the book, Conrad Farrell has no family military heritage, but when he graduates as a classics major at Williams College, he joins the Marines to continue a long tradition of honor, courage, and commitment.”

Friedman Legacy Day at Baxter Academy

noon to 1:30 p.m. “The Maine Heritage Policy Center, co-hosted with the Honorable Carol Weston of Americans For Prosperity-Maine, cordially invites you to participate in this year’s Friedman Legacy Day. This annual, international event provides fans of Milton Friedman and lovers of liberty the opportunity to learn about the late Nobel laureate, to share his ideas, and to celebrate the impact they had on our country and the world. Discover Baxter Academy: A Victory for School Choice and Economic Freedom. Presentations by: Amanda Clark, Education Policy Analyst, MHPC; Allison Davis, Vice Chair, Board of Directors, Baxter Academy; The Honorable Carol Weston, director, Americans for Prosperity-Maine. School tour by: Michele LaForge, Head of School, Baxter Academy.” Baxter Academy for Technology and Science, 54 York St., Portland. There is no charge for this event, but attendees must register in advance. Space is limited. Please respond to Ms. Kate Clark; 3212550, kclark@mainepolicy.org.” http://www.eventbrite. com/event/7356566689

‘Hansel & Gretel’ readings

4 p.m. The Children’s Museum & Theater of Maine presents

Dust of the Earth Pottery of Brunswick created this miniature landscape for the Portland Flower Show. The pottery business is a member of United Maine Craftsmen, which hosts art and craft shows throughout the state. The largest show in the state is at the Cumberland Fairgrounds, just 10 miles north of Portland, always the second week in August. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO) readings from “Hansel & Gretel” on Wednesday, July 31 at 4 p.m. in the Sam L. Cohen Children’s Library. “This program is presented as part of Portland Public Library’s summer reading program for children, ‘I Love Reading in Portland: I’m Your Neighbor.’ Actors from the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine will read their own adaptations of the classic Grimm’s fairy tale about a brother and sister’s journey into the woods to outwit a witch with a terrible sweet tooth. The play will be performed at the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine Oct. 18-28. This program is designed for children 3 years and older.”

Maine’s Favorite Birds

5:30 p.m. Speakers: Jeffrey V. Wells & Allison Childs Wells. “Join us in the Longfellow Garden for a presentation by the authors of ‘Maine’s Favorite Birds’ (Tilbury House, 2012), who will share fascinating facts, fun stories, beautiful images, and more about some of Maine’s best known and most loved feathered creatures. From lush forests and rocky coastlines to lakes, mountains, and rolling fields, spectacular natural beauty and diverse habitats make Maine a wonderful place for seeing and hearing some of North America’s iconic birds. The talk will appeal to anyone who wants to know and better appreciate the birds they are most likely to see in their backyards, wild areas, parks, and nature preserves. A book sale and signing will follow the talk. Jeffrey V. Wells and Allison Childs Wells are native Mainers and lifelong birders. After attending graduate programs at Cornell, both worked for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology; they returned to Maine in 2004. Independently and together, they have published widely in their field. Jeff is now senior scientist for the International Boreal Conservation Campaign and Allison is senior director of public affairs for the Natural Resources Council of Maine.” 489 Congress St., Portland. Maine Historical Society. www. mainehistory.org

Portland Democratic City Committee new date

5:30 p.m. “As Portlanders, we join in mourning the loss of Amanda Rowe, nurse and advocate for children’s health, and extending our warmest sympathy to her husband, family and friends for this grievous loss. In order not to conflict with services for Mrs. Rowe, we are moving our meeting up a week. The meeting and officer election will be Wednesday, July 31, at 5:30 p.m. in Conference Room 5 on the lower level of the Portland Public Library. ... Open positions are: President, Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer. All nominees must be members of the PDCC — that is, they must have attended two regular meetings or participated in the 2012 caucus. While we welcome all registered Democrats to participate and discuss, only official members can vote. (This is mandated by our bylaws, and we realize that it may be an issue for some people; it may well be that the new officers will recommend changes to those bylaws, but we need to elect them first.) After new officers

are elected, we’ll have a brief discussion of upcoming elections, campaigns and events.” http://portlanddems.org

Signs of Hope fundraiser for Spring Harbor

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. “On Wednesday, July 31, Spring Harbor Hospital will hold its annual fundraising event, Signs of Hope at the home of Sheri and Joseph Boulos from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Falmouth. “Randy Seaver, strategic communications consultant and author of the blog All Along the Watchtower, is the featured speaker at the event. Randy makes his living as a strategic communications consultant, helping a wide range of clients — from Fortune 500 companies to small non-profit organizations and municipalities find solutions to complex challenges. He is also a self-described “outof-the-closet consumer of mental health services,” and was hospitalized multiple times for mental health issues that include depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. Today, Randy’s illness is well-managed, and he’s become a public advocate, working to raise awareness about the impacts of mental illness and its stigma by serving as a panelist and a guest speaker in several forums throughout New England, include Maine Mental Health Partner’s It Takes A Community.” http://www.springharbor.org

‘Art of the Civil War’ in Bath

6:30 p.m. Lecture: “Their Eyes Have Seen the Glory: Art of the Civil War” by Author Stephen May. Maine Maritime Museum, Bath. Nonmembers $7; members $5. “In a fullyillustrated slide lecture, the author examines how the American Civil War and its aftermath were depicted by painters, sculptors and photographers on both sides of the conflict, including Maine painters Winslow Homer and Eastman Johnson and sculptor Franklin Simmons. To purchase tickets or for more information visit www.MaineMaritimeMuseum.org or call443.1316, ext 0.”

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m. see next page


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

Sunset Folk Series

7:30 p.m. Sunset Folk Series at Western Prom Park sponsored by Families of the Western Prom Neighborhood. Concerts last approximately 40 minutes (in case of inclement weather, concert canceled). Wednesday, July 31, 7:30 p.m. Phantom Buffalo (www.myspace.com/phantombuffalo); Wednesday, Aug 7, 7:30 p.m. Carolyn Currie (www.carolyncurrie.com); Wednesday, Aug 14, 7:30 p.m. Kurt Baker (www.kurtbakermusic.com). www.portlandmaine.com

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

8 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25.Preview performance. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org/2013season/joseph

Portland Trails ‘Star Trek’

8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Portland Trails “Star Trek” with Ed Gleason of the USM Southworth Planetarium. (postponed from Monday, due to cloud cover). “After a brief introduction and tour at the Southworth Planetarium we will move to a spectacular spot to view the summer night sky! Suggested $5 donation for Portland Trails members, $7 for non-members.” http://trails.org/programs

Thursday, Aug. 1 Museum benefit for Newtown, Conn.

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. “On Thursday, August 1, Maine Historical Society and five other museums across Maine will donate a portion of each admission fee paid that day to help support the construction of a children’s museum in Newtown, Conn., the city that was the site of a mass shooting in December. Some of the participating museums will also accept donations that day from visitors who wish to make a contribution toward the Newtown museum as well. the effort gained even greater momentum because many in the community realized there was a much greater need. ... After the December shooting, communities and organizations across the country looked for ways to help the children and families of Newtown. Three museums in Grand Rapids, Michigan, chose to contribute a portion of one day’s admission fees toward helping fund the Newtown children’s museum, which has been named the ‘Everwonder Museum.’ The Association of Children’s Museums picked up the movement and launched a national effort. When Amy Lent, executive director of Maine Maritime Museum, read about the effort she invited other museums in Maine to join as well and many responded enthusiastically. ... The participating Maine museums are the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine Discovery Museum in Bangor, Maine Historical Society in Portland, Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, the Maine State Museum in Augusta and Penobscot Marine Museum in Searsport.” Maine Historical Society reported: “MHS is still charging the regular admission fee for entrance to our Civil War exhibit and the Longfellow House. $1 from each paid admission will go towards the Ever Wonder Museum Fund.” Wadsworth–Longfellow House, Monday–Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., last tour at 4 p.m. Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., last tour at 4 p.m. Museum & Museum Store, Monday–Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www. MaineHistory.org

Deering Oaks Bandstand concerts

12:30 p.m. Deering Oaks concerts; starting at 12:30 p.m., concerts last approximately 40 minutes and are held at the Bandstand, Deering Oaks Park (if inclement weather, concert relocated to Reiche Community Center, 166 Brackett St.). Thursday, Aug. 1 Matt Loosigian (Kids Songs); Thursday, Aug. 8 USM Chemistry Club (Experimental Fun). www. portlandmaine.com

A Company of Girls at the Portland Public Library

10:30 a.m. Portland Public Library’s summer reading program for children, I Love Reading in Portland. “Programs designed for children ages 5-12 include: Thursday, Aug. 1 at 10:30 a.m., A Company of Girls – Theater Arts; Thursday, Aug. 8 at 10:30 a.m., I’m Your Neighbor: Anne Sibley O’Brien/A Path of Stars; Saturday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m., End of Reading Program Celebration at Riverton!” http://www.portlandlibrary.com

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two

A male house sparrow surveys its surroundings near the Bayside Trail. On Wednesday, July 31, at 5:30 p.m., Maine Historical Society presents a Book Talk: Maine’s Favorite Birds with speakers: Jeffrey V. Wells and Allison Childs Wells. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO) daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

2:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25. Preview performance. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse. org/2013season/joseph

Cultivating Community Twilight Dinner

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Turkey Hill Farm, 120 Old Ocean House Road, Cape Elizabeth. “Cultivating Community is holding a series of Twilight Dinners at their farm in Cape Elizabeth. The three-course meals will be cooked by local chefs to highlight the local and seasonal. The cost is $40 per person (BYOB). You can buy tickets online at Brown Paper Tickets. Aug. 1 — Chef Josh Potocki, Bread and Butter Catering Co. Aug. 8 — Cultivating Community Youth Growers supported by John Peelen of Dutch Door Kitchen. Aug. 15 — Chef Leslie Oster, Aurora Provisions. Aug. 22 — TBD. Aug. 29 — Chef Chris McClay, Modern Vegan Cooking School. Sept. 5 — Chef Mitch Gerow, East Ender.”

Eastern Promenade Concert Series

7 p.m. Friends Of Eastern Promenade Concert Series, sponsored by the Friends of Eastern Promenade and area businesses. Concerts last approximately one hour. Please note: Due to Fort Allen Park undergoing renovations, concerts this summer are held at Fort Sumner Park, North Street (in case of inclement weather, concert canceled). Thursday, Aug. 1, 7 p.m. Pete Kilpatrick (Acoustic Folk Pop); Thursday, Aug. 8, 7 p.m. Sly Chi (Funk Soul & R&B); Thursday, Aug. 15, 7 p.m. The Kenya Hall Band (Funk / NeoSoul); Thursday, Aug. 22, 7 p.m. North of Nashville (Outlaw Country/American Roots); Thursday, Aug. 29, 7 p.m. Maine Marimba Ensemble (Zimbabwean Music). http://www.portlandmaine.com

Live Music and Making a Difference in South Portland

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Summer Benefit Concerts: Live Music and Making a Difference. By coming to these concerts you will be making a difference in someone’s life. Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thornton Heights United Methodist Church 100 Westbrook St., South Portland. Charities sponsoring

the events: Aug. 1: Performer — Gunther Brown Band; charity — Southern Maine Agency on Aging; Aug. 8: Performer — Dave Shaffer and others; charity — Veterans of Foreign Wars; Aug. 15: Performer — Joe Farren, Stepping Stones: MAPS Shelter Services of Women and Child; Aug. 22: Performer — Lighthouse Jubilees; charity — STRIVE. Suggested donation of $5 at the door and all the proceeds go to these charities.”

Friday, Aug. 2 Hidden Ladder Collective at Meg Perry

7 a.m. to 7 p.m. “A marathon of art will be happening at the Meg Perry Center (644 Congress St.) on Friday, Aug. 2. The Hidden Ladder Collective is going to lock themselves inside the Meg Perry Center and create artwork starting at 7 a.m. and will not stop until 7 p.m., right in the midst of the First Friday Art Walk. Some artists will be working on ground level and some up on ladders to create 12 giant paintings that will be collaboratively created using every art weapon you can imagine (paints, pastels, pencils, crayons, markers, glue, plaster, etc). People are welcome to come by at anytime to watch the progress. An art table will also invite those visiting to create their own additions which may even be glued to the future paintings. The event is a fundraiser to save the financially struggling Meg Perry Center; as people can pledge money towards the center for each hour an artist works during the event. Both highest pledgers and random pledgers will be selected as the winners of the paintings at the end of the night (8 p.m. to 9 p.m.). Music and food will accompany the 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. portion of the event. The list of artists will be published on the event page prior to the event. ... Musicians will be on the stage composing an original show to perform that evening during the last half hour of the visual art collaboration (7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.). The show will be recorded live and produced as an album. The event will be open to the public starting at 7 a.m. Viewers are invited to come in throughout the day and witness the productivity and creation.” Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/ events/1382854008602366/?fref=ts; Hidden Ladder Collective: http://www.hiddenladdercollective.com; Meg Perry Center: http://www.megperrycenter.org.

Sanford’s Kids’ Club

9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sanford’s Kids’ Club, affiliated with the Sanford School Department. Kids’ Club fundraising committee presents car wash, bake sale, lemonade stand and face painting booth to raise money for community involvement and bussing to community service projects! Willard School, 668 Main St., Sanford. Community and business vehicles welcome recommended donation for car wash is $5. see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013— Page 15

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

ReLaunch Party for Port City Music Hall

5 p.m. “In celebration of the recent purchase of the Port City Music Hall, the State Theatre, a partnership of Alex Crothers and The Bowery Presents, will be hosting a ReLaunch Party this Friday, August 2 at 5 p.m. The ReLaunch Party will be featuring myriad local acts, including Awaas, Dj Matty T, Foam Castle and Hutch Heelan. In support of First Friday Art Walk, the evening will be free and all ages. Port City Music Hall opened it’s doors four years ago in the heart of the Portland Arts District and in that short time has played host to a range of incredible artists, including Grace Potter, Neko Case, They Might Be Giants, Dr. Dog and many more. The venue accommodates 529 people in a beautifully appointed and spacious room with hardwood floors, clean sightlines and full bar service. The new owners plan to host 120+ shows annually and will also be available for private events and parties. The music venue is the second endeavor for CroBo, LLC, which also operates the historic State Theatre at 609 Congress Street and produced the successful Gentlemen of the Road Stopover Festival with Mumford & Sons last August.” www.portcitymusichall.com or www.statetheatreportland.com.

‘Some Burdensome: Big Ships, Big Cargoes’

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. First Friday Art Walk on Aug. 2 featuring Opening Reception for “Some Burdensome: Big Ships, Big Cargoes” by Maine Maritime Museum, in the Lewis Gallery, Portland Public Library. http://www.portlandlibrary.com/ programs/lewisgallery.htm

First Friday with Maine Historical

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Exhibits and Longfellow House Open House, First Friday Art Walk. “Join us for the First Friday Art Walk and visit our Civil War themed exhibits: This Rebellion: Maine and the Civil War and Patriotic Imagery. The Art Walk promotes free, self-guided tours of museums and galleries in downtown Portland. MHS will serve refreshments, and the Museum Store will be open late. This month we’re featuring an open house of the Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Garden from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. only. “Our friendly docents will be in each room to answer your questions about Portland’s beloved poet and his boyhood home, and members of the Longfellow Garden Club will be on hand to talk about plants and the garden’s evolution. This Rebellion showcases a rich array of MHS’s Civil War collections — photographs, letters, artifacts, maps, and memorabilia — related to the Maine soldier’s experience during and after the war. For the first time ever, a database has been created of all Maine soldiers who died in the War (in battle or of war wounds or illness); the names appear in a remembrance wall as part of the exhibit. Patriotic Imagery: Union patriotic imagery was common during the Civil War. It was found on letterhead and envelopes that soldiers used, on memorial posters of soldiers’ service created after the war, and in many other printed formats.” Maine Historical Society, at 489 Congress St. http://www.mainehistory.org

Giant Robots!

of all faiths at the Portland Public Library on First Friday Art Walk, Aug. 2, 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The event will include Arabic writing demonstrations, henna painting, a prayer rug exhibit, and a chance to hear about two books set in Maine’s Muslim community, Moon Watchers and Out Of Nowhere. The Ramadan fast will be broken at 8:15 with food from Tandoor Bread. ... The Ramadan celebration and education allows families of all faiths and backgrounds to engage in conversation with and explore Islamic practices. Through breaking the fast together, a sense of community is created through the common act of sharing food. ‘I’m Your Neighbor, Portland’ is a year-long, city-wide read and series of public events designed to promote a sense of community among the city’s diverse communities.” For more information: www.imyourneighborportland.org; or Curious City, 420-1126; http://www.portlandlibrary.com

Back Bay Connection benefit

7 p.m. MVRA Presents: Back Bay Connection’s Summer Music Celebration. Bayside Bowl, A rocking show for a rocking cause. Join The Rattlesnakes, Metal Feathers, and more in raising some much-deserved funds for Back Bay Connection’s music program. $5 cover.

Film: ‘Dirty Wars’ at the PMA

7 p.m. “Dirty Wars.” Co-presented by SPACE Gallery and The Portland Museum of Art. Friday, Aug. 2, 7 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 3, 2 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 3, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Aug. 4, 2 p.m. PG13, 108 min. Admission $7 at the Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square, Portland. www.portlandmuseum.org/events/movies.php. SPACE Contact Jon Courtney: jon@space538.org. “It’s the dirty little secret of the War on Terror: all bets are off, and almost anything goes. We have fundamentally changed the rules of the game and the rules of engagement. Today drone strikes, night raids, and U.S. government–condoned torture occur in corners across the globe, generating unprecedented civilian casualties. Investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill (author of BLACKWATER: The Rise of the World’s Most Mercenary Army) traces the rise of the Joint Special Operations Command, the most secret fighting force in U.S. history, exposing operations carried out by men who do not exist on paper and will never appear before Congress. No target is off-limits for the JSOC “kill list,” even a U.S. citizen. Director Richard Rowley takes us on a chilling ride with whistleblower Scahill

Portland Playback Theatre

7:30 p.m. “On First Friday, August 2, Portland Playback Theatre’s theme is ‘Differences.’ Audience members are invited to tell their moments and stories about not fitting in, or that relationship that just wouldn’t work or just being different and watch our improvisors re-enact the story on the spot. Every month, Portland Playback uses improvisation to honor true stories from audience members’ lives. Find out more at www.portlandplayback.com. CTN5 Studio, 516 Congress St., Portland. $7 suggested donation at the door.

‘A Midsummer’s Night Dream’

7:30 p.m. The Harborside Shakespeare Company perform their rendition of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer’s Night Dream” on both Aug. 2 and 3 at Mayo Street Arts, Portland. “Shakespeare’s classic comedy of magic, fairies, love and confusion will transport you to a colorful kingdom where anything is possible and nothing is what it seems.” Doors at 7 p.m./show at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 adults, $10 students/seniors, and $8 for kids (18 and under). http://www. brownpapertickets.com/event/401137

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

8 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org/2013season/joseph

Saturday, Aug. 3 AWS Enjoys Antiques

5:30 p.m. First Friday Art Walk at Coast City Comics, Friday, Aug. 2. “Our art show theme will be Giant Robots! Transformers, Zords, Zoids, Pacific Rim, Gundam, Evangelion, and any number of whatever-the-hell-their-calleds from 90 percent of Anime out there! Pick a giant robot from pop culture and make it do something awesome, silly, hilarious, violent, adorable! Whatever you want! Make it so! Just get me your ready-to-hang pieces by Aug. 1.” 634 Congress St., Portland.

10 a.m. to t p.m. “Annual Antique Show at Kennebunk High School (89 Fletcher St., Kennebunk on Saturday, 10-5, and Sunday, 10-4. The AWS thanks Goosefare Antiques for allowing us to have a booth at the show and for the generous donation from a portion of the admissions revenue. Animal Welfare Society. www.animalwelfaresociety.org, 985-3244, ext. 117.”

5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Rines Auditorium, Portland Public Library, 5 Monument Square, Portland. Ramadan Mubarak: A Holiday Celebration and Education For Families of All Faiths. “‘I’m Your Neighbor, Portland’ is hosting a Ramadan celebration and education for families and individuals

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Shaker Village’s herbalist Betsey-Ann Golon will take participants into the Shakers’ 200-year-old gardens to harvest lamb’s ear, thyme, sage, oregano and other fresh herbs for the creation of an herbal wreath and/or herbal bouquet ornaments.” Class will be held on Saturday, Aug. 3 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fee: $40. Bring a lunch and

Ramadan celebration and education event

Heirloom Herbal Wreath and Ornaments Workshop

enjoy the shady comfort of the porch on the 1903 Girls’ Shop. Shaker Village is located on Route 26 (707 Shaker Road) in New Gloucester. FMI: 926-4597 or usshakers@ aol.com.

Film: ‘Dirty Wars’ at the PMA

2 p.m. and 7 p.m. “Dirty Wars.” Co-presented by SPACE Gallery and The Portland Museum of Art. Friday, Aug. 2, 7 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 3, 2 p.m.; Saturday, Aug. 3, 7 p.m.; Sunday, Aug. 4, 2 p.m. PG13, 108 min. Admission $7 at the Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square, Portland. www.portlandmuseum.org/events/movies.php. SPACE Contact Jon Courtney: jon@space538.org. “It’s the dirty little secret of the War on Terror: all bets are off, and almost anything goes. We have fundamentally changed the rules of the game and the rules of engagement. Today drone strikes, night raids, and U.S. government–condoned torture occur in corners across the globe, generating unprecedented civilian casualties. Investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill (author of BLACKWATER: The Rise of the World’s Most Mercenary Army) traces the rise of the Joint Special Operations Command, the most secret fighting force in U.S. history, exposing operations carried out by men who do not exist on paper and will never appear before Congress. No target is off-limits for the JSOC “kill list,” even a U.S. citizen. Director Richard Rowley takes us on a chilling ride with whistle-blower Scahill

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

3:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Clay Aiken in ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ at the Ogunquit Playhouse. “The Playhouse is going Technicolor with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s irresistible story of Joseph, his jealous brothers and one very colorful garment. The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable.” July 31 – Aug 25. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org/2013season/joseph

American Cancer Society benefit show

5 p.m. American Cancer Society benefit show Saturday, Aug. 3 featuring Greywinds (Portland Metalcore); Great American Ghost (Deleted Frequency Records); Dna (Portland Hardcore); Foreign Tongues (Paper + Plastic Records); Guilt (Nh Thrash); Ill Born (Portland Hardcore); Crises A.D. (Southern Maine Melodic Hardcore). Doors at 5 p.m. $10. Seasons Event Center, 155 Riverside St., Portland. All ages, cash bar with valid ID; all proceeds go directly to the Maine Branch of the American Cancer Society to fund cancer research.” Sponsored by: the American Cancer Society, ESCN brand, Resession Skate Shop, Maineproject.com.

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

‘A Midsummer’s Night Dream’

7:30 p.m. The Harborside Shakespeare Company perform their rendition of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer’s Night Dream” on both Aug. 2 and 3 at Mayo Street Arts, Portland. “Shakespeare’s classic comedy of magic, fairies, love and confusion will transport you to a colorful kingdom where anything is possible and nothing is what it seems.” Doors at 7 p.m./show at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 adults, $10 students/seniors, and $8 for kids (18 and under). http://www. brownpapertickets.com/event/401137

Mentalist Rory Raven in Portland

8 p.m. Mentalist Rory Raven at CTN, 516 Congress St., Portland. $15, $12 students and seniors. Community Television Network. http://www.ctn5.org/calendar

Sunday, Aug. 4 Scarborough Marsh canoe tour

6:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. “Explore the marsh by canoe at dawn when birds and other marsh creatures are often most active. 100 Pine Point Road, Scarborough. Maine Audubon members: $11/adult $11/child (12 and under); nonmembers: $13/adult $10/child (12 and under) Registration required. Register by calling 883-5100 or emailing us at smac@maineaudubon.org”; maineaudubon.org


Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Tuesday, July 30, 2013

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