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PORTLAND’S DAILY NEWSPAPER

Longest-serving WCYY deejay saying goodbye

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Abortion protesters may face buffer in Portland

Anti-tar sands rally Fae Silverman appears as “Sandy Dawn Rosenfin,” a “merperson” from Sebago Lake, Thursday at a rally at the Portland Water District headquarters to protest the possible transport via pipeline of tar sands oil through a pipeline which traverses the Sebago Lake watershed to Portland Harbor. “Three years ago today, a massive tar sands oil spill polluted 40 miles of the Kalamazoo River in Michigan,” said Dylan Voorhees, clean energy director for the Natural Resources Council of Maine. “Three years and a billion dollars later, the Kalamazoo River is still polluted.” For more about the protest, see page 3. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

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Page 2 — THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN, Friday, July 26, 2013 Page 2 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

Virginia Johnson, sex researcher, dies at 88

(NY Times) — Virginia E. Johnson, a writer, researcher and sex therapist who with her longtime collaborator, William H. Masters, helped make the frank discussion of sex in postwar America possible if not downright acceptable, died on Wednesday in St. Louis at an assisted living center. She was 88. Her son, Scott Johnson, confirmed the death. Dr. Masters was a gynecologist on the faculty of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis when he began his research into human sexuality in the mid-1950s. Johnson, who joined him in 1957 after answering an advertisement for an assistant, worked alongside him for more than three decades. She was variously his research associate, wife and former wife. The collaborators burst into public consciousness with their first book, a clinical tome titled “Human Sexual Response.” All about sensation, it created precisely that when it was published by Little, Brown in 1966. Although Masters and Johnson deliberately wrote the book in dry, clinical language to pre-empt mass titillation, their subject — the physiology of sex — was unheard-of in its day. The book made Masters and Johnson an institution in American popular culture. They were interviewed widely in the news media, wrote for popular magazines like Playboy and Redbook, and on more than one occasion caused heated public controversy. Their work was discussed in rapt half-whispers at suburban cocktail parties and even inspired a band, Human Sexual Response, a Bostonbased New Wave group of the late 1970s and early ’80s. Their other books, also published by Little, Brown, include “Human Sexual Inadequacy” (1970); “The Pleasure Bond: A New Look at Sexuality and Commitment” (1974, with Robert J. Levin); “Human Sexuality” (1982, with Robert C. Kolodny); and “Masters and Johnson on Sex and Human Loving” (with Dr. Kolodny).

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Labor leaders seek government aid for Detroit

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(NY Times) — Top leaders of the A.F.L.C.I.O., the nation’s main federation of labor unions, on Thursday called on President Obama and the Congress to offer an immediate financial infusion to Detroit, which last week became the largest American city ever to file for bankruptcy. The executive council of the A.F.L.-C.I.O, holding meetings at its headquarters in Washington, also called on the state of Michi-

gan to provide a comparable amount of financial support to Detroit, its most populous city. State and federal authorities have largely set aside suggestions of a bailout in the days since Gov. Rick Snyder and the emergency manager he assigned to solve Detroit’s woes announced that the city required bankruptcy protection. But the appeal on Thursday by labor leaders, who were angered by the prospect of cuts to pensions and health benefits to help resolve

the city’s $18 billion debt, suggests that questions about state and federal support for teetering cities like Detroit are far from over. “There is no question there’s a crisis in Detroit, but impoverishing the city’s public service workers and further decimating public services is not the solution,” said Lee Saunders, the president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, and chairman of the A.F.L.-C.I.O.

Holder wants Texas to clear voting changes with the U.S. WASHINGTON (NY Times) — Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced on Thursday that the Justice Department would ask a court to require Texas to get permission from the federal government before making voting changes in that state. The move opens a new chapter in the political struggle over election rules after the Supreme Court struck down a portion of the Voting Rights Act last month. In a speech before the National Urban League in Philadelphia, Mr. Holder also indicated that the filing, expected later on Thursday, was most likely just an opening salvo in

a new Obama administration strategy to try to reimpose “preclearance” requirements in parts of the country that have a history of discriminating against minority voters. His statements come as states across the South, from Texas to North Carolina, have been rushing to enforce or enact new restrictions on voting eligibility after the Supreme Court’s ruling in Shelby County v. Holder. “This is the department’s first action to protect voting rights following the Shelby County decision, but it will not be our last,” Mr. Holder said. “Even as Congress considers updates to the Voting Rights Act in light of

the court’s ruling, we plan, in the meantime, to fully utilize the law’s remaining sections to subject states to preclearance as necessary. My colleagues and I are determined to use every tool at our disposal to stand against such discrimination wherever it is found.” The move relies on a part of the Voting Rights Act that the Supreme Court left untouched in the Shelby County case. The court struck down the coverage formula in Section 4 of the law, which had subjected Texas and eight other mostly Southern states to federal oversight based on 40-yearold data.

Weiner admits lewd contact with Spanish train inquiry looks at up to 10 women; denies addiction speed obsessed driver after 80 die

(NY Times) — Anthony D. Weiner, the embattled candidate for mayor of New York City, acknowledged on Thursday that he had engaged in inappropriate online communications with up to three women since leaving Congress two years ago, as his campaign entered a troubled and circuslike phase. Weiner, in a news conference at a Brooklyn soup kitchen, said that in total, he had traded lewd messages with 6 to 10 women, including during the time he was a United States representative. But, he added, “I can’t tell you absolutely what someone else is

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SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, Spain (NY Times) — The grainy video lasts little more than 10 seconds, but long enough to show the blazing speed of a Spanish passenger train bound for Santiago de Compostela that bounced against a curved wall and thundered off the track like a twisted toy. Emergency workers were still picking through mangled debris on Thursday, hours after 80 people were killed in one of Europe’s worst rail accidents in recent years. With the footage from a security camera, investigators were exploring clues, focusing on the train’s speed and a middle-aged driver who relished high velocity and boasted about breaking speed records on his Facebook page. The driver, Francisco José Garzón Amo, with more than three decades of experience, is now under investigation by a judge who has ordered the collection of all recordings in connection with the crash. On the day of the wreck, he substituted for another driver at the controls just 60 miles before the crash, according to Spanish news reports.

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Anti-tar sands rally marks anniversary of Mich. spill

Environment Maine Director Emily Figdor speaks Thursday at a rally at the Portland Water District headquarters to protest the possible transport via pipeline of tar sands oil from Canada. If approved, the transport would carry the diluted bitumen through a pipeline which traverses the Sebago Lake watershed to Portland Harbor. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

Daily Sun Staff Report

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OBITUARY –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

John G. DiBiase Sr. PORTLAND — John G. DiBiase Sr. following a brief illness, passed away peacefully at the Gosnell Hospice House on July 23, 2013. John was born on Oct. 20, 1922, the oldest of three children of Camillo DiBiase and Angela (DiMatteo) DiBiase. He grew up on Waterville Street in the Munjoy Hill neighborhood of Portland. John was a graduate of Portland High School’s Class of 1940. Following graduation, John began his working career in construction and as a freight handler for the railroad. In 1947 John married Marilyn Fogg and his life was off and running! In 1949 John and Marilyn opened and operated the Famous Market variety store located on Forest Ave. It was during the seven years they owned their first store that John and Marilyn began raising their four children. In 1956 the family moved to South Portland where John and Marilyn established DiBiase’s Market. John and Marilyn worked long hard days together until they sold the store in 1976. Following the sale of the store, they moved to Portland and together operated a Day Care Center until 1996. Upon retirement, John and Marilyn joined the Italian Heritage Center. They became active members and chaired various functions over the past 37 years. Other than their family, the “Club” as they called it, was truly the center of their lives. John’s passion was music and remained an important part of his life right until the end. He

was a talented musician, accomplished in many instruments, all without reading a note. He filled their home daily with music, playing his piano. John played in local bands as a young man and performed often around the Greater Portland area. He was often asked to play at parties, weddings and gatherings of family and friends. He was a member of the Harmonicats, a four-piece harmonica band for several years. John’s other loves were dancing, telling jokes, and playing bocce. He enthusiastically embraced life and his youthful energy was always on display. John was well known for his comedic comebacks and oneliners. John was predeceased by his sisters Jeanette Zazzara and Cinderella Miller. He will be very lovingly missed by his wife of 66 years, Marilyn DiBiase of Portland,Maine; his daughter Cynthia and husband Scott Decker of No.Yarmouth, Maine; son Camillo DiBiase and wife Linda DiBiase of Phoenix, Ariz.; son John Jr. and wife Lynne of Poland, Maine and daughter Maria and husband Ed Doyle of Gorham, Maine; eight grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. He loved life, family and his many close friends. John will be dearly missed by his family, friends and relatives who were fortunate to have been a part of his life. He will now truly be our “Johnny Angel.” Visiting hours will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, July 28, 2013 at A.T. Hutchins Funeral and Cremation Services, 660 Brighton Ave., Portland. Prayers will be recited at the funeral home on Monday, July 29 at 9:30 a.m., followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. at St. Pius X Catholic Church, 492 Ocean Ave., Portland. Interment will be at New Calvary Cemetery, South Portland. To offer words of condolence and share memories with the family, please go to www.athutchins.com In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Scholarship Fund c/o The DiBiase Scholarship Italian Heritage Center, 40 Westland Ave., Portland, ME 04103.

Protesters of Canadian tar sands oil dressed in black to symbolize an oil spill, while at least one depicted a mermaid, in a rally Thursday at the Portland Water District headquarters in Portland. Fae Silverman appeared as “Sandy Dawn Rosenfin,” a “merperson” from Sebago Lake, to protest the possible transport via pipeline of tar sands oil through the Sebago Lake watershed. The rally coincided with the third anniversary of a tar sands spill at the Kalamazoo River in Michigan, which stemmed from failure of an Enbridge pipeline. Protesters on Thursday gathered “to denounce oil industry efforts to pump thick, heavy tar sands oil through the 63-year-old pipeline — which traverses the — to Portland Harbor for export,” a press release noted. “In addition to being a recreational mecca, Sebago Lake provides Portland Water District’s drinking water, supplying 200,000 people – 1 in 7 Mainers. This water would be threatened by a tar sands oil spill, which would be nearly impossible to clean up.” Rally participants, including residents who have worked to pass resolutions opposing the tar sands pipeline, called on U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, to join with the other members of Maine’s delegation and seek full environmental review of any tar sands oil pipeline proposal in Maine. “Three years ago today, a massive tar sands oil spill polluted 40 miles of the Kalamazoo River in Michigan,” said Dylan Voorhees, clean energy director, Natural Resources Council of Maine. “Three years and a billion dollars later, the Kalamazoo River is still polluted. It is clearer than ever: Maine cannot afford the risk from a tar sands pipeline crossing our state and its lakes, rivers, and bays. That is why today, we call on Senator Susan Collins to join with the rest of Maine’s Congressional delegation and ask the U.S. State Department to require a new Presidential Permit and full environmental review of any tar sands pipeline through Maine.” “Tar sands pose an unacceptable threat to our fisheries, drinking water, and way of life. A spill here could be a disaster of catastrophic proportions — polluting Sebago Lake and potentially our drinking water and forever changing the place we love,” said Eliot Stanley, board member of the Sebago Lake Anglers Association. Proximity of the pipeline to the lake has not been well publicized in Maine, he said.  “We need to learn from history so we don’t repeat mistakes,” said Environment Maine Director Emily Figdor. “The Kalamazoo spill tragically demonstrates the risks of pumping tar sands through our communities. We will not let Big Oil risk so much here in Maine for the sole purpose of increasing their profits.” A national review of the Michigan spill found that exterior corrosion, but not internal issues, contributed to the spill. This week, the South Portland Planning Board met for about four hours to review a proposed Waterfront Protection Ordinance prior to the South Portland City Council meeting next month to act on the citizen’s initiative. “Concerned Citizens of South Portland” prepared and sponsored a citizen’s initiative, collecting 3,793 signatures in 11 days, an ordinance to restrict tar sands in the city.


Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

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Mathematics: our fusing force

When Roman legions sacked the independent Greek city-state of Syracuse in 212 B.C., the consul Marcellus ordered that the mathematician Archimedes not be harmed. Long admired, Archimedes personified all that Rome held sacred, but was lacking: A mind on the frontier of reality, pushing back the boundaries which make sense of the physical world. Marcellus’ edict didn’t reach the trenches. A centurion came upon Archimedes on the beach. There in the sand, the old man had sketched several diagrams and written out an equation. With radius of a sphere still not drawn, the centurion demanded the way be cleared for advancing troops. Instead, Archimedes blurted out his death sentence: “Don’t disturb my circles!” As a youngster, this parable of devotion failed to catch my attention. I never gave much thought to math, even though I had always been good at it. Proving that the three sides of an equilateral triangle are equal in length was yet another puzzle to navigate when I didn’t want to think much. Ratcheting up the difficulty was pure entertainment, no different than advancing through the levels of any popular video game. When I wanted to think and feel deeply, I’d write. In college I realized I could put minimum effort into

Telly Halkias

––––– From the Stacks

see HALKIAS page 5

Curtis Robinson is taking the day off. His “Usually Reserved” column will be back in The Daily Sun.

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The lightning storm Went down and sat with some people fishing off the end of the Maine State Pier on one of those nights last week when it was unbearably hot and humid even after the sun went down. “Catch anything?” I said to no one in particular. “Oh yeah,” one guy laughed as he reared back and cast his line far out into the water, “hooked onto a sail boat but I had to throw it back because it wasn’t big enough!” Then, grinning up and down the line at the others and pointing up to the night sky: “Might’ve kept it but the Marine Patrol is up there watching from helicopters!” Of course, I glanced up, couldn’t help myself. Tittering all around. After I’d sat there for awhile, though, dangling my legs off the end of the pier looking down at the water and wiping the sweat from my forehead, they began to draw me in. “Hot, huh?” a guy wearing a tee shirt that didn’t quite stretch over his huge belly said. “Yeah,” I said, looking up at him as he lifted his tee shirt and wiped his face with it. “The Time and Temp sign said 103 this afternoon,” someone down the line said, “but the weather guy on TV said it was only 95. That was supposed to be some kind of a big record, but it was even hotter than that!” “I go by what the Time and Temp sign says,” said someone else, “the weather people get their information from up in Gray somewhere. I go by what it says right here.” “You got that right, read it for yourself, that’s the only way,” said another.

Cliff Gallant –––––

Daily Sun Columnist

“My father used to say that the best thing to do in a lightning storm is to stand beside someone taller than you,” the sail boat nabber said, laughing, but with a bit of uneasiness in his voice. Just as he said it there was a crack of lightning right over our heads that scared the hell out of all of us. We were riveted by it and could actually feel the heat.

That’s when the first small quick crack of lighting appeared in the sky over Peaks Island, followed by a low rumbling of thunder. Then, about two minutes later, the faintest hint of a cool breeze blew across the water. “Don’t that feel good!” about three people said at once. “Yeah-h-h-h!” the rest of us said, even though the breeze was ever so slight. A moment later lightning flashed again, first here then there, and the thunder that followed was louder and more menacing than before. “Looks like we’re gonna get some rain,” someone said. “There’ll be a little rain,” an older woman down at the far end said quietly, “but it won’t last long. This isn’t about rain, there’s no clouds around. It’s about lightning. All this heat’s got the air charged up so much something’s got to give. When all that electricity get’s released there’ll be a little sprinkling of rain see GALLANT page 5


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 5

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Just send a note Being a natural born smartass, I used to write a lot of notes. Not just notes for me, but for the average student who needed to get out of something and forgot to ask their parents for a note. The trick was in keeping some fairly good stationery on hand, as a ripped out sheet from a notebook just wouldn’t cut it. The subtleties of wording, the slightly rushed signature were the tricks of the trade. I’ve written before about needing an excuse for being late at work, the most memorable one being that I was at your house the previous evening, and kept insisting on “just one more” before you finally gave in and tossed a blanket on me and the couch. Summer being the height of avoidance of unpleasant tasks, I found myself Wednesday columnless. This would not make for a happy editor, so I reached back into the cabinet of excuses I have on hand to see if any were appropriate. “Please excuse Bob for not writing his column this week. He lost the handcuff key.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. Someone left a brick in the washing machine at work, and it blew a main bearing. He has spent most of the week trying to round up parts for a twenty-five-year-old machine.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He’s been following the current vote on

the House Floor, which may come in after deadline.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He is laying on the floor, passed out.” “Please excuse Bob for not subTabula in mitting a column this week. He felt entirely too well to come to Naufragio work today, or any other day this week. I’m sure this will pass on arrival of the next set of thunderstorms.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He has not been fishing or to the beach, and we are creeping up rapidly on the month of August.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He is actively engaged in trying to get a jailhouse interview with the famed North Pond Hermit.” (This one is actually true.) “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He is actively doing research on a diabolical plan for world domination that involves baconflavored marijuana wrapping papers.” (also, true.) “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He was trapped near the inner circle of fault.” (Fans of Albert Brooks will get this.) “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He was experiencing a drastic case of explosive diarrhea.” (Yes, unquestionably uncivil, but I have used this. It is the one excuse where your employer will PAY YOU to stay home.)

Bob Higgins –––––

“Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. Whiskey.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. There was some initial confusion about the deadline, and the extension thereof. I’m sure with a little application of effort, he may present last week’s missive in time for publication at a later date.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. There have been significant developments in a major story that require immediate and total attention.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He wanted to see how long it would take for the rumor to circulate among the Maine Media that he had been fired, and what staggering malcontents managed to inquire as to positions available.” “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. He was trying to figure out who to send a rather large FOAA bill to.” (True) “Please excuse Bob for not submitting a column this week. Due to the annual summer fluctuations in both city and state events, most lawmakers are sitting near a pool drinking mimosas ... and someone has to get the candid shots from the bushes.” Going back, there is only one way to sign any of these rejected notes to the editor. “Signed, Epstein’s Mother” (Bob Higgins is a regular contributor to The Portland Daily Sun.)

The visionary and the practical need each other to this day HALKIAS from page 4

my engineering courses and produce acceptable grades, thus spending more time tinkering with sonnets. My attitude adjustment arrived at the end of sophomore year after taking a class on differential equations. That entire semester, I could do no wrong. Professor Thal stopped calling on anyone else and would turn to me for the solution to a problem. I’d sit with a notebook of doodles and poetry in front of me, spouting out deadpan answers — all correct. After that semester, wanting to comprehend this bizarre yet surreal episode, I set out to integrate the physical world around me into a deeper context. I went on to learn that regardless of global cultures, mathematics is a fusing force, a bond holding together delightfully contrasting realities which anyone can comprehend. The sides of my aforementioned triangle are always equal, whether in Berlin, Boston, or Baghdad. Pi, which Archimedes computed, and is critical to every circular shape, is 3.14159 anywhere you travel. Ultimately, what math really teaches us is that there is comfort in security, and that universal truths do indeed exist. In that reassurance, numbers are the thread holding together the tapestry

of our everyday lives, a poetry Greek predecessors, were masof the universe not unlike my ters of doing and improving, beloved sonnets. but not necessarily of thinkTheir significance is validated ing and creating: “No Roman by the infinite ways which we lost his life because he was take them for granted. absorbed in the contemplation Look upward the next time of a mathematical diagram.” an airplane flies overhead. Indeed. Yet the visionary Breathe easy as you stroll and the practical need each across a bridge. Take a long other to this day, and math is glance at your home when their common link. The union you pull into the driveway. All was delayed that day in Syraof these things remain steadcuse, but not halted. fast because of mathematical An obscure legend claims advances made by our ancesthat, as Archimedes’ blood tors, often at great personal soaked the ground, it finished sacrifice and against a skepdrawing the needed radius. A tical, sometimes irrational night breeze then floated off world. the Mediterranean, and found That last point can’t be overthe Roman camp. Its voice foremphasized. Over the past two ever haunted the centurion, millennia, human fear of a parechoing the solution to the “Archimedes,” by Andre Thevet (1584). (Image from adigm collapse hasn’t changed Wikimedia Commons) sketches in the sand. much; it will always take a dreamer to push us forward. (Telly Halkias is an award-winning freelance jourSo in the end, Archimedes died for all of us. nalist from Portland’s West End. You may contact No less a mathematical giant than Alfred North him at tchalkias@aol.com or follow him on Twitter Whitehead once noted that the Romans, unlike their at @TellyHalkias.)

Turned out to be the most extreme weather event that’s happened around here in years GALLANT from page 4

from the humidity that was in the air, then things will start to cool down a bit.” “My father used to say that the best thing to do in a lightning storm is to stand beside someone taller than you,” the sail boat nabber said, laughing, but with a bit of uneasiness in his voice. Just as he said it there was a crack of lightning right over our heads that scared the hell out of all of us. We were riveted by it and could actually feel the heat. I’d like to say I stayed sitting on the end of the pier taking in the grand show after the rest of them took

off. Transfixed by the majesty of it all. But the truth is that lightning up that close is scary beyond belief, and your primal survival instincts kick in big time. I lit out with the rest of them. I can tend to be foolhardy at times, but when you catch yourself at it and persist anyway, that’s when you’re going to come by the big whammo. Turned out to be the most extreme weather event that’s happened around here in years. Violent flashes of super-charged lightning followed by angry booms of rolling thunder. Kept getting more and more intense, as if it would never stop. Went on for over an hour. If you remember that night, and you surely must,

you’ll remember that there was no huge downpour after all the thunder and lightning. Just as the lady had said would be the case, there was just a gentle rain for a moment or two. It was as if nature had made its statement and no more needed to be said. As the cool air moved in, I thought of sitting there on the end of the pier and how close that crack of lightning had been, and I realized with gratitude that being a little sweaty isn’t such a big deal after all. (Cliff Gallant of Portland is a regular columnist for The Portland Daily Sun. Email him at gallant. cliff555@yahoo.com.)


Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

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Longtime WCYY deejay bids farewell to Maine, announces plans in Florida By Timothy Gillis

new work as a certified yoga instructor with her expeRobin Ivy, the longestrience giving astrological running DJ at WCYY, is readings. heading south, following “I’ve done workshops in her heart and reuniting studios in Freeport, South with her former husband, Portland, Brunswick, and Jared, in Florida. I’ve decided to structure that She announced her and start a business,” she departure on the air yessaid. “I’m going to a yoga festerday, and earlier this tival in October in Florida. week she spoke about I’m going to focus on my own leaving on her blog. business right now, making “On August 2, 2013, I a lot of changes at once.” will do my final radio show Ivy also plans to bring on WCYY,” she posted. Robin’s Zodiac Zone to other “For 13 years I’ve been radio stations. doing alternative morn“I’ve never done that ings and Robin’s Zodiac before. I want to bring it all Zone, and for 18 years I’ve under one umbrella,” she been broadcasting there, said. “I have been softly the last original DJ in the debuting it (her new busilineup. Interestingly, we ness), in terms of name, went on the air as WCYY working on a trademark and on July 28, 1995, and our logo. It is all coming together birthday week is also my under one brand soon.” last week, 18 years later. Asked if she has any speIt’s like going away to colcial plans for next week, her lege at age 18. It totally last one on WCYY, she said feels like that last summer she wants things to conclude before you go away to naturally. school.” “I didn’t know today Robin Ivy, pictured here, said her former husband, Jared, Her house is in chaos found out in December that he’d be moving to Tampa, Fla., for was the day I was going to and her emotions are run- work sometime in the new year. Now, she is announcing plans announce it on the air until, ning all over the place, but to leave Maine and be with him in Florida. (COURTESY PHOTO) literally, five minutes before she feels like it’s the right I did it. That’s how next time to make the move. week will be. After I announced it, I realized I do “I feel ready,” she said in a phone interview Thurswant people to call me. I want to talk about whatday, just after hanging up with an astrology reading. ever memories we share. I want to hear from people. “It just feels like a natural time to make a transiWhat do they want to tell me?” tion. I guess I feel like I won’t be completely separating from here. Obviously, I won’t be here physically. ROBIN IVY’S SWAN SONG But Robin’s Zodiac Zone will still play (on WCYY and on WHOM at night). I will maintain a connecTune in to WCYY next week, Monday through tion with my audience. I have so many friends and Friday, from 6 a.m. to noon to hear Robin Ivy’s family here, and in Massachusetts. It’s going to be a swan song. To learn more about what’s in store big change. I’ve lived here my entire adult life, but for this experienced disc jockey, visit www.robI’m excited to try something new.” inivy.blogspot.com. As part of the move, Ivy plans to incorporate her SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 7

Fire Chief Chief Jerome LaMoria said the department did not think that PFD’s application was targeted for funding, but the money came in the 30th round of the SAFER program. (CRAIG LYONS FILE PHOTO)

Fire chief: SAFER grant ‘a very pleasant surprise’ Confined space rescue team given ‘breathing room’ By Craig Lyons THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A $1.1 million federal grant awarded to the Portland Fire Department came as quite a surprise, as the chief initially received word the application would not be considered. “It was a very pleasant surprise,” said Chief Jerome LaMoria. U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree announced Wednesday night that PFD will receive $1.1 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant program for the department’s special hazards response team. LaMoria said when the federal budget passed, more money than expected was allocated to FEMA for the SAFER program and more applications were given funding. LaMoria said the department did not think that PFD’s application was targeted for funding, but the money came in the 30th round of the SAFER program. “With municipal budgets tightening across the country, the SAFER program is critical in helping cities and towns keep their communities safe,” Pingree said, in a statement Wednesday. “I’m glad the Portland Fire Department will be able to meet its staffing needs without adding an extra burden on local taxpayers. The highly trained team this grant supports is critical to protecting Portland residents and businesses in especially unique and challenging emergencies.” The SAFER grant is a continuation of the $1.04 million award received two years ago that funded 12 positions. Those positions were primarily used as a reactive heavy rescue unit and were certified as a confined space rescue unit. LaMoria said those 12 positions will now continue to be funded through the new grant. “It does not mean that we’re able to hire additional firefighters,” he said.

“I’m glad the Portland Fire Department will be able to meet its staffing needs without adding an extra burden on local taxpayers. The highly trained team this grant supports is critical to protecting Portland residents and businesses in especially unique and challenging emergencies.” — U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-Maine The SAFER grant will continue to support the confined space rescue team that was created because the City Council tasked the department with finding outside funding to offset the cost of keeping those position, according to the chief. The confined space rescue team will work with employers to create a rescue plan and conduct training in the spaces, as is required by Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA regulations require that a workplace with permit required confined spaces have a rescue plan in place in the event of an emergency. To be in full compliance, employers must have a strategy in place in case a rescue from a confined space is needed, whether that be an onsite team or outside rescue team. LaMoria said the department has been successful in drawing attention to the program. It will take some time to get the revenue to the level to fully offset those positions, he said, but the extended SAFER grant will give them that time. “It gives us some breathing room,” he said. With the grant funding in place, LaMoria said all the revenue generated by the confined space rescue team will go into the general fund.

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Private investigator for defense attorney testifies about interactions with witnesses By Marge Niblock

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The remainder of Portland Police Det. Scott Dunham’s videotaped interview with Eric Gwaro began the third day of Gwaro’s trial in the beating of Sherri York, an incident on Aug. 30, 2012, which left York brain damaged. The final witness of the day in Cumberland County Unified Criminal Court was Gwaro’s wife, Jennifer McDonnell, who said that she had called him around 2 a.m. on the morning of the incident because he had not returned home yet. She said it was clear he was intoxicated when she spoke to him. “What he was saying made it clear to me he was incoherent,” McDonnell testified in court, as her husband faced attempted murder and related charges. McDonnell said his problem was “he didn’t know when to stop drinking.” She referred to Gwaro as more of a binge drinker. She said sometimes he’d come home drunk but in the eight years they’d been together he had never been violent. McDonnell said she’d seen the video of her husband’s interview and she noticed “signs of intoxication.” Dunham said his interview with Gwaro began at 4:30 a.m., about an hour and a half after the incident. Officer Victor Cote, an evidence technician with the Portland Police Department, was called to the stand Thursday and was questioned regarding his involvement in the matter. On that early morning nearly a year ago, Cote said he was called at home at 3 a.m. and asked to come to the Big Apple gas station at Cumberland and Washington avenues. Yellow barrier crime-scene tape was placed around various areas nearby. Cote said he collected two black flip-flops in the parking lot of the convenience store and photographed what appeared to be blood drops on the pavement. All stain marks in the area were photographed and evidence was collected for DNA analysis, which would be sent to the Maine State Police Crime Lab. Cote said he took samples with swabs and also took photos of Gwaro, his clothing and appearance from that evening, and any injuries he might have sustained. The items taken included jeans, shirts, a T-shirt being worn under another shirt, sneakers, socks, shorts and a wristwatch. Cote testified that the toe of the right sneaker appeared to have significant blood staining. He went to the hospital and photographed York in the Special Care Unit and also photographed her clothing from that evening. Photos were also taken of the interior and exterior of Gwaro’s vehicle. Cote stated that Gwaro’s cell phone hadn’t been located, but it was then found on the ground in the backyard of 12 Montgomery Street. Joseph Thornton — a licensed private investigator used by attorney Daniel Lilley, in that field for 38 years — offered evidence as well. He said he has worked for Lilley and has also been a personal friend for that same amount of time.

He went to the apartment at 9 Montgomery Street to take photographs of the view from three rooms facing Cumberland Avenue. (He mistakenly referred to a third-floor apartment, which in fact was a fourth-floor apartment.) Thornton testified that trial witnesses Megan Lichterman and Ryan Townsend (who are now married) refused to speak to him Gwaro because they didn’t want to help him or his client. They wanted Gwaro “to go away for a long time,” according to his testimony. He characterized Lichterman as “impolite” and “adamant.” When asked whether Clifford Hethcoat had spoken to him, Thornton replied that he had but he said Hethcoat was reluctant to talk. There was some discrepancy in what Hethcoat testified to in court and what he told Thornton. Hethcoat had testified under oath that he saw Gwaro punching and stomping a woman who was yelling, “Somebody help me! He’s going to kill me!” Hethcoat said the man was punching and stomping her chest and face. He said he had gone outside the apartment and saw Gwaro at the tree line near Peppermint Park and said to him, “What the f--- did you do?” He said the man replied, “Where’d he go?” Thornton was questioned on Thursday as to what Hethcoat said to the investigator. When Thornton had asked the witness if he’d observed any kicking, Thornton said, “No,” testifying that Hethcoat told Thornton somebody was being punched by a darkskinned person. Thornton was then asked whether Hethcoat had ever used the word “stomp,” and he said, “He did not.” When Officer Daniel Hondo was called to testify, he said that he knew York by name and by face but when he saw her that night in an alleyway with Officer Jacob Titcomb, her face was unrecognizable and he did not know it was York he was seeing. In a strange interchange that seemed to pop up out of nowhere, attorney Lilley presented a motion to ask the court why the state had stricken a particular juror. He said, “She was a black woman.” He wanted to know the basis for her exclusion. Deputy District Attorney Meg Elam seemed to be taken aback by the motion, and said, “If he had asked me, I would have told him.” She then stated that she perceived the woman to be Asian and that the reason for her exclusion was she had a criminal history, including terroristic threats and driving after revocation of her license. Then Lilley said, “The only reason we have a trial is because the state has overcharged Eric Gwaro,” and he moved for a judgment of acquittal on the charges of attempted murder and elevated aggravated assault. Judge Joyce Wheeler was taking these issues under advisement and was expected to rule on them Friday morning.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 9

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Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– THEATER REVIEW –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

From kids to pit band, this ‘Gypsy’ is a gem

Ethel Merman, the greatest Diva to ever walk the boards of the musical theater, American to the core. Ms. Merman was gutsy, brassy and a powerhouse voice, never needing a microphone during performance. People wrote shows specifically for this woman and she never had a flop, yet no character is more associated with this larger than life persona than Mama Rose in the American musical classic, GYPSY. Maine State Music Theater brings this gem to the stage and this is a show where the audience could sing along to the well known standards, BUT PLEASE DON’T! Dominic Missimi takes the helm, creating an inti––––– mate look into the hardship of life on the road, pursuing Theater the elusive dream of starCritic dom. Show Business can be ruthless, living out of a suitcase which contains all of one’s worldly possessions and always hungry for the next gig and applause. GYPSY is the story of a hard-driving stage mother and the true story of the rise of the greatest star Burlesque ever knew, Gypsy Rose Lee. Mr. Missimi takes advantage of the human toil and emotion packed into this script, creating characters who are three dimensional and giving a clear insight on the fragility of the human existence. Scenic Designer Thomas M. Ryan has created a wonderful set, injecting unrealistic flats to Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Brunswick theater stage as “the create the different playing scenes. I very much ultimate show business mother,” Rose, in “Gypsy.” (COURTESY PHOTO) enjoyed the feel of false stability and fleetingness represented with this design, underscoring the Act ll introduces the audience to three strippers who steal extreme passion for Rose to “make it”, to escape into the world your heart and provide the biggest belly laughs of the show. her mind has created as the savior to the daily grind she’s Susan Cella as Tessie Tura, Abby C. Smith as Mazeppa living. Dan Walker provides light and his design is a true partand Heidi Kettenring as Electra. All three are pros, no pun ner in creating the grimy world of early 20th century vaudeintended. “You Gotta Get a Gimmick” is a show stealer in the ville. Costumes and Wig designs are created by Kurt Alger, hands of these ladies. Ms. Kettenring’s Electra had me laughcompleting the world of GYPSY. The designs really enhance ing hard, wiping the tears away from my eyes and having diffithe struggle of a traveling performer during this era, when culty catching my breath, the genius of understatement. Tessie make-up was still associated with loose women and respectis tenderly portrayed by Ms Cella, mother figure and confidant. able citizens didn’t mingle with the tough living and drinking No other character inhabits the full realm of noble human qualworkers of the stage. ities, no matter what station in life, as Tessie. Tessie reminds Charis Leos steps into the iconic role of Mama Rose. She creus a tender heart is Christ like, not a trip to church on Sunday, ates the larger than life force, has the chops to sing the show a large bank account or living in the right part of town. stoppers and has no problem dominating the stage, yet to her Aaron McAllister is the Musical Director and leads an eightcredit, she doesn’t shy away from revealing the vulnerable piece pit band. The underscore is perfect and the music is underbelly of this flesh and blood woman. The cast as a whole always supporting the vocals, never overpowering. The band is terrific, including the army of youngsters. The Kids are cute is tight and sounds great. Never is enough applause given to singing and dancing with acting skills to boot. Missy Dowse these musicians, invisible to the audience eye, they are the portrays Louise (Gypsy Rose Lee). Ms Dowse has crafted an foundation of any musical production. extremely layered performance which is a joy to witness. She Maine State Music Theater has mounted a vibrant rendition threads the journey of her character with precision and bubof this American classic and you’ll find the music an old friend bles over with silent expression. Tulsa is played by Tyler Hanes to spend the evening with. and provided one of my favorite moments of the show, a dance GYPSY runs at the Maine State Music Theater through Aug. sequence. Tipping a hat to the greats of Kelly and Astaire, Mr. 3 on the Bowdoin College campus in Brunswick. Box Office, Hanes is not only elegant but shows athletic prowess as well. 725-8769 or www.MSMT.org The moment was wonderfully choreographed , highly executed and with Ms. Dowse’s Louise longing in the background to be (Harold Withee is a member of Actors’ Equity and SAGasked as a dance partner, emotionally touching as well. AFTRA.)

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Benefit ride set for Saturday This Saturday, the city of Portland will host the fifth annual Sgt. Johnsey & Sgt. Betters Benefit Memorial Ride from Portland to Naples. The event is Saturday at 9:30 a.m. for registration, 11 a.m. for the ride start time, at Parker’s Restaurant, 1349 Washington Ave., Portland. The motorcycle ride raises funds for the children of two Portland Police Sergeants, Rob Johnsey and Rick Betters, who passed away unexpectedly five and four years ago, respectively, a city press release noted. Participants can register the day of the ride, $20 per bike and $10 for passenger. Anyone interested in making a donation can mail a check made out to the “Johnsey/Betters Ride” to the Portland PD Federal Credit Union, 109 Middle Street, Portland ME 04101. All of the proceeds will go to the families, the press release noted. Johnsey was hired as a Portland Police Officer in August 1999. During his nine-year career with Portland Police Department, he served as a K-9 handler, Crisis Intervention Team officer, and was promoted to sergeant in January 2007. Prior to working for Portland, Johnsey was a deputy sheriff in Collier County, Florida and a member of the Army National Guard. In May 2008, Johnsey died due to an accidental gunshot wound to his femoral artery. He left behind his wife, Carol, and his two children, Rachel and AJ. Betters was hired as a Portland Police Officer in October 1985. During his 23-year career with Portland Police Department, Betters served as a patrol officer and team leader of the Department’s Special Reaction Team. He was promoted to sergeant in February 1999. Rick died of a heart attack at the age of 52 in January 2009. He left behind a wife, Jessica, and two daughters, Alexi and Fiona. For more information, contact Lt. Janine Roberts at jrob@portlandmaine.gov. — Staff Report


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 11

Festival of Nations returns as ‘dance party’ in Deering Oaks By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Greater Portland Festival

The 11th annual Greater Portof Nations land Festival of Nations brings together people from more than 20 The 11th annual Greater Portland countries this Sunday, July 28, at Festival of Nations will take place Deering Oaks park. in Deering Oaks Park on Sunday, Changes this year are an absence July 28, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The of flags, due to persistent theft in festival is a collaboration with many past years, and fewer vendors due to corporations, agencies and foundastate regulations, organizers said. tions in the greater Portland area. The family-oriented, cultural event Yet, organizers promised plenty of highlights Maine’s ethnic diversity music, food and joyful atmosphere and traditions, encourages underat the event. The event is free and standing, and promotes a healthy open to the public, running from Maine. More than 20 countries are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. represented there, including Greece, This year, organizers are crankCambodia, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, ing up the music, playing tunes China, and Italy. For more informafrom the different represented tion, visit www.festivalofnationscountries and encouraging festivalmaine.com. goers to dance until the day ends. “We are trying to make it more of a party or a celebration,” said closed,” she said. “He’s been doing Michael Odokara-Okigbo, the The 11th annual Greater Portland Festival of Nations returns to Deering Oaks this Sunday. (COURTESY PHOTO) it since he was 12. The festival is singing sensation who helped his the gift he gives. It’s amazing that mother, Shalom Odokara, start the “Our vendors are different,” Odokara said. “We did he doesn’t perform there, but I festival when he was 12 years old. “This year we colgive scholarships to our oldest (serving) vendors, but need him to do the trash.” lected songs from all over the world. We really want no more 100 percent scholarships. They can make She added that he is negotiating record deals to make it a dance party.” $3,000 (at the Festival of Nations), but they depend with RCA and Sony, “so I don’t know if he will always There will be fewer vendors this year, since the on that money to buy clothes and food for their childo it. This is a gift we give the city because the city state has a lot of requirements, according to Ododren.” has given us so much. I don’t want Michael to forget kara. “A lot of our vendors are new Americans,” she Another change this year is that festival attendabout Maine, no matter how far he goes.” said, “and have to certify with the city and the state. ees won’t see the impressive flag display from years Odokara is thrilled to have her son in town. MediThe cost for the Old Port Festival is $400. The Yarpast. “They were stolen last year,” Odokara said. cal conditions have hampered her ability to see him mouth Clam Festival is $500. We keep ours at $200 “We replaced them three times, and they took them perform, as he has lately in Los Angeles. “I had a for them to participate, but now state requirements three times.” stroke two years ago and cannot fly to see him, so make it harder.” Organizers plan to leave Deering Oaks cleaner I’m thrilled he’s here to help out,” she said. Next year, they plan to offer some vendor scholarthan they found it, and Odokara said she depends For his part, Odokara-Okigbo said, “I usually love ships but still hope to wean them off of that assison her musically talented son to help in that regard. being an only child, but the festival is one time when tance in the future. “Michael can run the festival with his eyes I wish I had siblings.”

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ARIES (March 21-April 19). You’ll be more effective if you do not care about winning the approval of the group you are trying to break into. You’ll manage to show your interest in others without a worry as to whether they are interested in you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). No one is polite all of the time, especially with your nearest and dearest. If you were, they would walk all over you. You may have to show your disapproving look or give exasperated eyes as a way of standing up for yourself. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Is anyone really different and therefore above the rules? Yes, of course. Who? The ones who decide, “I am different and above the rules.” A moral dilemma will have you toying with this idea today. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Even when you know you’re right, it’s important to prepare for the opposition, because when dealing with a group, you’ll only be as right as you can convince people you are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Tension on the strings of a guitar makes majestic music. There is undeniable tension in one of your relationships, too, but don’t rush to relieve it, or it will be like playing a flat, flappy string. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). As much as you enjoy striving for an ideal and doing your best, perfection is not your friend. Let go of this futile notion called “perfect,” and you’ll actually have fun with the challenging projects of the day. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). When multiple paths converge, it forms a blockage. No one path is any more correct than another, but something must be worked out, or nobody will move forward. That’s where you come in: the great negotiator. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). The thunder in the sky isn’t showing off as it bellows through the heavens -- it’s just being thunder. When you do your thing, you’re powerful, too. It’s an honest power, and that’s what makes it so startling to some people. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). You’re aware of the established order, but you don’t agree with it. You’re not the same person you

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HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

1 4 9 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 23 24 26 29 34 35 36

ACROSS Begley & Asner Play a guitar Ditch around a castle Rich soil Button on a DVD remote Take apart Restaurant’s list of offerings Carousels and Ferris wheels Male deer Ridiculous Singer Perry Membership fees Tax-deferred retirement acct. TV’s “The __ Family”; series for John Astin “...not a __ was stirring, not even a mouse...” Actor Jeremy Bread ingredient Woodwind

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 61 62 63 64 65

instrument, for short Thin coin Review of the financial books Witty comment 12/24 or 12/31 Woody or Mel Handbag Abandoned Drive forward Highest card Owl’s cry It was, to a poet Saying in a different way Cartoon bear Chris of tennis Shipshape Swimming spot Honking birds Violent wind Nervous Command Hightailed it

DOWN 1 Lawn tree

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 21 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 35 38 39

__ wonders for; improves much Of sound mind Unrestrained binges Coin toss call Impolite __ up; spends Most cluttered Oman’s capital Climb __; mount Man in Eden African nation Very ordinary Totals Mouse’s cousin Helped Operate a car Capitol roofs, often Relinquished Wet weather forecast Seize power Elevate Force out Christmas Second self Repeating the

41 42 44 45 47 48 49 50 52

words of St. Joan of __ Nudge Without a hitch Composer Cole Mare or stallion Sort; variety Teak or pine Very eager At any time

53 54 55 59

Garden intruder Within reach Celebration 1+2+3+4

Yesterday’s Answer


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 13

––––––– ALMANAC ––––––– Today is Friday, July 26, the 207th day of 2013. There are 158 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On July 26, 1953, Fidel Castro began his revolt against Fulgencio Batista (fool-HEN’-see-oh bahTEES’-tah) with an unsuccessful attack on an army barracks in eastern Cuba. Castro ousted Batista in 1959. On this date: In 1775, Benjamin Franklin became America’s first postmaster-general. In 1788, New York became the 11th state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1863, Sam Houston, former president of the Republic of Texas, died in Huntsville at age 70. In 1882, the Richard Wagner opera “Parsifal” premiered in Bayreuth (BY’-royt), Germany. In 1908, Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte ordered creation of a force of special agents that was a forerunner of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 1912, the Edison Studios production “What Happened to Mary,” one of the first, if not very first, movie serials, was released with Mary Fuller in the title role. In 1947, President Harry S. Truman signed the National Security Act, establishing the National Military Establishment, which later was renamed the Department of Defense. In 1952, Argentina’s first lady, Eva Peron, died in Buenos Aires at age 33. King Farouk I of Egypt abdicated in the wake of a coup led by Gamal Abdel Nasser. In 1956, the Italian liner Andrea Doria sank off New England, some 11 hours after colliding with the Swedish liner Stockholm; at least 51 people died. Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal. In 1971, Apollo 15 was launched from Cape Kennedy on America’s fourth manned mission to the moon. Photographer Diane Arbus died in New York at age 48. In 1986, kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Lawrence Martin Jenco, an American hostage held for nearly 19 months. American statesman W. Averell Harriman died in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., at age 94. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act. Ten years ago: Cuba celebrated the 50th anniversary of the start of Fidel Castro’s revolution against Fulgencio Batista. New York Times music critic Harold C. Schonberg died in New York at age 87. Five years ago: At least 22 small bombs exploded in Ahmadabad (AH’-muh-duh-bahd) in the Indian state of Gujarat (goo-JRAHT’), killing 58 people. One year ago: The White House said President Barack Obama would not push for stricter gun laws, one day after his impassioned remarks about the need to keep assault weapons off the streets. With the Olympics Games as a backdrop, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney held a day of meetings with Britain’s most powerful people; however, Romney rankled his hosts by calling London’s problems with Olympic Games preparation “disconcerting.”

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 8:00

Dial 5 6 7 8 9

CTN 5 S. Katsos

8:30 Outlook

Camp “The Mixer” Mack WCSH and the team prepare for a mixer. Bones “The Fact in the WPFO Fiction” An eccentric new intern. Shark Tank Gourmet WMTW meat business. (In Stereo) Å (DVS) TWC TV Mainely Motorsports

JULY 26, 2013

9:00 Link TV

9:30

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Midnite Mausoleum

Dungeon

Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) Å

News

The Following “Love News 13 on FOX (N) Hurts” Joe demands information from Ryan. 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) Å Would You Fall for That? (Series Premiere) (N) (In Stereo) Å Ridin Paid Prog. Maine Auto King

Tonight Show With Jay Leno Dish Nation The Office (N) Å “Golden Ticket” WMTW Jimmy News 8 at Kimmel 11 (N) Live Å Paid Prog. Paid Prog.

Washing-

Charlie Inside DCI Banks “Cold Is the Grave” Charlie Rose (N) (In Rose -- The Washing- Banks searches for a missing girl. (In Stereo) Å Week ton Å Stereo) Å Washing- McLaughlin Moyers & Company Inside E Charlie PBS NewsHour (In ton Week Group (N) Rep. John Lewis disStreet Å Rose -- The Stereo) Å cusses civil rights. Week The iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party Highlights of 30 Rock 30 Rock (In Friends (In TMZ (N) (In the two-day music event. (In Stereo) Å Jack wants Stereo) Å Stereo) Å Stereo) Å to be fired. ACM Presents: Tim McGraw’s Superstar Sum- Blue Bloods “Front Page WGME Late Show mer Night Tim McGraw performs with others. (In News” Erin questions News 13 at With David Stereo) Å Mayor Poole. 11 (N) Letterman Monk (In Stereo) Å Monk Break-in. Å Law Order: CI Maine Sunny Fast N’ Loud Å Warlocks Rising (N) Gold Rush: The Jungle Warlocks Rising Å

10

MPBN ton Week

11

WENH

12

WPXT

13

WGME

17

WPME

24

DISC

25

FAM Movie: “The Pacifier”

Movie: ›› “Happy Gilmore” (1996, Comedy)

26

USA Law & Order: SVU

Law & Order: SVU

27 28

Law & Order: SVU

The 700 Club Å Necessary Roughness

NESN MLB Baseball: Red Sox at Orioles

Extra

Red Sox

Sports

Outdoors

CSNE GFL Presents (N)

Sports

SportsNet Sports

SportsNet

30

ESPN Coaches

31

ESPN2 ATP Tennis

Coaches

Cold Case Å

Coaches

Coaches

Baseball Tonight (N)

SportsCenter (N) Å

Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) (Live) Å

WTA Tennis

Cold Case Å

Cold Case Å

Cold Case Å

33

ION

34

DISN ANT Farm Jessie (N) Phineas

35

TOON Cartoon Planet

King of Hill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy

Fam. Guy

36

NICK Turtles

Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends

Friends

37

Turtles

Gravity

MSNBC All In With Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow Show

Dog

Good Luck Jessie

Lockup: Raw

Jessie

Lockup: Santa Rosa

38

CNN Anderson Cooper 360

Piers Morgan Live (N)

Anderson Cooper

Stroumboulopoulos (N)

40

CNBC J. Crew and

Ultimate Factories

American Greed

Mad Money

Greta Van Susteren

The O’Reilly Factor

The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)

41

FNC

43

72 Hours (N) Å King TNT Movie: ››‡ “Shooter” (2007) Mark Wahlberg. Å (DVS) Hoarders “Al; Julie” Hoarders Hoarders “Augustine” Psychic Challenge Å LIFE

44

Say Yes

Say Yes

Say Yes

Say Yes

Randy to the Rescue

Say Yes

Say Yes

46

TLC

47

AMC Movie: ››‡ “Island in the Sky”

48

HGTV You Live in What?

You Live in What?

Hunters

49

TRAV Ghost Adventures

Ghost Adventures

Dead Files Revisited

The Dead Files Å

A&E Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Frasier

Frasier

50 52

Storage

BRAVO Movie: “Scary Movie”

Movie: ››‡ “S.W.A.T.” (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson.

Storage

Hunt Intl Storage

Hunt Intl

Movie: ›‡ “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry”

HALL Movie: ›‡ “Hope Floats” (1998) Å

56

SYFY WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Å

Continuum (N)

57

ANIM Treehouse Masters

Treehouse Masters (N) Treehouse Masters

58

HIST Hatfields & McCoys (Part 2 of 3) Å

60

BET

61

COM Tosh.0 FX

Treehouse Masters

Movie: ›› “Are We There Yet?” (2005) Tosh.0

Drunk

Frasier

Chuck

55

62

Frasier

Hunt Intl

Joe Rogan Questions

Hatfields & McCoys (Part 3 of 3) Å Movie: ›› “Kingdom Come” (2001) LL Cool J. South Park South Park Tosh.0 J. Oliver House

Movie: ››› “Iron Man” (2008) Robert Downey Jr., Terrence Howard.

TVLND Friends

68

There Yet? There Yet? TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Movie: ››‡ “Due Date” (2010, Comedy) Å Jeff Dunham: Minding the Monsters Jeff Dunham: Minding the Monsters Å Å SPIKE

76

Friends

Friends

Friends

Friends

The Bridge “Pilot”

67

Friends

Friends

Friends

78

OXY Movie: ›‡ “John Tucker Must Die” (2006)

Movie: ›› “Employee of the Month” (2006)

146

TCM Movie: ›››‡ “Day for Night” (1973)

Movie: ››› “The Last Metro” (1980, Drama)

DAILY CROSSWORD BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS

1 7 10 14 15 16 17 18 20 22 23 24 25 29 33 34 35

ACROSS Speakers’ platforms Audit pro __ Tzu Transient cessations of respiration Indonesian islands Put on board Exclamation of mild annoyance Shabby from overuse Obstinate Jim of “ABC’s Wide World of Sports” Meth. of operation Half a small antelope? Maker of verses Lying under oath Laxative from aloe Stir-fry pan Opposite of aweather

36 37 39 40 41 42 43 45

60 61 62 63 64 65

Campfire tale Tolerate Distaff hoops grp. Source for repros Lively dance Swains Hoffman film Lowest temperature Jug handle Trig function Moved stealthily Obdurate Very drunk Former mayor of NYC Church recess Arab robe Horny: pref. Comic Foxx Moisten City on the Vistula

1 2 3

DOWN Grate Snake: pref. Close-fitting

47 48 49 52 57 59

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 34 37

Training sch. Gathers greedily Analyzes chemically West Pointer Stick with a stick Summer mo. Agape Listen up! What’s the big __? Lamarr of “Algiers” VIP in Kuwait Spring fwd. syst. Fake-out move City official Satellite of Jupiter Shinto temple gateway Like some pheasants School of whales Bones in forearms Picture puzzle Leavening agent Hair purchase Cracked somewhat

38 Large storage container 42 Kitchen device 44 Fabricate 45 Round fig. 46 Waiting to bat 48 Assassinated Middle East leader 49 Flesh mark 50 Slangy denial

51 Tritons’ sch. 52 Cupbearer of the gods 53 Gumbo veggie 54 Wet thoroughly 55 External: pref. 56 Ship with a lateen sail 58 Nautical lurch

Yesterday’s Answer


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

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up feeling abandoned and angry, and if they ever learn that it was Dad who kept Mom away, they may never forgive him. If he needs counseling to reach that point, encourage him to get it. Dear Annie: I have a question regarding interracial attraction. Some of my friends have said they aren’t attracted to men of certain races. For example, my white friend says she simply isn’t attracted to black men. I find these comments very offensive, especially because I am of mixed ethnicity, and if someone told me they weren’t attracted to women of my race, I would be insulted. Are such comments acceptable? -- Nebraska Dear Nebraska: No. At the very least, these comments are offensive because they stereotype. To say that one isn’t attracted to a particular ethnic or racial group presumes that all people in that group look alike, when obviously they do not. People who make such remarks are bigoted, although they may not recognize it. You might be able to enlighten some of your friends by expressing how offensive these comments are to you. If nothing else, they will realize they cannot say such things without repercussions. Dear Annie: I’d like to add to your response to “S,” who asked how to address an envelope to a couple who are both doctors. My situation is slightly different. I am a physician. My husband does not have a doctoral degree of any kind. The proper way to address a formal envelope to us is “Dr. Jane Doe and Mr. John Doe,” or “Dr. Jane and Mr. John Doe.” Most envelopes to us are addressed incorrectly. Many say “Mrs. and Dr. John Doe,” which makes absolutely no sense at all. Hopefully this will clarify things. -- Lady Doctor in L.A.

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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Dear Annie: A year ago, our son, “Don,” discovered that his wife of eight years was cheating on him. It came as a shock to all of us. Don was devastated and angry, and quickly divorced his wife and got full custody of their three young children. He sold their home and bought one closer to us. It was obvious that he wanted to punish her. Our tight-knit family offered to help in any way. Don’s ex-wife, a woman we loved and cherished, became Public Enemy No. 1. She tried to call us a few times, but Don told the family, politely, that we should not answer her calls, and if she knocked on the door, we shouldn’t open it. He said it would be best for him and his kids if we ignored her. I said I would do my best. The problem is, I have been in communication with Don’s ex. (Her lover broke things off after Don found out.) She sees me as her only friend. Don won’t let her near the children. He says he doesn’t want them to think cheating is OK. She was so depressed, I couldn’t turn her down. If Don found out we were in touch, he would be furious and would never trust me again. My husband wants me to cut off ties with her, but she is so helpless and sad. What do I do? -- Confused Grandma Dear Grandma: Please stop lying to your son. Either tell him the truth or cease communication with your exdaughter-in-law. However, it is terribly wrong of Don to prevent his ex from seeing the children. He is still angry and hurt, but in punishing her, he is also punishing them. They need their mother. They will not mistake her presence for approval to cheat. The divorce is sufficient for them to understand how destructive her behavior was. Please urge him to put his kids first and work out a civil relationship with their mother. They may otherwise grow

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 15

City, urged to create buffer, to look into abortion protests By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Months of abortion protests outside the Planned Parenthood Portland Health Center at 443 Congress St. have been monitored by city officials, but next Tuesday the city’s response may move to a new phase. At 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 30, the Portland Public Safety, Health and Human Services Committee will discuss the protests and whether to enact a Portland “Patient Safety Zone” as requested by Planned Parenthood of Northern New England. The meeting will take place in the City Council Chamber on the second floor of Portland City Hall at 389 Congress St. The committee isn’t expected to take public comment, but supporters of a “safety zone” or buffer to keep protesters a distance away from patients and staff has sparked interest in the meeting. “We need to pack the room with Planned Parenthood supporters to show the City Council that Portland residents support the right to access reproductive health care free of harassment and intimidation!” wrote CodePink, a peace-activist group. Jill Krowinski, spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood of Northern New England, said it was her Sneddon understanding that public comment will not be accepted, but they will be discussing how to handle the ongoing protests, which occur every Friday and Saturday morning. “We’ve been petitioning for a while now to let city councilors know how important this issue is to the community and their constituents,” Krowinski said. “Our staff has been working with the city and the police department to try and deal with the protests that have been happening at our health center, and it has become a public safety issue,” she said. “It’s been determined that the best way to deal with it is creating a patient safety zone,” Krowinski said. “What we’re seeing with our staff and volunteers and patients is they’re being harassed as they enter the local health center,” she said. As public affairs director in Vermont, Krowinski said she is familiar with a similar effort for a health center in Burlington. “We were experiencing a very similar problem,” she said. Different parties worked to create a 35-foot buffer for the center in Burlington, Krowinski said, calling the result a “compromise that gave protesters close enough access and our patients and staff access.” Trish McAllister, neighborhood prosecutor for Portland, an attorney responsible for city code enforcement, said she will speak to the committee on Tuesday to offer an update. “On Tuesday, there’s not really a proposal, the committee asked me to give them information about what has been going on,” she said. Asked if she thought an ordinance would be in order to provide a buffer, McAllister said, “I’m not

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sure yet, we constantly dealt with the balancing act, of course people have First Amendment rights to protest on the sidewalk, but there are rights of these people seeking services to access the building.” McAllister said police officers who routinely patrol at the site when the weekend protests occur “have not witnessed criminal activity,” but she acknowledged they face a difficult task. “It’s very tough for the police officers, and they’ve done an amazing job,” McAllister said, calling the situation a “very delicate situation enforcementwise.” One enforcement case has been referred to the Attorney General’s office in Augusta, McAllister said. “We did have one incident a few months ago where there was a preacher who was being loud and possibly in violation of the Maine Civil Rights Act,” she recalled. The preacher quieted down after being warned, and per state law, no enforcement resulted. “Lots and lots of warnings, of course,” have ensued from the protests, McAllister said. “It simply hasn’t risen to the criminal level yet,” she said. But dozens of written complaints have been received from clients to Planned Parenthood, she added. “Buffer zones have been upheld in many courts across the country,” McAllister said, but the city proceeded with enforcement of existing law. “The city stance has been let’s make sure we’re doing everything we can with existing laws,” McAllister said. Planned Parenthood has been paying for an extra police officer to be at the scene, so an off-duty police officer can provide additional security during the protests, McAllister said. Portland Mayor Michael Brennan said the question now is does current law meet the needs of the situation. “There clearly has been a persistent group of protesters that are there on a regular basis on a regular time and we have countless reports of verbal abuse and intimidation,” Brennan said. “For a number of months, we have been monitoring the situation rather closely because initially we had complaints from people who were trying to access the building and tenants in the building,” he said. “We have had requests from individuals, we have had requests from Planned Parenthood itself and we have had requests from other councilors to review the situation to see if a buffer zone is necessary,” Brennan said. Tuesday’s meeting will seek “to start that initial discussion,” he said. The city’s corporate counsel has reviewed some of the laws and court decisions, and the reported purpose of the meeting is information gathering, Brennan said. “We’re always concerned about First Amendment rights in anything we do, and in this situation people clearly have a right to protest,” Brennan said. “What we need to determine is the balance of that right to protest and people having access to health care that’s protected under the law.” The mayor said initially protests were more confrontational, but added, “I think over time there has been an ebb and flow to the protests.” “We decided that our first step would be an educational step,” so police talked to the protesters about what is admissible under law, and what is not, Brennan said. The city also notified the Attorney General’s Office that the city would cite someone if they violated the law. “We’ve made a conscientious effort through the police and our neighborhood prosecutor to advise the people who are protesting about the current law,” he said. Mike Fink, owner of Guitar Grave pawn shop and neighboring Mike’s Restaurant at 437 Congress St., said he wants to see a buffer zone enacted. “I’m more for this thing than I have been for any other political thing in my whole life,” he said. Extra lobbying from Planned Parenthood appears to have swayed city leaders, Fink speculated,

although Fink acknowledged he detests politics and doesn’t get involved in the political part of this effort. “It’s kind of obnoxious and horrible,” Fink said of the protests, and blamed the ongoing demonstrations on the looming demise of Mike’s Restaurant. “I’m just going to close and go away. I’m going to close my other store on Friday and Saturday mornings as well, I’ll open later,” he said, referring to the pawn shop. In less than a month, Mike’s will be closed, Fink said. “I’m not going to keep trying to sell sandwiches with pictures of dead babies on posters out on the street,” he said. “It’s not just the pictures, it’s the way they confront women going into the clinic sometimes,” Fink said. “The two women who organize these protests out front each have had four abortions,” he said, citing the leaders of the protests. Leslie Sneddon, with Pro-Life Missionaries of Maine based in Richmond, said she and Donnn Hebert organize groups to protest and educate people going into the Planned Parenthood health center. “We’re just preaching the gospel and warning people who are going into the clinic,” Sneddon said. “They give us grief all the time, they call us hypocrites,” Sneddon said of hecklers, confirming that “we’ve had multiple abortions between the two of us. ,,, We’re not hiding that fact, we’re here to help women not make the same decisions.” Sneddon — who also is affiliated with the Center for Bio-ethical Reform, Maine and New England, which spearheaded a graphic anti-abortion display at University of Southern Maine — said the protests outside of Planned Parenthood “don’t inhibit entrance to the clinic.” “We can’t because that’s against the law, we cannot do that, we’re the first ones to tell our people, ‘Clear the sidewalk.’ We know where we can stand, and where we can’t stand,” Sneddon said. The atmosphere can vary from week to week, she said, stating that last week, a police officer intervened when she tried to hand a brochure to a woman entering the building. “It changes every week,” she said of the enforcement. “All I can say is we won’t go away, and if we need to seek legal counsel, we will,” Sneddon said. “We have hours and hours of videotape of us not doing anything except warning people who are going into the clinic,” Sneddon said. “We will fight it (in the case of a buffer), we would abide by the law, but we would definitely seek legal help” to overturn such an ordinance, she said. McAllister came out “several times in a month to watch what we were doing,” Sneddon confirmed. “We’re abiding by the law, I’m sure there’s heightened emotions and tensions, but that’s what happens when you’re doing front-line work,” she said. McAllister described an emotional atmosphere as well, with some protesters objecting to police. “They’ve kind of been in my face sometimes with their cameras telling me we’re infringing on their First Amendment rights,” she said. Lisa Savage, CodePink local coordinator, said the group’s involvement in the abortion issue extended back to a controversial new law passed in Texas. Savage said she and her sister and others stood in Augusta on July 15 “in solidarity with the Texas women,” and with the chapter in that state. “CodePink usually is active on war and peace issues ... but there is a CodePink chapter in Texas that is very active,” Savage noted. Planned Parenthood has circulated a petition urging a “Patient Safety Zone” (see http://tinyurl. com/lqls8jl). Fink said he isn’t sure the city will go along with a buffer zone, saying, “I think the city is afraid that they’re going to get sued and have to pay legal fees, that’s what I’ve heard.” Fink added that counterprotests he organized “may have delayed any buffer zone,” and backfired in a way. “My approach was humor and common sense against them, but it seemed to work at first but it didn’t have the correct results in the end,” he said.


Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

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www.bigeasyportland.com Jason Isbell at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $12; Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall. com

Line of Force at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $6; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Wednesday, July 31 Rap Night at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $3; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Saturday, July 27

72 Commercial St., Portland, ME

$

Friday, July 26

Father John Misty at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $17 (general); $26 (VIP); Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Benefit:

$

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

165 Main St. Biddeford

286-8771

Hours: Sun. 9am-6pm; Mon.-Sat. 8am-9pm

We accept EBT • Like us on Facebook

CLIP & SAVE

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A u y t o a w Car e ac e

Foreign & Domestic R 965R Forest Ave. Portland ________________ 210-6888

Brad Mac at Flask, 117 Spring St., Portland http://flasklounge.com

The Outlaws at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $21; Doors at 8 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/ concerts

Beach House at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $25 adv/$30 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.statetheatreportland. com

Spose, Trails, Lady Essence, Shane Reis & more at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $10; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Thursday, Aug.1 A Band Beyond Description at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Liz Longley CD Release at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $12 adv/$17 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare. com Tegan and Sara at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $30 adv/$35 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. Beck will appear at the State Theatre on Thursday, Aug. 1. (COURTESY www.statetheatreportland. IMAGE) com

Sunday, July 28 Tribal Seeds with Josh Heinrichs at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $13; 9:30 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $16 adv/$19 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Beck at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $45 adv/$50 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

Friday, Aug. 2

Royal Hammer at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $8; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com Grand Re-Launch at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland, Doors at 4 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Saturday, Aug. 3

Monday, July 29

Jamey Johnson at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $39; Doors at 8 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts

Model Airplane at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $5; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

The THE BAND Band at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $20 adv/$25 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com

Tuesday, July 30

Sunday, Aug. 4

Cover to Cover: Kenya Hall, Kristina Kentigan, & Lady Essence at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $5; Doors at 9 p.m.

Jimmy Eats World at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $25 adv/$30 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

–––––––––––––––– MOVIE LISTINGS ––––––––––––––––

Friday, July 26 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 6:30 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Pacific Rim (PG-13) 3:30, 8:40 The Way, Way Back (PG-13) 1:10, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:45, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 20 Feet from Stardom (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 The Bling Ring (R) 1:00, 6:30

Saturday, July 27 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 2:00 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30

Pacific Rim (PG-13) 3:30, 8:40 The Way, Way Back (PG-13) 1:10, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:45, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 20 Feet from Stardom (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 The Bling Ring (R) 1:00, 6:30

Sunday, July 28 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 2:00 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Pacific Rim (PG-13) 3:30, 8:40 The Way, Way Back (PG-13) 1:10, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:45, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 20 Feet from Stardom (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 The Bling Ring (R) 1:00, 6:30 (All times as listed; call for confirmation.)


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 17

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Friday, July 26 Ossipee Valley Music Festival

9 a.m. to 11 p.m. “Get dipped in a vat of music, with four days of forty bands on four different stages, featuring diverse musical styles from country & rock n roll with Marty Stuart and the Fabulous Superlatives, to soul and blues with the Holmes Brothers, from jazz and folk with Sarah Jarosz, to celtic and world rhythms with The Duhks, to Bluegrass with Della Mae. Enjoy barn dances, workshops, contests, yummy food, swimming, yoga, midnight film screenings, and a free children’s music program. This camping festival also has the best fireside picking and jamming scene around, so bring your instrument!” Ossipee Valley Fairgrounds, South Hiram Road South Hiram. July 25 to July 28, Camping Festival, 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. www.ossipeevalley.com

‘Charlotte’s Web’

1:30 p.m. Adapted by Joseph Robinette; based on the book by E.B. White, at the Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine, 142 Free St. “Meet Wilbur, the irresistible young pig; Fern, a girl who understands animals; and Charlotte, the extraordinary spider who proves to be ‘a true friend and a good writer.’ Charlotte writes miracles in her web, including the memorable words that just might save Wilbur. Watching this heart-warming story set on a Maine salt water farm is the perfect way to spend a summer afternoon. Produced with permission from Dramatic Publishing.” $8/member, $9/ visitor. Shows at 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. For tickets call 828-1234 x231, visit kitetails.org or stop by the front desk. Through July 28.

Puccini’s ‘La Boheme’

7:30 p.m. A new production presented by PORTopera, Friday, July 26, at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, July 28, at 2 p.m. Tickets $105/$65/$53/$41 (includes fee). Due to the orchestral pit, the first row of seating in Orchestra is row E. “For its 19th season, PORTopera produces one of the world’s best-loved operas: Giacomo Puccini’s incomparable ‘La Boheme.’ PORTopera’s new production of Puccini’s melodic masterpiece, with beautiful sets, wonderful costumes and an orchestra of over 50 musicians, will transfix you as it weaves the story of struggling young artists and friends in 19th century Paris with a love story of such magnificent beauty, it is an indelible experience you may never forget.”

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

‘The Music Man’ in Standish

7:30 p.m. Meredith Willson’s rousing musical ‘The Music Man’ comes to the stage of the Schoolhouse Arts Center from July 18 through Aug. 4. Return to the quaint streets of River City Iowa and enjoy the wonderful dance routines, spirited voices, and the adventure of summer romance. Watch Harold Hill try once again try to con Marion the librarian. Nevertheless, he finds himself caught in the snare of unexpected romance. Audiences will find their feet tapping as they sing along with old favorites like ‘Seventy Six Trombones,’ ‘Good Night My Someone,’ ‘Pick-A-Little Talk-ALittle,’ and lots of others. This show is expected to sell out, so make your reservations early. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Adult tickets are $18. Seniors and students are $16. The Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35. For reservations, call 642-3743 or buy tickets on-line at www.schoolhousearts.org.”

‘Young Frankenstein: The Musical’ in Ogunquit

8 p.m. Ogunquit Playhouse. “The hilarious musical comedy is a wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ film masterpiece. The story follows young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as he attempts to bring a corpse to life, but not without scary and hilarious complications.” Through July 27. http://www. ogunquitplayhouse.org

Mill Stream ripples past the old dam and mill site at Mast Landing Sanctuary in Freeport before flowing into the the Harraseeket River. On Saturday, July 27, the public is invited on the Historical Hike to Mast Landing Sanctuary at 9 a.m. This part of the L.L.Bean — Family Hike Series involves the Freeport Historical Society. For details, visit http://www.llbean.com. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO)

Comedy and craft beer collide

8 p.m. “The Portland Comedy Co-op is taking over the tasting room at Rising Tide Brewery, 103 Fox St., Portland, on July 26. Tickets are $6 at the door, which includes a flight of fresh Rising Tide samples to taste throughout the show. The jokes start at 8 p.m. with comedians Will Green, Jordan Handren-Seavey, Joe Timmins, Aharon Hebert, James Spizuoco, Travis Curran, and special guest and New England favorite Troy Pennell. Fresh beer will also be for sale when you want more than just a sample. So Bring your unquenchable thirst for tasty, local brews and your friends! Well, your friends who are 18 and older.”

Saturday, July 27 A Day on Peaks Island with Maine guides

7:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. Peaks Island tour with Maine Audubon. Members: $35, non-members: $45. “Bring a bag lunch and join registered Maine guides, Gary Roberts and George Libby, for a day trip to Peaks Island. Learn about the island’s history, from the time it was used as a summer gathering place by Maine’s early native peoples, its settlement in the 1600s, to present day. ... Our walk will pass the Fifth and Eighth Maine Regiment Houses and WWII fortifications.” http://maineaudubon.org

Historical Hike to Mast Landing Sanctuary

9 a.m. “L.L.Bean — Family Hike Series: Historical Hike to Audubon’s Mast Landing Sanctuary. “We’ll join with the Freeport Historical Society to hike and learn about the history of this 140-acre bird sanctuary. Get answers to why it is called ‘Mast Landing’ and understand the importance of the mill whose foundation is still visible on the property. This will be a slow paced, easy walk with plenty of time for questions and exploration. Don’t forget your binoculars!” Lower Mast Landing Road, Freeport. Free. www.llbean.com/freeport or 877-755-2326.

Scarborough Marsh bird survey

9 a.m. to noon. Maine Audubon. “Join us at Scarborough Marsh for a marsh-wide survey of birds and help us document all present species. Depending on the assignment, some surveys are on foot, by car or from a canoe/kayak. Scarborough Marsh, 100 Pine Point Road, Scarborough.” maineaudubon.org

‘Donation Yard Sale’ in Cape Elizabeth

9 a.m. to 2 p.m. “The Cape Elizabeth Church of the Nazarene (499 Ocean House Rd, CE) will hold its third annual ‘Donation Yard Sale.’ ... All items are donated to the church, and then are made available to buyers on a ‘set your own price’ basis. At the conclusion of the yard sale, unsold items will be donated to other charities. Proceeds will support children’s ministries through the church. For more information about donating an item to be sold, please contact Pastor Jon at 799-3692.”

Shaker-style chair, stool weaving

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Learn to weave a classic ‘checkerboard’

Shaker-style chair seat or stool seat using the same methods passed down by the Shakers since the 1800s. Antique and contemporary examples of Shaker chairs and Shaker chairs seats will be examined. Participants need to bring a new or antique chair or footstool to reseat. Materials list supplied upon registration. Fee: $35. Shaker Village is located on Route 26 (707 Shaker Road) in New Gloucester. FMI: 926-4597 or usshakers@aol.com

Ossipee Valley Music Festival

9 a.m. to 11 p.m. “Get dipped in a vat of music, with four days of forty bands on four different stages, featuring diverse musical styles from country & rock n roll with Marty Stuart and the Fabulous Superlatives, to soul and blues with the Holmes Brothers, from jazz and folk with Sarah Jarosz, to celtic and world rhythms with The Duhks, to Bluegrass with Della Mae. Enjoy barn dances, workshops, contests, yummy food, swimming, yoga, midnight film screenings, and a free children’s music program. This camping festival also has the best fireside picking and jamming scene around, so bring your instrument!” Ossipee Valley Fairgrounds, South Hiram Road South Hiram. July 25 to July 28, Camping Festival, 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. www.ossipeevalley.com

Sgt. Johnsey & Sgt. Betters Benefit Memorial Ride

9:30 a.m. “This Saturday, the city of Portland will host the Fifth Annual Sgt. Johnsey & Sgt. Betters Benefit Memorial Ride from Portland to Naples. Organized by Portland Police Lieutenant Janine Roberts, the motorcycle ride raises funds for the children of two Portland Police Sergeants, Rob Johnsey and Rick Betters, who passed away unexpectedly five and four years ago, respectively. Motorcycle enthusiasts are welcome to participate in the police motorcycle escorted hour and a half long ride starting at Parker’s Restaurant in Portland, ending at Bray’s Brew Pub in Naples where live music will greet riders and raffle prize winners will be drawn. Participants can register the day of the ride, $20 per bike and $10 for passenger. Anyone interested in making a donation can mail a check made out to the ‘Johnsey/Betters Ride’ to the Portland PD Federal Credit Union, 109 Middle Street, Portland ME 04101.” All of the proceeds will go to the families. 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. registration; 11 a.m. ride start time. Parker’s Restaurant,1349 Washington Ave., Portland. For more information, contact Lieutenant Janine Roberts at jrob@portlandmaine.gov.

Friends of Libby Library ‘Christmas in July’ Book Sale

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friends of Libby Library at Old Orchard Beach will hold its annual “Christmas in July” Book Sale on the grounds of Edith Belle Libby Memorial Library, 27 Staples St., Old Orchard Beach. This event starts at 10 a.m. on the Library grounds and continues until 2 p.m. “Along with bargain-priced books of every genre for adults and children, Christmas-themed items will be available for purchase. Proceeds from the ‘Christmas in July’ Book Sale are used to provide for the enhancement of children’s reading programs, materials, and activities at Edith Belle Libby Memorial Library.” see next page


Page 18 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

Author Claudia C. Bowker in Yarmouth

1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Claudia C. Bowker Book Signing Event at the Royal Bean, 18 Yarmouth Crossing Drive, Yarmouth. “Bowker, a resident of Amargosa Valley, Nev., will be available to sign copies of her book, ‘It Took a Bullet.’ Doris Butler, the beloved principal of George B. Williams Elementary School, lies near death in the Intensive Care Unit at University Medical Center. As she struggles to survive the gunshot wound, her estranged daughter, Jennifer, learns of the love and respect the community has for the mother whose love she has spent her life rejecting. As Jennifer learns from her brother and sister-in-law, and her mother’s colleagues, students, and community leaders of the impact Doris has made on their lives, Jennifer wonders if there is any hope of recovering the love she has chosen to isolate herself and her two young daughters from. If Doris survives, will Jennifer ever be able to repair the damage she has caused and give her daughters the grandmother’s love they deserve?” For more information, contact Michelle Whitman at michelle@keymgc.com.

Christmas in July at St. Augustine’s in OOB

1 p.m. to 4 p.m. St. Augustine’s Anglican Church will be offering a celebration of Christmas in July, taking place in Memorial Park at the gazebo in Old Orchard Beach. There will be the telling of the story of Christmas by St. Nicholas along with the singing of beloved carols. When we think of ‘Christmas’ we think of snow and gift giving. In the middle of summer we sometimes forget the joy of Christ’s birth and all of our wonderful Christmas traditions. This should be a popular and fun event for all. The program is family oriented calling upon members of the parish to do Biblical readings and providing the music. Those who gather are welcome to bring a picnic or snacks and the music is for all to sing.”

‘Young Frankenstein: The Musical’ in Ogunquit

3:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Ogunquit Playhouse. “The hilarious musical comedy is a wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ film masterpiece. The story follows young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as he attempts to bring a corpse to life, but not without scary and hilarious complications.” Through July 27. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org

Deep Space Showcase

8 p.m. Deep Space Showcase at Mayo Street Arts, Portland. “We come in peace, and we’re ready to entertain! Deep Space Showcase promises to be the Weirdest Show on Earth. Deep Space Showcase is the collaborative project of five female puppeteers, burlesque dancers, sideshow freaks and clowns hailing from points across the US. Deep Space Showcase combines the puppetry prowess of the Many Furs Puppet Troupe with the tranimalistic shenangians of the Bonobohobo’s Panspermic Circus. Appearing with Portland’s own MotionFolk Theater, bringing you their newest puppet interpretation of Cyrano DeBergerac.” Doors at 7:30 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance at http://www.brownpapertickets. com/event/408857

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

Lobsterstomp 2013

8 p.m. Bayside Bowl, Lobsterstomp 2013. “It’s that time of year again! Join us again for the annual Lobsterstomp with free music all night long. Featuring Cowgirls of the Damned, The Staten Island Fairies, The Gamma Goochies, The Flipsides, Anna Pillsbury, and DJ Matt Little.” http://www.baysidebowl.com/events

Sunday July 28 Pancake Breakfast on Peaks Island

8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Fifth Maine Regiment Museum, 45 Seashore Ave., Peaks Island. $8 adult, $5 child under 12. “Enjoy a delicious breakfast of blueberry or buttermilk pancakes,

On Saturday, Maine Audubon welcomes guests on a tour of Peaks Island with registered Maine guides, Gary Roberts and George Libby. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO) eggs, ham, baked beans, fruit, juice, watermelon, coffee and tea in our seaside dining room or on our verandah.” The Fifth Maine Regiment Museum is a non-profit museum and cultural center housed in the 1888 Fifth Maine Regiment Memorial Hall. Its mission is the preservation of Civil War and local history. To that end the museum offers a wide variety of lectures, concerts, tours, youth education programs, and community activities. Membership is open to the public. For more information call 766-3330 or email fifthmaine@juno.com.”

Steven Spielberg science fiction classic, part of the 2013 Rooftop Film Series by Mensk at the Spring Street parking garage roof (enter at 45 Spring St.). Each show starts at sunset, BYO chairs/blankets; no alcohol; donations requested. “The mission of Mensk is to inspire and support personal, local, and regional action for the development of creative and sustainable communities.” http://www.menskmaine.org

11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Irish American Club picnic will be held at Shoreway Park on the Southern Maine Community College campus. “Food, fun, music and vendors. Raffle. All Irish American Club members and friends invited. ... Join the Irish American Club. It’s your family. For more information about joining the Club, volunteering or sponsoring the parade, contact club2@irishofmaine.org.”

Failure of Democratic Transition in Libya and Syria

The Irish American Club picnic

Festival of Nations

11 a.m. to 7 p.m. “The Eleventh Annual Greater Portland Festival of Nations will take place in Deering Oaks Park on Sunday, July 28, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The festival is a collaboration with many corporations, agencies and foundations in the Greater Portland, Maine, area. The festival has been recognized as one of the most outstanding family-oriented cultural events held in the state of Maine. It highlights Maine’s ethnic diversity and traditions, encourages greater understanding, and promotes a healthy Maine.” For more information, call 420-1277. https://www.facebook.com/ TheMugadiFoundation

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

Puccini’s ‘La Boheme’

2 p.m. A new production presented by PORTopera, Friday, July 26, at 7:30 p.m., Sunday, July 28, at 2 p.m. Tickets $105/$65/$53/$41 (includes fee). Due to the orchestral pit, the first row of seating in Orchestra is row E. “For its 19th season, PORTopera produces one of the world’s best-loved operas: Giacomo Puccini’s incomparable ‘La Boheme.’ PORTopera’s new production of Puccini’s melodic masterpiece, with beautiful sets, wonderful costumes and an orchestra of over 50 musicians, will transfix you as it weaves the story of struggling young artists and friends in 19th century Paris with a love story of such magnificent beauty, it is an indelible experience you may never forget.”

‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind’

8 p.m. Screening of “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,”

Monday, July 29 7 p.m. The Failure of Democratic Transition in Libya and Syria and Its Relationship to Foreign Intervention. Presentation and discussion with Eric Hooglund, Lund University and Matteo Capasso, University of Durham. “Libya has not had an effective government since the uprising there in 2011 and Syria’s pro-democracy movement has descended into a brutal, sectarian civil war that has claimed over 100,000 lives, caused 1.8 million civilians to flee to neighboring countries, and is claiming 6,000 more lives each month. Both countries experienced extensive foreign intervention. How and why has this foreign intervention undermined the popular movements for justice? Eric Hooglund, Maine native, Portland resident, Peace Action Maine member, former professor at Bates and Bowdoin colleges and now senior research professor at the Center for Middle East Studies, Lund University in Sweden, will speak on the civil war in Syria. Matteo Capasso, a former graduate student who studied under Eric Hooglund at Lund and now is a doctoral student at Durham University in the UK will speak on Libya.” Meg Perry Center, 644 Congress St., Portland.

Tuesday, July 30 Arthritis Foundation speaker in New Gloucester

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Amber Wolfe, from the Arthritis Foundation, will be presenting a free workshop for farmers, gardeners, agricultural workers, healthcare professionals and the general public. Topics will include information on arthritis as a disease, treatment and pain management options, sources of joint stress and pain on the farm, operation changes, modifications to farm equipment and assistive technology tools. Specific segments on gardening and rural youth will also be discussed. Pineland Farms Conference Center, Room A, 15 Farm View Drive, New Gloucester.

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose.” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013— Page 19

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SUN SPORTS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Sea Dogs streaking By Ken Levinsky

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The Raging Bulls opened their 16th season last Saturday with a 20-6 victory over the Wolfpack. (KEN LEVINSKY PHOTO)

Local semi-pro football is back Raging Bulls and Sabers play at home fields this Saturday By Ken Levinsky

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Portland is home to two very successful semi-pro football teams made of former high school and college standouts. The Southern Maine Raging Bulls and The Maine Sabers play in the fourteam Northern Division of the New England Football League’s top (AAA) Colonial Conference

with the New Hampshire Wolfpack and Lowell Nor’Easter. Both local teams were victorious in their season openers last week and will swap opponents this weekend. The Bulls opened their 16th season last Saturday with a 20-6 victory over the Wolfpack. Phil Warren (No. 47) who played at Brunswick High and The University of Buffalo, led the team with 214 yards and two running touchdowns. Quarterback Alexis Colon (No. 7) ran in a TD on a one-yard goal line sneak. Defensively, the Raging Bulls were led by linebackers Bobby Nelson (No.

52) and Kyle Roberts (No. 2). The Bulls (1-0) will take on Lowell (0-1) on Saturday at 7 p.m. at Deering High’s Memorial Field in Portland. The Sabers 1-0) defeated that same Lowell team 37-32 in last week’s action. In their first year in the NEFL, the Sabers are also are at home on Saturday and will play the Wolfpack (0-1) at Scarborough High at 1 p.m. The Raging Bulls and Sabers will play each other twice this season, the first meeting being next Saturday, Aug. 3 at 7 p.m. at Deering.

The Portland Sea Dogs (52-52) turned the corner over the past week ending an eight game losing streak by winning six games in a row. They are home this weekend (except for Saturday’s Futures at Fenway game) for a four game series with the Western Division leading Harrisburg Senators (57-48) The Sea Dogs have climbed into fourth place in the Eastern League’s Eastern Division and are very much in the battle for second place. Portland trails rivals New Hampshire and Trenton, by just 1 and ½ games respectively. The top two clubs in each division will compete in the Eastern League post-season. Third baseman/designated hitter Garin Cecchini has gotten off to a fast start since his call up to Portland in June from single A Salem, where he was batting .350 with 15 stolen bases. The 6’ 2” 22 year old lefty hitter leads the Sea Dogs with a .330 batting average and a .417 on base percentage. Cecchini, who led the Red Sox organization with 51 stolen bases last year, has swiped 4 bases in his first 30 games with the Sea Dogs. His younger brother Gavin, age 19, selected by the Mets as the 12th overall pick in the 2012 draft, is currently playing for single A Brooklyn. Third baseman/designated hitter Michael Almanzar leads Portland in many offensive categories. The 6’ 3” 22 year old Eastern League rookie is batting .277 with 12 homeruns, 62 RBI and 10 stolen bases Second baseman/shortstop Heiker Meneses is second on the team (among those with at least 200 at bats) with a batting average of .273. The 5’ 9”, 160 pound 22 year old lefty is fourth on the team with 11 stolen bases. Peter Hissey is third on the team with a batting average of .267 The 6’ 1” 23 year old lefty is second on the team with 17 stolen bases, trailing team leader Shannon Wilkerson who has 18 thefts. Hissey was placed on the 7-day disabled list on July 24. Second baseman/Outfielder Tony Thomas leads the team with 63 runs batted and his 11 round trippers trail team leader Almanzar by just one. He is also third on the team with 12 stolen bases. Here is the Sea Dogs schedule for this weekend. Friday, July 26 vs. Harrisburg 6 p.m. Saturday, July 27 vs. Harrisburg, noon (at Fenway Park) Sunday, July 28 vs. Harrisburg, 1 p.m.

Yankees’ drama: A lack of trust as team deals with A-Rod By David Waldstein THE NEW YORK TIMES

ARLINGTON, Tex. — As the Yankees dressed for batting practice Tuesday, a television in the visitors’ clubhouse at Rangers Ballpark blared the latest report of distress between the Yankees and Alex Rodriguez, their $275 million faded star. “Why is this so loud?” pitcher Phil Hughes said. The noise surrounding Rodriguez has become deafening over the past month, an unwelcome soundtrack for a season of flagging expectations. The Yankees have fallen into fourth place, seven games behind the first-place Red Sox. The din is expected to intensify as the Yankees are forced to figure out what do with Rodriguez, a player who is still owed nearly $100 million, who is challenging the team doctor’s medical judgment, and who is a target of Major League Baseball’s investigation into performance-enhancing drugs. This unusual melodrama, sometimes bordering on farce, is fueled by increasing distrust and animosity. Most immediately, the team and the player once regarded as the game’s best are feuding over whether Rodriguez’s left quadriceps muscle is healthy. Rodriguez wants to play now and does not trust the Yankees’ medical evaluations, according to two people with knowledge of the matter who spoke on

condition of anonymity. The Yankees are making him wait at least another week. After a tense conference call with all the parties Thursday afternoon, including Rodriguez’s lawyer, it was grudgingly agreed by Rodriguez that he would play in a simulated or minor league game on Aug. 1 and could return to the team a day or two later. It may have been the first conference call in baseball history in which the player’s lawyer participated in a discussion about a mild thigh injury. But the presence of Rodriguez’s lawyer on the call is only one indication of the level of distrust that exists. The Yankees are considering disciplinary action against Rodriguez — most likely a fine — according to a team official who asked not to be named because he was not permitted to speak publicly on the matter. They will charge that Rodriguez violated the collective bargaining agreement when he sought a second opinion for his quadriceps injury. Rodriguez could respond by filing a grievance. “I would not comment,” General Manager Brian Cashman said Thursday regarding a possible teamimposed penalty for Rodriguez. The most recent chapter of this saga began Sunday, when Rodriguez was on the verge of being activated after 19 days of playing in the minor leagues to reha-

bilitate his surgically repaired hip. Rodriguez had complained the night before of tightness in his quad and said he could not play third base but could bat. So the Yankees sent him to New York on Sunday night to see have a magnetic resonance imaging test and see Dr. Christopher Ahmad. Rodriguez, sensing a conspiracy to keep him from playing Monday as scheduled, found the urgent timing of the M.R.I. suspicious. The Yankees steadfastly deny they are hindering Rodriguez. “The hope on the Yankees’ end has always been to have Alex back as soon as possible,” Cashman said. Dr. Ahmad diagnosed a Grade 1 strain, and Rodriguez was told to rest for about a week, similar to Ahmad’s recommendation for Derek Jeter, who is recovering from a similar injury. According to one of the officials, Rodriguez called the Yankees’ president, Randy Levine, at home late Tuesday night and told him that he did not trust the Yankees’ physician, Dr. Ahmad, and had sought a second opinion. He did not mention the name of the doctor. It was left that they would discuss the matter further Wednesday, the official said. That morning, Levine and Cashman called the Yankees’ trainer at their minor league facility in Tampa, Fla., where Rodriguez is rehabilitating.


Page 20 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 26, 2013

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