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Portland, Maine. Yes. News is good here! Wednesday, June 26, 2013

VOL. 5 NO. 82

PORTLAND, ME

PORTLAND’S DAILY NEWSPAPER

699-5801

PortFringe 2013: Low risk, high reward for participating artists — Showings begin today; see story, page 7

FREE Yarmouth man dies in duplex explosion See story, page 3

“Hedwig and The Angry Inch” will be performed Friday and Saturday at SPACE Gallery. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Riding for a cause — Local policeman takes trek; page 8

To stay or go See Natalie Ladd, page 4

Mayo Street anchored See page 6

y l i Da Deal

Portland Senior Lead Officer Daniel Knight celebrates along with a group of bicyclists who made a 2,200-mile trek to raise awareness about leukemia and lymphoma. Knight flew to Texas to join the Houston Police Department Bicycle Relay Team on its charity ride to support the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The ride took the 40 men and women from Discovery Green Park in Houston to Union Street in Portland and lasted eight days. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTO)

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Explosion in Yarmouth kills one resident, flattens duplex By David Carkhuff THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Propane is the suspected cause of a massive explosion that killed a Yarmouth resident and leveled a two-unit building in Yarmouth Tuesday morning. The body of a man recovered from the rubble was believed to be that of the occupant, 66-year-old Peter Corey, according to Maine Department of Public Safety spokesman Steve McCausland. Three other nearby residents sustained minor injuries and were treated and released, McCausland said. Robert and Rosemary MacKay, who occupied the other half of the building, and Mary Hallsey, who occupied an adjacent building, survived the blast, which stunned residents and damaged nearby buildings. State Fire Marshal investigators and members of the state’s Solid Fuel Board continued to work on the cause of Tuesday morning’s explosion, but McCausland said the only source of fuel to the buildings in the duplex was propane for heating and hot water.  “The only source of heat in that place is propane.

A NW

The only thing that could have sparked that big of an explosion is propane,” McCausland said in an interview. The explosion occurred around 6:17 a.m. Tuesday, at the very end duplex at 50 Gable Drive, Sgt. Ken Grimes, with the Fire Marshal’s office, told reporters at a news conference Tuesday morning. One section of the building was completely gone, another was heavily damaged, Grimes said. A helicopter was used to photograph the blast area, he said. Surrounding homes and even a nearby fire station sustained damage. Michael Robitaille, chief of the Yarmouth Fire Department, said a deputy fire chief was tossed to the ground while entering his office at the fire station at the time of the explosion. Fire investigators say some of the other buildings are uninhabitable and an engineering firm has been hired to conduct an assessment of them.  With buildings dating to 1985 and earlier construction, North Gables was described as mostly elderly housing.

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Senate Democrats in Texas try to block abortion bill with filibuster By Manny Fernandez THE NEW YORK TIMES

AUSTIN, Tex. — Texas Democrats attempted to prevent Republicans from passing a bill on Tuesday that would give the state some of the toughest abortion restrictions in the country, even as Gov. Rick Perry appeared ready to keep lawmakers in town to give the bill another chance. The bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, require abortion clinics to meet the same standards that hospital-style surgical centers do, and mandate that a doctor who performs abortions have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. Supporters of the bill, including the governor and other top Republicans, said the measures would protect women’s health and hold clinics to safety standards, but women’s rights advocates said the legislation amounted to an unconstitutional, politically motivated attempt to shut legal abortion clinics. The bill’s opponents said it would most likely cause all but 5 of the 42 abortion clinics in the state to close, because the renovations and equipment upgrades necessary to meet surgical-center standards would be too costly.

Police: Man smashes lobby door for second time By Marge Niblock

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

For the second time in less than a year, the Portland Police Department’s glass lobby door has been broken, and police said the same suspect has been identified as the culprit. At 11:17 a.m. on Friday, June 21, Officer Christopher Shinay reported the glass lobby door had been smashed, and police reported that Jeffrey Nason, 39, had been at the front desk in the station and then had left. Video evidence observed him returning and throwing a rock, which broke the glass panel, police said. Nason This isn’t the first time that Nason had vented his ire at police by damaging their

building. In September of 2012 Nason broke the glass door by throwing a brick against it. On that occasion he had come into headquarters because he was angry that someone had made fun of his New York Yankees baseball cap. When the officer at the desk informed him, “That’s not a crime,” he exclaimed, “Oh, really?” Then he went out and removed a brick from the sidewalk outside the door and wreaked his vengeance on the building. He then sat down and waited for police to come out and arrest him, which they did. He was charged with aggravated criminal mischief, due to the amount of damage sustained in that incident. His bail at that time was set at $1,000 dollars, which caused him to remain in jail for a couple of days. This time, police say, he will get a summons because he didn’t wait outside as he’d done on the previous occasion. It’s unknown at this point what angered him last Friday.

LEFT: The lobby door to the Portland Police Department sports a large spiderweb crack where a suspect threw a rock in an incident Friday. Police say their suspect is the same man who broke the door less than a year ago. (MARGE NIBLOCK PHOTO)

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Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

––––––––––––– LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ––––––––––––

The wrong people find profit in tragedy of public shootings Editor, It’s a real shame that a tragedy like the killing of school children can mean a lot of money for gun dealers and armament companies to make a bundle of money. Nothing sells a product better than telling a customer that if you don’t buy today, it might not be available tomorrow. I sold 4,300 used autos and that was my best line. Gun shops have become swamped with customers for guns and ammo. Their shelves are being emptied as fast as they can reorder. Some big stores can’t replenish because the bullets can’t be made fast enough. As usual, the Chinese make the cheapest ammo for these auto and semi-auto weapons. If you have a machine gun and need more bullets you can buy 2,000 rds. in a nice box from China. You just have to be 21 years old like buying a bottle of beer. I have a close friend that has 5,000 bullets for just one weapon in his house. Not only can these munition and military sell out of inventory, but they can take advantage of the situation, and add $ to the price. Sorta like the gasoline folks. Some people will buy an automatic or semi auto with 30 or 60 rd. clips because it is a good investment. Buy it for $1,500 and sell to a person who can’t buy for $2,000 or more. Like I said, it is a shame that the wrong folks benefit from a tragedy. Greg Locke Portland

We want your opinions All letters columns and editorial cartoons are the opinion of the writer or artists and do not reflect the opinions of the staff, editors or publisher of The Portland Daily Sun. We welcome your ideas and opinions on all topics and consider every signed letter for publication. Limit letters to 300 words and include your address and phone number. Longer letters will only be published as space allows and may be edited. Anonymous letters, letters without full names and generic letters will not be published. Please send your letters to: THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN, news@portlanddailysun.me.

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Contributing Writers: Timothy Gillis, Marge Niblock, Bob Higgins, Karen Vachon, Robert Libby, Cliff Gallant, James Howard Kunstler, Telly Halkias and Ken Levinsky Founding Editor Curtis Robinson THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN is published Tuesday through Friday by Portland News Club, LLC. Mark Guerringue, Adam Hirshan, Curtis Robinson Founders Offices: 477 Congress Street, Suite 1105, Portland ME 04101 (207) 699-5809 Website: www.portlanddailysun.me E-mail: news@portlanddailysun.me For advertising contact: (207) 699-5809 or ads@portlanddailysun.me Classifieds: (207) 699-5807 or classifieds@portlanddailysun.me

CIRCULATION: 13,600 daily distributed Tuesday through Friday FREE throughout Portland by Jeff Spofford, jspofford@maine.rr.com

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– COLUMN ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Should I stay or should I go now? In most professions, the natural progression of the employment timeline is to work hard, be a team player, behave with ethics and integrity, and hopefully gain new skills and proficiencies that make you an asset to the operation. Also, assuming you play well in the sandbox, aren’t a psycho, and haven’t offended anyone higher up the food chain than yourself, those skills and proficiencies typically lead to promotions. They’re also supposed to parlay into further educational cross training and ultimately better benefits, perks, more money and a spiffy title that commands respect and recognition. This back-in-the-day model of movin’ on up in the real world came about long before “The Real World” meant trampy girls in bikinis cat fighting over a David Beckham wanna-be, and is one vision graduating high school seniors still wishfully embrace. Actually, I suspect they wishfully embrace both interpretations. Graduating college seniors, on the other hand, have since taken off the rose-colored glasses and are becoming better acquainted with Sallie Mae and her demands

Natalie Ladd ––––– What It’s Like

for money. They are faced with their parents’ possible retirement, desire to downsize the homestead and perhaps a major relocation. Unless it’s spring break, I don’t know very many early 20-somethings who are eager to move to God’s Waiting Room (aka Florida) without a job or their own apartment outside of a retirement community, where shuffle board is more prevalent than beer pong. Enter the conundrum that is the restaurant business. It has forever been a tug-of-war for college-age servers and bartenders, especially those who land in high-end establishments, to walk away from the instant gratification that is cash-in-hand every night. It’s a seductive addiction and those who get hooked face a most difficult withdrawal when

entertaining a different path of employment or other direction in life. Many of these bright and shining hospitality people see their friends taking on more loans to attend graduate school, or toiling away at an entry-level job, cocooned in a cubicle and held prisoner to the rigid world of 9-to5. These young workers may have a sweet hookup right now, but do they want to wait tables forever, they wonder? Do they want to become like cranky, middle-aged Flo at Mel’s Diner? Or like Carla Tortelli of Cheer’s fame, both of whom they’ve seen on old, late night TV reruns? Do they want a closet full of banged up Dansko clogs rather than a few pairs of pristine Ferragamo’s, and perhaps one prize pair of Manolo Blahniks or Prada, for important meetings and imagined swanky work functions? In the past, making this choice was indeed that: a choice. People consciously embraced the restaurant lifestyle because the money was good, summer days meant hanging out on the beach before see LADD page 5


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 5

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Join the

Warning: Advancing to the next level almost always means making less money and working more hours LADD from page 4

work and it was most like something they were only doing “for now.” As things got economically tougher, the “for now” turned into being grateful for just having a job, even if it isn’t in sports management, running a travel agency or writing catchy advertising jingles. It’s really all a matter of perspective. Many of my hospitality brothers and sisters are not recently graduated 20-somethings, but instead are attending high school class reunions with those who have lost their hair or are on a fourth marriage. Like any job, some see it as a conscious choice to keep at it, for others it’s a steel trap. All this said, I’m not surprised that I wasn’t asked to address any of the several graduating classes of 2013 to share pearls of life-impacting wisdom (versus discussing an impacted wisdom tooth, which is probably equally as painful) about working in a restaurant. However, I had prepared a brief and motivating speech anyway, and will share it here instead of the podium at Merrill Auditorium: Dear graduates of 2013, Like most things in life, working in a restaurant is not what you think it is. The rules are different. Based upon where you work, they go from non-existent to completely inflexible, and if landing in a corporate environment, you’ll be wearing 100 percent polyester most of the time. Managers blatantly play favorites so if this line of work is something you’re interested in, learn how to suck up with class and discretion and keep track of brownie points. In this crazy business being promoted and advancing to the next level almost always means making less money and working more hours. Servers and bartenders will make more cash than you do and you’ll have to claim more in taxes. The title of shift manager, manager on duty or manager in training will sound great to your proud parents and rings of a promising future. I won’t say this isn’t the case, but Saturday nights off are most definitely a thing of the past. Think retail manager at Hot Topic or Foot Locker. The restaurant business as a life profession carries weight and prestige if your first name is above the door, or you have the words “general” or “executive” in your title. People will view you as less than a professional otherwise, regardless of your cash flow. Here’s a short story, “I once waited on a group of women who were frustrated at the long wait for their food due to a very busy kitchen. One woman kept insinuating I had somehow messed up the order and was making snide comments, which I professionally ignored. Finally she said,

Enter the conundrum that is the restaurant business. It has forever been a tug-of-war for college-age servers and bartenders, especially those who land in high-end establishments, to walk away from the instant gratification that is cash-in-hand every night. ‘And this is why I tell my daughter to stay in college.’ “ Her group was aghast, and I couldn’t help but ask what she did for a living. She proudly told me she was a receptionist at an insurance company and I couldn’t help but laugh out loud. There was no tip on that check and that’s OK because I wasn’t expecting one. The lesson here is a cliche, two of them in fact. Number one is don’t judge a book by its cover, and number two is remember, embrace and live the Golden Rule. So graduates/readers, I wish I could say I made this up, but I didn’t and these two cliches will get you far if you stay grounded, calm and are more than a bit lucky. No matter what career path you take, I’m banking on the very best for all of you. However, should you end up in my Dansko’s, I sincerely hope it’s by choice. I wish you large parties with automatic gratuities, supportive supervisors who have “been there,” and the utmost of pride no matter how long you perform this timeless job. The Down Low: As if things at the Pepper Club could become any more accommodating, Mary and Melissa are pleased to roll out a very fun drink menu having moved from beer and wine to a full bar. BJ Esposito is on hand helping craft the list, order the booze and organize the effort now that the liquor license is in tact. That’s the good news. The bad news is the growing trend in and around the Old Port to charge almost thirteen dollars for a Tito’s Cosmopolitan. Even hand-squeezed lime juice and oversized glasses don’t make this a perceived value. (Natalie Ladd is a columnist for the Portland Daily Sun. She has over 30 continuous years of corporate and fine-dining experience in all front-ofthe-house management, hourly and under-the-table positions. She can be reached at natalie@portlanddailysun.me.)

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Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Mayo Street Arts finds solid footing for eclectic arts Donation from Brooks Family Foundation provides stability at Portland nonprofit arts venue By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Mayo Street Arts is singing a new song. The arts center was struggling to survive, facing the commercial sale of their building, but they recently received a generous donation from the Brooks Family Foundation to purchase the venue and keep it in the hands of the nonprofit arts organization. Blainor McGough, director at Mayo Street Arts since its inception four years ago, said the money came in the nick of time and will allow them to continue to offer art, music, dance and theater programming for the area. “We’re really busy, with more than 150 visits and performances each year,” McGough said. “There are so any people from the neighborhood that use the space, including an after-school programs for kids and a meeting place for neighborhood organizations, like a crime watch.” Mayo Street Arts has become a well-loved and well-used space, and the thought of it being sold to be used for other purposes was a genuine threat. Now, lovers of small-stage creative arts can breathe a sigh of relief. “Most of the shows we do are packed with people,” McGough said. “There are so many dancers and musicians who use the space for classes, including tango and capoeira,” which is a Brazilian dance/ martial arts mix. One such eclectic event shook the roof this past Sunday, when Tcha Limberger, a Manouche (or Gypsy) jazz musician, played for two hours to a packed house. Matt Schreiber, a programmer at Mayo Street Arts, organized the International Heritage Music Series, of which Limberger was part III. Earlier this month, Part I featured Siembra, an Afro-Caribbean drummer from New York City, and Part II showcased Elitsa Stoyneva and the Maine Women’s Balkan Choir. The music series was made possible by grants from the Brooks Family and Davis Family foundations. Limberger brought a couple of newfound friends with him. He had been in Montreal, teaching

ABOVE: Tcha Limberger (center) brought a couple of newfound friends with him to Mayo Street Arts last weekend: Dennis Chang, a guitarist from Canada, and Sergio Poppa, an accordion player from Moldova. BOTTOM LEFT: Limberger went from performing in front of 500 people in Montreal to enjoy the intimate setting at Mayo Street Arts. (TIMOTHY GILLIS PHOTOS)

cal timing was especially impressive, knowing that they had just met each other four days ago. The chance to see someone of Limberger’s skill up close and personal is one of the special treats of Mayo Street. He narrated the background of each song before he sang it, often in another language, so the audience could understand the story behind the lyrics. He played and sang drinking songs and love songs, including some of his own compositions. Limberger is blind; his musical ear is tuned in. His vocal range ran from deep and bluesy to scat singing. Several times throughout the concert, the audience seemed to hold its collective breath while waiting Blainor McGough, director at Mayo Street Arts, stands near one of the stained-glass windows in the for his next surprising turn former St. Ansgar’s Church (inset, below). (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTOS) of tune. Limberger was born in a Manouche music at a school there when “Manouche” family with a long-standing he met Dennis Chang, a guitarist from musical tradition. His grandfather was Canada, and Sergio Poppa, an accordion the legendary Piotto Limberger. Both his player from Moldova. He invited them to father Vivi, singer and guitar player, and join his road trip to Maine. his Flemish mother raised him to underLimberger took the stage by himself stand and appreciate each culture. At age first, alternating songs between guitar 12, he started playing the clarinet, joining and violin. He made other music as well, the family orchestra. He also learned how using every bit of the back of his guitar to play the flamenco guitar, and then as a drum and each finger as a drumswitched to Django-style guitar playstick. Later on, he employed his powerful ing. When he was 17, he started studymouth to mimic the sounds of a trumpet. ing the violin, inspired by stories about Limberger had just played in front of his grandfather and recordings of Toki 500 people in Montreal, but he said the Horvath. chance to play in front of 50 people in an Limberger rarely performs in the United States. intimate setting like Mayo Street Arts was his prefFolks who saw him Sunday witnessed one of the erence. two shows he will play in the States this year. “I’m pleased to be here,” he said, “And pleased And that’s the aim of Mayo Street Arts: to bring Mayo Street escaped some other purposes, so you world-class music and theater to their small setting can have a place where people can get together and to share with the locals. Next up for the center is enjoy some culture.” the International Toy Theater Festival on Thursday, When Poppa joined him on accordion, their musiJune 27. See http://mayostreetarts.org/calendar.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 7

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ABOVE: Jimmy Grzelak performs “How To Be A Terrorist,” on Friday, June 28, at 7 p.m. at SPACE Gallery and Saturday, June 29, at 8 p.m. at PSC Storefront. RIGHT: “Hedwig and The Angry Inch” will be performed Friday, June 28, at 9 p.m. at SPACE Gallery and Saturday, June 29, at 6 p.m. at SPACE Gallery. “’Hedwig and The Angry Inch’ is a glam rock musical about a transgendered rocker who escaped communist East Berlin only to land in a mid-western trailer park,” the program states. Both are featured at this year’s PortFringe festival. (COURTESY PHOTOS)

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PortFringe 2013 eases risks, offers rewards to artists By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

PortFringe 2013 opens today throughout town, with something for just about everyone. The fiveday festival, now in its second year, offers nearly 50 unique acts hitting four stages, including such wayout works as a zombie puppet musical, a Beastie Boys tribute, and folk metal story-telling. “This fringe theater festival is about innovative, experimental works that don’t fit into a traditional theater company’s season. Or it gives individual theater artists a chance to try something new at no risk to them,” said Deidre Fulton, one of seven members of the organizing committee. “PortFringe pays for the venues, and all money (except for a processing fee for tickets) goes back to the artists. Last year, we sent about $13,000 back to the artists. This year, we hope to be just as successful, if not more so.” The offbeat shows can be seen at Geno’s Rock Club, SPACE Gallery, and the Portland Stage Company’s studio theater and storefront space. And PortFringe is still going strong, organizers say, despite the cancellation of the Portland Performing Arts Festival, which coincided with the fringe event last year. “The feedback from last year was terrific,” Fulton said. “One of the reasons that we started the festival in the first place was to give the local theater community a chance to collaborate with people they may not normally work with. And people love the opportunity to see more than one show in one night, and to see local theater.”

The PortFringe 2013 line-up features original musicals, one-man and one-woman shows, puppets, vaudeville, and burlesque. In addition to fostering new and experimental work, PortFringe also encourages creative cross-pollination, organizers say. This year’s festival includes collaborations between actors, dancers, filmmakers and musicians. PortFringe is one of New England’s only fringe theater festivals. With generous support from the community, an army of volunteers, and a pool of talented actors, directors, designers, and producers, PortFringe 2012 showcased impressive depth and breadth of local talent. In its inaugural year, PortFringe demonstrated that there is a hunger in Portland, Maine for eclectic, homegrown, and fun arts programming, organizers say, adding that such creative pursuits can also be economically viable. PortFringe 2013 promises to be even bigger and better. “It’s a fun, laidback experience, unlike any other theater experience in Maine,” Fulton said. “There were even more applicants this year, including people from out of town, so word is spreading and people seem to be excited.” A full schedule is available at portfringe.com. Tickets are available at the door. RIGHT: One of the acts at PortFringe, Daniel Forlano, according to the program, performs in a style influenced by his experience as an actor and comedian. He will appear 4 p.m. Sunday, June 30 at Portland Stage’s Studio Theater. (COURTESY PHOTO)


Page 8 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

ABOVE: Portland Senior Lead Officer Daniel Knight led the way for a group of bicyclists who made a 2,200-mile trek to raise awareness about leukemia and lymphoma. The ride took the 40 men and women from Discovery Green Park in Houston to Union Street in Portland and lasted eight days. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTOS)

ABOVE: Senior Lead Police Officer Dan Knight was welcomed to Portland by his family, who waited at the finish line on Union Street Tuesday. Knight was one of 40 men and women who biked from Texas to Portland to raise money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. BELOW: Randy Upton, of the Houston Police Department’s relay team, presented Chief Michael Sauschuck and Mayor Michael Brennan with certificates of appreciation for their help with the race, and lending them Knight for the cross-country trek. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTOS) ABOVE LEFT: A long-haired chihuahua named Precious made the ride in a basket on this bicycle. (MARGE NIBLOCK PHOTO)

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Yes. News is good here.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 9

In a scene from January 2012, Bob Reynolds, who said he is homeless, pauses in a doorway at 566 Congress St. near a replica of a Maine labor mural. Sometimes the homeless need assistance short of police or medical response. When the homeless find themselves in distress or are the focus of conflict, a HOME Team, short for Homeless Outreach and Mobile Engagement, often responds. The city has found funding for the popular program thanks to increased community development block grant program funding. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO)

City set to receive extra money for block grants Risbara’s Greenhouse Inc. Popular HOME Team slated for full funding By Craig Lyons THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

A group of social service and development programs that received less money from Portland’s community development block grant program are about to receive a pleasant surprise. Portland received more money than anticipated from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, to the tune of $94,824, according to a memo to the council’s Housing and Community Development Committee. The additional allocation would bring the city’s CDBG budget up to $1.85 million, and provide the City Council more money to give to programs. The council is set to review the CDBG adjustments in July, while the HCDC will look at it on Wednesday. The added funds will allow the city to increase funding by $44,567 for development services, $31,291 for social services and $18,965 for administration. When the CDBG budget was approved in April, the city manager had cut 15.8 percent from 10 social service program poised to receive full funding in order to give some money to the Wayside Food program and the Preble Street emergency food programs. The extra allocation will give full

funding to the Milestone Foundations’ HOME Team — for a total of $75,000 — and additional money to all the others. The HOME Team, short for Homeless Outreach and Mobile Engagement, is a popular service that provides assistance with the homeless on Portland streets. Health Care for the Homeless will receive $8,590 for a total of $101,149. Catherine Morrill Day Nursery; the Maine Center on Deafness; Florence House Women’s Shelter; Amistad Peer Support and Recovery Center; Preble Street Resource Center; the Parkside Neighborhood Center; the Wayside Food program; and Preble Street’s emergency food programs will each get an extra $1,438. On the development side, the extra $44,567 will allow the city to fully fund the Cumberland Avenue sidewalk and street lighting project at $233,170 and the city’s business assistance program at $100,000. The Coastal Enterprise mircroenterprise assistance program will get an extra $7,186 for a total of $27,186. The CDBG funding for the Sagamore Village playground, program expansion at Youth and Family Outreach; facade improvement program; deployment of Big Belly trash cans; the Anderson Street byway; the Iris Network, the tree planting program; and ADA curb ramps will remain unchanged from the April vote.

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Today’s Birthdays: Actress Eleanor Parker is 91. Jazz musician-film composer Dave Grusin is 79. Actor Josef Sommer is 79. Singer Billy Davis Jr. is 73. Rock singer Georgie Fame is 70. Actor Clive Francis is 67. Actor Michael Paul Chan is 63. Actor Robert Davi is 62. Singer-musician Mick Jones is 58. Rock singer Chris Isaak is 57. Rock singer Patty Smyth is 56. Rock singer Harriet Wheeler is 50. Country musician Eddie Perez is 45. Rock musician Colin Greenwood is 44. Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson is 43. Actor Sean Hayes is 43. Actor Matt Letscher is 43. Actor Chris O’Donnell is 43. Actor Nick Offerman is 43. Actress Rebecca Budig is 40. MLB All-Star player Derek Jeter is 39. Country singer Gretchen Wilson is 39. Pop-rock singer-musician Ryan Tedder is 34. Actormusician Jason Schwartzman is 33.

DAILY CROSSWORD TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

by Lynn Johnston

strongly indicates that this is the case. What you want doesn’t make sense, but you can’t change that you want it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Simplify, prioritize and eliminate what’s been cluttering your view. Once you define your values, much of what you prize will be represented in the physical world. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Meet your own needs. Once your needs are met, you won’t feel the need to grip the controls of life so tightly. You’ll be still and centered while those around you are caught up in a swirl of high drama. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’ll be recognized for an achievement. This won’t feel the way you anticipated it would. Consider why this is so. Perhaps you are being called to a different kind of achievement. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (June 26). This year features your strong sense of your unique talents. You’ll stand out from the group and be comfortable in this as you realize you’re headed for big things. You’ll gain expertise in July. In August, you’ll be the recipient of a grand gesture. In October, you’ll protect the integrity of something you hold sacred. Pisces and Libra adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 30, 1, 22, 35 and 18.

by Paul Gilligan

ARIES (March 21-April 19). If you create a habit, you no longer have to use your precious and limited daily reserves of willpower to execute that activity. Do it consistently until it becomes a natural process for you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Acting on behalf of another person, you will meet many interesting people. You’re a true friend, and you will try to connect your loved ones with the people who will be good for them to know. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Timing is crucial to your success. It’s not something you have to sense, it’s simple science. You know when you feel most alert, and you’ll make those times count by doing your hardest work then. CANCER (June 22-July 22). The people you love will try your patience. The reason they are able to do this so effectively is that they are the people you love. Your caring makes you vulnerable, and you wouldn’t have it any other way. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). There is such a thing as too much inspiration. Ultimately what inspires and motivates you the most isn’t people trying to inspire and motivate you, it’s (SET ITAL) you (END ITAL) taking action and enjoying it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You require an overview perspective that will help you understand where you are. If only life were like those signs at the mall that read, “You are here.” A mentor can act as an objective observer and shed some light on this. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Your success is not a function of ability or talent. You have plenty of both, but that is not the magic ingredient. You are competent and work hard, and that is the real reason you will succeed. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Don’t attempt to wing it today. Although your instincts are terrific, you will still do best when you have a structure that supports your goals. Turn to what has worked before. It will work again. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Does your soul have an agenda that your mind doesn’t know about? Today’s evidence

By Holiday Mathis

by Jan Eliot

HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25 26 29 30 31

ACROSS Sporting events Encourage Become furious Without companions __ file; emery board Smell In __ of; as a substitute for Actress Daly Swampy area Summary Rough; full of gritty particles Chinese restaurant staple Astonished Greek goddess of wisdom Composer Franz __ Actor Carrillo Pick up after a reaper

33 Lubricated 37 One of the Three Bears 39 Diminished 41 Sheltered bay 42 Coil of yarn 44 Planted 46 Actor __ Diesel 47 __ to; cite 49 By a hair 51 Most widely used painkiller 54 Thin metal thread 55 African nation 56 Survives; lives longer than 60 Yahtzee cubes 61 Night twinkler 63 “Gem State” 64 Small bills 65 Lions & tabbies 66 At no time 67 Cincinnati team 68 Remove from power 69 Say hello to

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 32 34 35

DOWN Openings Friendly nation Painful cry Audience’s request for more Oozing out Loosen Sunbeams Card game Votes into office Lovey-dovey Decorate Silly as a __ Was wrong Climb Greek liqueur Tendon Charitable gift Yellowish-brown wood Residence Work Actor Buddy Elvis’ “__ Me Tender” Wicked

36 Declare untrue 38 Lightness; buoyancy 40 Left-hand ledger entry 43 Egghead 45 Sweetheart 48 Debacle; catastrophe 50 Kindle user

51 52 53 54 56 57 58 59 62

Passion Pigs and hogs Walked the floor Sausage Morsels for a horse’s dinner Keep for later You, biblically Categorize Greek “T”

Yesterday’s Answer


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 11

––––––– ALMANAC ––––––– Today is Wednesday, June 26, the 177th day of 2013. There are 188 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On June 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy visited West Berlin, where he delivered his famous speech expressing solidarity with the city’s residents, declaring: “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner). On this date: In 1483, Richard III began his reign as King of England (he was crowned the following month at Westminster Abbey). In 1870, the first section of Atlantic City, N.J.’s Boardwalk was opened to the public. In 1915, following a whirlwind courtship, poet T.S. Eliot married Vivienne Haigh-Wood in London. (The marriage proved disastrous, but the couple never divorced.) In 1925, Charlie Chaplin’s classic comedy “The Gold Rush” premiered at Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office by delegates to the Democratic national convention in Philadelphia. In 1945, the charter of the United Nations was signed by 50 countries in San Francisco. In 1948, the Berlin Airlift began in earnest after the Soviet Union cut off land and water routes to the isolated western sector of Berlin. In 1950, President Harry S. Truman authorized the Air Force and Navy to enter the Korean conflict. In 1973, former White House counsel John W. Dean told the Senate Watergate Committee about an “enemies list” kept by the Nixon White House. In 1988, three people were killed when a new Airbus A320 jetliner carrying more than 130 people crashed into a forest during a demonstration at an air show in Mulhouse (muh-LOOZ’), France. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush went back on his “no-new-taxes” campaign pledge, conceding that tax increases would have to be included in any deficit-reduction package worked out with congressional negotiators. In 1993, President Bill Clinton announced the U.S. had launched missiles against Iraqi targets because of “compelling evidence” Iraq had plotted to assassinate former President George H.W. Bush. Ten years ago: A jury in Fort Worth, Texas, convicted former nurse’s aide Chante Mallard of murder for hitting a homeless man, Gregory Biggs, with her car, driving home with his mangled body lodged in the windshield and leaving him to die in her garage. (Mallard was later sentenced to 50 years in prison.) Five years ago: The U.S. Supreme Court struck down a handgun ban in the District of Columbia as it affirmed, 5-4, that an individual right to gun ownership existed. One year ago: Sen. Orrin Hatch won the GOP primary in Utah, handily turning back a challenge from tea party-backed Dan Liljenquist (lihl-IHN’kwihst). In Oklahoma, five-term Rep. John Sullivan fell to a tea party-supported candidate, Jim Bridenstine, who went on to win election to Congress. Essayist, author and filmmaker Nora Ephron, 71, died in New York.

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 8:00

Dial

8:30

9:00

9:30

JUNE 26, 2013 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

5

CTN 5 911 TV

6

2013 Stanley Cup Final Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks. Game 7. WCSH From the United Center in Chicago. (If necessary). (N) (In Stereo Live) Å

7 8 9

Portland Water District Program.

Friendly

Future

Tonight Show With Jay Leno Dish Nation The Office MasterChef “Top 13 Compete; Top 12 Compete” News 13 on FOX (N) (N) Å “Did I StutWPFO Cooking with an unexpected ingredient. (N) (In Stereo) Å (DVS) ter?” Å The Middle Family Modern Live With ABC’s The Lookout (N) WMTW Jimmy News 8 at Kimmel WMTW “The Bach- Tools (N) Å Family (In Your Par- (In Stereo) Å elor” Stereo) ents 11 (N) Live (N) Ridin Paid Prog. Maine Auto King Paid Prog. Paid Prog. TWC TV Mainely Motorsports Nature “Black Mamba”

10

MPBN Black mamba of Africa.

11

WENH

12

WPXT

13

WGME

17

WPME

24

DISC

25

FAM Melissa

(In Stereo) Å (DVS) The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes “The Speckled Band” Å Arrow “Legacies” Bank robbers threaten the city. (In Stereo) Å Big Brother The contestants move into the house. (N) Å NUMB3RS Å Naked and Afraid Daddy

NOVA “Earth From Space” Satellite data of the earth. (In Stereo) Å

Charlie Rose (N) (In Stereo) Å

Doc Martin “Remember Scott & Bailey Rachel is Me” Joe Penhale’s amne- narrowly missed by a car. siac ex-wife visits. (In Stereo) Å Supernatural Kevin 30 Rock 30 Rock (In hears Crowley’s voice in “The C Stereo) Å his head. Å Word” The American Baking Criminal Minds Beth Competition “Desserts” has surprising news for (N) Å Hotch. Å (DVS) NUMB3RS Å Law Order: CI MythBusters (N) Å King of the Grill (N)

PBS NewsHour (In Stereo) Å

Daddy

The 700 Club Å

Melissa

WGME News 13 at 11 (N) Maine

USA NCIS “Recruited” Å

NESN MLB Baseball: Rockies at Red Sox

Sports

Sports

28

CSNE Game 365 On, Water Red Bull Series

Sports

SportsNet Sports

30

ESPN College Baseball: NCAA World Series Championship, Game 3

31

ESPN2 MLB Baseball: Rangers at Yankees

WWE Main Event (N)

Flashpoint Å

Late Show With David Letterman Sunny

MythBusters Å

27

ION

Royal Pains (N)

Twisted Å

Friends (In TMZ (N) (In Stereo) Å Stereo) Å

26

33

Access

News

Necessary Roughness NCIS: Los Angeles Sports

Sports SportsNet

SportsCenter (N) Å

Baseball Tonight (N)

SportsNation Å

Flashpoint (In Stereo)

Flashpoint Å

34

DISN Gravity

Austin

35

TOON NinjaGo

Teen

36

NICK Full House Full House Full House Full House The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny The Nanny

37

Jessie

Good Luck A.N.T. Farm Å Jessie King of Hill King of Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy

MSNBC All In With Chris Hayes Rachel Maddow Show

The Last Word

ANT Farm Fam. Guy

All In With Chris Hayes

38

CNN Anderson Cooper 360

Piers Morgan Live (N)

Anderson Cooper 360

Erin Burnett OutFront

40

CNBC Crime Inc.

America. Gun

American Greed

Mad Money

41

FNC

The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity (N)

Greta Van Susteren

The O’Reilly Factor

43

Franklin & Bash (N) TNT Castle (In Stereo) Å Movie: “Where the Heart Is” (2000) Å ›› LIFE

Castle (In Stereo) Å

Franklin & Bash Å

Movie: ›‡ “Because I Said So” (2007) Å

47

Toddlers & Tiaras (N) TLC Toddlers & Tiaras AMC Movie: ›››‡ “The Sons of Katie Elder” Å

Movie: ›››‡ “The Shootist” (1976) Å Hunters

44 46

My Big Fat Gypsy

Toddlers & Tiaras

48

HGTV Love It or List It, Too

Property Brothers

Hunt Intl

Property Brothers

49

TRAV Burger

Burger

Toy Hunter Toy Hunter Dig Wars

Dig Wars

Rock-RV

50

A&E Duck D.

Duck D.

Duck D.

Duck D.

Duck D.

Duck D.

Chef Roblé & Co. (N)

Happens

Million

Frasier

Frasier

52

BRAVO Million Dollar Listing

Duck D.

Million Dollar Listing

Duck D.

55

HALL Movie: ››‡ “The Good Witch’s Gift” (2010)

Frasier

56

SYFY Ghost Hunters Å

Paranormal Witness

Ghost Hunters Å

57

ANIM Off Hook

Treehouse Masters

Treehouse Masters

Off Hook

58

HIST American Pickers Å

Larry the Cable Guy

Top Shot All-Stars (N)

Top Shot All-Stars

Movie: ›››‡ “Dreamgirls” (2006) Jamie Foxx, Beyoncé Knowles. Å

60

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61

COM Futurama

62

FX

Off Hook

South Park South Park South Park Futurama

Movie: ››‡ “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” (2010)

67

TVLND Raymond

68

TBS Big Bang Big Bang SPIKE “Inglourious Basterds”

76 78 146

Ghost Hunters (N)

Frasier

Rock-RV

Raymond

Real Husbands

Futurama

Daily Show Colbert

Movie: ›› “Priest” (2011, Fantasy)

Friends

Friends

Cleveland The Exes

Soul Man

Big Bang

Big Bang

Big Bang

Conan (N) Å

Fight Master

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King

Fight Master

Bad Girls-Bat. I’m Having Their Baby I’m Having Their Baby OXY Bad Girls-Bat. Movie: ›››› “Rebecca” (1940) TCM Movie: ››› “They Died With Their Boots On” (1941) Å

DAILY CROSSWORD BY WAYNE ROBERT WILLIAMS

1 4 9 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 27 28 31 32 33 34

ACROSS That girl Hindu teacher Walked worriedly Simple card game Butter maker Chicago airport __ had it! Acts of worship Word with nose or numeral Start of a Vilhjalmur Stefansson quote Figurative use of a word Letter before sigma Top Sicilian volcano Costume jewelry __ vera Fix a roulette wheel? Spiritual guide Thais and Koreans, e.g.

36 Reduced in rank 38 Islamic women’s quarters 41 Suffer heartbreak 42 South African golfer Ernie 45 Eurasian goat 46 Come to terms 48 Shoelace problem 49 Vue or Bronco, briefly 50 Sloppy digs 51 Toy soldier 52 End of quote 57 “West Side Story” song 58 Sporting sphere 59 Little yelp 60 Play bagpipes 61 Predictable cards? 62 Sushi bar offering 63 Hellenic language 64 Idyllic spots 65 Sardonic 1

DOWN Faster

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 22 26 28 29 30 31 33 35 36

Dutch cheese When I’ll be back on Broadway? Loose rock debris Sudden fancy Wheels TV equine Stick in __ Alegre, Brazil Hail in a harbor Ms. Parker Bowles Something rubbed out Thieves’ headquarters Rejuvenation center Put one’s sword away __ Moines, IA Throb Metric measure Beet product Assist Valuable stone Behold “Oedipus __”

37 High card 38 Brief greetings 39 First Muslim caliph 40 Abstracted musing 42 Delighted in 43 More nuts 44 How a mesa rises 47 Whirl

48 50 51 53 54 55 56 57

Clan members Celery unit Tiny pests Grow weary Folk-song abbr. At this place By and by Chinese food additive

Yesterday’s Answer


Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN CLASSIFIEDS Wanted To Buy

CLASSIFIEDS • CALL 699-5807 DOLLAR-A-DAY CLASSIFIEDS: Ads must be 15 words or less and run a minimum of 5 consecutive days. Ads that run less than 5 days or nonconsecutive days are $2 per day. Ads over 15 words add 10¢ per word per day. PREMIUMS: First word caps no charge. Additional caps 10¢ per word per day. Centered bold heading: 9 pt. caps 40¢ per line, per day (2 lines maximum) TYPOS: Check your ad the first day of publication. Sorry, we will not issue credit after an ad has run once. DEADLINES: noon, one business day prior to the day of publication. PAYMENT: All private party ads must be pre-paid. We accept checks, Visa and Mastercard credit cards and, of course, cash. CORRESPONDENCE: To place your ad call our offi ces 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 699-5807; or send a check or money order with ad copy to The Conway Daily Sun, P.O. Box 1940, North Conway, NH 03860. OTHER RATES: For information about classified display ads please call 699-5807.

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human resources department or a higher-up? Is it possible to move your desk? Would you be willing to wear a surgical mask or filter? Allergies can’t always be helped, but people should be considerate of one another. Dear Annie: I read your advice to “Nervous in Vermont” with much interest, being the parent of a transgender child myself. Even if an initial conversation may have seemed encouraging, it can be dangerous for trans kids to come out to their parents. Half of all homeless kids are LGBT, some as young as 12, and were kicked out of their parents’ home after coming out to their families. And a staggering number of trans kids end up committing suicide if met with scorn, shame or parental refusal to accept or discuss the subject. Coming out must be done eventually, but unless the child is nearing 18 or has contingency plans, one must take into consideration the things that can go wrong. I’d like to offer a couple of parental resources for such situations: Trans Youth Family Allies (imatyfa.org) is a wonderful group of parents of trans kids that includes a support email list, as well as organized trainings for schools and other organizations. Gender Spectrum (genderspectrum.org) holds a yearly Gender Spectrum Family conference in Oakland, Calif., as well as a trans-masculine oriented Gender Spectrum conference in Seattle, Wash. These two groups can be of incredible assistance to parents after their kids have come out. We’ve found that going through the process of accepting our kids is not dissimilar to the grieving process. What is lost is not the person (thank goodness), but our hopes, dreams and plans for our child. We fear for them and their future. But we support each other and learn to move on, create new dreams and celebrate our children’s true identities. -- Sara

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

Prickly City

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

MASONRY REPAIR DAVE MASON

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dear Annie: We live in a quiet family neighborhood. Recently, a neighbor tried to locate the owner of a rental home next door in order to discuss a shared fence issue. When our neighbor could find no contact information through the city department of housing, he searched the Internet. He was shocked to discover that for the past 10 years, the owners have had a porn site registered at that rental home address. None of us wants a porn site associated with our neighborhood. How should we handle this? -- No Name or Location, Please Dear No Name: While we certainly understand your moral objections, these owners seem to be running a legal operation. Most web-based or home-based businesses are fine unless there are customers or employees coming to the house. There may be a requirement to have a business license, but that’s about it. You can contact a lawyer in your city to find out whether there are other possibilities, but we suspect there is nothing you can do, legally, about this. Sorry. Dear Annie: I share a small workspace with someone who constantly coughs, sneezes, clears her throat, blows her nose and grunts. Worse, she never covers her mouth, so I am surrounded by airborne germs all day. It’s extremely annoying and interferes with my ability to concentrate on my work. I know some of this is allergies, but she also doesn’t stay home when she is sick. I have offered cough drops and antihistamines, which she has refused. I suffer from allergies, as well, but try to keep my symptoms to myself. I have talked to my boss, but she won’t deal with it. Other co-workers are unwilling to switch desks with me (understandably). I used to like going to work, but I am ready to hand in my notice. What do you suggest? -- Had It with the Hacking Dear Had It: First be more direct with this co-worker, explaining your discomfort and asking her to please cover her nose and mouth. If that doesn’t help, can you complain to the

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 13

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEWS BRIEFS–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Portland Public Library to welcome E.B. White’s granddaughter for talk Daily Sun Staff Reports The Portland Public Library will host Martha White at the Brown Bag Lecture Series at noon today in the Rines Auditorium, when she is scheduled to speak about her new collection of E.B. White’s writing, “E.B. White on Dogs. “ In the book, his granddaughter and manager of his literary estate compiled the best and funniest of his essays, poems, letters, and sketches depicting over a dozen of White’s various canine companions, according to the library, according to a press release from the library. “Featured here are favorite essays such as ‘Two Letters, Both Open,’ where White takes on the Internal Revenue Service, and also ‘Bedfellows,’ with its ‘fraudulent reports’; from White’s ignoble old dachshund, Fred. (‘I just saw an eagle go by. It was carrying a baby,’),” the library reported. Some previously unpublished photographs from the E. B. White Estate show the family dogs, a press release noted. E.B. White (1899 1985) is best known for his children’s books, “Charlotte’s Web,” “Stuart Little” and “The Trumpet of the Swan.” Columnist for The New Yorker for over half a century and co-author of Strunk and White’s “The Elements of Style,” White hit his stride as an American literary icon.

‘Celebration, Tradition and Change’ to open at Maine Jewish Museum Artist Asherah Cinnamon will launch an exhibit of new work at the Maine Jewish Museum at the base of Munjoy Hill in Portland. Nancy Davidson curated Cinnamon’s new show titled, “Celebration, Tradition and Change.” This exhibition will run from Friday, July 5 to Thursday, Aug. 29, the museum announced. The opening reception with the artist will be held at the Maine Jewish Museum at 267 Congress St. on Tuesday, July 9 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Cinnamon is an international award-winning, contemporary sculptor, installation/performance artist, and creative educator, a press release stated. “Her

work explores avenues of healing, both personal and planetary. Asherah’s parents were survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. Their ability to take great joy in life and to overcome that experience was an inspiration for her,” the press release stated. Graduate of the Maine College of Art (BFA), Boston University (MSW), Cambridge University (Graduate Diploma), and the University of Wisconsin (BA), she has made her home in Maine for over 30 years. “Cinnamon’s creative practice explores the power of human interaction as a means to build community, seek justice (tzedek), and heal the world (tikkun olam),” the press release added. The Maine Jewish Museum is located at Etz Chaim Synagogue and is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. or by appointment. For more information, contact Curator Davidson at TootzDavidson@ yahoo.com or 239-4774.

July 4 celebration honors Lincoln, features Don McLean in concert The annual Fourth of July celebration in Portland, “The Stars and Stripes Spectacular,” will offer something extra this year, in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation, the city announced. The celebration will feature a free Patriotic Pops concert with Special Guest Artist Don McLean who will perform with the Portland Symphony Orchestra. McLean is the artist best known for the hit song, “American Pie.” This year the Patriotic Pops concert will have a Lincoln theme. As part of the day of festivities the Maine Historical Society will present a reading of the Declaration of Independence by former state legislator Herb Adams and a reading of the Gettysburg Address by Portland Mayor Michael Brennan. The readings will take place at noon in front of the Longfellow House at 489 Congress St. Other festivities will take place at the Eastern Promenade Park. The Patriotic Pops concert is scheduled to begin at 7:40 p.m. and will be broadcast live on WHOM 94.9PM. The concert will run throughout the fireworks display which will begin at approximately 9:20 p.m. A rain date is scheduled for Friday, July 5. The public can visit www.July4thportland.org for the most up to date information or call the city’s hotline at 756-8130.

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Sales & Service 772-0053

U.S. Army Sgt. Corey Garver, with Baker Company, 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, provides security as soldiers with Baker Company and Afghan National Army soldiers clear a village in Paktia province, Afghanistan, on May 29. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Robert Porter/Released)

Delegation responds to death of Maine soldier in Afghanistan U.S. Senators Susan Collins and Angus King and U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree, all of Maine, issued statements following the death of Sergeant Corey E. Garver, 26, of Topsham, during service in Afghanistan. According to the U.S. Army, Sergeant Garver died on June 23, in Paktiya Province, Afghanistan, while supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, Collins and King reported. Initial reports indicate that he died of injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device, they said. “We are deeply saddened to hear of Sergeant Garver’s passing,” Collins and King said in a press release. “He was a true American hero who valiantly dedicated himself to the defense of our country. His actions on the battlefield demonstrated the highest caliber of leadership and courage and we owe him our enduring gratitude. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family in this most difficult time.” Pingree issued a statement, saying, “Sergeant Garver died defending his country and we owe him and his family a debt of gratitude for their sacrifice. I know words can’t ease the pain that his family is feeling, but I hope they know that the thought and prayers of the people of Maine go out to them during this most difficult time.” Sergeant Garver was a member of the B Company, 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

Condolences extended after death of Maine’s Senator Hathaway The passing of former Senator William Hathaway, who represented Maine for six years in the U.S. Senate after winning the seat from Margaret Chase Smith in 1972, prompted statements from political leaders. Senator Hathaway died in his home in McLean, Va., on Monday. He was 89. “I extend my sincerest condolences on behalf of all Maine citizens to the family and friends of Senator Bill Hathaway,” Gov. Paul LePage said. “He devoted much of his life to serving Maine and the American people, both in the private and public sectors, as well as in the military. My thoughts and prayers are with him and his family during this difficult time.” U.S. Senator Angus King, I-Maine, said, “I was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Senator Bill Hathaway, a dear friend, cherished mentor, and dedicated public servant for his beloved State of Maine. ... His example is one that continues to inspire me each and every day, and his legacy of service and contributions to Maine will resonate within the state for generations to come. My thoughts and prayers are with Bill’s family during this difficult time.” Senator Hathaway served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and was held for two months as a prisoner of war in 1944.


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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Wednesday, June 26 ‘E. B. White on Dogs’

noon to 1 p.m. “In ‘E. B. White on Dogs,’ his granddaughter and manager of his literary estate, Martha White, has compiled the best and funniest of his essays, poems, letters, and sketches depicting over a dozen of White’s various canine companions” Edited by Martha White. Part of Portland Public Library’s Brown Bag Lectures. Each lecture is held in the Rines Auditorium from noon to 1 p.m. (unless otherwise noted) with a book signing held afterward. Complimentary coffee is generously provided by Coffee By Design and cookies are donated by Whole Foods Market. Longfellow Books provides books for sale to be signed by the author.

MHS walking tours of historic Portland

1:30 p.m. “Maine Historical Society is pleased to announce daily walking tours of historic Portland. Explore various sections of downtown Portland including Post Office Park, Boothby Square, Exchange Street and more. Walk down cobblestoned streets and discover how social movements, the economy and adversity over the last four centuries made Portland what it is today. Weather permitting, tours depart daily from Maine Historical Society at 1:30 and last approximately one hour.; $10/per person; or $15 for both walking tour and Longfellow House tour. Tours run through September 30, 2013. Call MHS for group bookings. Appropriate footwear is recommended. For more information about the Historical Walking Tours: Brent Daly, Education Department, Maine Historical Society ,489 Congress St., Portland. 774-1822, ext 214. www.mainehistory.org.”

‘Les Miserables’ at MSMT in Brunswick

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Les Miserables,” June 26 to July 13, Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Based on a novel by Victor Hugo, ‘Les Miserables’ tells the musical tale of redemption and revolution in early 19th-century France. Ex-convict, Jean Valjean, becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past as he tries to save himself and those around him. The award-winning score composed by Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and a book by Alain Boublil, features such memorable musical numbers as ‘On My Own,’ ‘I Dreamed a Dream,’ ‘Do You Hear the People Sing’ and ‘Bring Him Home.’” Maine State Music Theatre, Pickard Theater, Brunswick. Tuesday-Sunday. msmt.org. 725-8769.

Casco Bay Sunset Cruise

5:45 p.m. “Sunset Cruise of Casco Bay” with the Maine Island Trail Association, with guest presenter Brian Marcaurelle, program director of the Maine Island Trail Association. Get a jump on your summer boating and island exploration plans. Specific pricing for this event. 5:45 p.m. to 8 p.m. Register for any Trek by contacting info@trails.org/775-2411.

The Friends of Evergreen annual meeting

6:30 p.m. Friends of Evergreen 22nd Annual Meeting at Wilde Memorial Chapel. “The Friends of Evergreen invite the public to the Annual Meeting of its Members with guest speaker, Lois Tucker, ‘19th Century Artisans Interred in Pine Grove Cemetery.’ Lois is co-author of ‘American Painted Tinware, A Guide to Its Identification — Volumes I thru IV.’ Please join us for refreshments and learn about our efforts to preserve Evergreen’s future. Parking is available along Stevens Avenue outside of the Cemetery gates. For more information, please visit www.friendsofevergreen.org.”

Maine Festival of American Music

7 p.m. “Synergy” eighth season, Maine Festival of American Music: Its Roots and Traditions. Three consecutive evening concerts plus workshop day/master class. “The Synergy of Native American Legend and Chamber Music” is Wednesday. Artistic directors are the Portland String Quartet. Guest artists are Native American storyteller David Lonebear Sanipass, Shaker Society’s Br. Arnold Hadd, and artist and composer Patrick Doane. Held in the 1794 Shaker Meetinghouse. Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Rd. Route 26 New Gloucester, June 26 to 29. 7 p.m. $25 per evening concert; seniors $20; under 21-free. Reservations suggested, 926-4597. www.shaker.lib.me.us

Improvised Puppet Project, Port Fringe 2013

8 p.m. A Post-Apocalyptic Improvised Zombie Puppet Musical, Wednesday, June 26, Portland Stage Company Storefront; and Saturday, June 29, at 10 p.m. at SPACE Gallery. :Join the Improvised Puppet Project for a completely improvised musical — with puppets! — set in a world devastated by the Great Zombie Attack of 2013. A tenuous peace has been reached between the two factions, and now humans and zombies must learn to live side-byside. Only the power of musical theater can help them set aside their differences — or can it? This show will be performed twice and — because it’s improvised — it will be different EVERY TIME! So you should probably see both shows.” For additional Port Fringe events, see http://www. portfringe.com/shows.htm

At 6:30 p.m. today, the Friends of Evergreen invite the public to the group’s annual meeting of its members at Wilde Memorial Chapel with guest speaker, Lois Tucker, “19th Century Artisans Interred in Pine Grove Cemetery.” (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO)

Thursday, June 27 Greek Festival

11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church Grounds, Portland (located on the corner of Pleasant and Park Street). “This spectacular three-day Greek Festival is a wonderful family event that each year draws more than 10,000 visitors from around the greater Portland area. Along with the exquisite Greek cuisine, there will be live music and traditional dancing. Guests will dine on exceptional Greek food, cooked the oldfashioned way by hard-working members of the Holy Trinity parish, using authentic Greek recipes, all-natural ingredients and lots of tender, loving care. For more information, call 774-0281.

Women’s Mountain Bike Night

6 p.m. Allspeed & Singletrack Sisters Present: A Women’s Mountain Bike Night at Allspeed Cyclery & Snow. Ride — “All abilities group ride from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (leaves from the shop). Learn — Basic mountain bike maintenance clinic with a Q&A session. Deals — 25 percent off parts, cothing and accessories and 15 percent off bikes (pricing valid for this event on June 27, must attend in person to receive discounts). Juliana Bicycles Mountain bikes made for women. Available exclusively at Allspeed Cyclery & Snow. 878.8741, allspeed.com, 72 Auburn St., Portland.”

Cultivating Community Twilight Dinner

6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Turkey Hill Farm, 120 Old Ocean House Road, Cape Elizabeth. “Cultivating Community is holding a series of Twilight Dinners at their farm in Cape Elizabeth. The three-course meals will be cooked by local chefs to highlight the local and seasonal. The cost is $40 per person (BYOB). You can buy tickets online at Brown Paper Tickets. June 27 — Chef David Levi, Vinland. July 3 — TBD. July 11 — Chef Jonah Fertig, Local Sprouts. July 18 – Chef Mitch Gerow, East Ender. July 25 — Chefs Brad Messier and Erin Lynch, Rosemont Market & Bakery. Aug. 1 — Chef Josh Potocki, Bread and Butter Catering Co. Aug. 8 — Cultivating Community Youth Growers supported by John Peelen of Dutch Door Kitchen. Aug. 15 — Chef Leslie Oster, Aurora Provisions. Aug. 22 — TBD. Aug. 29 — Chef Chris McClay, Modern Vegan Cooking School. Sept. 5 — Chef Mitch Gerow, East Ender.”

‘Shaker History and Shaker Song’

7 p.m. “Shaker History and Shaker Song.” “Join Brother Arnold Hadd, the Sabbathday Lake Shakers and violist Julia Adams in an evening of Shaker history and Shaker song. Bring your voices, weak or strong, to this unique singalong!” Maine Festival of American Music: Its Roots and Traditions. Three consecutive evening concerts plus workshop day/master class. Artistic directors are the Portland String Quartet. Guest artists are Native American storyteller David Lonebear Sanipass, Shaker Society’s Br. Arnold Hadd, and artist and composer Patrick Doane. Held in the 1794 Shaker Meetinghouse. Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Rd. Route 26 New Gloucester, June 26 to 29. 7 p.m. $25 per evening concert; seniors $20; under

21-free. Reservations suggested, 926-4597. www.shaker. lib.me.us

Maine Crime Writers Panel

7 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Walker Memorial Library is pleased to welcome Maine Crime Writers Kate Flora, Gerry Boyle and Lea Wait for an evening of mystery talk and fun. Join us! For more information on some of our state’s great mystery writers, check out:http://mainecrimewriters.com. And we have several books by these authors available, come check out one or all of their books.” Walker Memorial Library, 800 Main St., Westbrook. http://www.walker.lib.me.us/wordpress

‘Les Miserables’ at MSMT in Brunswick

7:30 p.m. “Les Miserables,” June 26 to July 13, Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Based on a novel by Victor Hugo, ‘Les Miserables’ tells the musical tale of redemption and revolution in early 19th-century France. Ex-convict, Jean Valjean, becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past as he tries to save himself and those around him. The award-winning score composed by Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and a book by Alain Boublil, features such memorable musical numbers as ‘On My Own,’ ‘I Dreamed a Dream,’ ‘Do You Hear the People Sing’ and ‘Bring Him Home.’” Maine State Music Theatre, Pickard Theater, Brunswick. Tuesday-Sunday. msmt.org. 725-8769.

‘Only the Young’ at the library

7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. “The Portland Public Library POV Summer Documentary Film Series presents ‘Only the Young’ on Thursday, June 27 from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Rines Auditorium. Chris Gorman, Associate Director at the Maine Youth Action Network — an organization that seeks to engage and empower youth in Maine — will introduce the film and lead a facilitated discussion with the audience after the film.The film, by Jason Tippet and Elizabeth Mims, chronicles skateboarders Garrison and Kevin, and Garrison’s on-and-off girlfriend, Skye who are in many ways living the archetypical American teen life. Growing up in the small southern California town of Santa Clarita, they hang out, listen to punk music, change their hairstyles (and hair colors) and complain about living in a place with nothing to do. They explore friendship, discover first love (and heartbreak) and dream about the future.” For more information visit www.pbs.org/pov.

Toy Theater Traveling Show

8 p.m. Mayo Street Arts, Great Small Works’ International Toy Theater Traveling Show. Following the 10th International Toy Theater Festival, Great Small Works will embark on a short New England tour featuring work of Great Small Works and two international companies-Facto Teatro from Mexico City; and Barbara Steinitz and Bjoern Kollin from Berlin. Each show on the tour will feature programs by two or three of the companies, each doing a 20-30 minute Toy Theater performance. Doors at 7:30/Show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 adults/$10 students/artists. www.brownpapertickets.com/event/358480 see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013— Page 15

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Friday, June 28 Maine Military & Community Network conference

8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Maine Military & Community Network will hold the third annual Statewide Conference from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. “The conference will take place at the Central Maine Community College, 1250 Turner St., Auburn. The theme for the event is ‘Military Children & Families.’ The Keynote Speaker will be Allyson Handley, Ed. D., president of University of Maine Augusta. Specific focus will be placed upon the education experience faced by children and families of Military Members as well as the impact of deployment upon the military family unit. Navy Spouse and author of the newly released book, ‘Dinner with the Smiley’s,’ Sara Smiley will be present with her children to give insight to the perspective of facing deployment from the home front in a veteran family panel. Awards for excellence in support of Maine’s military population will also be presented. The afternoon will start with focus on the movie ‘A Matter of Duty’ which details Kennebec Sheriff Randy Liberty’s personal battle with PTSD and several veterans in his charge at the Kennebec County Jail. ... Producer Charlie Smith and Jennifer Rooks of Maine Watch will be present to talk about the importance of shining the light of public awareness. This event is open to the public for the cost of $40.” Register at http://mainemcn.eventbrite.com.

‘Teaching and Performance’ at Shaker Village

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. “Teaching and Performance” workshop day Maine Festival of American Music: Its Roots and Traditions. “String students and adult players come to the SDL Shaker Village to be coached by the PSQ with a culminating Master Class (3:30 p.m.). Licensed counselor Caroline Loupe will help players explore methods which enhance the joy of playing music.” Master Class only — free of charge and open to the public. Held in the 1794 Shaker Meetinghouse. Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Rd. Route 26 New Gloucester, June 26 to 29. 7 p.m. $25 per evening concert; seniors $20; under 21-free. Reservations suggested, 926-4597. www.shaker.lib.me.us

‘This Rebellion’ at Maine Historical Society

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Maine Historical Society exhibit opening. “‘This Rebellion: Maine and the Civil War.’ ‘This Rebellion’ showcases a rich array of MHS’s Civil War collections — photographs, letters, artifacts, maps and memorabilia -related to the Maine soldier’s experience during and after the war. For the first time ever, a database has been created of all Maine soldiers who died in the War (in battle or of war wounds or illness); the names will appear in a remembrance wall as part of the exhibit. The exhibit is a stop on the new 23-site Maine Civil War Trail.” The exhibit opens to the public on June 28 and will be up through May 26, 2014. Museum hours: Monday–Saturday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday (May-Oct.): noon to 5 p.m. http://www.mainehistory.org

‘Breckinridge Long’ author at the library

noon. “Neil Rolde will be talking about his new book ‘Breckinridge Long: An American Eichmann??? An Enquiry into the Character of the Man Who Denied Visas to the Jews’ at the Friday Local Author Series on Friday, June 28 at noon in Meeting Room No. 5 at the Portland Public Library. During the Holocaust, while the Nazis were exterminating thousands of Jews daily, the U.S. State Department official in charge of matters concerning all European refugees was Breckinridge Long. ‘He’s an example of the banality of evil,’ said Neil Rolde author of the first full-length biography of Long. ‘I wanted to highlight his own accounts of his life written in all his diaries, and the times in which he lived, to give people a comprehensive look into his character.’” http:// www.portlandlibrary.com

Maine Artist Collective exhibit

noon to 4 p.m. “Every city seems to have its own unique sense of place marked by its history, commerce, people, art and architecture. See how the Maine Artists Collective sees our city of Portland where natural elements meet steel, brick, granite and concrete when the Urban Landscape exhibit opens June 28 and runs to July 22 at Constellation Gallery, 511 Congress St. in Portland. Gallery hours are Monday to Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. A reception is planned for First Friday, July 5 from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The mission of the Maine Artist Collective is to connect the public with Maine artists and support development by providing exhibition and studio space, education, and professional workshops.”

MHS walking tours of historic Portland

1:30 p.m. “Maine Historical Society is pleased to announce daily walking tours of historic Portland. Explore various sections of downtown Portland including Post Office Park, Boothby Square, Exchange Street and more. Walk down cobblestoned streets and discover how social movements, the economy and adversity over the last four centuries

made Portland what it is today. Weather permitting, tours depart daily from Maine Historical Society at 1:30 and last approximately one hour.; $10/per person; or $15 for both walking tour and Longfellow House tour. Tours run through September 30, 2013. Call MHS for group bookings. Appropriate footwear is recommended. For more information about the Historical Walking Tours: Brent Daly, Education Department, Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St., Portland. 774-1822, ext 214. www.mainehistory.org.”

Pin Maine-ia pinball championship

2 p.m. The New England Pinball Championship sponsored by New England Pinball. June 28-30. The Main Event, an 18-Round Match Play Championship with a Final Round Shoot Out for the top four finishers to crown the New England Champion. All Day Saturday. Trophies, Plaques and Cash will be awarded to the top 4 finishers in A and B groups. A division records will be carried forward after the cut. The B Division. After the first nine rounds of the Main Event, the bottom half of the bracket will be cut and the “B” division will be formed. All records will be wiped clean and a B Division Champ will be Crowned from this group. The four Top finishers will also play in a final round shoot out. The Team Championship. Everyone will be invited to compete in a four-person team event using a Pin-Golf scoring format. Players will be seeded according to their skill level and Cash and Plaques will be awarded to the Top Teams. The Lobster Pot Classic — A Coin Drop tournament. This event helps support Pin Maine-ia. Half of the cash box receipts to the High Score on each machine. Friday 2 p.m. to midnight. Saturday 10 a.m. to miidnight. Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25 Hickory Lane Gorham, Maine. $60 for the weekend. This includes Free Play on all machines, Entry into three tournaments and a commemorative T-shirt. drjr@maine.rr.com. Spectator Fee, $10 per day or $15 for the weekend. This includes Free Play on all nontournament machines. Kids 6-12, $5/$10. Under 6 free. http:// nepinball.com/index.php?title=Main_Page

‘Les Miserables’ at MSMT in Brunswick

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Les Miserables,” June 26 to July 13, Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Based on a novel by Victor Hugo, ‘Les Miserables’ tells the musical tale of redemption and revolution in early 19th-century France. Ex-convict, Jean Valjean, becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past as he tries to save himself and those around him. The award-winning score composed by Claude-Michel Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and a book by Alain Boublil, features such memorable musical numbers as ‘On My Own,’ ‘I Dreamed a Dream,’ ‘Do You Hear the People Sing’ and ‘Bring Him Home.’” Maine State Music Theatre, Pickard Theater, Brunswick. Tuesday-Sunday. msmt.org. 725-8769.

Saccarappa Art Collective reception

5 p.m. until 8 p.m. “Painter Barbara Brady will exhibit a collection of her work titled ‘Marking Time’ at Saccarappa Art Collective’s Main Gallery from June 28 through Aug. 7. Brady draws on experience as a plein-aire landscape artist to produce her colorful abstract compositions through a process she describes as ‘much like the process of life — the intention is direct but the experience is very emotional and intuitive.’ Anne Bernard’s hauntingly sensitive encaustics and drawings will be showcased on the gallery’s Riverside Wall. Bob Thomas will join as a special guest with member artists Andy Curran, Sherry Ballou, Mary Brooking, Jim Flahaven, Jeremy Greene, Caren-Marie Michel, Frank Valliere and Julie Vohs, who will also present new work. An opening reception will run from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. on the evening of June 28. Saccarappa Art Collective is committed to presenting the authentic vision of local and regional professional artists to the greater community. Gallery hours are WednesdaySaturday: noon-7 p.m.” 861 Main St., Westbrook. https:// www.facebook.com/SaccarappaArtCollective

Cape Farm Alliance Strawberry Festival

6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cape Farm Alliance Strawberry Festival in Cape Elizabeth. Shady Oak Farm, 30 Fowler Road. Saturday at Maxwell’s Strawberry Field, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Two Lights Road. “Our Annual Strawberry Fest will be held this year on the last weekend in June – the 28th and 29th – so mark your calendar now so you don’t miss out! Tickets for the very popular Lobster Bake/Pork Roast at Shady Oak Farm the evening of June 28 will go on sale in late May/early June – you can purchase at Alewives Brook Farm or Jordan’s Farm Market on Wells Rd.” www. capefarmalliance.org

‘Can’t Keep A Good Woman Down’

7 p.m. Friday, June 28 to Sunday, June 30, two shows on Saturday. St. Lawrence Arts Center. “A young black mother struggles to keep her faith after a series of heartbreaking setbacks. When her daughter is hospitalized, and her husband becomes more and more abusive, she is on the verge of giving up. It is only though her faith in God that she is able to carry on.” http://www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/380753

‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’

7:30 p.m. “Schoolhouse Arts Center at Sebago Lake will present ‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ by Rebecca Feldman and William Finn from June 21 to July 7. “‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ at Schoolhouse Arts Center is directed by Michael Hjort. Cast members include Sean Colby and Ben Plummer from Limington, Kim Drisko from Gorham, Dillon Bates from Portland, Andrew Goodwin from South Portland, Molly Olsen from Windham, Adam Gary Normand from Old Orchard Beach and Angelica and Elizabeth Phipps from Standish. Performances of ‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ will be held at Schoolhouse Arts Center on June 28 and 29 and July 5 and 6 at 7:30 p.m. and June 30 and July 7 at 5 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults and $16 for students and seniors. Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35. For reservations, call 642-3743 or buy tickets on-line at www.schoolhousearts.org.”

‘Deathtrap’ at Lyric Music Theater

8 p.m. “Deathtrap” at Lyric Music Theater, South Portland. “‘Deathtrap’ — This Ira Levin play has many twists and turns! Accomplished writer Sidney Bruhl finds himself struggling to write the next big play. After several flops, he becomes desperate. Sidney reads a play by a young writer, Clifford Anderson, which he finds to be a perfect thriller. He plots to kill Clifford and pass the play off as his own, but soon realizes that this will not be as easy as he planned!” Call the Box Office at 799-1421.

Saturday, June 29 Urban Raid in Portland

10 a.m. Urban Raid starting at Ocean Gateway terminal. 5K obstacle course race. “Introducing a new, cutting-edge race series designed for a new breed of cross training athlete — The RAID. Come experience the next generation of obstacle racing; one that features varied terrain, largescale customized infrastructure, and extraordinary venues that range from picturesque beaches, to energized downtown metros, to breath-taking mountain sides. The RAID offers you the chance to choose one or conquer all three races in distinct environments — a unique challenge that no other series can provide. For just under five miles in distance at each race course, you’ll be challenged to run, crawl, jump, climb, and scramble on sand, city streets and steep slopes.” http://raidevents.com/urban-raid-portland/#

English Garden Party and Home Tour

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Event at 402 Pulpit Rock Road, Cape Elizabeth. Maine Home and Design English Garden Party and Home Tour in Cape Elizabeth. “Enjoy an English garden party, tea and home tour at one of the most beautiful private properties in Cape Elizabeth — Garrison Field. This property was modeled after a spectacular English Tudorstyle estate. Garrison Field Cape Elizabeth, MaineStroll the grounds and shore, take a guided home tour, and relax with a ‘spot of tea’ and variety of performers. Parking is available at Cape Elizabeth High School with vans running regularly. Tickets are $25 for Garden Party and Home Tour and are available at Whole Foods Market, Nonesuch Books Mill Creek, IGA Pond Cove, Jordan’s Farm Market, Broadway Gardens, O’Donals, Estabrooks, Skillins, Highland Avenue Nursery, and www.fortwilliams.org. Or extend your day with a VIP package for $50, which includes workshops, reserved parking, English Fare Lunch & Tea, and garden party and home tour tickets. Available only at Whole Foods and at www.fortwilliams.org. This tour benefits The Arboretum at Fort Williams Park, a project of the non-profit Fort Williams Foundation. The funds generated will be used to create a series of garden landscapes within Fort Williams Park in Cape Elizabeth, for the public to enjoy.”

Smokey the Bear in Gray

11 a.m. “Join a local District Forest Ranger from the Maine Forest Service on Saturday, June 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to see a demonstration and display of the tools of their trade. Inspect a Ranger truck loaded with 1,500 lbs of fire equipment and initial response gear. Forest Rangers protect our forests, properties and homes from fires, insects, disease and misuse. A special photo opportunity for the kids is scheduled from noon to 12:30 p.m., when Smokey the Bear will arrive to meet and greet his fans. Bring your cameras for photos of Smokey with your children! There will also be a team of volunteers from the the Forest Pest Outreach and Survey Project with an information table focused on invasive forest pests such as the Asian longhorned beetle, emerald ash borer and the hemlock wooly adelgid.” Maine Wildlife Park, 56 Game Farm Road, Gray (off Route 26). See www.mainewildlifepark.com for details about these and all our other scheduled 2013 events. see next page


Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Wednesday, June 26, 2013

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Maine Festival of American Music

7 p.m. “Synergy” eighth season, Maine Festival of American Music: Its Roots and Traditions. Three consecutive evening concerts plus workshop day/master class. “The Synergy of Performance and Composition.” Violinist and composer Patrick Doane, Maine native, former PSQ student and now Juilliard graduate, joins the Portland String Quartet in an evening of Chamber Music. Shaker hymns will be woven skillfully into a Festival commissioned work by Doane.” Held in the 1794 Shaker Meetinghouse. Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, 707 Shaker Rd. Route 26 New Gloucester, June 26 to 29. 7 p.m. $25 per evening concert; seniors $20; under 21-free. Reservations suggested, 926-4597. www.shaker. lib.me.us

‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ in Standish

7:30 p.m. “Schoolhouse Arts Center at Sebago Lake will present ‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ by Rebecca Feldman and William Finn from June 21 to July 7. “‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ is a musical comedy which centers on a fictional spelling bee set in a geographically ambiguous Putnam Valley Middle School. Six quirky adolescents compete in the Bee, which is run by three equally-quirky grown-ups. The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at Schoolhouse Arts Center is directed by Michael Hjort. Cast members include Sean Colby and Ben Plummer from Limington, Kim Drisko from Gorham, Dillon Bates from Portland, Andrew Goodwin from South Portland, Molly Olsen from Windham, Adam Gary Normand from Old Orchard Beach and Angelica and Elizabeth Phipps from Standish. Performances of ‘The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee’ will be held at Schoolhouse Arts Center on June 28 and 29 and July 5 and 6 at 7:30 p.m. and June 30 and July 7 at 5 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults and $16 for students

Casco Bay Lines offers a variety of scenic cruises in Casco Bay. Visit http://www.cascobaylines.com/maine-boat-tours/ for details. (DAVID CARKHUFF FILE PHOTO) and seniors. Schoolhouse is located at 16 Richville Road (Route 114) in Standish, just north of the intersection of Route 114 and Route 35. For reservations, call 642-3743 or buy tickets on-line at www.schoolhousearts.org.”

‘Les Miserables’ at MSMT

7:30 p.m. “Les Miserables,” June 26 to July 13, Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Based on a novel by Victor Hugo, ‘Les Miserables’ tells the musical tale of redemption and revolution in early 19th-century France. Ex-convict, Jean Valjean, becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past as he tries to save himself and those around him. The awardwinning score composed by Claude-Michel

Schonberg, with lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer and a book by Alain Boublil, features such memorable musical numbers as ‘On My Own,’ ‘I Dreamed a Dream,’ ‘Do You Hear the People Sing’ and ‘Bring Him Home.’” Maine State Music Theatre, Pickard Theater, Brunswick. Tuesday-Sunday. msmt.org. 725-8769.

‘Deathtrap’ at Lyric Music Theater

8 p.m. “Deathtrap” at Lyric Music Theater, South Portland. “‘Deathtrap’ — This Ira Levin play has many twists and turns! Accomplished writer Sidney Bruhl finds himself struggling to write the next big play. After several flops, he becomes desperate. Sidney reads a play by a young writer, Clifford Anderson, which he finds to be a perfect thriller. He plots to kill Clifford and pass the play off as his own, but soon realizes that this will not be as easy as he planned!” Call the Box Office at 799-1421.

Sunday, June 30 ‘Les Miserables’ at MSMT

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “Les Miserables,” June 26 to July 13, Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables,” “Based on a novel by Victor Hugo, ‘Les Miserables’ tells the musical tale of redemption and revolution in early 19th-century France. Ex-convict, Jean Valjean, becomes a force for good in the world, but cannot escape his dark past as he tries to save himself and those around him.” Maine State Music Theatre, Pickard Theater, Brunswick. Tuesday-Sunday. msmt.org. 725-8769.

‘Deathtrap’ at Lyric Music Theater

2:30 p.m. “Deathtrap” at Lyric Music Theater, South Portland. “‘Deathtrap’ — This Ira Levin play has many twists and turns! Accomplished writer Sidney Bruhl finds himself struggling to write the next big play. After several flops, he becomes desperate. Sidney reads a play by a young writer, Clifford Anderson, which he finds to be a perfect thriller. He plots to kill Clifford and pass the play off as his own, but soon realizes that this will not be as easy as he planned!” Call the Box Office at 799-1421.

Monday, July 1 Drain in 2013 MFA Artist Lecture Series

6:30 p.m. The MFA program at Maine College of Art announced the roster of visiting artists for the summer of 2013 MFA Artist Lecture Series, including Jim Drain. “Jim Drain is a Miami-based artist who creates hyperactive, chaotic art, fashion and furniture, using an abundance of materials from chains to yarn to costumes. He graduated from Rhode Island School of Design and was involved in the highly influential Fort Thunder community in Rhode Island, and was also a former member of Forcefield, a performance art collective who collaborated on videos, comics, totems, experimental music, kinetic sculptures covered in textiles, and more. His work has been collected by the Museum of Modern Art.” All lectures are held in Osher Hall on the second floor of MECA’s Porteous Building at 522 Congress Street, and begin at 6:30 p.m. http://www.meca.edu


6 26pds