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During a group use of the Kiwanis Pool Thursday, lifeguard Zach Sawyer keeps an eye on swimmers. The pool, located on on Douglass Street, features an open swim which has been packed, thanks to a 90-degree heat wave this week, he said. The Kiwanis pool, Portland’s only outdoor public pool, is open until 7:30 p.m. daily. The pool offers one of three splash pads located in the city — the others are at Stone Street Playground (Oxford Street) and Payson Park Playground (Baxter Boulevard). The National Weather Service expected peak heat today, and then a cold front should create milder conditions for the weekend. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)

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Spice ban kicks in this fall Lightning strikes: Dealership stays open in wake of storm, fire — See page 3

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All the news that fits? Rolling Stone creates a backlash with cover

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Page 22 — — The THE PORTLAND PORTLAND Daily DAILY Sun, SUN, Friday, Friday, July July 19, 19, 2013 2013 Page

Viruses: Not so small after all

(NY Times) — There was a time not that long ago when it was easy to tell the difference between viruses and the rest of life. Most obviously, viruses were tiny and genetically simple. Those two standards, it’s now clear, belong in the trash. Over the past decade, scientists have discovered a vast menagerie of viruses that are far bigger, and which carry enormous arsenals of genes. French researchers are now reporting the discovery of the biggest virus yet. The pandoravirus, as they’ve dubbed it, is 1,000 times bigger than the flu virus by volume and has nearly 200 times as many genes — 2,556 all told. Making the discovery all the more startling is the fact that, of all the genes that pandoraviruses carry, only six percent match any gene known to science. “We believe we’re opening a Pandora’s box – not so much for humanity but for dogma about viruses,” said Dr. Jean-Michel Claverie of the University of Mediterranée, co-author of the paper that was published online Thursday in the journal Science. “We believe we’re touching an alternative tree of life.” Giant viruses would be important enough simply for the way they have blurred the line between viruses and the rest of life. But they excite scientists for another reason. Utterly unknown a decade ago, they turn out to be everywhere, including in our own bodies.

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An inefficient virus kills its host. A clever virus stays with it.” — James Lovelock

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Detroit goes bankrupt, the largest city to do so in U.S.

DETROIT (NY Times) — Detroit, the cradle of America’s automobile industry and once the nation’s fourth-most-populous city, has filed for bankruptcy, an official said Thursday afternoon, the largest American city ever to take such a course. The decision to turn to the federal courts, which required approval from both the emergency manager assigned to oversee the troubled city and from Gov. Rick Snyder, is also the largest municipal bank-

ruptcy filing in American history in terms of debt. Not everyone agrees how much Detroit owes, but Kevyn D. Orr, the emergency manager who was appointed by Snyder to resolve the city’s financial problems, has said the debt is likely to be $18 billion and perhaps as much as $20 billion. For Detroit, the filing comes as a painful reminder of a city’s rise and fall. Founded more than 300 years ago, the city

expanded at a stunning rate in the first half of the 20th century with the arrival of the automobile industry, and then shrank away in recent decades at a similarly remarkable pace. A city of 1.8 million in 1950, it is now home to 700,000 people, as well as to tens of thousands of abandoned buildings, vacant lots and unlit streets. From here, there is no road map for Detroit’s recovery, not least of all because municipal bankruptcies are rare.

Touring refugee camp, Kerry Putin critic gets 5-year jail sees mounting Syrian suffering term, setting off protests ZAATARI, Jordan (NY TImes) — Secretary of State John Kerry helicoptered to the crowded refugee camp here on Thursday to take stock of the humanitarian crisis caused by the bitter fighting in neighboring Syria and highlight the American efforts to provide aid. But as frustrated Syrian refugees appealed for Western military intervention to halt the attacks by the Syrian government’s forces, Kerry’s visit soon became a graphic illustration of the limits of the Obama administration’s policy. “We just need an action,” Jamalat Abdulraouf al-Hariri, 43, said after her meeting with Kerry,

noting that the refugees wanted the United States to establish a no-fly zone or a protected area for civilians inside Syria. The Zaatari camp, so close to the border that refugees can hear artillery fire at night, sprouted up as a temporary refuge. But some 115,000 people currently live here. And now that the forces of the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad — with the help of Hezbollah fighters and Iranian paramilitary Quds force operatives — have captured the strategic western town of Qusayr, the Zaatari camp has begun to take on a more permanent appearance.

KIROV, Russia (NY Times) — The most prominent leader of the Russian opposition movement was sentenced to five years in prison for embezzlement on Thursday, a harsh sentence that seemingly reflected his rise as a political threat to President Vladimir V. Putin. The opposition figure, Aleksei A. Navalny had grown in stature from his beginnings as an anti-corruption blogger and leader of street protests. He had recently decided to run for mayor of Moscow, though he was given scant chance of winning. Navalny has said he wants to be president one day, but he posed a different sort of threat, a growing popularity combined with an incorruptibility that made him impossible to co-opt and a relentless effort to embarrass officials by disclosing their corrupt dealings. Putin has shown a willingness to tolerate a certain amount of dissent, particularly on the Internet. But he has drawn the line at political challenges, as he did with the oil billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who was imprisoned in 2005 after he began backing independent political parties to challenge the Kremlin.

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New law to ban Spice in Maine kicks in this fall By Marge Niblock

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A new law prohibiting the sale and possession of synthetic drugs known as “Spice” will take effect in Portland this fall, initially with a goal of voluntary compliance from businesses that sell the products, the Portland chief of police said. “As the law goes into effect we would hope for voluntary compliance. As is the case with some new legislation, we could start with education and work into more enforcement-driven details,” Portland Police Chief Michael Sauschuck said. Governor Paul LePage signed L.D. 661, “An Act to Prohibit the Sale or Possession of Synthetic Cannabinoids,” into law on June 24, and the law Sauschuck will take effect 90 days after the signing, or at the end of September. Synthetic cannabinoids are commonly referred to as Spice or K2, and have been sold legally in Maine head shops and convenience stores, often marketed as “herbal incense.” “It’s been a strong negative impact on our community. I’m incredibly pleased this legislation was signed by the governor,” Sauschuck said. Maine Rep. Adam A. Goode, D-Bangor, sponsored the bill, which went first to the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee. A public hearing was held on March 22, with testimony given at that time. One of those testifying was a 13-year-old Augusta boy who riveted people’s attention with his narrative of smoking Spice at a friend’s home and later

Spice products, such as these packets found locally, target children and young people with their brightly colored packages, officials say. (MARGE NIBLOCK PHOTOS)

on having aftereffects causing him to spend several days in the hospital, including a stint in the intensive care unit. These products target children and young people with their brightly colored packages and quickly became a substance abuse problem, officials said. The aim of the bill was to prevent future sales. Representative Goode said he was very excited that the bill was signed by the governor. “I think it’s great!” he said, and referring to the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee, Goode said, “The committee was unanimous; they did a wonderful job.” The problem with bath salts — another dangerous synthetic substance that prompted legislative action — in the Bangor area was one of the reasons Goode was so anxious to stay ahead of the curve with the Spice issue. “There are negative public health implications,” he said.

The bill wasn’t passed as an emergency measure, but Goode said Maine tackled the issue aggressively. Goode said, “Sometimes government waits too long. It’s good to do something in advance. I think it’s a good tone to set.” Roy McKinney, director of the Maine Drug Enforcement Agency, has stated the object of L.D. 661 was “banning dangerous substances so no one can get it. And we want to hold the sellers accountable.” He suggested an amendment, which was adopted. It replaced a previous bill and used generic language to prevent the necessity of having to schedule each synthetic substance specifically. The psychoactive designer drugs are listed as Schedule Z drugs. On Thursday, McKinney noted that his agency worked with the legislature to “strike the right balance in language that seeks to identify and encompass all of these variants of these cannabinoids.” “We’ve crafted the language that does seek to encompass all of the known cannabinoids which is the same thing we did with the so-called ‘bath salts,’” McKinney said. Other states that have enacted laws to outlaw these substances have removed business licenses from stores not removing the products from their shelves. Some states have threatened to rescind lottery licenses from convenience stores that were not removing the items. Of the three shops in the Old Port that sold Spice, two had stopped selling it several weeks before the law was signed. Those owners decided it was not a positive influence on their businesses and they didn’t want the negative association. The third store still had the products prominently displayed right before the signing, and when asked about Spice, the person behind the counter said, “It’s incense!” Many convenience stores in Portland are also selling the substances.

Used car dealership stays open in wake of storm, fire Fire department says lightning suspected cause of building fire By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A thunderstorm that rolled across Maine Wednesday evening was blamed for a fire at a single-story industrial building on Warren Avenue. Frank Gatto, owner of Bay City Motors at 324 Warren Ave., said Thursday that he continued welcoming customers, even as he was displaced from his building. He said his office sustained damage from the late-evening fire. The Portland Fire Department attributed the two-alarm fire to lightning, saying there didn’t appear to be a human cause. Bay City Motors, which sells “quality pre-owned autos” and specializes in “European and import passenger cars,” lost use of its shop and office, Gatto said, but he said Christman Pool Service at 336 Warren Ave., which shares the same driveway, is providing office space. “We’re out there on the lot and talking to people as they come and look at cars,” Gatto said. Customers can still come by and test drive cars, he said. The fire originated in a garage bay next to the

storefront, Gatto said, and carried over into the office. Most of the fire damage was near the garage bay; one car, a 1990 VW Cabriolet he owns, sustained some damage, Gatto said. “We’re not able to really use the facility,” Gatto said. Preliminary damage estimates are over $200,000, according to a press release from the city. Fire Chief Jerome LaMoria said in the press release, “It doesn’t appear that there was a human element involved in this fire, at this point, the investigation is pointing to a lightning strike on the building.” There were no injuries. Fire officials left the scene of the two-alarm fire at approximately 2:30 a.m. Thursday, the city reported. The building owner, Castle Rock Investments of Falmouth, is working with its insurance company, the press release stated. In an interview, Deputy Chief Robert Wassick said the 11 p.m. call required 13 pieces of equipment and 40 people, including five engines, four ladder trucks, two ambulances, heavy rescue apparatus and two chiefs. Heavy smoke was visible to the first arriving fire units, the city reported. The fire was contained by fire crews quickly, “but, due to the building’s construction style, the building isn’t safe to reoccupy at this point in time,” Wassick said in the press release.

HEAT AND LIGHTNING The high temperature in Portland on Thursday was 83 degrees, four degrees above normal for the day, according to the National Weather Service in Gray. Today is expected to bring peak heat for the week, with temperatures above 90 degrees. A midweek storm featured hundreds of lightning strikes, the weather service reported. A Thursday afternoon lightning storm failed to last as long as Wednesday’s light show, dissipating quickly, the weather service noted. — Report by David Carkhuff

Gatto said the used car business had to “rearrange how we do things,” but “we’re still staying here and trying to stay open.” During a week of hot, humid weather, the city warned of thunderstorms. Around 3:40 p.m. Thursday, following a thunder clap that boomed over Portland, a lightning strike was reported to a tree, downing wires on Brook Street in Westbrook. The city issued an alert early this week, warning of the hot weather, and noted if you can hear thunder, you are likely in striking distance of lightning and should go indoors. For more information, visit http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/.


Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

––––––––––––– COLUMN –––––––––––––

Customary conundrums

The first time I visited England as a teenager, a teacher of mine warned me to be aware of certain customs, practices, and terms. Having attended Oxford University as a graduate student, he rattled off his laundry list, and I could barely keep up. “Finally,” he said, “never lift your index and middle finger together facing you, sort of in a reverse peace sign. That’s the same as flipping someone the bird in the U.S.” That august tutorial, received at age 14, made me curious of mannerisms, phrases and most of all general protocols of other culFrom the tures. I started compiling them in my memory banks, Stacks and have been lucky enough during my 17 years overseas to make sense of some of them. For example, on that first trip to England I learned right away that American English and British English have a variety of words and phrases that need deciphering or would initially make no sense to each other. Some are easy to sort out, such as our current tendency to use the term “cell” for the phone in our pocket as opposed to the nearly universal international term of “mobile.” Or calling an elevator a “lift.” Or the pharmacist a “chemist.” Or, I guess, even a doctor’s office the “surgery.” But there are words that drift from any semblance of familiarity. A bathroom is a “loo.” A police car is

Telly Halkias –––––

see HALKIAS page 6

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All the news that fits?

We take all kinds of pills that give us all kind of thrills But the thrill we’ve never known Is the thrill that’ll getcha when you get your picture On the cover of the Rollin’ Stone — Dr. Hook, “The Cover of the Rolling Stone.” Well, we finally know that at least some of our fellow citizens figure that terrorists are the new rock stars of American culture, and we know this because one of the Boston Marathon bombers is on the cover of Rolling Stone — right there in soft-focus glory, looking more like Jim Morrison’s love child than a cold-blooded killer. Boy, that pisses me off. But let’s at least agree that the cover brings Janet Reitman’s accompanying story the sort of attention it deserves. Which is a bit like realizing Edward Snowden’s revelations brought defense contractors the attention they deserve. Personally, my quick anger comes from spending time with people like Marc Klaas, the California missing-child advocate who entered that role after his 12-year-old daughter was kidnapped at knifepoint from a slumber party, raped and strangled to death. He has something to say about the killer, who is safe and warm in prison, having fan clubs and girlfriends and infamy and Internet access. We have long grown exhausted of the media lust for these guys, the way they become reality TV stars and their victims are sometimes reduced to dehumanized plot points. We see them well-dressed on TV, that ultimate American success, not in chains on Death Row.

Curtis Robinson ––––– Usually Reserved

So when something as iconic as a Rolling Stone cover adds to that, well... Rolling Stone covers are for rock stars, movie This Rolling Stone cover spread across celebs and the the Internet as many expressed outrage occasional Ralph over the photo. (Facebook image) Steadman treatment of Nixon’s face melting (Sept., 1973). A quick survey of our office copy of collected RS covers shows this is just without precedent. The angry are not alone. Some Maine retailers will not be carrying Rolling Stone. “CVS/pharmacy has decided not to sell the current issue of Rolling Stone featuring a cover photo of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect,” the Rhode Island-based pharmacy chain said in a statement. “As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones.” see ROBINSON page 6


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 5

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The other option Waking mid Saturday afternoon with a throbbing noggin as a result of GonzoFest, I was unprepared for the verdict in the George Zimmerman case to come down that night. A couple of days of reflection brings up a curious name from the past, but we’ll get to that in a bit. A populace is outraged. An Attorney General calls for changes in the law. A family grieves. There are hoots and howls about justice denied, and back-room mutterings of revenge that will be swift, sure and devilishly brutal. Back up a bit. You think I was speaking about Trayvon Martin? Nope. Try Sabato Raia. The name rings a bell, but can’t remember the specifics? Firing up the wayback machine, let’s revisit the hot night of June 24, 1997. The temperature had been in the 80s for days, and tempers were short. There was an argument at a bar between Raia, his current girlfriend and her previous boyfriend. In the early morning hours, Kevin Pinette, Dana Matthews and Nicholas Patenaude all went to Raia’s house. Shortly before 2 a.m., the three lay dead in his yard, with gunshot wounds to the head.

He even stopped to reload. When the police showed up, he admitted to killing the three. Six months later, on December 18, a jury set him free. It was self defense. Raia had reason to Tabula in believe he was in mortal fear for his life, and justified his actions Naufragio under the “Castle Doctrine.” You have to admit, this does sort of lend a bit of credence to the mistakenly attributed Mark Twain quote, “History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” A better observation would be the one from Lee Simonson. “Any event, once it has occurred, can be made to appear inevitable by a competent historian.” Ten years later, in 2007, changes came to Maine law and the Castle Doctrine. Now, there is a duty to first seek retreat. Only under very specific circumstances of your life being threatened, an inability to retreat, and the life or safety of another person being in threat could a Mainer use that defense. A report by a juror (who did not wish to be identified) in the Sun Journal a few days later pretty much sums up both cases separated by time. “I don’t really believe someone has the right to just kill someone based on fear, but we did the only thing we could do

Bob Higgins –––––

based on the law. We had no choice.” Are you listening, Florida? This is a fairly quick and easy fix. Yes, it would be too late to matter to Trayvon Martin, but every law that ever passed was the result of that same scheduling. We may curse the jurors for an unreasonable verdict, or laud them for protecting the right to protect yourself. All that is a matter of perspective. Tossing that third option into the law makes it damnably difficult to be labeled as a racist vigilante, even in an era which seems obsessed in finding them. UPDATE: Last week, I chimed in on the recruiter issue in Portland and Yarmouth. Both schools deny the charges that they’ve been difficult with recruiters, to the point of sending out a press release image on Monday of a recruiter at a function at PATHS taken in the last few months. Since I have a serious dislike for people on either side of the issue attempting to blow smoke up any orifice of mine, I’ll be filing Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests with the Army and Freedom of Access Act (FOAA) with both school departments. Somebody is fibbing, and I’ll make the attempt to find out who. Let’s see who complies with the requests. (Bob Higgins is a regular contributor to The Portland Daily Sun.)

Meet the Mayor When I read in the paper that Mayor Brennan was going to be holding a first-ever “Meet the Mayor” session at City Hall, my first reaction was that he would be disappointed in the turnout. Kind of cringed for him, actually. He’s such a well intentioned and sincere guy, after all. I just knew that out of a city of sixty-five thousand, a good many of whom hold virulent opinions on an an endless variety of topics, there wouldn’t be more than a couple dozen that would show up. I was wrong. One more than a couple dozen attended, that being twenty-five. Twenty-five citizens out of sixty-five thousand. Here’s the thing, though: That’s the number that was expected. There were just that many chairs set up in the room the event was held in. Very telling. As a dispassionate observer, I got the number of attendees just about right, but I figured that because this event was conceived by him and he’d be the main attraction, the mayor would anticipate bigger numbers. Someone with a more inflated view of himself would’ve reserved Merrill Auditorium and been crushed when only half the front row was filled. Not only did the mayor anticipate what I would call a small turnout, but he also acted as if he was addressing a mass audience. The number of people in attendance didn’t seem to matter to him in the slightest. One had the feeling that if only one concerned soul had ambled through the door they would’ve been met with the same degree of respect and enthusiasm. Truthfully, I don’t know how any of these politicians do it. Like most people, I sometimes get interested in a particular issue that I get riled about, but when the issue passes I’m back to the bric-a-brac of my own life. I’m not obligated to have a thought-out position on everything that comes down the pike. Not so with elected officials. They might hold a press conference where what they have to say on a major issue of the day will be the lead story in the media the next day; but then they might stop in the supermarket on their way home from the press conference and be pigeon-holed in the bakery aisle by some woman who is incensed because that pothole on her street she wrote a letter to City Hall about three whole months ago hasn’t been filled yet. And the elected official has to be as responsive to her as he was to the news media about what’s going to be done with the ten million dollar

Cliff Gallant –––––

Daily Sun Columnist grant the city is in line to receive from the federal government. No, thanks. As they say, they couldn’t pay me enough. But, of course, it’s not the money these people are after. Don’t know quite what it is that motiBrennan vates them, but it’s not the paycheck. Many of them make a decision to forego far more money they could make in the private sector when they run for public office. So what is it? Some of them are in it for self-aggrandizement. Hey, you go to a family picnic where you haven’t seen your loud-mouth opinionated uncle from Massachusetts for a while and he guffaws and asks you in front of a bunch of your relatives if you’ve made anything of yourself yet. You answer that, well, you’re serving a stint as mayor of your city. That stifles him real fast. Very gratifying. But the satisfaction in that is shortlived. People like him don’t stay stifled. Give him a moment to regroup and he’ll find a way to belittle whatever response you might have had. “No one else would take the job, huh?” So if you’re in it for ego gratification, forget it. As in every other area of life, people know when you’re trying to impress them and they respond accordingly. The halo lasts for about as long as the first time you screw up. Make one misinformed or ill-considered remark and that’s what you’ll be remembered for. As much as we might be resistant to the notion, though, it just might be that once in a while a politician shows up who’s in it for the right reasons. Sitting in that small room in City Hall the other evening witnessing Mayor Brennan in action I got the impression that we have the genuine article before us. The man is obviously devoted to serving the public good, and that seems to be his only agenda. He’s done the

work of becoming informed on an unbelievably wide variety of public issues and he’s genuinely concerned about the welfare of those he was elected to serve. Omiword, that sounds like a campaign soundbite, but there it is. And it’s not like he maneuvers around until he finds the position that will please the greatest number of people. He takes the people’s will into account, yes, but he doesn’t make decisions according to which way the polls read. If that’s all it took, the pollsters could make public policy on their own. The proposal to sell Congress Square Park to Rockbridge Capital is a good case in point. The mayor was asked questions on quite a range of subjects and, through a combination of having done his homework and displaying a genuine respect for the opinions of others, seemed to satisfy questioners with his responses. The Congress Square Park issue was not so easily handled, though. Emotions are running high. A number of people, including me, are opposed to the sale and are eager to hold the city’s elected officials accountable. When a questioner brought up the issue at the meeting I thought to myself: “Aha, let’s see what he’ll do with this one.” What he did was state clearly that he thinks the sale would be a good deal for the city, and said that it’s the direction he thinks we ought to go in. He respectfully listened to what others had to say, then shared the conclusions he’s arrived at. Very frustrating in this instance, but that’s what leaders do. Brings to mind an incident from his youth. As an editor of the Florida State University student newspaper in the 1970s, Brennan uncovered a series of offseason training programs that exceeded NCAA limits and didn’t hesitate to write candidly on his discoveries, which resulted in the college being put on athletic probation in 1974. When he, a highly touted halfback coming out of high school himself, went into the team’s training facilities to get reactions to the team’s having been put on probation he was thrown out by an assistant coach ... by the name of Bill Parcells, the future and fiercely competitive coach of the New England Patriots. The man took on the “Big Tuna” and lived to tell about it. “Meet the Mayor,” indeed. (Cliff Gallant of Portland is a regular columnist for The Portland Daily Sun. Email him at gallant. cliff555@yahoo.com.)


Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

A widespread European futility is finding anyone in August HALKIAS from page 4

a “panda” (I get it, but come on!). An undershirt is a “vest.” London’s subway is “the Tube.” And, perhaps my personal favorite: A salesman is a “counter jumper.” Other practices, such as punctuality and efficiency, seem to follow along ethnic-cultural lines, or as some on the Weather Channel might suggest, along coolwarm climate boundaries. Anyone who has ever visited the Mediterranean knows what I’m talking about. It doesn’t matter if you are in Southern Europe, North Africa, or Asia Minor. There’s something about nice weather that causes everyone to hit the brakes when checking their watch. I can’t even begin to describe how many Greek friends of mine back in the old country would say to meet somewhere at 3 p.m., and show up at 3:30 p.m. instead (this is actually considered “not bad a wait”). The same was true when I was in Milan as well as in Barcelona. And this wasn’t just with buddies and dates. On a half dozen instances in Cairo and Tel-Aviv, when I had appointments to conduct official business, I had to wait an average of one hour

for the administrator in question to show. Basically, I learned it was O.K. to be late; most often, so was the other party. But those were habits I couldn’t take with me to Germany, Austria, the Netherlands or Demark. There, even the slightest tardiness meant missing your appointment and insulting business partners. And when someone told you to catch the 2:45 p.m. train to Stuttgart with them, and you showed up at 2:46 p.m., they were already a mile away on that train — not hanging around for you to arrive for the 3:15. Another widespread European futility is finding anyone in August. Northerners, who love whatever sunshine they can get, all head to the Mediterranean. For their part, Mediterraneans all pour out of their cities to their rural ancestral roots, apparently to make room for the inbound Vikings and Huns. Hello? Is anyone home in late summer? One final thing applies worldwide, and this includes when foreigners visit us here in the States: how to address people’s names properly when greeting them. During my Army years, I was tapped to escort

several senior Korean Army officers through a simulation exercise at a stateside base. I prepared by learning the dignitaries’ names from an advance roster. However, I was not attuned to listing surnames first and given names second in what is a common, though not exclusive, Oriental practice. On reviewing final preparations with a public relations liaison, he quickly berated me: “You’re going to make fools of all of us!” Fortunately, the Korean generals wore bilingual nametags, so I made the adjustment and saved face — by a whisker. Over the years, friends of mine have urged me to put this stuff in a book, but there have been many written on the subject, to include official diplomatic training manuals. Yet looking back, I can better appreciate my teacher’s efforts at preparing me for culture shock, or keeping me from getting beat up while riding the Tube. (Telly Halkias is an award-winning freelance journalist from Portland’s West End. You may contact him at tchalkias@aol.com or follow him on Twitter at @TellyHalkias.)

Uneasy panic? Panic over the suspect’s personal narrative? Really? ROBINSON from page 4

One of those victims, James “Bim” Costello, 30, of Malden, Mass., who needed pig skin grafts on most of his right arm and right leg after the bombing, was quoted by the Associated Press about the RS cover. “I think whoever wrote the article should have their legs blown off by someone, struggle through treatment and then see who they would choose to put on the cover,” Costello told The Associated Press. Since any boycott naturally brings ignorant cries of “censorship,” let’s be clear: It’s not censorship if somebody decides not to distribute your magazine on private property; it’s only censorship if somebody won’t let YOU distribute your materials in public. This issue becomes about choice. Rolling Stone can choose to use that image, knowing the likely response. Stores can choose what they sell. Customers who don’t like it can choose to go elsewhere. Me, I can choose to be pissed off about the cover but appreciate the article. Clearly, the long-form Rolling Stone story at least justifies the premise that led to that insane cover decision: How did this normal-seeming kid from Cambridge come to become a terrorist? Critics might note it reads like a VH-1 “After the Music” feature without the music, but the research weaves together interviews that probably only Rolling Stone could get, given their demographic and history.

the moment they turn around, I don’t understand why all of them aren’t angrier. I’m actually kind of surprised it’s taken so long for one of these kids to set off a bomb.’” Talk about good deeds never going unpunished. That alone justifies the story, and the cover image supports a premise worth exploring. Rolling Stone, of course, faces the challenge that has always come with what amounts to (Matt Taibbi and other wildly important exceptions aside) a glorified fanzine that sometimes veers into Mother Jones wannabe territory — or what it calls “serious and thoughtful coverage of political and cultural issues.” The transition can be a shock, but the exceptions are not usually granted the glory of cover. The magazine, after all, was home to the late journalist Hunter S. Thompson, who created and practiced “gonzo journalism” in its pages. Not that Hunter was always that much of an RS defender, for reasons both personal and professional, but the firestorm illustrates what RS Publisher Jann Wenner means when he says that HST is “part of the DNA” of the magazine. So think what you want of the Rolling Stone cover, and we’ll see if they actually doctored the image to make it more star-worthy, but let’s admit that it had its desired effect: attention. Nobody, after all, complained when the same image appeared in the New York Times. The problem is that the resulting undesired cultural effects of a RollOwned and operated by the Hutchins Family, ing Stone cover, as the providing Funeral and Cremation Services accompanying story clearly illustrates, may in Greater Portland. take some time to manifest themselves, when Offering families a full range of services, from they might piss us off the basic direct cremation, even more.

We should also be impressed that they did not dwell on the fact that the older of the brothers, on the road to radical, stopped drinking alcohol, listening to music and smoking pot. The story premise is echoed by the younger killer’s wrestling coach: “I knew this kid, and he was a good kid,” [the coach] says, sadly. “And, apparently, he’s also a monster.” Says the story: “... after several months of interviews with friends, teachers and coaches still reeling from the shock, what emerges is a portrait of a boy who glided through life, showing virtually no signs of anger, let alone radical political ideology or any kind of deeply felt religious beliefs.” Well, you know, no real signs up until the bombing that killed three and wounded more than 200 others. Granted, we could have done without the writer’s loopy assertion that “... an uneasy panic settled over Boston when it was revealed that the Tsarnaev brothers were not, as many assumed, connected to a terrorist group, but young men seemingly affiliated with no one but themselves. Russian émigrés, they had lived in America for a decade — and in Cambridge, a city so progressive it had its own ‘peace commission’ to promote social justice and diversity.” Uneasy panic? Panic over the suspect’s personal narrative? Really? Hey, Rolling Stone: you can kiss our Boston Strong butt. As you might guess, the story raises the “why?” question without coming

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close to providing an answer; indeed, it seems to imply that we’ll never really know. And it surely humanizes the younger of the two bombing suspects while presenting the older brother as much more of a religious radical ringleader. Along the way, we visit some of the usual touchstones of youth: identity crisis, family issues, a need to identify with something larger than ourselves. But here’s the thing — the RS brings home the “story” in a way that ongoing news coverage seldom can. Like the fact that one of the three people he killed was an 8-year-old boy, ironic since that’s the same age he was when America granted his family political asylum because of ethnic violence in his homeland. We offered his family years of government assistance including subsidized housing, food stamps and he benefited from a fine public school system. And this is the thanks we get? See, now I’m pissed off again. But, at least, not at the magazine cover. To that “gratitude” point, Rolling Stone does offer a chilling insight of sorts: “Wick Sloane, an education advocate and a local community-college professor, sees this as a widespread condition among many young immigrants who pass through his classrooms. ‘All of these kids are grateful to be in the United States. But it’s the usual thing: Is this the land of opportunity or isn’t it? When I look at what they’ve been through, and how they are screwed by federal policies from

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(Curtis Robinson is the founding editor of The Portland Daily Sun.)


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 7

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SUN SPORTS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Portland Sea Dogs hope to end their swoon soon By Ken Levinsky

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The Portland Sea Dogs (46-50) are glad to be back home this weekend for their four-game series with the lastplace Reading Fightin’ Phils (40-55). Despite a 1-8 road trip, which dropped the Sea Dogs into fifth place in the Eastern League’s Eastern Division, they remain very much in the battle for second place. Portland trails rivals New Hampshire, Trenton, New Britain by just three and a half games, two games and one game, respectively. The top two clubs in each division will compete in the Eastern League postseason. Second baseman Heiker Meneses leads the team (among those with at least 200 at bats) with a batting average of .268. He is tied for third on the team with 10 stolen bases. Third baseman Michael Almanzar leads Portland in many offensive categories. The Eastern League rookie is batting .267 with 11 homeruns and 54 RBI. Peter Hissey is third on the team with a batting average of .266 The lefty is second on the team with 13 stolen bases, trailing team leader Shannon Wilkerson who has 17 thefts. Center fielder Wilkerson made a spec-

tacular catch to save two runs in New Hampshire last week, holding on to the ball after running into the fence and flipping over. Second baseman/Outfielder Tony Thomas leads the team with 57 runs batted and his 10 round trippers trail team leader Almanzar by just one. He is also tied for third on the team with 10 stolen bases. Here is the Sea Dogs schedule for this weekend: Friday, July 19 vs. Reading, 7 p.m. Saturday, July 20 vs. Reading, 6 p.m. Sunday, July 21 vs. Reading, 1 p.m.

Sea Dogs games can be heard on WPEI 95.5/ 95.9 FM Portland, WEZR 1240 AM Lewiston/Auburn, WKTQ 1450 AM South Paris and WTME 780 AM Rumford. Coverage begins 20 minutes prior to the first pitch with the pre-game show. The talented and informative Mike Antonellis, the playby-play announcer, returns to Portland for his ninth season, (17th season overall) in Minor League Baseball. Honored as the 2009 Eastern League Broadcaster of the Year, Antonellis also serves as the host of the Saturday Morning Jab on Big Jab Radio (96.3 FM and 1440 AM)

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Page 8 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

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–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– THEATER REVIEW –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

‘Young Frankenstein’ in Ogunquit offers monster, grown-up laughs Welcome to the second half of 2013. Children need to be entertained and taken to the lake, heat has replaced cold as a reason to complain, gas prices are

“Young Frankenstein” — playing at Ogunquit Playhouse — features Brad Nacht as the Monster, Nathan Klau as Igor, John Bolton as Dr. Frankenstein, Lara Seibert as Inga and Sandy Rosenberg as Frau Blucher. (COURTESY PHOTO)

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going through the roof and you just sat through an evening of back-to-school commercials. I ask, what have you done for you lately? Call the babysitter (this is not a family-friendly show) and head to the Ogunquit Playhouse because you need an evening of laughing your backside off. Mel Brooks’ iconic ‘70s movie, “Young Frankenstein” became a Broadway ––––– smash in 2007, and Ogunquit Theater has brought much of that talent to Maine to mount this “monCritic ster” of a show. Direction and choreography are placed into the very capable hands of Jeff Whiting, who worked as the associate director on the original production under the great Susan Stroman. Mr. Whiting is joined by Robin Wagner’s original scenic design and William Ivey Long’s costumes from the Broadway production. I have to comment on how technical this production is and flawless in execution. The large puppet in the dream sequence reminded me how simple illusions, well executed, are magical to witness. The lighting is amazing, with Richard Latta’s design, and most of the evening I was blown away with the production values. Remember, technically, this show is the Broadway production.

Harold Withee

see next page


Liberty Caucus backs Bennett for GOP chair THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Former State Senate President Rick Bennett has been endorsed unanimously by the Maine Republican Liberty Caucus to be the next chair of the Maine Republican Party, the caucus reported in a press release Thursday. “Rick Bennett isn’t going to agree with us 100 percent of the time but we have found him equitable and willing to listen to our views and give them fair consideration. At this time the Republican Party Bennett desperately needs a leader who will bring all factions together and grant each an equal seat at the table,” said Maine RLC State Chair Vic Berardelli. Maine Republican Party Chairman Rich Cebra and Vice Chairwoman Beth O’Connor both resigned earlier this month, spurring a search for new leadership. Berardelli said the caucus had not endorsed a state party chair candidate in the past but, in compliance with bylaws, the Thursday night vote was called on the written request of four of the nine State Board members asking for a special meeting to endorse Bennett. Approximately 10 percent of the

Maine GOP State Committee voting members are also dues-paid members of the Maine RLC. “Rick Bennett showed leadership skills in bridging factions when he was accepted by Democrats as Senate President in the leadership sharing agreement when the Senate was deadlocked in 2002 yet, in that session, he was on record fighting against government expansion and tax increases,” Berardelli said. “Rick Bennett showed leadership skills in bridging factions when he was accepted by Democrats as Senate President in the leadership sharing agreement when the Senate was deadlocked in 2002 yet, in that session, he was on record fighting against government expansion and tax increases,” Berardelli said. Maine RLC, according to its press release, is a certified state chapter of the national Republican Liberty Caucus, a 527-c grassroots volunteer organization which is the oldest group of liberty activists working within the GOP, founded in 1991. MPBN reported that party elections will be held Saturday in Augusta. According to a 2012 blog, “Rich Bennett for Senate” (http://bennettformaine.com/blog, “Rick Bennett was elected Maine State Senate President in a historic power-sharing agreement with Democrats brought on by his successful management of the Maine Republican Senate caucus at a time when other Republicans were not successful at the ballot box.”

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(Harold Withee is a member of Actor’s Equity and SAG-AFTRA.)

45

Often with such spectacle on stage, the actors become diminished, reduced to mere set pieces. “Explosive” is the only word to describe the energy and presence this cast brought to the state; upstaging the scenery was not a problem. Television and Broadway star John Bolton steps into the lead as Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, earning every penny he is being paid. Yes, he can sing, dance and act, and has impeccable comic timing. Nothing would save this script without the lead being a perfect match; he is, enough said. All the wacky, lovable characters are here, singing hilarious and sometimes naughty ditties such as “Roll in the Hay,” “Deep Love” and S&M favorite “He Vas My Boyfriend.” Bosom-endowed Inga is wonderfully played by Lara Seibert, and housekeeper Frau Blucher is portrayed by Sandy Rosenberg, who masterfully creates her own unique version of this classic film character. Nathan Klau gets a workout in the role of Igor, and Lesly McKinnnell stole my heart as Elizabeth. The only cast member who seemed to lag a bit was Tom Souhrada

as Inspector Kemp. I believe his accent changed four times and he never was solid with the hand gag. Mr. Souhrada also played the hermit and was brilliant, creating the lovable blind hermit with huge laughs. Fun is how I can convey the evening of theater which is “Young Frankenstein.” Leggy, large-breasted dancers for the gents, an army of young men in tights for the ladies, a dab of Yiddish yuks, dance numbers, songs to make you laugh and a bit of Gothic ‘30s movie making. Pure entertainment at times is just what the doctor ordered so make a date with old friend Mel Brooks, leave the kids at home and have a memorable summer night on the beach. “Young Frankenstein” runs through July 27 at the Ogunquit Playhouse. Box Office: 646-5511; Ogunquitplayhouse.org. Shows are Tuesday through Sunday.

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Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

Scenes of summer in Portland LEFT: The Kiwanis pool, Portland’s only outdoor public pool, open until 7:30 p.m. daily, has been a popular spot during the mid-July heat wave. Eric Baker of Portland brought eight-month-old daughter, Penelope, to sample the water jets Thursday. ABOVE: A panhandler braves the heat Thursday to ask for help from motorists on a median on Forest Avenue. The Portland City Council on Monday passed an ordinance that prohibits loitering in medians, effective Aug. 15. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTOS)

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 11

Young Dubliners anchor third outing of Brunswick festival By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The Saltwater Celtic Music Festival will bring a rock edge to Thomas Point Beach in Brunswick this Saturday and Sunday, July 20 and 21. Now in its third year, the musical celebration of all things Celtic kicks off Saturday with a special program featuring the Maine Public Safety Pipe and Drum Corps and their friends from the Nassau County Firefighters Pipes and Drums of Long Island, the first volunteer firefighter’s bagpipe band in the nation. Nassau County firefighters were first responders during last year’s devastating Hurricane Sandy. Randy Labbe, the festival organizer, expects this edition of Saltwater to be the biggest and best one yet. “We have performers coming from Scotland, Ireland, the province of Quebec, even Los Angeles, and each one was hand-picked to help us present the deepest, most compelling Celtic music experience of 2013,” he said. “The music is going to be phenomenal, and the audience can expect that each day is going to close with energy!” Saltwater 2013 will offer its traditional Art Tent, cohosted by Portland’s own Michael Shaughnessy and Judy O’Donnell, the 2013 artist-in-residence. There will be a Lit Tent, co-hosted by Paula de Fougerolles and Saltwater emcee Kevin O’Hara, author of “Last of the Donkey Pilgrims.” Labbe continues to run the festival as a family affair: he gets help from family members, and they consider Saltwater a great attraction for families to attend. “One could very easily say that I’ve been blessed,” Labbe said. “Saltwater doesn’t resemble a corporate-driven event because it isn’t that; Saltwater is a small but growing and dynamic, family-run and family-oriented event. Saltwater really is a labor of love, and we hope that everybody who comes out can feel that.” The festival is quite young, especially when compared with other regional musical gatherings, so it has taken a little time to find itself. “A challenge for any young festival is to find its identity. Initially, you present a basic image or brand identity, and then the musicians and

other participants and the audience put their stamp on it, and it really takes on a life of its own,” Labbe said. “We can’t be all things to all people, but our mission is to build the broadest, most compelling Celtic music festival in North America, right here in Maine. I think we’re off to a pretty good start.” One of the main attractions this year is the L.A.-based band, Young Dubliners, called “quite possibly Celtic rock’s hardest working band, playing hundreds of shows to thousands of fans across the U.S. and Europe every year.” In recent years they have twice appeared on ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live!”, had songs featured in TV shows like “Sons Of Anarchy,” and toured extensively as a headliner and as festival favorites. The Young Dubliners’ Maine debut will be doubly good as they are scheduled to play both days of the festival. Young Dubs, as they are known, have toured the United States and Europe since 1994, and have supported Jethro Tull, John Hiatt, Chris Isaak, and Collective Soul. Members include lead vocalist and guitarist Keith Roberts, bassist Brendan Holmes, violinist Chas Waltz, guitarist Bob Boulding, and drummer David Ingraham. Their repertoire consists largely of original rock compositions and Irish folk songs with a rock twist. Their influences include Thin Lizzy, The Pogues, The Waterboys and U2. They just released their ninth album, appropriately enough called “9,” which they recorded and produced without the help of a record label. Roberts spoke of the freedom and challenges inherent in such an undertaking. “We didn’t want to use any of the existing formats like Kickstarter or

PayPal, so we started our own,” he said. “It had all of the potholes of doing it yourself. We were going on the road, coming back, playing live again, and see DUBLINERS page 15 RIGHT: The L.A.-based band, Young Dubliners, called “quite possibly Celtic rock’s hardest working band,” will perform at this weekend’s Saltwater Celtic Music Festival at Thomas Point Beach in Brunswick. (COURTESY PHOTO)


Today’s Birthdays: Actress Helen Gallagher is 87. Country singer Sue Thompson is 87. Country singer George Hamilton IV is 76. Singer Vikki Carr is 73. Country singer-musician Commander Cody is 69. Actor George Dzundza is 68. Rock singer-musician Alan Gorrie (Average White Band) is 67. Tennis player Ilie Nastase is 67. Rock musician Brian May is 66. Rock musician Bernie Leadon is 66. Actress Beverly Archer is 65. Movie director Abel Ferrara is 62. Actor Peter Barton is 57. Rock musician Kevin Haskins (Love and Rockets) is 53. Movie director Atom Egoyan is 53. Actor Campbell Scott is 52. Actor Anthony Edwards is 51. Country singer Kelly Shiver is 50. Actress Clea Lewis is 48. Percusssionist Evelyn Glennie is 48. Country musician Jeremy Patterson is 43. Classical singer Urs Buhler (Il Divo) is 42. Actor Andrew Kavovit is 42. Rock musician Jason McGerr (Death Cab for Cutie) is 39. Actor Benedict Cumberbatch is 37. Actor Jared Padalecki is 31. Actor Steven Anthony Lawrence is 23.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Big day. You won’t do everything on your list, and this is a very positive sign. “If you have accomplished all that you planned for yourself, you have not planned enough.” -- Edward Everett Hale AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You want to impart some valuable skills to others, but it’s not quite time. You have to live it more before you can properly teach it. You’re well on your way to the higher levels of this learning. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). There’s an old joke that goes, “It’s destiny when things work out the way you want and blind chance when they don’t.” These days, you’re not leaving anything to chance, so it doesn’t matter either way. Your fate is self-created. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (July 19). You get the feeling that someone is watching out for you, and you’re right. Kismet joins you with a loving person in the next five weeks. Get advice before making a financial choice in August. Your fitness level rises in October. You’ll tend toward bold action in your personal life because you crave experience, and you’ll get it! Aries and Pisces people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 40, 5, 17, 9 and 12.

by Paul Gilligan

ARIES (March 21-April 19). You don’t have too many policies as an individual and can afford to adopt a few more to guide the action over the next few days. For instance, “I do not help anyone over the age of 30 move.” Or, “Five trips to the airport max per friend.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20). As the sign of the bull, you know that taking the bull by the horns is sometimes necessary, but isn’t always wise. Today you will outsmart the “bull” without risking your personal safety. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). People can be poor predictors of what will make them happy, and you’ll experience this first-hand. The good news is that you won’t have to give up what you want, probably because you find that you don’t really want it, after all. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Today’s fresh experience will be as crisp and as sweet as fresh fruit. You only wish your memory were worse so you could enjoy this for the first time all over again. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Getting older has been very much on your mind in recent days. Be like a sunflower. Don’t fear the encroaching shadow; shine and grow right now while the sun graces your face with beautiful energy. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You like reality and can take more of it than most people. But even you will reach a saturation point today and long for a good escape into the land of fiction and fantasy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’re still getting a lot of noise from your people because of a recent decision. Don’t increase the racket by defending yourself or explaining. Put in your ear buds and listen to your own music instead. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). One-stop shopping is mighty appealing to people like you who don’t believe in wasting time. However, what you need today is so special that you’ll only find it in a smaller place where the care is personal and specific. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Your talents can’t fully come to light if you avoid the light. Unfortunately, the spotlight operator may not know to follow you right now, so you’ll have to chase down the spotlight and stand in it.

By Holiday Mathis

by Jan Eliot

HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 25 26 28 31 32 34 36

ACROSS Texas __; large university in Lubbock Homeless animal Thin Hawaiian island Tranquillity Sickly looking Snatch Churchill Downs and Pimlico __ at once; suddenly Rube Regions Giggle Bakery dessert Votes in Impede; thwart Pennies Bessie Smith’s music Soggy soil Takes more than one’s fair share

37 38 39 40 41 42 44 45 46 47 50 51 54 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 1

Courted Man or boy Half and half Chairs & stools Fine __; fabric for a tablecloth Misbehaving Shout of protest Fore and __ __-frutti Worship Go skyward Oinker Self-__; autonomy Poet Teasdale Nights before Policeman’s identification Perched upon Car blemish Gave up, as land Strong urges DOWN Old Roman garment

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 19 21 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

British peer Tragic US space shuttle Wheel center Bits of parsley Instruct Luggage __; car roof topper Highest spade Up until now Showed leniency toward Frilly trimming Actress Chase Untidy state __ cats and dogs; pours Hovels Plays a role “The __ Piper of Hamelin” Canyon sound Africa’s Sierra __ Colors Set free Measuring stick

32 33 35 37 38 40 41

Dory or dinghy “Thanks a __!” Declare untrue __ away; left Catcher’s glove Not as risky Old stringed instrument 43 Most unusual 44 Evicted

46 47 48 49 50 52 53 55 56 57

Slight coloring Like fine wine Bird of peace Microwave, e.g. Actor __ Foxx Make smooth Spaces Big TV network Actress West Utter

Yesterday’s Answer


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 13

––––––– ALMANAC ––––––– Today is Friday, July 19, the 200th day of 2013. There are 165 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On July 19, 1943, Allied air forces raided Rome during World War II, the same day Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini met in Feltre in northern Italy. On this date: In 1553, King Henry VIII’s daughter Mary was proclaimed Queen of England after pretender Lady Jane Grey was deposed. In 1812, during the War of 1812, the First Battle of Sackets Harbor in Lake Ontario resulted in an American victory as U.S. naval forces repelled a British attack. In 1848, a ground-breaking women’s rights convention convened in Seneca Falls, N.Y. In 1870, the Franco-Prussian war began. In 1903, the first Tour de France was won by Maurice Garin. In 1952, the Summer Olympics opened in Helsinki, Finland. In 1961, TWA became the first airline to begin showing regularly scheduled in-flight movies as it presented “By Love Possessed” to first-class passengers on a flight from New York to Los Angeles. In 1979, the Nicaraguan capital of Managua fell to Sandinista guerrillas, two days after President Anastasio Somoza fled the country. In 1980, the Moscow Summer Olympics began, minus dozens of nations that were boycotting the games because of the Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan. In 1989, 111 people were killed when a United Air Lines DC-10 crashed while making an emergency landing at Sioux City, Iowa; 185 other people survived. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush joined former presidents Ronald Reagan, Gerald R. Ford and Richard M. Nixon at ceremonies dedicating the Nixon Library and Birthplace (since redesignated the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum) in Yorba Linda, Calif. In 1993, President Bill Clinton announced a policy allowing homosexuals to serve in the military under a compromise dubbed “don’t ask, don’t tell.” Clinton fired FBI Director William Sessions, citing “serious questions” about Sessions’ conduct and leadership. Ten years ago: A chartered aircraft carrying three families to a game reserve plowed into Mount Kenya, killing all 12 American tourists and the two South African pilots on board. Five years ago: Democrat Barack Obama visited U.S. troops and met with officials in Afghanistan as part of a congressional fact-finding tour. The Indiana Fever defeated the New York Liberty 71-55 in the WNBA’s first outdoor game, played at Arthur Ashe Stadium. One year ago: A calm-looking Syrian President Bashar Assad made his first appearance on state TV a day after a bomb killed some of his top lieutenants. Russia and China again vetoed a Western-backed U.N. resolution aimed at pressuring Assad’s government to end the escalating civil war in Syria. Omar Suleiman, 76, Egypt’s former spy chief, deposed President Hosni Mubarak’s top lieutenant and keeper of secrets who ran for president earlier in the year, died in Cleveland, Ohio. Sylvia Woods, 86, founder of the famed soul food restaurant in New York’s Harlem neighborhood that carries her name, died in N.Y.

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 8:00

Dial 5 6 7 8 9

CTN 5 S. Katsos

8:30 Outlook

Camp The annual capWCSH ture-the-flag competition. Å (DVS) Bones The team looks WPFO into the death of a teen. Å (DVS) Shark Tank Sugar WMTW scrubs; shrink-wrap gift bags. (In Stereo) Å TWC TV Mainely Motorsports

JULY 19, 2013

9:00 Link TV

9:30

10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Midnite Mausoleum

Dungeon

Dateline NBC (N) (In Stereo) Å

News

The Following A follower News 13 on FOX (N) and Joe form a deadly plan. What Would You Do? 20/20 (N) (In Stereo) Å (N) (In Stereo) Å Ridin

Paid Prog. Maine Auto King

Charlie Inside DCI Banks “Friend of the Devil” The Rose: The Washing- murder of a paralyzed woman. (In Week (N) ton Å Stereo) Å Washing- McLaughlin Moyers & Company (In Inside E Charlie ton Week Group (N) Stereo) Å Street Å Rose: The Week (N) Whose Whose Perfect Perfect 30 Rock 30 Rock Line Is It Line Is It Score Å Score Å “Episode “Leap Anyway? Anyway? 210” Å Day” Å Undercover Boss Mood Hawaii Five-0 “Olelo Blue Bloods “Fathers Media CEO goes under Pa’a” McGarrett talks and Sons” Danny’s son is cover. Å about a mission. Å severely injured. Monk (In Stereo) Å Monk (In Stereo) Å Law Order: CI Warlocks Rising Å Warlocks Rising (N) Philly Throttle (N) Å

Tonight Show With Jay Leno Dish Nation The Office (N) Å “Stress Relief” WMTW Jimmy News 8 at Kimmel 11 (N) Live Å Paid Prog. Paid Prog.

10

WashingMPBN ton Week

Charlie Rose (N) (In Stereo) Å

11

WENH

PBS NewsHour (In Stereo) Å

12

WPXT

13

WGME

17

WPME

24

DISC

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FAM Twister

26

USA Law & Order: SVU

27 28

Movie: ››› “Twister” (1996) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton.

Friends (In TMZ (N) (In Stereo) Å Stereo) Å WGME News 13 at 11 (N) Our Homes

Warlocks Rising Å

Law & Order: SVU

The 700 Club Å Necessary Roughness

NESN MLB Baseball: Yankees at Red Sox

Extra

Red Sox

Sports

Outdoors

CSNE Paul Pierce

Sports

SportsNet Sports

SportsNet

Law & Order: SVU World Poker Tour

30

ESPN 2013 Open Championship

31

ESPN2 ProFILE

Baseball Tonight (N)

Fútbol Mexicano Primera División

Cold Case “Colors”

Cold Case Å

SportsCenter (N) Å

Boxing Friday Night Fights. (N) Cold Case Å

Cold Case “Start-Up”

Good Luck Dog

Jessie

33

ION

34

DISN Movie: “Teen Beach Movie” (2013)

35

TOON Cartoon Planet

36

NICK Sam & Cat Sam & Cat Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny Friends

37

Late Show With David Letterman Sunny

Liv-Mad.

King of Hill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy

MSNBC All In With Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow Show

Lockup

Austin Fam. Guy Friends

Lockup: Raw

38

CNN Anderson Cooper 360

Piers Morgan Live (N)

Anderson Cooper

Stroumboulopoulos (N)

40

CNBC How I Made, Millions

Ultimate Factories

American Greed

Mad Money

The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)

41

FNC

43

TNT Movie: ››‡ “Red” (2010, Action) Bruce Willis. Hoarders “Vula; Lisa” LIFE Hoarders Å

44

Greta Van Susteren

The O’Reilly Factor

72 Hours (N) Å

King & Maxwell Å

Hoarders Å

Psychic Challenge

Randy to the Rescue

Say Yes

47

Say Yes Say Yes Say Yes TLC Say Yes AMC Movie: ››› “McLintock!” (1963) John Wayne.

48

HGTV Extreme Homes Å

Cool Pools Å

Hunters

49

TRAV Ghost Adventures

Ghost Adventures

Dead Files Revisited

The Dead Files Å

Storage

Storage

46

50 52

A&E Storage

Storage

BRAVO Housewives/NJ

Storage

Housewives/NJ

Say Yes

Movie: ››› “16 Blocks” (2006) Bruce Willis. Hunt Intl Storage

Hunt Intl

Hunt Intl

Storage

Storage

Housewives/NJ

Happens

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Frasier

Frasier

55

HALL Movie: ››› “Honeymoon for One” (2011) Å

Frasier

56

SYFY WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) Å

Continuum (N)

57

ANIM Tanked: Unfiltered (N)

Treehouse Masters

Treehouse Masters (N) Treehouse Masters

58

HIST American Pickers Å

American Pickers Å

60

BET

61

COM Tosh.0

62

FX

Movie: ›‡ “Catwoman” (2004) Halle Berry. Tosh.0

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Movie: ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black.

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68

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Fam. Guy

Movie: ››› “Wedding Crashers” (2005) Owen Wilson.

78

OXY Movie: ›› “Couples Retreat” (2009) Vince Vaughn. TCM Movie: ››› “The Soft Skin” (1964, Romance)

BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS

Friends

Movie: ››‡ “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift”

146

DAILY CROSSWORD

Friends

›› “50 First Dates”

Movie: ››› “Kung Fu Panda”

67 76

Friends

American Pickers Å

Movie: ›‡ “Friday After Next” (2002) Å

1 4 10 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 25 27 30 33 36 37 39 41 43 44 46

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Friends There Yet?

Ink Master Å Movie: ›› “Couples Retreat”

Movie: ›››› “Jules and Jim” (1961, Drama)

ACROSS By way of Capturing exclamation Thirst quenchers Tourist’s stopover Mountain bush Created Bowling zero Magnani or Pavlova Celestial hunter Aid a criminal Fitzgerald’s forte Withdraw Hangman’s knot Time for a final round Pillbox or porkpie Mike of “Dirty Jobs” __-de-dah Cheapen Disconcert Accomplished Food seasonings Discarded cargo Pt. of a poem

48 Oodles and oodles 49 Affirmative vote 50 ‘56 and ‘70 U.S. Open tennis champion 53 Tanklike animal 55 Uses a crane 59 Free from jeopardy 61 Spill over 64 SLR setting 65 Shrinking Asian inland sea 66 Discount destination 68 Shrill cry 69 Vain 70 Truly! 71 Mineo and Maglie 72 Fitted together in a stack 73 Piggery 1 2 3 4

DOWN Forceful exertion Habituate Bit of tomfoolery Jackson of “A Touch of Class”

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 24 26 28 29 31 32 33 34 35 38 40

Scull crewman Brass band member Grouch Montana’s capital In toto Collect Place for a ball “So Big” writer Ferber Chair Like peek-a-boo shoes U.S. immigrant’s subj. Barcelona bravos Wee bit Onion-like herb Concerning Examination Hindu title Toe the line Cascade Belief in an ancient Semitic god Last name in spydom

42 Morning condensation 45 Rainy season in India 47 Cheerleader’s word 51 Dissolved 52 Propelled in a high arc 54 Pitches in

56 Guy wires 57 For rent, in London 58 Awkwardly awry 59 Comments 60 Field 62 Cornelia __ Skinner 63 Cemetery piece 67 Language suffix

Yesterday’s Answer


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

DAILY SUN CLASSIFIEDS

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIEDS • CALL 699-5807 DOLLAR-A-DAY CLASSIFIEDS: Ads must be 15 words or less and run a minimum of 5 consecutive days. Ads that run less than 5 days or nonconsecutive days are $2 per day. Ads over 15 words add 10¢ per word per day. PREMIUMS: First word caps no charge. Additional caps 10¢ per word per day. Centered bold heading: 9 pt. caps 40¢ per line, per day (2 lines maximum) TYPOS: Check your ad the first day of publication. Sorry, we will not issue credit after an ad has run once. DEADLINES: noon, one business day prior to the day of publication. PAYMENT: All private party ads must be pre-paid. We accept checks, Visa and Mastercard credit cards and, of course, cash. CORRESPONDENCE: To place your ad call our offi ces 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 699-5807; or send a check or money order with ad copy to The Conway Daily Sun, P.O. Box 1940, North Conway, NH 03860. OTHER RATES: For information about classified display ads please call 699-5807.

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DEADLINE

for classifieds is noon the day prior to publication

Dear Annie: My ex-wife and I put our 24-year-old son through college. He recently was accepted to a foreign medical school that will cost $50,000 per year for the next three years. My ex decided to remortgage her house in order to finance a year or two of this expense. I’m sure she will feel that any additional expense he incurs should fall upon me. We shared his educational expenses up to this point, but as a retiree on a fixed income, I am not in a position to match her largesse. This has made me feel inadequate as a provider. I took out loans to finance my own graduate education and believe it would do our son a world of good in the long run to arrange his own tuition through loans and part-time jobs. I am thankful that my ex is able to assist our son, but it pains me to be unable to contribute equally. How can I best cope with this feeling of inadequacy? -- Worried in Altadena Dear Worried: Please don’t feel inadequate because you aren’t financing your child’s post-graduate degree. That is his responsibility. We understand that your ex wants to make this exorbitant expense easier to bear, but no parent is under an obligation to finance their adult child’s continuing education and the accompanying expenses. Remind yourself that you are teaching your son to be self-sufficient -- something much more valuable to his future than borrowing from his parents.

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dear Annie: My aunt works at the doctor’s office where I am a patient. I am very private about my personal affairs, especially my health records. When I first saw this physician, I requested that my records be kept in a separate area so they could not be accessed by my aunt and would remain confidential. The receptionist assured me that would be done, saying many patients make similar requests. Somehow this got back to my aunt, and she is creating a huge family fuss over this, telling everyone she was called in by her boss and almost got fired over it. She also said I posted derogatory information concerning this on Facebook, which is a complete lie. I am beside myself. I never said anything about her looking at my records. I only asked that they be kept separate. How do I handle this? She is making something innocent into something ugly. Please help. -- B.K. Dear B.K.: It’s a good thing your aunt doesn’t have access to your records. It sounds as if she would put them all over the Internet out of spite. You have done nothing wrong and should say so. Tell your family members that you posted nothing on Facebook, nor did you make any comment to the doctor or his staff. (Although we wonder how your aunt heard about it.) Hold your head up and let her rant. As difficult as it may be, the storm will pass eventually. Your relationship with your aunt, however, may not recover. Sorry.

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 15

Cleaves collaborator describes backstories of songs By Timothy Gillis

create a reservoir and sell energy out of state.” The 18,000-acre area in Eustice became Flagstaff Lake. “When the Depression hit in the 1930s, CMP sent agents to buy options on property,” St. Pierre recalls from the article. “The area was already depressed. Some people jumped at the chance (to sell), and the town began to decline.” Some people refused to sell, but their properties were flooded or CMP burned the houses, she said. Graves were moved to New Flagstaff, and church windows were moved to a new chapel next to the new cemetery. “I had a friend who was 80 at the time — Paul Colburn. He was there the year of the flood. We did a talk at the Old Berwick historical society. Quite a few people from Flagstaff came down, and then invited us to go to their Old Home Day the following year. By then, the song had come out, and people were interested. It was a pretty moving experience. We had people in the audience who didn’t even know this had happened and people

who had been forced to move.” The other song she worked on with Cleaves is called “Gone,” inspired by a friend’s grandmother, who lost her car keys and said in disbelief, “I put them there, and they were gone.” The line led St. Pierre to wonder how it would work in a country song. “I thought: what a great line, or hook. ‘There she was, gone.’ I was flying out to Colorado for a class, talking with Slaid about topics, about this friend’s grandmother. It turned into a long love story, of a person with Alzheimer’s, from young love through parenthood into the older years.” St. Pierre said she starts her writing process with a poem, “and then we talk a little bit about the content, sometimes we just write back and forth about it, and then he puts it to music. I have very little to do with the music. I’m more at the wordsmithing end of the partnership.” South Berwick is the home of several noted writers including Sarah Orne Jewett, Robert Pirsig (“Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance”), songwriter Rod Picott, and the novelist Nicholson Baker, who mentions Cleaves in “The Anthologist.” “It’s a gift to have someone like him,” St. Pierre said of Cleaves. “People don’t give themselves enough time to write, so it’s really a nice connection we have to be able to do that.” She received a royalty check for “Below” from Bose speaker company and showed her students, saying, “See? You can make money from writing.” She is working on a song now called “Pandora’s Train” about this dream she had about a woman who wanted to leave her life and run away. She waits for the circus to come to see the fortuneteller who tells her Pandora’s train is coming. She asks what does it cost and is told, “you don’t know until you get off.” At the end of the song, the woman is climbing up stairs, and you don’t know if it’s the stairs to her house or the train. “We’re going to leave it like that. Slaid likes to leave things to the audience, likes things to be more shadowed,” she said. Another song she started a while ago is called “Malaga Island,” about an island off the coast of Maine populated by some freed slaves and some mixed race children, during the time of eugenics when many of them were labeled as simple. “When the wealthy wanted the island for their homes, the people were transplanted,” she said. “It’s another one of those ‘kicked out of your homes’ songs that makes for good country fare.”

Roberts started playing music in his own bar in Los Angeles back in 1995. He played at “Fair City, a Dublin pub,” with the likes of Dave King before he started Flogging Molly. “The whole Celtic rock genre was something that sort of developed after we started,” he said. “We’re just a bunch of Irish guys playing music. Each one of us was more of a rock musician than a Celtic musician. The band’s developed over the years, and I’m very happy with where we ended up. We’re using guitar and fiddle in unison, creating our own version of this. A lot of bands have started mixing Irish music with rock. We’re predominantly a rock band with a strong Irish influence.” Young Dubliners have had the same lineup for 12 years now. “There were some early changes. In 1999, we had the biggest switch-up, but since then we’ve been the same. This record was another example where everybody now is in tune with writing for the band.” Their new album started off organically, with band members taking a couple weeks off from playing live. “We sat in room and put our ideas out on the table,” Roberts said. “We started writing music, then I wrote the lyrics, along with Chas.” The musical result is a thumping, churning mix of brash sounds and somber lyrics. “It ends up being a reflection of where we are. You go back into the past and always pull some ideas out of the past, but you also have to look at currents events, your lives, your friends’ lives,” said Roberts, adding that he’s happy. “The album represents where we’ve been the last four years.”

The songs contain some heavy-hearted words, but Roberts thinks that’s natural for a group that’s been together so long. “Rain” is about Roberts’ mother, who lost her husband, and what that transition has been like for her. “You have to never stop going or you’ll regret it forever,” he said. Waltz wrote a sad song about the experiences of his daughter. And “Fall” is a song about “being out that night, knowing we’re going to feel like s--t tomorrow. You know, the ‘Fall’ is coming, but we just play on anyway.” Roberts says he’s not a doom and gloom writer, for the most part. “Even if I write about something heavy, there’s some sort of resolve, some silver lining,” he said. “Some bands’ records — by the end, you feel like slitting your wrists. That’s not the message I want to send out with our stuff.” “We’re the Mighty” is a song about everyone leaving Ireland. “You come to America, but don’t know what you’re coming to. Here, they celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and do other fun stuff, but it’s all sort of a little cheesy,” he said. “‘We’re the Mighty’ is a letter to the next wave, saying ‘Don’t worry; there’s plenty of us over here.’ It’s like a “don’t worry, come on and hope” song, and we hope other nationalities would relate to it as well.” The band has been slammed this past week, launching the new LP at the Roxy in L.A. last Friday night. They will bring the new songs and plenty of Celtic charisma to the Saltwater Music Festival in Brunswick this weekend. For more information on Saltwater Celtic Music Festival, visit www.saltwaterfest.com.

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Slaid Cleaves’s concert at One Longfellow Square Friday night is sold out. The popular singer-songwriter owes much of his success to tunes that are melodic ballads of hardscrabble life. Brought up in South Berwick, he often writes about working-class people with tough roads to hoe. Nicole St. Pierre, a friend and classmate at Marshwood High School, has co-written two of his hits and says the collaborative process is one with which they have always felt comfortable. “We met in eighth grade. We were in the same homeroom,” she said this week, gearing up for his show. “Our parents were friends. My brother and him were friends.” The relationship is one that has lasted even though the singer now lives in Austin, Texas. Early on in his career, he returned to his Maine hometown often, to play for St. Pierre’s students and discuss music with them. St. Pierre taught eighth grade for a while, and is now curriculum coordinator for the Old Berwick Historical Society and Marshwood schools. “There are still students of mine who write on Facebook that they’ve gone to see Slaid in California, Oregon or Texas,” she said. “They still follow him, and he’s still part of their musical lives.” Cleaves would return to South Berwick for their “Hot Summer Nights” concert series for eight years after he moved away. Inevitably, he’d see a familiar face in the crowd, or run into his old kindergarten teacher, she said. “When he came to Marshwood, every year our theme song was “The Rain Song,” said St. Pierre, singing a few lines. “’Know your rights, right your wrongs. ... You can start over, it won’t be the same. Hold your face up to the rain.’ One year, we lost a freshman, Michael Wile, in a snowboarding accident. Slaid did a benefit concert for the family, who bought his headstone with the money that was raised.” On Cleaves’s new CD, “The Rain Song” has been remade into “In the Rain.” St. Pierre co-wrote “Below” (2006) and “Gone” (2012) with Cleaves, and says the writing process was distinct for each of the songs. “’Below’ came about because Slaid’s a story-teller,” she said. “I saw an article in a magazine about the town of Flagstaff and Dead River, flooded by CMP back in the time before regulations of electricity were really nailed down. CMP wanted to build a damn,

Critically acclaimed musician Slaid Cleaves and songwriting partner Nicole St. Pierre formed a successful, artistic team. (Photo courtesy of Nicole St. Pierre)

‘Each one of us was more of a rock musician than a Celtic musician’ DUBLINERS from page 11

finally said ‘enough is enough’ and really got into it the last few months.” The album is available at Saltwater this weekend, and on the band’s website (www.youngdubliners.com), but will not be available in stores until September. About their first foray into Vacationland, Roberts said, “Maine is one of the few states where we haven’t played as much as we wanted to. That’s one of reasons we wanted to do this festival. As much as we tour, there are still some places that slip through the cracks.” Roberts loves Maine, he said, because it reminds him of home. “I was born in Dún Laoghaire, Dublin, right near the beach, so I’ve always loved all aspects of a fishing village.”

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY


Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

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Wednesday, July 24

Pardon Me Doug at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $7; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Rap Night at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $3; 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Slaid Cleaves at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $20 adv/$25 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare. com

Goodnight, Texas at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $8 adv/$12 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com

Freddie McGregor at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $22; Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Narrow Escape at Flask, 117 Spring St., Portland, http://flasklounge.com

Saturday, July 20

A Band Beyond Description at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Thursday, July 25

The Kenya Hall Band/Nat Spencer Albee will appear at Port City Music Hall Saturday for Osborn Band at Big Easy, a CD release show. (COURTESY IMAGE) 55 Market St., Portland, $8; The Portland Jazz Orchestra at One Longfellow Square, Doors at 9 p.m. 181 State St., Portland, $15 adv/$20 door; 8 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com www.onelongfellowsquare.com Spencer and Brenda at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $10; Doors at 8 p.m. Spencer Albee Friday, July 26 solo album release. www.portcitymusichall.com Line of Force at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $6; Charles Brown and Friends at St. Lawrence Arts, 76 Congress St., Portland, $12 adv/$15 door; 7:30 p.m. www.stlawrencearts.org

Sunday, July 21 OLS Sunday Jazz Brunch at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $8; 11 a.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com Gregory Alan Isakov at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $15 adv/$20 door; 7:30 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com Xavier Rudd at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $22/$35; Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Father John Misty at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $17 (general); $26 (VIP); Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Saturday, July 27 The Outlaws at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $21; Doors at 8 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts Spose, Trails, Lady Essence, Shane Reis and more at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $10; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Monday, July 22

Liz Longley CD Release at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $12 adv/$17 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com

Model Airplane at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $5; Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Tegan and Sara at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $30 adv/$35 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

Alligator with Cocaine Lasers at Flask, 117 Spring St., Portland. http://flasklounge.com

Sunday, July 28

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Friday, July 19

Tuesday, July 23 Cover to Cover: Suburban Fights covers REM’s Reckoning at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $5; 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com Paul McKenna Band at St. Lawrence Arts, 76 Congress St., Portland, $15; 7 p.m.

Tribal Seeds with Josh Heinrichs at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $13; 9:30 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $16 adv/$19 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com (Visit us at http://www.portlanddailysun.me.)

–––––––––––––––– MOVIE LISTINGS ––––––––––––––––

Friday, July 19 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 6:30 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Grown Ups 2 (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 9:55 Pacific Rim (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:25 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 The Bling Ring (R) 1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45

Saturday, July 20 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 2:00 p.m.

Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Grown Ups 2 (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 9:55 Pacific Rim (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:25 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 The Bling Ring (R) 1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45

Sunday, July 21 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Renoir (R) 2:00 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Red 2 (PG-13) 1:20, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30 Grown Ups 2 (PG-13) 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 9:55 Pacific Rim (PG-13) 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:25 Despicable Me 2 (PG) 12:40, 2:50, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40 Unfinished Song (PG-13) 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:10 The Bling Ring (R) 1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 17

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Friday, July 19 ‘Trail to Ale’ 10K Preview Runs

7 a.m. Portland Trails Discovery Trek: “Trail to Ale” 10K Preview Runs. The third Fridays in July (July 19) and August (Aug. 16), and the second Friday in September (Sept. 13). 7 a.m. Run the 10K route on the East End with Portland Trails Director, Kara Wooldrik. Free for people registered for the “Trail to Ale” 10K; suggested $5 donation for Portland Trails members, $7 for non-members. Sign up at trails.org.

Riverside Golf Course ribbon cutting

10 a.m. South Course Club House, Riverside Golf Course, public reception. “Portland Mayor Michael Brennan along with representatives and friends of the Riverside Golf Course will cut the ribbon officially opening the new South Course Club House. The club house will be the home to a new Pro Shop, public restrooms and function room. The First Tee Riverside Program will also be located in the new building. In honor of the celebration, golfers can enjoy 9 holes at a reduced rate ($10 from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. and $15 from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.). The ribbon cutting and reception are open to the public with light refreshments to be served. The South Course Club House opening is the latest effort to enhance the experience at the city’s golf course. In May, the city announced the hiring of Nick Packard, a PGA professional, and the creation of a new Riverside Golf Course app for smartphones. The app allows the public to book tee times online, map their course while viewing a hole flyover, track scores and post to the course’s leader board, and even remotely order a snack from Through the Woods, the golf course restaurant. The app entitled Riverside Golf Course ME is available for free online at the Apple App Store. Also this year, the golf course joined with three other area courses, Val Halla, Dunegrass and Nonesuch to form the Greater Portland Golf Association, gPGAme. The association offers multi-play passes for the occasional golfer looking to explore the courses in the Greater Portland area. More information about the association is available online at http://www.gpgame.us/.”

Yarmouth Clam Festival

10 a.m. Celebrate the Official Opening on Memorial Green, join Festival mascot, “Steamer” the Clam, for the official opening of the 48th Annual Yarmouth Clam Festival. Scout Troop No. 35 will assist Steamer by raising the flag leading the Pledge of Allegiance. The Downeasters Barbershop Chorus will lead the National Anthem. 10 a.m. Smokey’s Greater Shows Carnival. Carnival Opens at Bennett Field by Rowe School. Rides and amusements by Smokey’s Greater Shows, Inc. Clam Festival Parade from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday. This year’s theme is “Maine on Parade ... a tribute to all things Maine.” The Clam Festival Kids’ Fun Run will also take place Saturday, July 20 at the Memorial Green with the first age group starting at 7:15 a.m. The first 400 registered runners get free T-shirts. The festival’s 32nd annual Pat’s Pizza Clam Festival Classic 5-Mile Road Race will take place Saturday, July 20 at 8 a.m. starting at Town Hall on Main Street. T-shirts will go to the first 700 registered runners. The Clam Festival Canoe and Kayak Race will take place Saturday, July 20 at the Yarmouth Town Landing at 8:30 a.m. The race starts at Town Landing and goes down river, around Lanes Island, and back to the Town Landing via the Royal River. (approx. 6 miles). The 32nd Annual Men’s & Women’s Professional Bike Race will take place Sunday, July 21 at 9 a.m. starting at the Memorial Green on Main Street. This is a 3.6-mile loop with one short climb — 10 laps for men (36 miles) and six laps for women (21.6 miles). There will be $1,500 in prizes and the field will be limited to 100 per race. Registration forms and more detailed schedules for the following races may be found at the festival’s website at http://www.clamfestival.com.

‘Twanda and the White Girl’

noon to 1 p.m. Friday Local Author Series, Marc Felix, PhD, author, “Twanda and the White Girl,” Meeting Room 5, Portland Public Library. “‘Twanda and the White Girl’ is the compelling story of a woman’s evolution from a shamanic African tribal culture through slavery and into 1960s suburban America. The book boldly challenges the beliefs and expectations of conventional American life and invites us to open our hearts, move past ethnocentric narrow-mindedness, and experience the oneness of our souls.” www. portlandlibrary.com

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music

Smokey’s Greater Shows attraction returns for the Yarmouth Clam Festival. The festival runs Friday through Sunday. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO) Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose,”” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

Tour of Fort Richmond (repeat outing)

4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fort Richmond Site, Rte. 197, Richmond. “Friends of Merrymeeting Bay (FOMB) is sponsoring the second and last guided tour of the Fort Richmond archeological site by Maine Historic Preservation Commission Historic Archaeologist, Dr. Leith Smith before the site is closed for bridge construction. The Maine Department of Transportation is replacing the Richmond-Dresden Bridge over the Kennebec River. The new bridge approach road will pass through the site of Fort Richmond, the first of the Kennebec River forts, constructed in 1721 and decommissioned in 1755. Also impacted is the site of the Parks family homestead that was present between ca. 1775 and 1830. Archaeological work in 2012 revealed intact structure foundations, palisade trenches and fort period artifacts, as well as refuse deposits from the Parks occupation. Unfortunately further excavations by the Maine Historic Preservation Commission and local volunteers will only be allowed until approximately mid-July of 2013, not enough time for this complex and historic site in the way of ‘progress.’” To receive more information on FOMB’s programs call Kathleen McGee, Friends of Merrymeeting Bay, at 666-3598 or kathleencmcgee@gmail.com or go to the FOMB website for more details: www.friendsofmerrymeetingbay.org.

Fenix Theatre Company at Deering Oaks

6:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday at 6:30 p.m. in Deering Oaks Park. “Fenix Theatre Company exists to provide the southern Maine community access to free classical theater in the beauty of Deering Oaks. We thrive on the unique collaboration between audience and performer found in outdoor theater. Fenix Theatre Co. is proud to present William Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 6:30 p.m. through Aug. 10 in Deering Oaks Park. All shows are free to the public. http://www.fenixtheatre.com/#!2013-season

Michael Macklin commemorative issue event

7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Café Review, Portland’s long-running poetry journal, launches its Michael Macklin commemorative issue this Friday, July 19, at a special gathering at Longfellow Books. Readings, food and drink, as well as music provided by Peter Albert, local guitar legend from Westbrook. Sponsored by The Café Review, Longfellow Books, and the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance.

‘The Music Man’ in Standish

7:30 p.m. Meredith Willson’s rousing musical ‘The Music Man’ comes to the stage of the Schoolhouse Arts Center from July 18 through Aug. 4. Return to the quaint streets of River City Iowa and enjoy the wonderful dance routines,

spirited voices, and the adventure of summer romance. Watch Harold Hill try once again try to con Marion the librarian. Nevertheless, he finds himself caught in the snare of unexpected romance. Audiences will find their feet tapping as they sing along with old favorites like ‘Seventy Six Trombones,’ ‘Good Night My Someone,’ ‘Pick-A-Little Talk-ALittle,’ and lots of others. This show is expected to sell out, so make your reservations early. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Adult tickets are $18. Seniors and students are $16. The Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35.” www.schoolhousearts.org.

Port Opera Film Fest 2013 at the St. Lawrence

7 p.m. Port Opera Film Fest 2013 at the St. Lawrence Arts Center. “FILMfest featuring original films inspired by Bohème’s melodic themes. Join us for a free public screening and awards presentation this Friday at 7 p.m. at St. Lawrence Arts & Community Center, 76 Congress St., Portland. A great way to support opera and our local arts community, too! Donations at the door.” PORTopera’s 2013 production of La Bohème is scheduled for three performances at Merrill Auditorium: Wednesday, July 24; Friday, July 26, and Sunday, July 28 (matinee). Tickets for the much-loved opera range from $41 to $105 and are available online through www.porttix.com or in person at the PortTIX box office, 20 Myrtle St., Portland, noon to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information about PORTopera and La Bohème, visit www.portopera.org.

‘Young Frankenstein: The Musical’ in Ogunquit

8 p.m. Ogunquit Playhouse. “The hilarious musical comedy is a wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ film masterpiece. The story follows young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as he attempts to bring a corpse to life, but not without scary and hilarious complications.” Through July 27. http://www.ogunquitplayhouse.org

Tsunami Tattoo party

8 p.m. SPACE Gallery. Tsunami Tattoo party. “Proud to be a part of both the small business and creative economies, Tsunami Tattoo takes a moment to thank Portland for its supportive and collegial tattoo scene. Join the shop’s staff, clients, friends, and colleagues for an evening of magic, burlesque, and nostalgia that will include a raffle for prizes and a human scavenger hunt (the winner of which wins a free tattoo project). Local film maker Alex Coppola will be screening a short film about the shop. And crowning the evening’s entertainment will be NYC’s Albert Cadabra and his burlesque troupe, who will be performing an adult magic/burlesque show. Tsunami Tattoo will donate all proceeds to a local non-profit to be determined in advance by vote (see Tsunami Tattoo’s website for details on how to cast your vote).” www.space538.org/ events/tsunami-tattoo-party see next page


Page 18 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

Saturday, July 20 Yarmouth Clam Festival

7:15 a.m. The 48th Annual Yarmouth Clam Festival. Blueberry Pancake Breakfast at Memorial Green. 10 a.m. Smokey’s Greater Shows Carnival. Carnival Opens at Bennett Field by Rowe School. Rides and amusements by Smokey’s Greater Shows, Inc. The Clam Festival Kids’ Fun Run will also take place Saturday, July 20 at the Memorial Green with the first age group starting at 7:15 a.m. The first 400 registered runners get free T-shirts. The festival’s 32nd annual Pat’s Pizza Clam Festival Classic 5-Mile Road Race will take place Saturday, July 20 at 8 a.m. starting at Town Hall on Main Street. T-shirts will go to the first 700 registered runners. The Clam Festival Canoe and Kayak Race will take place Saturday, July 20 at the Yarmouth Town Landing at 8:30 a.m. The race starts at Town Landing and goes down river, around Lanes Island, and back to the Town Landing via the Royal River. (approx. 6 miles). The 32nd Annual Men’s & Women’s Professional Bike Race will take place Sunday, July 21 at 9 a.m. starting at the Memorial Green on Main Street. This is a 3.6-mile loop with one short climb — 10 laps for men (36 miles) and six laps for women (21.6 miles). There will be $1,500 in prizes and the field will be limited to 100 per race. Registration forms and more detailed schedules for the following races may be found at the festival’s website at http://www.clamfestival.com.

Chalk on a walk art show

9 a.m. to noon. Chalk will be provided, slots are free. If you would like to sign up to draw, email jgifford@cumberlandmaine.com Individuals and families welcome. Free family fun! Prince Memorial Library, 266 Main St., Cumberland. FMI 829-2215

Master-carver Norm Devonshire

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Master-carver Norm Devonshire will teach the basic techniques of woodcarving, including proper use of the knife, methods of cuts and sharpening. Participants will complete a classic carving of a Scottie dog. Materials provided. Fee: $25. Shaker Village is located on Route 26 (707 Shaker Road) in New Gloucester. FMI: 926-4597 or usshakers@aol.com.

Latino Festival to benefit capital campaign

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. “To offer support to a parish that has become a cornerstone in the daily life of many local residents, neighborhood and parish leaders will host a Latino Festival to benefit the Sacred Heart/St. Dominic Capital Campaign at the rectory parking lot located on 65 Mellen Street this Saturday, July 20, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. All are welcome and encouraged to attend. Live music, games and activities will be held throughout the day, and visitors will have the opportunity to enjoy various dishes from Central and South America. ... The Sacred Heart/St. Dominic Capital Campaign aims to raise $200,000 in order to make necessary repairs to Sacred Heart Church, one of the most historical buildings in the city. The church, located at the corner of Sherman and Mellen Streets, provides over 25 social service programs to parishioners from many surrounding communities.” Those interested in contributing to the Sacred Heart/St. Dominic Capital Campaign can do so online at https://sacredheartstdominicportland.weshareonline.org/index.aspx.

Maine Artist Dahlov Ipcar

10 a.m. to noon. Maine Artist Dahlov Ipcar. Portland Museum of Art. Free admission. “Come meet Dahlov Ipcar, one of Maine’s most beloved artists and children’s book illustrators and have her sign your favorites! Ipcar’s children’s books and other merchandise, including the 2014 calendar Dahlov Ipcar: Full Circle, will be available for purchase in the PMA Store and online at store.portlandmuseum.org.”

‘Aliens, Ghosts and Bigfoot, Oh My!’

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The annual Paranormal/Psychic Faire returns to Fort Knox, Saturday and Sunday, July 20 and 21, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “‘Aliens, Ghosts and Bigfoot, Oh My!’ This unique event features,book signings of her book ‘Haunted Fort’ by author Liza Gardner Walsh (July 20 only), psychics, East Coast Ghost Trackers (ghost hunters), author Patricia Hughes (‘Ghostly Lost Treasure Tales of Maine’), Loren Coleman (one of the world’s leading cryptozoologists. Coleman has written 17 books and more than 300 articles, has appeared frequently on radio and television programs, and has lectured throughout North America, as well as in London and at Loch Ness) and Audrey Hewins — founder of Starborn Support. (Audrey Hewins is an identical twin alien abductee, also known as an Experiencer. Audrey’s first encounters with extraterrestrials started as a very small child in the small town of Athens, Ohio. These experiences followed her and her sister to Massachusetts and everywhere they have lived since. Audrey now resides

Thursday through Saturday at 6:30 p.m. in Deering Oaks Park. “Fenix Theatre Company presents “Romeo and Juliet.” Fenix Theatre, shown here in an earlier production at the park, aims to “thrive on the unique collaboration between audience and performer found in outdoor theater.” (COURTESY PHOTO) in Oxford, Maine. Both she and her twin sister have had many encounters throughout their lifetime). Regular Fort admission and a $2 event donation requested. Also, various psychics will be on hand to provide readings for an extra charge in the Fort Officer’s Quarters area. On Saturday only, visitors will be able to purchase a photograph that displays their personal aura. Lectures for the event take place outside the Fort Visitor Center. For additional information about upcoming Friends’ of Fort Knox events check out their web site at fortknox.maineguide.com. Fort Knox is owned by the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands and managed by the Friends of Fort Knox for the people of Maine.”

Fun in the Sun Kitten Caboodle

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coastal Humane Society in Brunswick, Saturday and Sunday, July 20 and 21. “Join CHS and a showcase of their adoptable kittens, cats, and other adoptable furry friends at 190 Pleasant Street in Brunswick. All cats 1 year or older are fee-waived, bunnie are fee-waived, and there are plenty of other deep discounts on other adoptable friends. Fun for families and kids!” Address: 190 Pleasant St.; U.S. Route 1, the old Dexter Shoe log cabin building. FMI: Call 449-1366 x5 or visit coastalhumanesociety.org

‘Aquaboggan For America Day’

1 p.m. “Aquaboggan Theme Park will be presenting ‘Aquaboggan For America Day’ to honor those who love America and support the Constitution. This event will be held July 20 at the Park, and will feature guest speakers Governor Paul LePage, Bruce Poliquin, Blaine Richardson, Beth O’Connor and Scott Lansley starting at 1 p.m. Included with the General Pass ticket are all slides, pools and wave pool.” Saco, www.aquabogganwaterpark.com. Ticket sales end July 19. http://www.restoreamericamaine.org/Home_Page.html

Paula Benoit at the Portland Observatory.

1 p.m. Portland Observatory. “Paula Benoit, former director of the historic Blaine House, will read from her book ‘Baxter in the Blaine House,’ a dog’s interpretation of historic preservation and story telling telling about what happens in the historic Governor’s Mansion. Baxter is a sweet terrier with his paw on the pulse of the Blaine House.” https://www. facebook.com/portlandobservatory

Charlotte’s Web at Children’s Theater

1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Adapted by Joseph Robinette; based on the book by E.B. White. “Meet Wilbur, the irresistible young pig; Fern, a girl who understands animals; and Charlotte, the extraordinary spider who proves to be ‘a true friend and a good writer.’ Charlotte writes miracles in her web, including the memorable words that just might save Wilbur. Watching this heart-warming story set on a Maine salt water farm is the perfect way to spend a summer afternoon. Produced with permission from Dramatic Publishing. $8/member, $9/ visitor. Shows at 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. For tickets call 828-1234 x231, visit kitetails.org or stop by the

front desk. Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine, 142 Free St., Portland.

Lowry’s Lodge monthly poetry reading

7 p.m. Hosts: Jim Donnelly and Anna Wrobel. Featured Poets: Ted Bookey and Robin Merrill, Saccarappa Art Collective, 861 Main St., Westbrook, $3 suggested donation.

‘The Music Man’ in Standish

7:30 p.m. Meredith Willson’s rousing musical ‘The Music Man’ comes to the stage of the Schoolhouse Arts Center from July 18 through Aug. 4. Return to the quaint streets of River City Iowa and enjoy the wonderful dance routines, spirited voices, and the adventure of summer romance. Watch Harold Hill try once again try to con Marion the librarian. Nevertheless, he finds himself caught in the snare of unexpected romance. Audiences will find their feet tapping as they sing along with old favorites like ‘Seventy Six Trombones,’ ‘Good Night My Someone,’ ‘Pick-A-Little Talk-ALittle,’ and lots of others. This show is expected to sell out, so make your reservations early. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Adult tickets are $18. Seniors and students are $16. The Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35. For reservations, call 642-3743 or buy tickets on-line at www.schoolhousearts.org.”

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose,”” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

‘Young Frankenstein: The Musical’ in Ogunquit

8:30 p.m. Ogunquit Playhouse. “The hilarious musical comedy is a wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ film masterpiece. The story follows young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as he attempts to bring a corpse to life, but not without scary and hilarious complications.” Through July 27. http:// www.ogunquitplayhouse.org see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013— Page 19

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEWS BRIEFS–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Avesta project in Kennebunk finalist in magazine contest Daily Sun Staff Reports

Avesta Housing’s Park Street School in Kennebunk has been named a finalist in the 2013 Affordable Housing Finance Magazine Readers’ Choice Awards in the category of rural housing, Avesta reported. Park Street School was selected out of more than 140 nominations as one of 34 finalists in Affordable Housing Finance’s ninth annual Readers’ Choice Awards for the nation’s top developments of 2012 and 2013. Finalists were selected based on several key characteristics, including adding to the affordable housing stock, neighborhood revitalization, innovative financing and community support. The rural housing category recognizes projects in communities with a population of less than 25,000. Avesta has grown to become the largest nonprofit developer in northern New England and one of the country’s most innovative leaders in affordable housing. Avesta manages a portfolio of more than 1,900 apartments in 31 Maine communities including Portland, Windham, Saco, Rockland and Kennebunk.

Frost joins Mercy Pulmonary Care Dr. Jason R. Frost has joined the Pulmonary and Critical Care team at Mercy Hospital, the hospital reported. A native of Gorham, Frost graduated from the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine (Old Westbury, N.Y.) with a full academic scholarship as a Fellow of Neurology and Neuro-anatomy. He completed an internship in general surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (Worcester, Mass.). He also completed both an Internal Medicine Residency and Osteopathic Rotating Internship at Saint Vincent Hospital in Worcester, Mass. Frost completed his Fellowship in Critical Care Medicine through the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University (R.I.). During his fellowship, he traveled to Germany’s University of Tubingen to teach a critical care course to medical students attending the International Winter School. “After returning home, Dr. Frost’s time at Brown will serve our community well adding to our current group of experienced physicians in Pulmonary and Critical Care,” said Scott Rusk, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Vice President of Medical Administration for Mercy Hospital.

“I am thrilled to be returning to Maine and to be part of the team at Mercy. Mercy’s commitment to offering the highest standards of clinical excellence and compassionate care aligns perfectly with my vision of the type of medicine I want to practice,” Frost said. In addition to his extensive medical training and experience, Frost is a certified Rescue Scuba Diver and an avid cyclist and triathlete, a press release noted.

Preseason Patriots games on WMTW WMTW 8, the ABC affiliate broadcasting in Southern Maine and eastern New Hampshire, announced that preseason New England Patriots football will air on the station. The Patriots kick off the preseason when they take the field against the Philadelphia Eagles on Friday, Aug. 9. For the 17th consecutive year, WMTW will serve as the Patriots preseason television network. WMTW will broadcast the preseason opener at Philadelphia (Aug. 9) and then the last two preseason games when the Patriots travel to Detroit (Aug. 22) and return home for the preseason finale versus the New York Giants (Aug. 29).

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– EVENTS CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– from preceding page

Sunday, July 21 Yarmouth Clam Festival

7:15 a.m. The 48th Annual Yarmouth Clam Festival. Blueberry Pancake Breakfast at Memorial Green. 10 a.m. Smokey’s Greater Shows Carnival. Carnival Opens at Bennett Field by Rowe School. Rides and amusements by Smokey’s Greater Shows, Inc. The 32nd Annual Men’s & Women’s Professional Bike Race will take place Sunday, July 21 at 9 a.m. starting at the Memorial Green on Main Street. This is a 3.6-mile loop with one short climb — 10 laps for men (36 miles) and six laps for women (21.6 miles). There will be $1,500 in prizes and the field will be limited to 100 per race. Registration forms and more detailed schedules for the following races may be found at the festival’s website at http://www.clamfestival.com.

Open Farm Day

9 a.m. “Visit select Maine Farms this Sunday, July 21. All across the State of Maine, close to one hundred farms will open their gates to the public for a family adventure. Held each year, Open Farm Day is an opportunity for consumers to learn about Maine and Maine food producers.” Cumberland County: Bessie’s Farm Goods — Freeport; Cashmere Cabin at Elmledge Farm ­— Windham; Longwoods Alpaca Farm, LLC — Cumberland; North Star Sheep Farm — Windham; Pineland Farms — New Gloucester; Queen’s Land Farm Alpacas — New Gloucester; Sabbbathday Lake Shaker Village — New Gloucester; Smiling Hill Farm — Westbrook; Upper Farm Alpacas — Pownal. A full list of participating farms is available at: http://www.getrealmaine.com/index. cfm/fuseaction/calendar.detail/event_id/186/index.htm

Ecstatic Dance Series

10 a.m. to noon. “Ecstatic Dance Series, drug-free community of dancers, open DJ’d, dance space to be free and expressive, Ecstatic Dance Maine,Portland, Reiche School 166 Brackett St. $10 to $15, sliding scale. Ecstaticdanceme.com. 10 a.m. to noon Sundays ongoing.”

The Art and Craft of Altered Books

noon to 4 p.m. Community Room, Peaks Island Branch Library, The Art and Craft of Altered Books. www.portlandlibrary.com

Shaker Village Open Farm Day

noon until 4 p.m. Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village will participate in Maine Open Farm Day. “Featured free activities include guided barn tours with Shaker historian and farmer Brother Arnold Hadd, tractor-drawn wagon rides, beekeeping demonstrations, herb garden tours, wood-carving demonstrations, plant sale, and special museum exhibits. The Shaker Store and the Museum Gift Shop will be open. Food and beverages will be sold. Rain or shine. Shaker Village is located on Route 26 (707 Shaker Road) in New Gloucester, Maine. FMI: 926-4597 or usshakers@aol.com.”

‘Young Frankenstein: The Musical’ in Ogunquit

2 p.m. Ogunquit Playhouse. “The hilarious musical comedy is a wickedly inspired re-imagining of the Frankenstein legend based on Mel Brooks’ film masterpiece. The story follows young Dr. Frankenstein (that’s Fronkensteen) as

he attempts to bring a corpse to life, but not without scary and hilarious complications.” Through July 27. http://www. ogunquitplayhouse.org

Public Services; Ecomaine; No Umbrella Media; The Root Cellar; and Ruth’s Reusable Resources.” Free. More info: blog.kitetails.org,828-1234, x227.

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose,”” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m.

4 p.m. Nationally known Civil War enthusiast and historian Nicholas Picerno, will be at the Maine State Archives in Augusta on July 22 at 4 p.m. to speak about “The 10th Maine at Antietam, a terrible and bloody contest.” “Mr. Picerno, chairman emeritus of the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation in New Market, Virginia, serves on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, and the Lee-Jackson Education Foundation of Charlottesville, Virginia. He is also Vice- President of the Lincoln Society of Virginia. Appointed by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior to the National Advisory Board of the Cedar Creek- Belle Grove National Park, Mr. Picerno is currently working on a book titled, ‘Merit is Better Than Fame,’ a history of the 1st-10th-29th Maine Regiments during the Civil War.”

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

‘The Music Man’ in Standish

5 p.m. Meredith Willson’s rousing musical ‘The Music Man’ comes to the stage of the Schoolhouse Arts Center from July 18 through Aug. 4. Return to the quaint streets of River City Iowa and enjoy the wonderful dance routines, spirited voices, and the adventure of summer romance. Watch Harold Hill try once again try to con Marion the librarian. Nevertheless, he finds himself caught in the snare of unexpected romance. Audiences will find their feet tapping as they sing along with old favorites like ‘Seventy Six Trombones,’ ‘Good Night My Someone,’ ‘Pick-A-Little Talk-ALittle,’ and lots of others. This show is expected to sell out, so make your reservations early. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 5 p.m. Adult tickets are $18. Seniors and students are $16. The Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35. For reservations, call 642-3743 or buy tickets on-line at www.schoolhousearts.org.”

Monday, July 22 Pop-Up Playscape

noon to 6 p.m. Pop-Up Playscape presented by Children’s Museum & Theatre of Maine at Kennedy Park. “At this first-of-its-kind event, people of all ages will meet up at Kennedy Park to build the ultimate fort-meets-sculpturemeets-homemade-playground. We’ll have a huge supply of recycled materials, like cardboard boxes, old books, tubes, fabrics and more. You bring your imagination and sense of adventure. Artists and Museum & Theatre staff will be on site to help make your vision a reality. At day’s end, we’ll take down the structure and recycle it. All kids take home a bag of recycled building materials to keep dreaming and creating long after the event is over. (PS: Meet us on the Eastern Prom on Aug. 31 for a second Pop-Up Playscape!). Event supported by the Cumberland County Community Building Fund of the Maine Community Foundation. Thanks to our community partners: City of Portland Recreation and

‘The 10th Maine at Antietam’ in Augusta

Tuesday, July 23 Animal Refuge League at Preschool Story Time

10:30 a.m. Preschool Story Time at the Portland Public Library. “Join us at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, July 23 for Preschool Story Time with our guest reader. This time we will be joined by Jeana Roth from the Animal Refuge League of Greater Portland. Come and join the fun — and perhaps meet a furry friend!” http://www.portlandlibrary.com

‘A Land Without Peace’ at MHS

noon. Student Spotlight: “A Land Without Peace: Indians, Colonists, Speculators, and the Struggle for Maine, 16881763.” Speaker: Ian Saxine, Ph.D. Candidate, Northwestern University. “In 2012, thanks to a Graduate Research Grant from Northwestern University, Ph.D. candidate Ian Saxine spent six months at the MHS library researching how different ideas about land ownership between Indians, colonists led to decades of violence in frontier Maine. In this ‘Student Spotlight’ presentation, Ian will share the fruits of his research.” 489 Congress St., Portland. Maine Historical Society. www.mainehistory.org

‘Gypsy’ at Maine State Music Theatre

2 p.m. “Everything’s coming up roses July 17, as Maine State Music Theatre continues its 55th season of professional musical theater at the Pickard Theater on the Bowdoin campus in Brunswick with the smash musical fable, ‘Gypsy.’ Loosely based on the memoirs of striptease artist, Gypsy Rose Lee, ‘Gypsy’ follows the dreams and disappointments of Mama Rose and her fight to raise her two daughters, Dainty June, based on actress, June Havoc, and Louise, in the world of 1920s show business, when vaudeville was dying and burlesque was born. ... Maine State Music Theatre favorite, Charis Leos, returns to the Maine State Music Theatre stage as ‘the ultimate show business mother,’ Rose,”” Tickets to see Gypsy are now on sale. Contact the MSMT box office at 725-8769, visit the box office at The Pickard Theater or select and purchase your seats online at www.msmt.org. The show opens on July 17 and runs until Aug. 3. Matinees are at 2 p.m. and evening shows are at 7:30 p.m. Visit http:// msmt.org/


Page 20 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, July 19, 2013

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7 19pds