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Machar Nguany of East Bayside poses after practicing lacrosse at Kennedy Park. Of all of Portland’s neighborhoods, East Bayside has seen the greatest amount of residential growth, with an increase of 3 percent for a total of 1,573 residents. (DAVID CARKHUFF PHOTO)


Page 22 — — THE The PORTLAND PORTLAND DAILY Daily SUN, Sun, Friday, Friday, May May 3, 3, 2013 2013 Page

Suicide rates rise sharply in U.S. (NY Times) — Suicide rates among middle-age Americans have risen sharply in the past decade, prompting concern that a generation of baby boomers who have faced years of economic worry and easy access to prescription painkillers may be particularly vulnerable to self-inflicted harm. More people now die of suicide than in car accidents, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which published the findings in the May 3 issue of its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. In 2010 there were 33,687 deaths from motor vehicle crashes and 38,364 suicides. Suicide has typically been viewed as a problem of teenagers and the elderly, and the surge in suicide rates among middleage Americans is surprising. From 1999 to 2010, the suicide rate among Americans ages 35 to 64 rose by nearly 30 percent, to 17.6 deaths per 100,000 population, up from 13.7. Although suicide rates are growing among both middle-age men and women, far more men take their own lives. The suicide rate for middle-age men was 27.3 deaths per 100,000, while for women it was 8.1 deaths per 100,000. The most pronounced increases were seen among men in their 50s, a group in which suicide rates jumped by nearly 50 percent, to about 30 per 100,000. For women, the largest increase was seen in those ages 60 to 64, among whom rates increased by nearly 60 percent, to 7.0 per 100,000. While suicide rates can be notoriously difficult to interpret, C.D.C. and academic researchers said they were confident that the data document an actual increase in deaths by suicide and not a statistical anomaly. While reporting of suicides is not always consistent around the country, the current numbers are, if anything, too low. “It’s vastly underreported,” said Julie Phillips, an associate professor of sociology at Rutgers University who has published research on rising suicide rates. “We know we’re not counting all suicides.”

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SEOUL, South Korea (NY Times) — The United States said Thursday that North Korea should immediately release an American citizen who was sentenced this week to 15 years of hard labor, setting up a potential new source of confrontation between the two countries that could aggravate tensions still high over North Korea’s nuclear war threats. The State Department spokesman in Washington, Patrick Ventrell, said the Obama admin-

istration had “longstanding concerns about the lack of transparency and due process in the North Korean legal system.” Ventrell said that the administration wanted the convicted American, Kenneth Bae, who was sentenced on Tuesday on charges of committing hostile acts, to be granted “amnesty and immediate release.” Ventrell’s statement signaled that the administration was not prepared, at least not now, to seek Bae’s release through a high-profile mission to North Korea, as it

has done twice in the past when Americans were held by the North Korean authorities essentially as hostages to gain concessions from the United States. Asked at a State Department briefing if such a mission to free Bae were an option, Ventrell said “I’m not aware one way or another.” While he acknowledged such previous missions, he said, the administration was urging North Korea “to grant him amnesty and to allow for his immediate release, full stop.”

Politics and vetting leave Central Bank takes step as key U.S. posts long unfilled Europe’s downturn drags on WASHINGTON (NY Times) — John Kerry is practically home alone at the State Department, toiling without permanent assistant secretaries of state for the Middle East, Asia, Europe and Africa. At the Pentagon, a temporary personnel chief is managing furloughs for 800,000 civilian employees. There has not been a director of the Internal Revenue Service since last November, and it was only on Thursday that President Obama announced a nomination for commerce secretary after the job was open for nearly a year.

As the White House races this week to plug holes in the Cabinet, the lights remain off in essential offices across the administration. The vacancies, attributed to partisan politics and lengthy White House vetting, are slowing policy making in a capital already known for inaction, and embarrassing a president who has had more than five months since his re-election to fill many of the jobs. “I don’t think it’s ever been this bad,” said Representative Frank R. Wolf, Republican of Virginia, who recently wrote a letter urging Obama to act swiftly to fill top vacancies.

BRATISLAVA, Slovakia (NY Times) — The European Central Bank cut its benchmark interest rate to a record low on Thursday, but remained unwilling to deploy more powerful weapons that many economists say are needed to jolt the Continent out of recession. The central bank, meeting in Bratislava, trimmed its main rate to 0.5 percent from 0.75 percent. The move was seen by many as mostly symbolic, to avoid the impression that the bank and its president, Mario Draghi, were sitting on their hands as recession spread across the euro zone. Draghi promised to continue letting banks borrow as much as they wanted at the benchmark rate for ‘‘as long as needed,’’ and at least until mid-2014. That was a longer time commitment than the E.C.B. has offered in the past. And he said the bank was exploring ways to increase the supply of credit by reviving the moribund market in Europe for asset-backed securities — ones in which mortgages or other loans are bundled and resold to investors.

Obama arrives in Mexican capital to meet with new leader MEXICO CITY (NY Times) — President Obama arrived here Thursday afternoon for talks with President Enrique Peña Nieto of Mexico, with both leaders seeking to shift attention from the security issues that have dominated in recent years to the vast economic relationship between the two nations. But the two presidents were sure to face sharp questions about Peña Nieto’s commitment to working closely with United States intelligence and drug enforcement personnel in the fight against Mexico’s violent drug trafficking organizations. Peña Nieto, who took office in December,

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has made steps in recent months to centralize his country’s fight against violence, rethinking some long-standing cooperative agreements with Washington. Obama said this week that the jury was out on whether those changes would prove problematic for the fight against drug trafficking. At a news conference on Tuesday, he said that he would not “judge yet how this will alter the relationship.” The two presidents are scheduled to follow their afternoon meetings on Thursday with a news conference in the Palacio Nacional. Both men are expected to stress

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the need for greater commercial integration, more educational cooperation and an increased number of cultural exchanges. “Sometimes I think we forget this is a massive trading partner responsible for huge amounts of commerce and huge numbers of jobs on both sides of the border,” Obama said earlier in the week. The Mexican government, which has made economic improvements a central promise, is eager to highlight commercial successes that have kept the economic growth rate in Mexico higher than that of the United States in the last several years, analysts said.

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 3

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Actor Michael J. Fox (third from left) stopped by Tony’s Donuts in Libbytown Tuesday after attending the funeral of his friend Albert Glickman. Glickman — namesake of the Albert Brenner Glickman Family Library on the University of Southern Maine Portland campus — died last Saturday in Los Angeles from complications related to Parkinson’s disease, which he battled for 20 years. Fox is seen here standing with the crew from the popular donut shop. (COURTESY PHOTO)

Nearly 2,500 drivers cited during seat belt enforcement Daily Sun Staff Report Maine State Police cited nearly 2,500 motorists with seat belt violations during the first three months of 2013, according to an update from Steve McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety. In his April 26 “Communicator” bulletin, McCausland said 2,478 motorists received a summons and another 2,549 were issued a warning. This year’s

effort, doubled the numbers generated by Troopers during a similar effort last summer, when 769 summons and 1,717 warnings were issued, he said. The Chief of the State Police, Col. Robert Williams, had asked troopers to make seat belt enforcement a priority. Williams said the increased seat belt enforcement was intended to help save lives. The Bureau of Highway Safety reports that of the 22 highway deaths this year, 11 of the victims were not wearing seat belts.

Officials are reporting a continued increase in heroin overdoses in Portland.  Wednesday, four people in Portland received life-saving emergency medical treatment from the Portland Fire Department for overdoses of heroin, the city reported. Later, a fifth person was found dead in an East End apartment and his death is being investigated as a possible drug overdose, a city press release reported.  Recently heroin use in Portland has increased dramatically, according to the Portland Police Department, Portland Fire Department and Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Division. It is believed that addicts are seeking heroin as a replacement for Oxycontin, the agencies noted. Testing of recent seizures of the drug does not indicate a higher than average potency, suggesting the problem is related to increased use. In the past month, Portland police and fire departments have responded to 14 reports of overdoses where the patient survived after receiving emergency medical treatment, the city reported. Three people died over the same period from what is believed to be accidental drug overdoses, and most of these individuals were using heroin, the press release stated. The fire department has had to increase its supply of Naloxone, a narcotic antagonist which can reverse the respiratory depression associated with narcotic overdose, as a result of this trend. From January to March of this year, Portland firefighters administered Naloxone 11 times, and 14 times in April.

Man guilty of marriage fraud conspiracy Ronald Serunjogi, 35, of Saco, was convicted of marriage fraud conspiracy Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Portland, following a jury trial, according to U.S. Attorney Thomas E. Delahanty II. Evidence at the trial showed that Serunjogi and Sampson Sengoonzi, both Ugandan nationals, paid money to a Lewiston woman who agreed to marry Sengoonzi so that Sengoonzi could seek to become a lawful permanent resident of the United States, Delahanty reported. Sengoonzi was previously convicted and sentenced for his role in the scheme and has been ordered deported. Serunjogi faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. 

Portland Sea Dogs come home in first place By Ken Levinsky

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

The Portland Sea Dogs, returning home riding a five-game win streak, host the New Britain Rock Cats (14-13) Friday evening at 6 p.m. at Hadlock Field. With victories in 10 of their last 12 contests, and a record of 16-9, the Sea Dogs occupy first place in the Eastern League’s Northern Division. In fact, Portland has the best winning percentage in the entire 12-team league.

Third baseman Michael Almanzar leads all Sea Dogs with a .313 batting average. The 6-foot, 3-inch, 22-year-old Eastern League rookie, who was born in the Dominican Republic, also has five home runs. His father, Carlos Almanzar, pitched in the Major Leagues from 1997-2005. Twenty-year-old shortstop Xander Bogaerts, second on the team with a .309 batting average, has hit safely in his last seven games. The 6-foot, 3-inch, 175-pound right handed slugger, who was born in

Aruba, played for The Netherlands in the 2013 World Baseball Classic. Here is the Sea Dogs schedule for this week’s home stand: Friday, May 3 vs. New Britain, 6 p.m. Saturday, May 4 vs. New Britain, 1 p.m. Sunday, May 5 vs. New Britain, 1 p.m. Monday, May 6 vs. Reading, 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 7 vs. Reading, 6 p.m.


Page 4 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

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Why Plutarch matters

Fascination with the lives of our societal leaders began centuries ago, scratching a voyeuristic itch in the reading public. Knowing a good thing, publishing houses keep churning out fresh interpretations of these profiles. While such biographies remain popular today, the seeds of this frenzy were planted several millennia ago by Plutarch. Already the premier essayist of his time, Plutarch (A.D. 46-120) was a philosopher, teacher, and one of the high priests of the Delphic Oracle. However, he left his mark on history with an account of 50 famous Greeks and Romans, “Parallel Lives.” Breaking from the accepted biographical template of the classical period, Plutarch added three unique From the elements to his style which Stacks remain influential, as well as spur controversy. First, instead of listing chronologies and events, Plutarch added the dimension of behavior and thought to his subjects. As far as scholars know, he was the first biographer to attempt this maneuver.

Telly Halkias –––––

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We want your opinions All letters columns and editorial cartoons are the opinion of the writer or artists and do not reflect the opinions of the staff, editors or publisher of The Portland Daily Sun. We welcome your ideas and opinions on all topics and consider every signed letter for publication. Limit letters to 300 words and include your address and phone number. Longer letters will only be published as space allows and may be edited. Anonymous letters, letters without full names and generic letters will not be published. Please send your letters to: THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN, news@portlanddailysun.me.

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Assigning urgency points It will be hard to control expectations now that we’ve seen how quickly a united and turbocharged Congress can accomplish its tasks. The world changed last week as federal lawmakers needed fewer than 24 hours to pass a major law letting the FAA use construction funds for operations, ending nationwide flight delays. The measure bolted through the Senate so quickly the last paragraph was hand written. The FAA, of course, had been cutting hours of air traffic controllers under the new budget rules, and could not just shift money around without congressional action. So just like that, in effect. the friendly skies were free from those pesky “sequester” rules. Despite the administration’s view that exceptions to those broad cuts would undermine efforts for a “bigger fix,” which is the reason to have the sequester in the first place, compromise was reached. Maine’s Senator Susan Collins, who is the ranking member of the chamber’s appropriations transportation subcommittee, emerged as a leader, noting way back on April 25 that a particular FAA program had sufficient funds to support the transfer. “This is a common-sense solution,” said Collins, who was a co- sponsor of the measure. “It doesn’t involve additional money. It is a one-time shift of unused moneys. It does not make a permanent change in the Airport Improvement Program.” It turns out that particular construction-focused program is funded by taxes and fees on airline tickets and aviation fuel, and was exempt from those evil sequestration cuts. Even more common sense: The $253 million needed to fix the flights is only 7.5 percent of the $3.35 billion allotted by the program for projects this year. See how much sense people make when the issue is important, like getting the heck out of Washington? Any opposition simply got out of the way. It turns out that a few days of flight delays reminded Congress that those “flyover” states are also fly-into states, and with their own vacation week looming they got busy. Yet, sadly, some among us already see only the dark cloud around our silver lining. These critics linger on the fact that the so-called sequester budget continues to create chaos, impacting a range of issues like Headstart funding, cancer treatments, food programs and even our military. Why, they ask, is aviation the only issue vital enough to get such swift attention? Could it be because Congress folk wanted

the fix before they got delayed getting out of Washington? Could it be because, unlike so many of the other laws, this one actually mattered in the lives of ––––– the lawmakers? Usually The point was made by one of the CBS morning show anchors, Reserved who noted that Congress can act “only when it affects THEIR travel time.” We should note she did not pose it as a question. Here’s the point: Who cares? If this is the game, and those are the rules, then we’d better play. So what matters is that now we tie every single national issue to congressional flight delays. That’s right. We need to pass one more quick law: “The FlightDelay Congressional Incentive Act of 2013.” The law would assign certain delays to key issues depending on importance, which would be set by citizens ranking the challenges online. Immigration reform? That is vital to something like 12 million people, and by extension nearly all of us. Yet it lingers year after year. Under FDCIA, each month of inaction would result in five minutes of flight delay for any aircraft carrying a member of congress. I can hear the captain now: “Yes, everybody, this is the flight deck and we’ll be pushing back from the gate 30 minutes late for no good reason except there’s a member of congress is on board and, you know, those guys still have not passed immigration reform!” Other issues might have less time, like two minutes for every month Congress doesn’t address military budgets with the zeal they apparently reserve for flight delays. It’s going to add up fairly quickly. Who knew fixing Congress could be so simple? It turns out we live in a world where major compromise and common-ground laws can be passed in days instead of years, and who among us ever expected that?

Curtis Robinson

(Curtis Robinson is the founding editor of The Portland Daily Sun.)


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 5

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

You can’t go home

What happens when a police standoff keeps you out of your apartment and away from your pet cat?

The call came from my roommate, bad news in the middle of a Monday afternoon. “Dude, we can’t go home. Portland SWAT team has the house surrounded, you can’t even get down the street.” Nothing like a slow news day, I have to tell you. Just arriving at the paper in the middle of the afternoon, the editor passed me going the other way in the hallway, headed off with the camera at a good clip. Figuring there was something going on, I didn’t bother to tarry and inquire at the elevator. A few minutes later, when that fateful call came in, it was time to hotfoot it down the street to see what the deal was. From a news perspective, a writer really isn’t supposed to cover stuff they have a possible conflict of interest with. I dashed off the quick social media update, knowing the followers would chime in. Most of the responses were along the “what did you do NOW?” category. Chuck Igo nailed it with the double-word score triple somersault and stuck the landing. “Used to be someone would mark-up your copy with a red pencil. wow.” 9.9 From the Russian judge. From a Gonzo writer’s perspective, that is the only sort of story that really matters. So here I was, on the crowd side of the yellow tape. Gathering information, sharing it with colleagues from the news and TV stations. (By the way, a gentle reminder to someone who shall remain nameless. “OFF RECORD” means exactly that.) There was the info from a usually reliable source, that not only did the alleged suspect have a gun, but that he had explosives. I tried to put the rumor to rest, as these days it’s a short list of people who are that smart AND that dumb. Paraphrasing a bit here, I wanted a story ... and for my sins, they gave me one. An interesting side note from this side of the yellow caution tape. Watching a scene like this from the sidelines is sort of like watching a slow motion car wreck, or smoke coming from your house. You want to get in there and DO SOMETHING, every bit of bone and sinew in your body stretched to the snapping point. Back behind the yellow tape, fat-boy. Comings and goings, brief press updates from the chief from time to time. Even though all the scuttlebutt on the street was pretty much useless, there were some moments of clarity. “John,” the guy from across the street who worked with Kyle Upton in the past, getting him on the cell phone. That same guy passing the info on to the Portland PD that Kyle wanted to give himself up, gently, and being told to hang up the phone NOW. Then, a few minutes later, his phone was

Bob Higgins –––––

Tabula in Naufragio

taken from him. Then, the SWAT team rolled even closer to the house. Not exactly the way of sending a message of willingness for a peaceful ending to a barricade/standoff

situation. Somehow, at some point we have to work on that whole “surrender peacefully” concept. If someone is willing to come out peacefully and handcuff themselves, they probably should be swiftly forced to the ground with a knee on the neck while experiencing a TSA style groping. Walk them up the street and toss them in the wagon. If that could be seen happening without the extra damage after the play, more folks might give up peacefully. To their credit, the PPD treated me and the roommate fairly, holding us back a bit after the street was opened so they could clear the house. It took awhile, but it’s interesting to note that the only weapon found was a BB gun. To be fair, I probably should have remembered to hand the officer that searched my place a can of cat food to toss in my room like a grenade, as that seems to be the only safe method for approaching a freaked out 19-yearold black cat in a dark room. Quite frankly, I’m shocked and happy that he got away with his skin ... as that cat had taken on German shepherds and veterinarians alike with the same attitude. There was even some post-incident conversation. The cop that was asked to wait at the scene after the others left was expecting “the chief” to come, but it turned out being the chief of Portland’s Fire Department. An aluminum door-opening wedge was borrowed for the party, and someone had to get it back to its rightful place. He got stuck with the extra task, along with the weapons search. There was late night conversation that “creating a standoff” was a matter of paying a fine in this state, that in other states it’s a fairly serious criminal charge. Quoting Maine Revised Statutes, Title 25, “Creating a police standoff is a civil violation. The court may order a person who creates a police standoff to make restitution to each agency that responded to the standoff. Restitution must equal the direct costs incurred in responding to the standoff or $500, whichever is greater” Might want to get on that and beef it up a bit, Maine legislators. I suppose that after he left, sneaking up on the WGME news team parked outside the house for the live shot on the 11 news while dressed in a gorilla suit was the appropriate end to a long day. Well, maybe NOT appropriate. Sometimes “you just GOTTA.” (Bob Higgins is a regular contributor to The Portland Daily Sun.)

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Page 6 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OPINION –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Scoundrels in Portland’s history What closes the case on whether someone actually is a scoundrel or not is when, in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, they continue to deny any wrongdoing. No apologies, no clearing the air, no indication whatsoever that they accept responsibility and are repentant. Like with Richard Connor, the disgraced former CEO of Maine Today Media, the publisher of the Press Herald. The paper recently reported in a front-page story that Connor took their company for over a half million dollars during the time that he was CEO, from June 2009 to October 2011. Along with other self-serving expenditures, they say he gave himself unauthorized raises and bonuses amounting to $287,224.78 — at the very time when “line workers,” people who depend on a weekly paycheck, were voluntarily accepting pay cuts so that the company could avoid bankruptcy. They wanted to save their jobs, sure, but they also did it because they love the company. If you’ve ever worked at a newspaper you’ll understand that. And the guy won’t even give them the satisfaction of saying he made a mistake and he’s sorry. He smugly comes across with one fumbling arrogant denial after another, even after the paper’s insurance company has agreed to compensate the Press Herald under the “employee theft” clause of its insurance policy, thereby strongly suggesting that Connor is indeed guilty as charged. That makes him a scoundrel, if all is true as presented. The story seems to be that he was hired to rescue the city’s daily newspaper and he almost destroyed it, then slunk off with a smirk on his face. Kind of made my blood boil and got me thinking about other scoundrels in the history of the city. There was, of course, Captain Henry Mowat, the British naval commander who ordered the burning of Falmouth, now Portland, on Oct. 18, 1775, for its resistance to British rule. He had his fleet of six warships bombard the city from nine o’clock in

especially cruel. He, accordingly, became the morning until six the only American slave trader to be o’clock at night, then tried, convicted and executed for being had a landing party engaged in the slave trade. go ashore and set fire Certainly any list of scoundrels in the to any buildings still history of the city should include Milstanding. Virtually dred Gillars, better known as Axis Sally. every building in town During World War Two she was the was destroyed, and European equivalent of Tokyo Rose, and, four hundred families yes, she was from Portland. She is best were left homeless and with no provisions remembered for her “Home Sweet Home with winter coming on. Hour,” where her running theme was the Now, one might say that Mowat was a infidelity of American soldiers’ wives and military man acting under orders from sweethearts at home. The background his government, but, in fact, that was music was the long lonesome sound of not quite the case. His orders from home train whistle as a troop train pulled out clearly stated that he was not to commit Connor of Anytown, USA, filled with young men such an act unless the town refused to waving good-bye to women good ol’ Milengage in negotiations. When he issued dred said were headed straight to other arms. his warning on the morning of the 18th, though, the Oh, enough. I’ve put Mr. Connor in the company townspeople sent a delegation to plead with him for of a war criminal, a slave trader, and a traitor, all mercy and discuss other means of settling the issue, based on accounts provided by the people he allegbut he gave no quarter. edly wronged. I’ve never even met the man and I Evidently his attitude stemed from an indignity don’t have any first-hand evidence, so who really he had suffered some months earlier when he was knows. As time goes on maybe things will come out briefly imprisoned on shore after he came into port that will put a different “spin” on it than the Press with his fleet to protect a Loyalist ship builder who Herald people did, as Mr. Connor’s attorney has sugwas attempting to defy the town’s boycott of trade gested might be the case. with Great Britain. Seems as though Mowat had a What bothers me, though, is that nowhere in all personal account to settle. of this has Mr. Connor acknowledged any degree of Not only did the British government show its guilt. The attorney for the Press Herald has said disapproval of his actions by stalling his career in that the company wants to “move on and put Rich the Royal Navy, but his foul deed was also recorded Connor behind it” and I guess that’s the decent way for all time in what might be considered the finest to go, but it sure would be good to at least hear some document ever written, The Declaration of Indepensort of admission from him that he made certain dence. In their listing of their grievances against errors in judgment here and there, or something of King George, the founding fathers included: “He has that nature. I’m sure the people who took pay cuts to plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our save the company would appreciate that. towns, and destroyed the lives of our people.” How about it, Rich? Then there was Nathaniel Gordon, the lowlife slave trader from Portland who was convicted of (Cliff Gallant of Portland is a regular columnist slave trading in the year 1860, forty years after it for The Portland Daily Sun. Email him at gallant. became illegal. President Lincoln refused to comcliff555@yahoo.com.) mute Gorgon’s sentence because his methods were

Cliff Gallant –––––

Daily Sun Columnist

Shakespeare is an example of Plutarch’s influence HALKIAS from page 4

For example, getting inside Antony’s head to evaluate his love for Cleopatra and the context in which it existed to satisfy her political ambitions is one thing. Telling us he ruled the eastern Roman provinces, and had a fling with the queen of Egypt is quite another. While such an interpretation is problematical to modern historians given the lack of Plutarch’s primary sources, it remains visionary, and added much needed spice to an otherwise bland recipe. Next, Plutarch used comparative analysis. At the conclusion of his 50 short biographies, he formed 18 pairs, one Greek and one Roman in each, chosen for similar time periods or official roles. He then scrutinized their similarities, differences, and related effects. From there, he examined the psychology for why one subject chose a particular course, while the second subject chose another. This was another unheard of technique, which opened the gates to his final motive. Plutarch always drew ethical conclusions from the behavior of famous leaders, which is consistent with his background as a priest and his other writings, such as the widely read

The influence of “Parallel Lives” by Plutarch is legion. (COURTESY IMAGE)

“Moral Essays.” While this served his era well, it has run Plutarch into trouble today. In an increasingly relativistic world defined by ethical gray areas and the constant vacillation of religion’s relevance, many postmodern scholars chided Plutarch’s judgmental approach. Nevertheless, the ancients were concerned with identifying right from wrong, even if they didn’t always prac-

tice it. Unlike Thucydides, Plutarch didn’t consider politics and warfare as bodies of work from which to provide future governing models. “Parallel Lives” focused on the struggle of living rather than the lives themselves. Plutarch cared more for why statesmen and soldiers do what they do, so that his readers could understand their rulers — a populist rationale. And enduring. Embattled college classics departments survived the postmodern scourge and in the last decade have experienced a renaissance. The influence of “Parallel Lives” in the great works of literature and government is legion, and provides a solid foundation for human philosophy in both creative and pragmatic endeavors. Ultimately, this is why Plutarch still matters today, and why biographies of civic leaders remain top bestsellers. Shakespeare is one such example of Plutarch’s nuanced influence. His dramatic works are rife with moralistic tales and psychological character profiles. The Bard’s table of contents is peppered with names from the main index of “Parallel Lives.” All faced ethical choices in real life: Julius Caesar, Mark Antony, and Coriolanus, to name a few. The plays reveal more names familiar to Plutarch, as well as

dramatization of his exact behavioral evaluations. The Founding Fathers also sought inspiration from “Parallel Lives.” In “The Federalist,” Hamilton, Madison and Jay invoke Plutarch’s tone in arguing for ratification of our Constitution, however imperfect a document they knew it to be. They assessed the struggle to create a system of rule by recounting the travails of such past upstarts as the Spartan lawgiver Lycurgus, and the Athenian ruler Pericles. The Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire, a Shakespeare devotee, once noted: “Just as there is one geometry, there is one morality.” In this same vein, there is a reason why we flock to biographies, especially those of politicians and generals. “Parallel Lives,” which has influenced all such accounts to this day, remains not only an opus about how leaders live, but about why. Were he alive now, and almost three centuries after first reading Plutarch, Voltaire would still approve. (Telly Halkias is an award-winning freelance journalist from Portland’s West End. You may contact him at tchalkias@aol.com or follow him on Twitter at @TellyHalkias.)


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 7

First Friday features photography and film By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Fans of pictures, both the still and moving variety, can get their fill at the First Friday art walk. The Salt Institute of Documentary Studies is exhibiting “Flash Forward,” the award-winning work of emerging photographers from the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Creative Portland and the Maine Academy of Modern Music are teaming up to show the first free public viewing of MAMM’s popular video “Be in Love” in Congress Square. The two film formats are part of the art walk tradition that continues to showcase art and music created on nearby streets or in distant lands.

Flash Forward 2012 Group Exhibition

Salt Institute is exhibiting “Flash Forward” until May 8. The school, at 561 Congress St., will be open Friday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. An exhibition of young photographers from Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States, “Flash Forward” has work from the winners of this juried competition. Participants must be 34 years old or younger. “It’s a program to encourage emerging photographers, to help them get into collectors’ home and galleries,” said Maryann Camilleri of the Magenta Foundation which organizes the contest, now in its ninth year. “The competition gets judged by 15 jurors from around the world. Each May, we announce the winners of the previous year. And the 2013 “Mentions” were just posted for next year’s competition.” This is Magenta’s second year at Salt. “We love working there, love their students and what they do,” Camilleri said. “Because so much of our program supports photojournalism and documentary work, it’s a great fit.” Technology has worked its way to the forefront of the medium, she said. “Especially this year, lots of photographers are pushing the boundaries with digital. We were inun-

dated with submissions this The film is a result of year because the avenues for MAMM’s work with local celebrating photojournalism filmmakers, musicians, and documentary work are and students to make becoming more narrow. Life and a video in the style of other magazines like that just the Playing For Change don’t exist anymore,” she said. “Songs Around The World” The contest names 35 winseries. “We chose to feaners from each country, one ture the song ‘Be In Love’ “Bright Spark” winner who colby Portland’s own Dominic lects $5,000, and 12 honorable Lavoie,” Jeff Shaw, director mentions. of MAMM said, according “Each winner gets a doubleto YouTube video notes. page spread in the Flash For- Lesley MacVane, photographer, “Let Them Eat Cake.” (COUR- The film was produced by ward book,” Camilleri said. David Meiklejohn. Jim TESY IMAGE) Nelson Chan, a photo instrucBegley was mixing engitor at Salt, will be showing his own work at the Flash neer and Adam Ayan was mastering engineer. Forward Festival in Boston in two weeks. Flash For“The video captures the spirit of music and the ward invited him and nine other photographers to creative community in Portland,” said Jennifer exhibit at a show called “Cultivated: New Photography Hutchins, executive director of Creative Portland, from New England.” who was looking for a way to make it known to more “This body of work is a seven-year project that I’ve people in a live setting. been working on, photographing my parents, who To check out the video, visit http://www.youtube. own a business in Hong Kong,” Chan said. His parcom/watch?v=KrkWKdkN-CM&feature=youtu.be. ents, Stephen and Jenny Chan, often travel back and For more information on the Maine Academy of forth from Hong Kong to New Jersey. “I weave a comModern Music, visit http://maineacademyofmodernbination of portraiture, still-life, and landscape work music.org. between both countries, to try to create a narrative to make their work and home seem the same. It’s a ‘Stiletto Life’ family-business (a toy company) that has consumed Kick up your heels on First Friday with the Maine their lives. My parents were always traveling when Charitable Mechanic Association, 519 Congress St. I was growing up, so after college this was my own MCMA member Lesley MacVane, photographer, way to reconnect with them.” is the May artist in the library and will open her The Flash Forward Festival is May 16 to 19. photography exhibit, “Stiletto Life” on the First Friday Downtown Art Walk, May 3, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Be In Love” in Congress Square The Maine Charitable Mechanic Association was Creative Portland and the Maine Academy of founded in 1815 as a craftsman’s guild to teach Modern Music will show “Be in Love” in Congress and promote excellence among Portland’s various Square Friday. Live performances will start at 6 mechanical and artistic trades. p.m., and the video will be shown on the big screen For details, visit http://www.mainecharitablemat 8 p.m. echanicassociation.com.

Cinco de Mayo at El Rayo brings out the local bands By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

For those who plan to get in tune with a popular holiday this Sunday, a chance to celebrate Cinco de Mayo at El Rayo Taqueria in Portland means checking out some local musical talent. The York Street taco shop and the cantina next door are hosting a bunch of local bands, in a grand event called FIESTA! Cinco de Mayo. There will be music by the Pete Kilpatrick Band, Anna and the Diggs, and Pete Witham and the Cozmik Zom- ABOVE: Pete Kilpatrick Band. RIGHT: Marc Chillemi of Primo Cubano. (COURTESY PHOTOS) bies. Jaw Gems joins in the fun, us can ride a mechanical bull. have all these cross-streets. At every as does the Maine Marimba There will be a tent, so no matter the corner, there’s a ‘son’ group just like Ensemble and Primo Cubano. weather, music and Mexican frivolity ours.” The fifth of May commemorates the will be on tap. Chillemi, who plays trumpet, was in Mexican army’s victory over France This is the fourth annual Fiesta! and Cuba in 2002. Guitarist Paul D’Alessio at the Battle of Puebla, during the organizers say it will be bigger and went there in 2004 and also got turned Franco-Mexican War. Often mistakbetter than ever. on to the music. D’Alessio just returned enly thought of as an Independence “We’re really excited about the music from Trinidad again, Chillemi said, Day, it is a relatively minor holiday in lineup we have,” Cimitile said. “It’s as part of an agricultural exchange Mexico, but has come to be a celebragoing to be the biggest production we’ve between Brunswick and its sister city tion here for Mexican-Americans. had. We were looking for kind of a minithat dates to the Eisenhower adminisRob Cimitile, assistant manager musical festival feeling.” tration. at El Rayo, will play with the Maine Marc Chillemi, of Primo Cubano, says Think of the band as the Buena Vista Marimba Ensemble, as well as his he loves playing his music, called “son Social Club of Portland, said Chillother band, Builder of the House. Cubano” or “the sound of Cuba,” in an emi, who is joined by D’Alessio, Lenny There will be an outdoor kitchen outdoor venue. Hatch on percussion, Eric Winter who and bar, in addition to the regular “This music is built to play outside,” plays maracas and sings, and Duane menu offerings. Kids can enjoy face he said. “In the old part of Havana, you Edwards on bass fiddle. painting, and the brave ones among

The cantina next door to El Rayo Taqueria opens at 9 a.m. so early-risers can get their Mexican fix even sooner. Each year, the crowds at the event get bigger. “Last year was pretty insane,” Cimitile said. “I don’t know all the numbers off the top of my head, but it was nonstop people coming in the entire day. We didn’t promote much last year, but it’s been building on its own. Last year, we got slammed and that influenced our approach this year. We said, ‘Let’s just go all out.’ We won best Mexican restaurant in Portland in April (in a local newspaper poll), so we’ve been riding that wave.”

The Event:

FIESTA! Cinco de Mayo at El Rayo Sunday, May 5 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. El Rayo Taqueria / Cantina 101 York Street, Portland

The Bands:

Primo Cubano at 11 a.m. Maine Marimba Ensemble at 1 p.m. Jaw Gems at 3 p.m. Pete Witham and the Cozmik Zombies at 4 p.m. Builder of the House at 6 p.m. Anna and the Diggs at 7 p.m. Pete Kilpatrick Band at 8 p.m.


Page 8 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

Rising Tide Brewery moved from an industrial park to Anderson Street as the bunsiness expanded. The Rising Tide team: Heather, Nathan and Spence. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTO)

East Bayside: ‘As good as it’s ever been’

‘It’s a really cool little bubble down here,’ says one merchant about thriving neighborhood By Craig Lyons

G reg St. Angelo was a “Dump Ranger.” That title was bestowed on the kids who grew THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

up in East Bayside because of the proximity to the dump, but the residents wore the title as a badge of honor. People said East Bayside was a dumpy place, according to St. Angelo, but the residents knew better because it was their home. “It was a great place to grow up,” St. Angelo said. “I can’t tell you anything bad about the neighborhood.” St. Angelo grew up on Everett Street, where his family had lived since his grandparents immigrated to the United States. All the families knew each other, the kids played together and people cared about the neighborhood. After he left Portland in 1951 and came back in 1970, St. Angelo said the neighborhood began to change as many of the people who grew up there moved away and never came back. St. Angelo, who lives in North Deering, said when he visits the old neighborhood now, it’s improved greatly over the years and feels like it used to. “I think right now, it’s probably as good as it’s ever

been,” he said. During the past few years, East Bayside has slowly developed into one of the city’s most thriving neighborhoods as more people are moving into East Bayside and businesses are springing up. Of all of Portland’s neighborhoods, East Bayside has seen the greatest amount of residential growth, with an increase of 3 percent for a total of 1,573 residents. “It just feels like a place where people live, work and play,” said Heather Sanborn, co-owner of Rising Tide Brewery on Anderson Street.

P

The tipping point

ortland developer Peter Bass saw opportunity in East Bayside as the site of a housing complex he planned to build in the early 2000s. Bass said he saw Anderson Street as a transitional location between the multi-family residential properties on the hill and the light industrial properties in East Bayside. When the 145 Anderson St. project opened in 2002, Bass said he thought economic growth in East Bayside would happen sooner but the recession delayed it.

“It is happening now,” he said. A major factor that led to the boom in East Bayside is the overall growth of Portland, Bass said. Given the lower prices in that neighborhood, it became attractive because more established areas like the West End and Munjoy Hill got too pricey, he said. Jed Rathband, an East Bayside resident and member of the neighborhood organization, said space started to become scarce on the peninsula, especially when people wanted to be downtown. The location and amount of available property drove East Bayside’s recent growth, he said. East Bayside has reached its tipping point, said Rathband, as people are paying attention to the neighborhood and getting interested in it. “The interest comes first and then the growth,” he said. Rising Tide Brewery, Tandem Coffee, Bunker Brewing, Pistol Pete’s Upholstery, Portland Power Yoga, the Greener Cleaner, Horizon Energy and Urban Farm Fermentory are all businesses that have cropped up during the last year and a half in East Bayside. Other companies like Maine Mead Works and Coffee By Design have grown and expanded as new businesses are moving in. see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 9

Greg St. Angelo grew up in East Bayside and says that the neighborhood is now as good as it ever was. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTO)

Neighborhood business ‘never questioned the decision’ to open from preceding page

The crop of new businesses was fostered, in part, by the light industrial space that scarcely exists elsewhere on the Portland peninsula. The industrial buildings in East Bayside outgrew their usefulness for manufacturing and warehousing because they were antiquated or too small, Bass said. Serious light industrial uses are moving to larger parcels off Warren Avenue and Presumpscot Street, said Bass, but the buildings in East Bayside are being subdivided for smaller businesses. He said that movement opened up the light industrial real estate to new uses. “That kind of got things going down there,” he said. An early pop-up in the industrial section of East Bayside was Maine Mead Works, which got its start on Anderson Street before moving to 51 Washington Avenue more than two years ago. When the company was looking for

startup space, the Anderson Street light industrial area felt like a good choice because it was close to downtown, said Nick Higgins, the company’s meadmaker, and it wasn’t out in an industrial park. “It was just a good fit,” he said. Rising Tide first opened its doors off Riverside Street in an industrial area that housed five other breweries, said Heather Sanborn, co-owner of Rising Tide Brewery, and the space lacked the community feeling since it wasn’t in a neighborhood. Sanborn said when they started looking for a new space to expand the operation, their priority was finding a building where the interior fit the needs of a brewery, like floor drains and overhead doors, plus it would be an advantage to have space on the peninsula. Sanborn said she grew up in Portland and thought that East Bayside was not a good neighborhood, but found that wasn’t the case. “I’ve never questioned the decision to take this space,” she said. see next page

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Page 10 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

Police: Crime trends in right direction from preceding page

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When Will and Kathleen Pratt moved to Portland in earlier 2012 and started scouting locations to open a coffee roastery in Portland, the first building they were shown was 122 Anderson St., and it was love at first sight. “It was perfect,” said Kathleen Pratt, the co-owner of Tandem Coffee. At first, Pratt said they just planned on having a roastery but got the zoning exceptions to open a small cafe. “I feel like we picked the best place for us,” she said. As other businesses were establishing themselves in East Bayside, Pratt said she noticed a lot of exciting things happening in the neighborhood with the breweries, distillery, fermentory and artesian food makers. “I feel like there’s a lot of momentum down here,” Pratt said. East Bayside has an authentic, local businesses community that has driven its growth, she said, and that atmosphere was created by companies like the soon-to-open distillery, Tandem Coffee Roasters, Bunker Brewing, Urban Farm Fermentory, Horizon Energy, Maine Green Building Supply, the Greener Cleaner, Portland Power Yoga. “They make this place a better neighborhood every day,” she said.

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iggins, of Maine Mead Works, had an impression growing up in Portland that East Bayside was a sketchy and unsafe neighborhood, but found that wasn’t the case when he moved to Hammond Street. Having lived on the West End, he said, there are areas in that neighborhood that feel more unsafe than in East Bayside and was pleased with what he found. “It’s just really safe,” he said. Aside from working in East Bayside, Higgins bought a house in the neighborhood. Higgins said when he started looking at buying a home, he knew he wanted to live on the peninsula, but had to work within his budget. After about a year of searching, Higgins said he decided to take a look at East Bayside. Higgins said he never thought of East Bayside as a residential area but went to look at some houses, and found one that was within his budget and didn’t need a lot of work. After looking at the property, Higgins said, he took a walk around the neighborhood later in the day. “I realized it’s a great little neighborhood,” he said. Melissa Hoskins, president of the East Bayside Neighborhood Organization, had lived on both Munjoy Hill and the West End before she started looking for a house. Hoskins said she knew she wanted a multi-family building but had a limited budget. She zeroed in on East Bayside. “It was close to the East End but it wasn’t as expensive,” Hoskins said, and it had a diverse neighborhood with a mix of people. Hoskins said East Bayside is the state’s most diverse neighborhood. According to the 2010 Census, the East Bayside block has a diversity index of 71.4 percent — the highest in Portland. The index means that if two people are chosen at random, there’s a 71.4 percent chance they belong to different races or ethnic groups. “That was very attractive to me,” she said. It’s important for the neighborhood’s residents to retain the diversity and mix of incomes, said Hoskins, and not let East Bayside get gentrified to the point where those residents are pushed out. Higgins said one of his first impressions of the neighborhood was the diversity. He said there’s large immigrant population, young people and the long-time working-class residents. “I’m really happy I ended up there,” he said.

Jed Rathband said East Bayside’s challenge has been dispelling the myths that it’s a bad neighborhood and nothing is there. People see the beauty in the neighborhood, the history and the diversity, he said, and that is what makes Easy Bayside’s future bright.

S

Getting past the past

tories persist about East Bayside’s past crime problems and blighted houses, but residents say that’s no longer the case. In 2010, the Portland Police Department established the East Bayside Community Policing Office to create a greater presence in the neighborhood. Senior Lead Officer Anthony Ampezzan said he’s seen positive changes in the neighborhood during the past few years. “It’s moving in the right direction,” he said, and people are paying better attention to the neighborhood, and putting money and resources into the houses and amenities, like the basketball courts. Ampezzan said the added presence in the neighborhood helps the officers get to know the residents and build relationships. He said as time goes on, more people are becoming more comfortable with telling the community policing office about any issues. “The relationships are much better than a few years ago,” he said. Hoskins said crime in the neighborhood comes in spurts, and the community policing office addresses one issue and another crops up. She said, based on the stories she’s heard, it’s a huge improvement from a few years ago. Two factors have driven the decrease in some of the crime issues, said Hoskins, and that’s the police presence and the influx of people who are concerned about their neighborhood. “I think we’re moving in the right direction with that,” she said. Ampezzan said even with the improvements to the buildings, new residents and greater foot traffic, there are still some problem spots. “I believe crime has gone down but it’s not disappeared,” he said. Rathband said East Bayside’s challenge has been dispelling the myths that it’s a bad neighborhood and nothing is there. People see the beauty in the neighborhood, the history and the diversity, he said, and that is what makes Easy Bayside’s future bright. “We’ve really made progress when we’ve dispelled the myths,” he said.

T

Room for improvement

andem has relied on word of mouth and their wholesale business to attract patrons, Pratt said, and the biggest challenge for the developing businesses is getting people into the neighborhood and showing them it’s not just an industrial wasteland. “People are interested in what’s happening down here,” she said. “It’s a really cool little bubble down here.” When it comes to making improvements in the neighborhood, Hoskins said, there are some infrastructure improvements that can be made but the city is working on them. District 1 City Councilor Kevin Donoghue said the city has already approved the funding for a connection along Boyd Street that links up to the Bayside Trail, the Anderson Street Byway project and improving trail access along Tukey’s Bridge. see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 11

City looking at creative zoning for area’s light industrial zone from preceding page

Hoskins said the improvements will better communicate that people are in a neighborhood, and draw more people to the neighborhood and attract more residents and businesses. “I kind of feel like the ball is rolling now,” she said.

A

Doing nothing to promote growth

s growth in East Bayside continues, the city has a simple strategy to foster the neighborhood: Do nothing. “We need to affirmatively do nothing,” Donoghue said, with the knowledge that doing nothing preserves what’s there. Jeff Levine, the city’s director of planning and

Donoghue said there’s a concern about protecting the light industrial zone’s productive uses and not gentrifying the businesses out of existence. The city is taking a look at creative zoning for the light industrial zone that protects the existing uses but still allows retail components. “We’re trying to balance those different things,” he said. Allowing housing and serious retail operations in the light industrial zone could jeopardize the businesses in that area, Levine said, and block ABOVE: Will and Kathleen Pratt moved to Portland and chose East Bayside to start Tandem Coffee, a roast- future productive uses ery and cafe. Kathleen Pratt said she noticed a lot of exciting things happening in the neighborhood with if apartments are put the breweries, distillery, fermentory and artesian food makers, with plenty of momentum still evident. in and residents object BELOW LEFT: Nick Higgins, meadmaker at Maine Mead Works and an Easy Bayside resident, said the area to the noise or smells is a great little neighborhood for both living and working. (CRAIG LYONS PHOTOS) associated with the operations. urban development, said the best way to protect uses Donoghue said the city can meet the demand for in both the residential and light industrial zones is retail that’s associated with productive uses in the to avoid major changes in zoning that might have an light industrial zone, but the line is crossed when adverse effect but still allow flexibility to meet the retail becomes a major component of a business, needs of businesses and residents. someone is selling products they didn’t make or a “The light industrial is really unique,” Donoghue tasting room becomes a bar. said, and has either accidentally or through neglect “I think it’s working great, it should continue to flourished because the city hasn’t made any significant changes to the zoning.

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see next page


Page 12 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

Housing density one objective

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work great,” Donoghue said, and the city needs to be aware of not letting expanded retail or residential uses creep into the area. Outside the light industrial and business zones, the housing market is beginning to stabilize in East Bayside with first-time homeowners buying property. Donoghue said in the way of development, there isn’t much acreage for new housing projects, but the Portland Housing Authority has a great opportunity to create higher density housing. “Washington Avenue is zoned for more density than it’s built,” Donoghue said, and current regulations allow for building heights between 44 to 55 feet. Two projects are in the works that would build to the allowed density: an Avesta Housing project at 134 Washington Ave. and a private project at 202 Washington Ave. Avesta is planning an 18-unit building at 134 Washington Ave. The project will create rental housing units built on a 0.235-acre site occupied by a single-family home and detached garage. At 202 Washington Ave., developers plan to build the East Bayside Loft Homes, which will house three units and will be built into the slope of the hill. Levine said density is less of an issue along Washington Avenue than the city’s current parking requirements for multi-unit buildings. The Avesta project request and was granted a waiver from the parking requirements, and 202 Washington Avenue includes garage space for the units. Levine said the city is planning to take a look at its parking requirements to allow buildings to have less parking. With an eye toward the future, East Bayside’s only threat to its growth is itself. “I think we need to stay on the course we’re on,” Donoghue said.


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 13


Page 14 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

Variety store celebrates golden anniversary By Timothy Gillis

SPECIAL TO THE PORTLAND DAILY SUN

Anania’s has seen a lot of changes in the last 50 years. Competition from bigger food shops, up and down economies, and the fickle nature of owning a small business have all given Ed and Barbara Anania plenty to think about as their outer Congress Street store celebrates its golden anniversary. But the success stories have won out over such hardships, due to both an adaptable marketing strategy and the consistent freshness and quality of the food they serve. Over the years, the store changed their offerings to keep ahead of the food club competition. Ed contrasted the store as it was then with what it’s like now. “The biggest difference is we started out as a minigrocery store. But with the grocery stores getting bigger, we started making sandwiches.” That change helped them compete and stay in business, and the family-run operation has been thriving ever since. Joe Anania, Ed’s uncle, bought the Newbury

Moms • Grads • Dads SHOW THEM THE LOVE and place an announcement in

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• Mother’s Day • Graduation • Father’s Day Email us your message of 50 words or less and a jpeg/camera ready photo of your special Mom, Grad or Dad to: ads@portlanddailysun.me, or call 699-5806. Be sure to include your message, a photo, your name and contact information so we may process your $25 payment (credit card or check) and guarantee placement. Space is Limited! Due Dates for messages, pictures and payment: Mother’s Day - Due Wednesday, May 8, Running Friday, May 10 Graduation - Due Wednesday, May 28, Running, Friday, May 31 Father’s Day - Due Wednesday, June 12, Running, Friday, June 14

Street Market in the Little Italy section of Portland in 1958. Ed Anania, the current owner’s father, bought into the business in 1959. They named it Anania’s in 1963. Ed worked there since he was a kid, in the mid 1970’s. He has been working full-time there since 1983, after he graduated from the University of Southern Maine. His three sisters also worked there through high school. His own three kids chipped in at the store when they were in high school and college. Two of his children are now army officers, the third is living in Massachusetts. They opened a second store, a Wash- Ed and Barbara Anania at their outer Congress Street store, which celebrates its golden anniington Avenue locale, in 1997. versary. (TIMOTHY GILLIS PHOTO) A while ago, they decided to get into the catering business, as another way to take advantage of good food ready-made for the CLIP & SAVE public. “Every time the big guys get bigger, we try to change, to bring in new things.” Ed said. “We have some fantastic whoopie pies.” The changes over time have been the lifeblood of the variety store, and the fresh, local food has been the backbone. Asked about what might be in store for them in No Expiration the years ahead, Ed and Barbara said so much time in the business has taught them to be ready for changes, and to be ready to adapt when they come. As part of the 50th anniversary celebration, Anania’s is offering two Italian sandwiches for $7.99, _______________ about a dollar off the normal price.

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The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 15

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Today’s Birthdays: Folk singer Pete Seeger is 94. Actress Ann B. Davis is 87. Actor Alex Cord is 80. Singer Frankie Valli is 79. Sports announcer Greg Gumbel is 67. Pop singer Mary Hopkin is 63. Singer Christopher Cross is 62. Country musician Cactus Moser (Highway 101) is 56. Rock musician David Ball (Soft Cell) is 54. Country singer Shane Minor is 45. Actor Bobby Cannavale (ka-nuh-VAL’ee) is 43. Music and film producer-actor Damon Dash is 42. Country musician John Hopkins (Zac Brown Band) is 42. Countryrock musician John Neff (Drive-By Truckers) is 42. Country singer Brad Martin is 40. Actress Christina Hendricks (TV: “Mad Men”) is 38. Actor Dule (doo-LAY’) Hill is 38. Country singer Eric Church is 36. Dancer Cheryl Burke (TV: “Dancing with the Stars”) is 29. Soul singer Michael Kiwanuka is 26. Actress Jill Berard is 23.

DAILY CROSSWORD TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

by Lynn Johnston

times overestimate what you can accomplish in a day. But with consistent effort, you will hit your marks -- if not today, then soon! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You sense when people aren’t telling the whole truth, but you often don’t press the issue, sensitive to their need for privacy. Maybe the truth is too embarrassing. Anyway, you’ll slyly figure it out on your own. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When you spend a great deal of time with someone who under-appreciates you, you begin to believe that your gifts are not worth much. To keep your light shining bright, you must go where its radiance is celebrated. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May 3). Good habits bring success. This month’s change to your routine will lead to your biggest win yet. New relationships shape up over the next six weeks. You’ll earn an excellent rating in some regard and be promoted in July. Travel, research and education are worth an investment, and you’ll commit wholeheartedly in October. Pisces and Scorpio people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 7, 20, 19, 3 and 13.

by Paul Gilligan

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Tight friendships sometimes leave little room for outsiders, but this can be unhealthy -- especially now, when it’s best to have many opinions and influences. Broaden your social horizons. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). To be able to think strategically is a talent, though those who possess this gift, yourself included, often form their brilliant plans so effortlessly that they don’t give the process the credit it deserves. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Good enough doesn’t thrill you. Like a diver after pearls, you will search for what is truly rare and beautiful, even if it means you have to plunge the depths to do so. CANCER (June 22-July 22). If you wait until you really feel like telling others how wonderful they are, you’ll waste time and miss out on advancing relationships. Give compliments now, if only for the practice. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Even though you are the most generous of the bunch, you would prefer not to be noticed for this. In fact, it embarrasses you to be called out in this way. For this reason, you’re better off giving anonymously. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Gifts are nice, except that they obligate you to the giver. A sweet thank-you note is often the least you can do in return. Avoid setting a precedent of physical gift-giving. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll commit your talent to the job of making someone else look better. You’re on the lookout for work that’s already quite good and just needs a few refinements to become spectacular. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Brilliant timing is the theme of the day. You’ll get the peaceful feeling that everything occurs precisely when it’s supposed to, even when nothing is going according to plan. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). The wind is invisible, but its strength changes the landscape. You love with a power that is stronger than the wind, and the force of your feelings will move people. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Because you are so ambitious, you some-

By Holiday Mathis

by Jan Eliot

HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

Page 16 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

1 4 9

ACROSS Encountered Late mum of Prince William Donahue or Mickelson Not closed Gold bar Suffer defeat Small rodents Move over Travelers’ lodges Sparkling

13 15 16 17 18 19 20 drink 22 Acquires 23 Golfing pegs 24 Letters on a speedometer 26 Severe experience 29 Desire to eat 34 Seashore 35 Fraternity letter 36 Adriatic or Mediterranean 37 Cargo __ 38 Zones 39 Jolts

40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 61 62 63 64 65

1 2

__ up; spend Perfect Rib good-naturedly Shy Package Hawaiian ring __ & feathers; punishes, old-style Luau dance Avoids Perched upon Burst forth Slangy reply Enthusiastic supporters Cowboy competition Couch “My Country, ‘Tis of __” Derisive smile Tennis court divider

12 14. 21 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

DOWN Parent Heroic tale

33 35 38

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Georgia __; Atlanta college Drive away, as one’s fears Indians of Peru Very excited Lunchtime Endeavors Sad situation Sharpen Common contraction Not as much Most orderly Veal or venison Pod vegetable Happen Waken Valleys __ of time; early Ring out Sir __ Newton Unwilling to say much Portrait stand Sequoia or spruce Consultants

39 41 42 44 45 47

Football shirts Wrath Sour Go by, as time Parish leader Cone-shaped dwelling 48 Ax handle 49 Ogden’s state

50 “The __ Ranger” 52 Metal whose symbol is Fe 53 City fellow on a ranch 54 Lowly laborer 55 Bank vault 59 Head topper

Yesterday’s Answer


Today’s Birthdays: Folk singer Pete Seeger is 94. Actress Ann B. Davis is 87. Actor Alex Cord is 80. Singer Frankie Valli is 79. Sports announcer Greg Gumbel is 67. Pop singer Mary Hopkin is 63. Singer Christopher Cross is 62. Country musician Cactus Moser (Highway 101) is 56. Rock musician David Ball (Soft Cell) is 54. Country singer Shane Minor is 45. Actor Bobby Cannavale (ka-nuh-VAL’ee) is 43. Music and film producer-actor Damon Dash is 42. Country musician John Hopkins (Zac Brown Band) is 42. Countryrock musician John Neff (Drive-By Truckers) is 42. Country singer Brad Martin is 40. Actress Christina Hendricks (TV: “Mad Men”) is 38. Actor Dule (doo-LAY’) Hill is 38. Country singer Eric Church is 36. Dancer Cheryl Burke (TV: “Dancing with the Stars”) is 29. Soul singer Michael Kiwanuka is 26. Actress Jill Berard is 23.

DAILY CROSSWORD TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES

by Lynn Johnston

times overestimate what you can accomplish in a day. But with consistent effort, you will hit your marks -- if not today, then soon! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You sense when people aren’t telling the whole truth, but you often don’t press the issue, sensitive to their need for privacy. Maybe the truth is too embarrassing. Anyway, you’ll slyly figure it out on your own. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). When you spend a great deal of time with someone who under-appreciates you, you begin to believe that your gifts are not worth much. To keep your light shining bright, you must go where its radiance is celebrated. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (May 3). Good habits bring success. This month’s change to your routine will lead to your biggest win yet. New relationships shape up over the next six weeks. You’ll earn an excellent rating in some regard and be promoted in July. Travel, research and education are worth an investment, and you’ll commit wholeheartedly in October. Pisces and Scorpio people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 7, 20, 19, 3 and 13.

by Paul Gilligan

ARIES (March 21-April 19). Tight friendships sometimes leave little room for outsiders, but this can be unhealthy -- especially now, when it’s best to have many opinions and influences. Broaden your social horizons. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). To be able to think strategically is a talent, though those who possess this gift, yourself included, often form their brilliant plans so effortlessly that they don’t give the process the credit it deserves. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Good enough doesn’t thrill you. Like a diver after pearls, you will search for what is truly rare and beautiful, even if it means you have to plunge the depths to do so. CANCER (June 22-July 22). If you wait until you really feel like telling others how wonderful they are, you’ll waste time and miss out on advancing relationships. Give compliments now, if only for the practice. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Even though you are the most generous of the bunch, you would prefer not to be noticed for this. In fact, it embarrasses you to be called out in this way. For this reason, you’re better off giving anonymously. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Gifts are nice, except that they obligate you to the giver. A sweet thank-you note is often the least you can do in return. Avoid setting a precedent of physical gift-giving. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’ll commit your talent to the job of making someone else look better. You’re on the lookout for work that’s already quite good and just needs a few refinements to become spectacular. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Brilliant timing is the theme of the day. You’ll get the peaceful feeling that everything occurs precisely when it’s supposed to, even when nothing is going according to plan. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). The wind is invisible, but its strength changes the landscape. You love with a power that is stronger than the wind, and the force of your feelings will move people. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Because you are so ambitious, you some-

By Holiday Mathis

by Jan Eliot

HOROSCOPE

by Chad Carpenter

Solution and tips at www.sudoku.com

TUNDRA Stone Soup Pooch Café For Better or Worse LIO

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

by Mark Tatulli

The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 17

1 4 9

ACROSS Encountered Late mum of Prince William Donahue or Mickelson Not closed Gold bar Suffer defeat Small rodents Move over Travelers’ lodges Sparkling

13 15 16 17 18 19 20 drink 22 Acquires 23 Golfing pegs 24 Letters on a speedometer 26 Severe experience 29 Desire to eat 34 Seashore 35 Fraternity letter 36 Adriatic or Mediterranean 37 Cargo __ 38 Zones 39 Jolts

40 41 42 43 45 46 47 48 51 56 57 58 60 61 62 63 64 65

1 2

__ up; spend Perfect Rib good-naturedly Shy Package Hawaiian ring __ & feathers; punishes, old-style Luau dance Avoids Perched upon Burst forth Slangy reply Enthusiastic supporters Cowboy competition Couch “My Country, ‘Tis of __” Derisive smile Tennis court divider

12 14. 21 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

DOWN Parent Heroic tale

33 35 38

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Georgia __; Atlanta college Drive away, as one’s fears Indians of Peru Very excited Lunchtime Endeavors Sad situation Sharpen Common contraction Not as much Most orderly Veal or venison Pod vegetable Happen Waken Valleys __ of time; early Ring out Sir __ Newton Unwilling to say much Portrait stand Sequoia or spruce Consultants

39 41 42 44 45 47

Football shirts Wrath Sour Go by, as time Parish leader Cone-shaped dwelling 48 Ax handle 49 Ogden’s state

50 “The __ Ranger” 52 Metal whose symbol is Fe 53 City fellow on a ranch 54 Lowly laborer 55 Bank vault 59 Head topper

Yesterday’s Answer


Page 18 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

THE

CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS • CALL 699-5807

DOLLAR-A-DAY CLASSIFIEDS: Ads must be 15 words or less and run a minimum of 5 consecutive days. Ads that run less than 5 days or nonconsecutive days are $2 per day. Ads over 15 words add 10¢ per word per day. PREMIUMS: First word caps no charge. Additional caps 10¢ per word per day. Centered bold heading: 9 pt. caps 40¢ per line, per day (2 lines maximum) TYPOS: Check your ad the first day of publication. Sorry, we will not issue credit after an ad has run once. DEADLINES: noon, one business day prior to the day of publication. PAYMENT: All private party ads must be pre-paid. We accept checks, Visa and Mastercard credit cards and, of course, cash. CORRESPONDENCE: To place your ad call our offi ces 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 699-5807; or send a check or money order with ad copy to The Conway Daily Sun, P.O. Box 1940, North Conway, NH 03860. OTHER RATES: For information about classified display ads please call 699-5807.

Antiques

Boats

For Rent

Home Improvements

BEST Cash Prices Paid- Also, buying contents of attics, basements, garages, barns. 1 item to entire estates. Call Joe (207)653-4048.

2000 PRINCECRAFT 14.6 FT. RESORTER DLX (side counsel) 1999 mercury 25 hp four stroke motor. upgraded princecraft boat trailer. new radio (marine) am-fm. motor has low hours. boat package is in very good condition. selling for $4,800. tel. 603-752-4022.

PORTLANDWoodford’s. 2 bedrooms, parking, heated, bright rooms, oak floor, just painted. $825/mo. (207)773-1814.

EXTERIOR/ Interior Painting. 20+ years experience. Also, cleaning out of garages, basements, attics, barns. Insured. References. Call Joe at (207)653-4048.

Business Opportunities

For Sale

HOTDOG cart, stainless steel, earn $300 a day, working downtown Portland, $5,000/obo, (207)318-2222.

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For Rent

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HIGHEST cash price paid for your scrap box trailers, school busses, heavy equipment and cars. No Campers (207)393-7318.

Autos 1996 Ford Escort, runs good, new water pump, timing belt, $1,600/obo. Also 1989 Lincoln, (603)318-2222.

CASH 4 CARS Dead or alive! (207)615-6092.

Rossrecyclenremoval@gmail.com

Cash for autos and trucks, some metals. Call Steve (207)523-9475.

WINDHAM- 1 bedroom, utilities plus cable. Serious person, references. Some work for lower rent. (207)892-7150.

Services ECO-FRIENDLY electric and reel mowing (207)318-6397. lowcarbonlawncare.com LAWNMOWING and powerwashing. Free estimates, call Bryan (207)939-3582.

MASONRY REPAIR DAVE MASON

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SPRING CLEANUP Dump runs, yard work, mulch and more! (207)615-6092.

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Dear Annie: My husband and I have a blended family with his two girls and my three sons. I am so grateful that we both took on this challenge. We had some good times, and we had some bad times, and when I say bad, I mean horrible. Our children are all adults now, and we are still butting heads over them, mostly my boys. He has given up on two of my sons because he says they don’t respect him, not to mention some less than legal activity they decided to embark on in our home while we were on vacation. But, Annie, I feel as if he has never really cared for them. I try to help them with rides or letting them wash clothes at our house or whatever I can do. People mature at different levels, and maybe I help too much, but they are my kids. At what point am I supposed to turn my back on them? My husband says that because I help them against his wishes, it means I love them more than him. That isn’t true. One son is homeless and has to look for a place to stay every night. That breaks my heart. My husband found him downstairs sleeping one morning and told me that I’d better get him out or he would call the police. He won’t even allow me to let my son shower here. I realize the boys need to make it on their own, but am I supposed to turn my back on them when they need help? At what point do you give up on your kids and choose your husband instead? I feel like such a horrible mom. -- Worried for Them Dear Worried: Your husband should not be issuing ultimatums wherein you must choose between the man you love and the children you love. This is unfair and creates tremendous resentment. Your husband may have good cause to want the kids out of the house, but it’s difficult to do when they have no place to go. How old are they? Do they have jobs? Would

you temporarily assist with their rent if it got them out of the house? Are there substance-abuse issues that need treatment? Try Because I Love You (bily.org), and ask your husband to work with you on this. Dear Annie: I am one of five siblings. My brother was married last fall in a small ceremony that was put together quickly so my mother could be there before she died. He is having a celebration of his marriage later this summer, and the party is being held in another state on the day before my wedding anniversary. My brother’s party would require travel, hotel and meals. My husband and I have already booked (and paid for) a nonrefundable weekend getaway and made arrangements with his parents to watch our kids. We did this three months before my brother sent out his save-the-date cards. How do I break the news to my brother? I should add that I am rarely included in anything the rest of the family does, and I worry that if I miss this event, I will never be included in anything again. -- Little Sis Dear Sis: Call your brother and let him know you have a conflict. Tell him you are heartbroken to miss his party and wish you could find a way out of your nonrefundable reservations, but it’s not possible. Then send him a lovely wedding gift to make up for your absence. These things happen. There’s nothing more you can do. Dear Annie: This is for “N.N.,” whose husband is depressed. Please tell her to have him tested for celiac disease. Depression is one of the symptoms. My husband was depressed for a long period of time and even threatened to take his life. We were finally able to determine that he had celiac disease. Doctors are not that familiar with the symptoms. -- Betty

Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to: anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

Prickly City

by Scott Stantis

Services

Yard Sale

PA-PA DAN’S MOWING

MOVING Sale- Portland- North Deering neighborhood, 21 Fobes St. Saturday 5/4 8-3pm, Sunday 5/5 9-1pm. Quality furniture, household items, books, and tools.

No, you won’t get a pizza... But you’ll get a nicely mowed yard! Brighten, Stevens, Allen Ave. areas. Formerly with Lucas Tree. Most yards $35. (207)878-6514.

Yard Sale LOTS OF STUFF!

Wanted To Buy I pay cash today for broken and unwanted Notebooks, Netbooks, and Macbooks. Highest prices (207)233-5381.

196 Allen Ave, Portland. May 4th, 8-12pm.

Portland Arts and Technology High School

Help Wanted

Academic Director Summit Achievement of Stow, ME is a nationally recognized outdoor behavioral healthcare program providing customized academics and adventure therapy to adolescents with mild to moderate social, emotional and educational issues. A team of core-subject educators provide individualized instruction under the leadership of the Academic Director, who is responsible for the effective and efficient management of all aspects of the academic programming. Preferred candidates have experience in educational administration, teaching, special education, and web-based technologies. This position is full-time with competitive pay and benefits.

Please send a cover letter, resume, and three letters of recommendation to Mik Oyler moyler@summitachievement.com or Fax to (207)697-2021

Controller for large general contractor in the Conway area of the beautiful White Mountains in New Hampshire. Candidate must have construction experience, a degree in accounting or finance, and a willingness to reside in the area. Controller reports directly to owners and prepares monthly and annual financial statements in accordance with GAAP, with few audit adjustments.

Please e-mail resume and salary requirements to: Curtiscoleman@ajcoleman.com

Serious inquirers with questions please contact Curtis Coleman (603)447-5936.

ALVIN J.

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The Daily Sun Classifieds


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 19

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– OBITUARIES –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Richard Lester Scott, 86

PORTLAND — Barbara Crockett MacDougall, 83, passed away on April 24, 2013, at home. Barbara was born in Arlington, Mass., on April 14, 1930, the daughter of Sherman and Mabel Crockett. A longtime resident of Portland, she graduated from Gould Academy and from Westbrook Junior College before raising a family. Later in her life Barbara worked for many years as a paralegal at local law and title research firms in Portland, Legal Services for the Elderly and the

Southern Maine Agency on Aging. She was a woman who cared deeply for her neighbors and friends, always willing to lend a hand. She has recently been an active community volunteer with the American Red Cross, St. Luke’s Essentials Pantry, and St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Scarborough. She was a prolific solver of crossword puzzles, an avid reader, an artist and musician. She especially enjoyed playing the bagpipe and was quite fond of her Nova Scotian and Scottish heritage and its music. She loved to attend the Portland Symphony Orchestra. She is survived by her brother, George Crockett and his wife Stephanie of Portland; her daughter Margaret Snyder and her husband Andrew, daughter Elizabeth MacLean of South Portland, son Maxwell MacLean of Andover, Mass.; granddaughters, Erin and Sarah Speeches, her grandsons, Calvin MacLean and Samuel Jenness; and her greatgrandson, Miles Jenness. She was predeceased by her daughter Andria Farrington late of Portland. A memorial service will be held at St. Nicholas Church on Route One in Scarborough at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 11.

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PORTLAND — Richard L. Scott, 86, died on April 30, 2013, at his home, with his family by his side. He was born in Portland on March 25, 1927, the son of William, Sr. and Olivette (Brosseau) Scott. Richard grew up in the area and attended local schools. In 1945, he left school to serve his country in the United States Navy, where he was present on the USS Missouri when the Instrument of Surrender was signed. Upon his return, he graduated high school in 1948. He married Irene Mary Cantin on Oct. 13, 1951. Richard was a member of the Elks, VFW post 832, and the Disabled American Veterans. In 1967 he started working for the United States Post Office as a letter carrier, until he retired in 1987. Richard was a faithful communicant of St. Pius X Church in Portland, and he was active in HAM Radio. Richard is survived by his beloved wife of 61 years, Irene of Portland; son David Lee Scott and wife Debra of Portland; two grandchildren, Christina

Kiebish and husband Michael, and Ryan Scott and wife Nicole; one great-grandchild, Haley Kiebish, with another on the way; brother William C. Scott Jr. of Portland, and sister Dorothy R. Keefe and husband Edward of Port Charolette, Fla. Visiting hours were to be held from 2-4 p.m. on Thursday, May 2, at Conroy-Tully Crawford Funeral Home, 172 State St., Portland. Prayers were to be recited at 9:15 a.m. at the funeral home, followed by a 10 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial at St. Pius X Church, 492 Ocean Ave., Portland. Interment will follow in New Calvary Cemetery, South Portland.

Barbara Crockett MacDougall, 83

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Page 20 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

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Friday, May 3 PHS naturalization ceremony

10 a.m. “Portland High School, which has educated generations of immigrants to the United States, will host a naturalization ceremony for 45 new citizens on May 3 at 10 a.m. in the school auditorium. Portland High students will greet the new citizens as they arrive. An art class taught by Barbara Loring prepared a giant American flag as a backdrop for the ceremony. Posters and flags representing the applicants’ nations will be displayed. ... The new citizens who will take their oath during the ceremony come from 19 countries: the Bahamas, Bulgaria, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, France, Iraq, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Serbia, Somalia, Sudan, Thailand, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and Vietnam.”

Shana Youngdahl in Friday Local Authors Series

noon. Shana Youngdahl to speak about her poetry collection “History, Advice and Other Half-Truths” at the Portland Public Library’s Local Author Series. Meeting Room No. 5. Part of the Friday Local Authors Series. “Youngdahl was born and raised in Paradise, CA and educated at Mills College and the University of Minnesota. She is the author of two chapbooks Donner: A Passing (Finishing Line 2008) and Of Nets (Gendun 2010) and has received a grant from the Iowa Arts Council and a residency at Devil’s Tower National Monument. Her poetry has appeared widely in journals including Third Coast, Shenandoah and Margie. Youngdahl is currently a Lecturer in Creative Writing and First-Year writing at the University of Maine, Farmington.”

American Chestnut tree at Mayor Baxter Woods

1:30 p.m. Mayor Baxter Woods (at the entrance), Stevens Avenue, Portland. “This Friday, City of Portland Mayor Michael Brennan will plant a new varietal of the American Chestnut tree at Mayor Baxter Woods. The tree is one of two disease resistant nut trees donated by the American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) Maine Chapter to the city for reintroduction to its natural habitat. The donation was made in concert with Mayor Brennan’s stated goal to increase the number of fruit and nut trees within the city, an objective identified in the Mayor’s Initiative for Healthy Sustainable Food Systems. The new American Chestnut trees represent more than thirty years of backcross breeding and more than $30 million in research. The planting is part of the TACF’s effort to bring the American Chestnut back to Maine and Portland. The city has been selected as one of the first sites to receive the new varietal.” www.portlandmaine.gov

Portland Public Schools First Friday

5 p.m. “Students from the Portland Public Schools will present dance, poetry readings, an orchestral performance, art, sculpture and photography exhibits and an event to raise awareness about childhood hunger at Portland’s First Friday Art Walk on May 3. Here is the schedule of events: 5 to 8 p.m., Portland City Hall: The Portland Public Schools Art Show, featuring hundreds of works by students from kindergarten through 12th grade, will be on display. 5 to 8 p.m., City Hall Plaza: Students from the Portland Arts and Technology High School commercial art program will install three environmental sculptures made of plastic wrap and packing tape. The students worked with visiting sculptor James Murray on the installation. 5 to 7 p.m., Hope.Gate. Way gallery, 185 High Street: The Lincoln Middle School Photography Club presents a photo exhibit on peace. 5 to 7 p.m., Monument Square (in front of the Public Market House): Seventh graders involved with the Lincoln Middle School Hunger Project are partnering with the Good Shepherd Food Bank and the Maine Hunger Initiative at Preble Street to raise awareness about hunger in Maine. Those who stop by on May 3 can make a paper plate to present to Maine government officials asking them to put an end to hunger or buy a pin, with donations going to Good Shepherd. 5:15 p.m., City Hall rotunda: The Deering Sisterhood and Kindred Spirits will present dancing and poetry. 5:30 p.m., City Hall rotunda: The Lincoln Middle School Select Orchestra will perform. 6 p.m., City Hall Plaza: Dancers from the PATHS Arts Academy will perform. The school district is partnering with the city of Portland, Creative Portland and local venues to present the student showcase as part of the May Art Walk.”

SMCC Bath Center graduation

5 p.m. to 7 p.m. “Students from the Southern Maine Community College (SMCC) Bath Center will join with fellow students from University College to celebrate their graduation on Friday, May 3 at the Bath Golf Club. The annual event is hosted by the local student government, which is shared between the two entities. A total of 60 students from the Bath Center will be graduating as part of the class of 2013 at SMCC. These students, along with their friends and families, have been invited to join in the special Graduation Celebration. The formal 2013 Commencement Ceremony for all SMCC graduates will be held on the SMCC South Portland Campus on Saturday, May 18. ... This spring, more

“The Last Romance” is playing at The Public Theatre, Lewiston/Auburn’s Professional Theatre, May 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11 and 12. For details, visit www.thepublictheatre.org. (COURTESY PHOTO) than 200 students enrolled at the SMCC Bath Center, while another 367 students enrolled at the nearby SMCC Midcoast Campus in Brunswick.”

US-Brazil Art Exhibit at Portland Public Library

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Opening Reception for art exhibit highlighting sixteen bright and exuberant paintings created by Portland’s Daniel Minter and visiting Brazilian artist Flavio Freitas. At the reception, there will also be brief demonstrations of samba dancing performed by the Portland Youth Dance Company. Also, children three years and older will be able to take part in an art activity in which they will create colorful paper fish. Both artists participated recently in an artist exchange between Maine and the state of Rio Grande do Norte in Brazil. The exchange was sponsored by Maine Partners of the Americas in cooperation with its sister chapter in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. The art exhibit continues throughout the month of May. Admission is free.” https:// www.facebook.com/MainePartners/events

First Friday at SPACE

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. SPACE Gallery, 538 Congress St., Portland. “Join us for the opening of I Was Dreaming This, Providence-based artist Sophia Narrett’s exhibition of embroidered paintings in our annex. Also, in our main gallery, check out Surface Tension, an exhibition of work by employees or former employees of Designtex (formerly Portland Color), a commercial imaging company that has been in operation in Maine since 1988.” http://www. space538.org

Vintage Maine Images launch party

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Vintage Maine Images, the e-commerce website of the Maine Historical Society, was recently redesigned and is ready to party! Join us on Friday, May 3 for a rollicking good time. See the Vintage Maine Images: A Website Comes to Life exhibit in the lecture hall gallery, nosh on yummy food, sip cool bevs, listen to music by Ms. H, have your photo taken in our vintage photo booth, and celebrate this cool new website!” https://www.mainehistory.org

The gallery at Oak Street Lofts

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The gallery at Oak Street Lofts will feature the work of resident artist Ingrid Grins on Friday, May 3, from 5-8 p.m. for First Friday Art Walk. Grins’ exhibit, titled “The Diggy Nova Show,” explores humanity’s relationship with the sun using a mix of media, including oil, acrylic, watercolor and ink. “Sun worship is as old as the emergence of humans as human,” said the artist about her show. “Our existence will end at the end of our star, millions of years in the future. With my artwork, I hope to convey my part in the connectivity of humankind.” Oak Street Lofts is the first affordable multi-family building in Maine to achieve LEED Platinum certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. The gallery, located at 72 Oak St., is open to the public every First Friday Art Walk. www.avestahousing.org

Discussion of the Fireman Statue

5:30 p.m. “Friday as a part of First Friday Art Walk, the Portland Public Art Committee (PPAC) will feature Art in Our Front Yard: Portland’s Public Art Collection with a discussion of the Fireman Statue located in front of Central Fire Station on Congress Street. PPAC member Anthony Muench will lead a discussion of the statue, its history and significance within the city’s collection. The public is encouraged to join the PPAC Friday, May 3 and learn about the art in their front yard and share in a discussion of the unique place public art holds in our community. Designed and created by Edward Souther Griffin (1834-1928), the Fireman Statue was originally installed at the Western Cemetery in 1898. In 1910, the statue was moved to the Evergreen Cemetery where it remained until 1987. He now stands at Central Fire Station on the corner of Pearl Street and Congress Street. Friday, May 3, 5:30 p.m. The Fireman Statue, Central Fire Station, corner of Pearl Street and Congress Street, Portland.” http://www.portlandmaine.gov

Maine Artists Collective First Friday

5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. “Although it sounds like a computer art show, members of the Maine Artists Collective (MAC) are opening their artistic windows to let fresh impressions in. This exhibit, which runs from April 26 to May 28, at Constellation Gallery, 511 Congress St., Portland, is a window of opportunity for artists to present new work or re-imagine their old work. The gallery will host a reception on First Friday, May 3 from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. The work in the exhibit ranges from sculpture to assemblage (using an actual window) to acrylic and water color paintings to photography to digital images presented in light boxes. MAC artists in this exhibit include Diana Ellis, Kifah Abdulla, Kyler Henningsen, CindyC Barnard, Jos Ruks, Tatia Dichiara, Jeanelle Demers, jan snyper, Geeta Ramani, Linda Kirk, David Marshall and Ann Tracy.”

‘All in the Timing’

6 p.m. Students in Casco Bay High School will present the David Ives play, “All in the Timing,” on May 3 at 6 p.m. and May 4 at 7 p.m. in the third floor dance studio of Portland Arts and Technology High School, 196 Allen Ave., Portland. Admission is free.

Comedy by Design

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Hosted by the Portland Comedy Co-op at Coffee by Design, 67 India St., Portland. “End your First Friday Art Walk with coffee, music, and laughter! Portland Comedy Co-op presents: Comedy by Design a monthly showcase featuring veteran and up and coming comedians from all over Maine and New England. This month features comedians Paul Hunt, Erik Gunderson, Doug Collins, and Brett Groh as well as members of the Portland Comedy Co-op. In addition to the jokes, the show kicks off at 6:30 with this month’s exciting musical guest, regional favorite, Tricky Britches.” Free admission. see next page


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 21

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from preceding page

Ray McGovern event at USM

7 p.m. Ray McGovern event at University of Southern Maine. “Ray McGovern leads the ‘Speaking Truth to Power’ section of Tell the Word, an expression of the ecumenical Church of the Saviour in inner-city Washington. He also teaches at its Servant Leadership School. ... As an act of conscience, on March 2, 2006 Ray returned the Intelligence Commendation Medallion given him at retirement for ‘especially meritorious service,��� explaining, ‘I do not want to be associated, however remotely, with an agency engaged in torture.’ He returned it to Rep. Peter Hoekstra (R, Michigan), then-House Intelligence Committee Chairman. ... Ray studied theology and philosophy (as well as his major, Russian) at Fordham University, from which he holds two degrees. He also holds a Certificate in Theological Studies from Georgetown University. A Catholic, Mr. McGovern has been worshipping for over a decade with the ecumenical Church of the Saviour and teaching at its Servant Leadership School. He was co-director of the school from 1998 to 2004.” For more about Ray McGovern visit www.raymcgovern.com. This event is organized by the Sociology Department, USM.

‘It is Well — Life in the Storm’ author

7 p.m. “Chris Faddis, author of ‘It is Well — Life in the Storm,’ will discuss his book, his family’s incredible journey of faith, and how the memory of his late wife Angela continually inspires him at an event scheduled for Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m. at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception on 307 Congress Street. Chris Faddis is a father of two, Gianna (5) and Augustine (3). On Easter Sunday 2011, Chris’ wife Angela was diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer. When the doctors informed the couple of the devastating news, Angela’s words to Chris were, ‘Jesus still rose, so we will trust.’ The statement became the couple’s mission as they strived to trust in Christ and prayed for healing. The couple shared their journey on a Facebook support page that drew thousands of visitors. During this time, the couple decided that perhaps they were meant to write a book to tell their story of trust. The book, ‘It is Well — Life in the Storm,’ was set to be a memoir of a life of faith lived in the middle of the storm, but prior to completion, Angela passed away. She remained faithful until the end. On her death bed, Angela told Chris, ‘I’m at peace. I want the world to know that no matter what, they must trust in Jesus.’” For more information, contact Joe Mailhot, Youth & Young Adult Ministry Coordinator for the Diocese of Portland, at 321-7813 or at Joe.Mailhot@portlanddiocese.org.

Cheverus Drama Society production

7 p.m. “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” at Cheverus High School 267 Ocean Ave., Portland. Friday, May 3 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, May 4 at 7 p.m.; Sunday, May 5 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8 and $ 6 for students and seniors.

2013 Fine Arts Night, Make-A-Wish benefit

7 p.m. to 9 p.m. St. Brigid Catholic School will be hosting its 2013 Fine Arts Night on Friday, May 3 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the school located on 695 Stevens Ave. “The event

will feature special performances and artwork from the students. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged as whatever is collected will be donated to Make-A-Wish Maine. The Maine Chapter of Make-A-Wish opened in 1992 and has grown to serve children in each of Maine’s counties. As of March 2012, the organization had granted over 1,000 wishes. The average cost of a wish is $6,000, and all wish expenses are fully covered, making fundraising events like St. Brigid’s Fine Arts Night crucial.” For more information, contact Peter Buckley at 797-7073. 7:30 p.m. April 30 – May 19. “Trouble brews in the hallowed halls of Wittenberg University as professors Martin Luther and Doctor Faustus duel for the allegiance of their pupil – Prince Hamlet. From tennis and beer to soliloquies over skulls, Davalos’ imaginative comedy of 16th century college life mixes slapstick and wordplay with a philosophical exploration of reason versus faith, played out in a zany spin on classic characters – real and imaginary!” April 30 to May 3, at 7:30 p.m.; May 4 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 5 at 2 p.m.; May 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; May 11 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 12 at 2 p.m.; May 14-17 at 7:30 p.m.; also May 16 at 2 p.m.; May 18 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 19 at 2 p.m. Portland Stage. ttp://www.portlandstage.org

The 12th annual Maine Playwrights Festival

7:30 p.m. St. Lawrence Arts Center. The 12th annual Maine Playwrights Festival features two schedules of short plays, an evening of 2-minute plays and monologues, a staged reading of a full-length play, and the 24-Hour Portland Theater Project. April 25 to May 6. To Purchase Tickets online, visit http://www.acorn-productions.org/Playwrighttxs.html. Schedule B: Friday, May 3, 7:30 p.m.: The Perils of Company; Saturday, May 4, 4 p.m.: The Perils of Company. Schedule A: Saturday, May 4, 8 p.m.: Beating the Odds; Sunday, May 5, 7 p.m.: 24-hour Portland Theater Project. Tickets are $15/Adults; $12/Students and Seniors. $10 All Ages for 24-hour Theater Project. Festival Passes (valid for all four schedules): $45/Adults; $40/ Students and Seniors. All Day Pass (valid Saturday, May 4 for both shows): $25/Adults; $20/Students and Seniors.” http://www.stlawrencearts.org

‘The Last Romance’ at The Public Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Is it ever too late to find love? The answer is a resounding ‘no’ in ‘The Last Romance,’ the heartwarming romantic comedy about the thrill and complications of love in the later years, now playing at The Public Theatre May 3 -12. Widower Ralph Bellini has a life filled with routine, but life is suddenly a thrill again when he takes a new route on his walk home and spies a lovely lady in a dog park. The traditional ways to woo a woman may be chocolate and roses, but Ralph is no ordinary suitor. Using a few operatic arias and a bar or two of rap music, Ralph puts his heart on his sleeve and leaps headfirst into a last chance at romance. ‘The Last Romance’ is playing at The Public Theatre, Lewiston/Auburn’s Professional Theatre, May 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12. Show times are Thurs/Fri at 7:30, Sat at 8 p.m., Sun at 2 p.m., with an added Sat matinee on May 11 at 2 p.m. For tickets call 782-3200 or visit www.thepublictheatre.org for more information.”

Portland Playback Theatre

7:30 p.m. “On First Friday, May 3, Portland Playback Theatre theme will be ‘Bumps and Bruises’ (both inner and outer.) Audience members are invited to tell their stories and watch our improvisors re-enact the story on the spot. Every month, Portland Playback uses improvisation to honor true stories from audience members’ lives. Find out more at www.portlandplayback.com. CTN5 Studio, 516 Congress Street, Portland. $7 suggested donation at the door.” see next page

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Page 22 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

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Saturday, May 4 Cub Scout Pack 350 Pancake ‘Fun’draiser

8 a.m. to 11 a.m. United Methodist Church, corner of Fountain and Cedar streets, Old Orchard Beach. “We will be serving: Pancakes, bacon, sausage, orange juice, apple juice, cranberry juice, and hot coffee. Money raised goes directly to our pack here in Old Orchard Beach and helps pay for things like camping trips/fees, field trips, patches, activities, and rank advancement/awards. This helps keep our great program running. Cost is 5$ per plate You can purchase tickets in advance by contacting our Pack or Tickets will be sold at the door the day of the event. Keep an eye for more details on our website http://pack350oldorchardbeach.ScoutLander.com.”

Maine College Rugby Championship

8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The 11th Annual Maine College Rugby Championship, sponsored by the Portland Rugby Football Club. “Every year both men’s and women’s teams representing Bates College, Bowdoin College, Colby College, Maine Maritime Academy, University of Maine, University of Maine at Farmington and University of New England come together for a day long festival of rugby, competing for the ‘Maine Cup’ and player selection for Maine’s All-Star Team.” Deering High School, 370 Stevens Ave., Portland. http://portlandrfc.com/maine-college-cup

Polarbear Triathlon and Duathlon

8:30 a.m. The Polarbear Triathlon and Duathlon. Farley Fieldhouse, Bowdoin College, Brunswick. “One exciting update for the 2013 edition of the Polarbear is the NEW pavement on the bike course on Rossmore Road. With these improved road conditions, we’re happy to announce the “non-aero zone” rule has been lifted for that section of the course! This is the year to go after your fastest bike split!” http://www.tri-maine.com/Races/PolarBear.html

‘Maine Fiddlehead Festival: Local Food Day’

9 a.m. “The University of Maine at Farmington and an exciting partnership of community businesses and organizations is pleased to announce the second annual ‘Maine Fiddlehead Festival: Local Food Day’ to be held on Saturday, May 4, on the UMF campus and throughout downtown Farmington. Parade and information sessions are free and open to the public. The festival celebrates local foods, both wild and cultivated, and promotes community involvement in enhancing the area’s local food system and supporting local farmers. The collaborative effort includes the UMF Sustainable Campus Coalition and Partnership for Civic Advancement, the Farmington Downtown Association, UMaine Cooperative Extension, Franklin Savings Bank, Homestead Bakery, University Credit Union and Western Mountains Alliance. An antique tractor parade down Main Street will kick off the day’s festivities at 9 a.m., with farmers showing off their favorite farm machinery, accompanied by musicians and other parade marchers.”

History Barn Open House

9 a.m. to noon. The New Gloucester Historical Society will hold its monthly History Barn Open House on Saturday, May 4 from 9 a.m. to noon. Admission is free. The History Barn is located at 389 Intervale Rd. (Route 231), behind the Town Hall.

Spring Cleanup Day at Fort Preble

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Community members are invited to join the Fort Preble Preservation Committee on Saturday, May 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. to assist in the annual Spring Cleanup Day and to receive a special ‘open door’ tour of the 204-year-old fort on the Southern Maine Community College South Portland Campus. A group of faculty, staff, students and concerned local residents will gather for the annual Spring Cleanup Day, making small repairs and cleaning the grounds of Fort Preble. In the past, the group has removed invasive plants, scraped and painted iron works, and cleaned out some of the underground and above ground fortifications. As a bonus to all those who take part, the Fort Preble Preservation Committee will open up some of the underground rooms and conduct tours at 11 a.m. This is a chance for history buffs to take an active role in the preservation of a site that was active militarily as early as King George’s war until the fort’s decommissioning after World War Two. ... Volunteers are asked to meet in the parking lot between the Transportation Building at 123 McKernan Drive and Bunker Lane at Bunker Lane at 9 a.m. For a campus map please visit www.smccME.edu/SouthPortland. Please wear appropriate shoes and clothing and bring work gloves and hand tools if possible.”

Jehovah’s Witnesses Open House

10 a.m. to noon. “Jehovah’s Witnesses who meet on Canco Road, Portland, are planning to hold an Open House after completing the recent remodeling of their local place of worship (which they refer to as a Kingdom Hall).” The

Open House program is scheduled for Saturday morning May 4 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Kingdom Hall located at 335 Canco Road, Portland. “This will be a perfect time for the public to see not only what work was done, but also what the inside of one of their Kingdom Halls looks like.”

Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum, 58 Fore St., Portland, open daily starting May 4. www.mainenarrowgauge.org

Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Fair at SMCC

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Fair for Homeowners at SMCC. “Homeowners and small business owners will have an opportunity to learn how to make their homes energy efficient and explore converting to solar, geothermal and other alternative energy sources at a free Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Fair being held on Saturday, May 4, at Southern Maine Community College (SMCC). The Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Fair for Homeowners is hosted by SMCC and Common Ground Learning Solutions. The fair will run rain or shine from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the SMCC South Portland Campus and will take place at the College’s SEA Center, Jewett Hall and the grounds surrounding Spring Point. The event is sponsored by South Portland Bus Service, Casella Waste Systems, Design Group Collaborative, Wright-Ryan Construction and 158 Pickett Street Café.”

Reduced-price gas, thanks to Next Level Church

11 a.m. For one day, anyone can come buy gas for just $2.89/gallon at Portland Citgo starting at 11 a.m. “Gas prices keep rising and Next Level Church has decided to do something about it! Next Level Church wants to bless the community by relieving some of the pressure people are feeling as a result of high gas prices. On May 4, Next Level Church will be paying down 2,500 gallons of gas, beginning at 11 a.m., to bring the price to $2.89 per gallon for the first time in over two years. Next Level Church will partner with the Citgo Xtra Mart Gas Station located at 865 Brighton Ave. in Portland in an effort to drastically reduce prices and give people an opportunity to take advantage of the lowest gas prices in recent years. Starting at 11 a.m., the price of unleaded fuel will be lowered to $2.89 per gallon for the next 2,500 gallons sold at that station, no strings attached, with NLC paying the difference between $2.89 and whatever that day’s normal fuel price is! Next Level Church will have volunteers on hand (as well as the local Police Department) to help with traffic flow and to assist anyone who needs it. Next Level Church began four and a half years ago and now meets in four locations: Newington, N.H.; Portland; North Shore, Mass.; and Epping, N.H. At every location, there is a local pastor, live band, and amazing kids environments, where people can experience the message of the Bible in a casual, inviting atmosphere no matter where they are in life. For more information on Next Level Church, visit: www.nlc.tv.”

‘Wittenberg’ by David Davalos

4 p.m. April 30 – May 19. “Trouble brews in the hallowed halls of Wittenberg University as professors Martin Luther and Doctor Faustus duel for the allegiance of their pupil – Prince Hamlet. From tennis and beer to soliloquies over skulls, Davalos’ imaginative comedy of 16th century college life mixes slapstick and wordplay with a philosophical exploration of reason versus faith, played out in a zany spin on classic characters – real and imaginary!” April 30 to May 3, at 7:30 p.m.; May 4 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 5 at 2 p.m.; May 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; May 11 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 12 at 2 p.m.; May 14-17 at 7:30 p.m.; also May 16 at 2 p.m.; May 18 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 19 at 2 p.m. Portland Stage. www.portlandstage.org

The Mad Hatter Affair

5 p.m. “Once upon a time, young women learned the art of hat-making as part of their education. ... Millinery shops can still be found (including in Portland), but they are now something of a rarity. There’s one day each year that Maine Historical Society celebrates fancy headwear — our annual gala, The Mad Hatter Affair. On May 4, we will once again gather at the Woodlands in Falmouth to kick off spring, cheer on the Kentucky Derby contestants, and celebrate the work of MHS. Please join us for this annual fundraiser and dinner. Live music, a silent auction, and the opportunity to wear your fanciest springtime hat make for a fantastically fun affair.” www.mainehistory.org/support_gala.shtml

Kentucky Derby party

5 p.m. “On Saturday, May 4, the historic Royal Oak Room at Ironhorse Court in Lewiston will be the backdrop for a festive Kentucky Derby party including live Derby coverage, food, best dressed contests and live music from The Soul Sensations featuring The Colwell Brothers. A total of $5 from every ticket sold will be donated to local nonprofit, Riding to the Top Therapeutic Riding Center, which is dedicated to helping people with disabilities reach their highest potential through the healing power of horses. The event

will feature a gourmet dinner buffet including Southernstyle classics and a cash bar offering signature mint juleps and whiskey tasting flights. The race will be shown live and there will be a best hat contest for ladies and most dapperly dressed contest for gentlemen. The event will also have a photo booth stocked with props where guests can have some fun and take home custom prints. After the race, guests are invited to dance the night away with The Soul Sensations featuring The Colwell Brothers.” http://www. royaloakroom.com

Superhero Lady Armwrestlers of Portland

7 p.m. Event at Mayo Street Arts Center, with Cash Bar, admission $7. “On Saturday, May 4, the Superhero Lady Armwrestlers of Portland take the stage at Mayo Street Arts, raising fists and raising money for a great cause. This tournament’s sole beneficiary will be A Company of Girls, a nonprofit theater for opportunity youths. This will be SLAP’s third tournament to date. Return heroines Voom Voom Valhalla and Lumbersmack Sally will return to duke it out. The two women’s alter egos have been bitter enemies since the first match, and their rivalry is now HUGE since their posturing, bragging, and semi-serious threats have been blown all out of proportion via gossip and social media. ... In addition to the wrestlers there will be live music by surf band Zombie Beach, celebrity judges, Grande Emcee Rachel Flehinger, and other Special Guests. Audiences member will be issued SLAP BUCKS at the door with which they can ‘vote’ for their favorite wrestler.’”

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Horse Prom

7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Mad Horse Theatre Company announced its second annual fundraising gala: It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Horse Prom. “This night of crazy fun and dancing will happen Saturday, May 4, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., at the Maine State Ballet Theater in Falmouth. . ... Tickets for The Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Horse Prom are just $25 per person, or $45 per couple. All proceeds from this exciting evening of dancing and laughter will help support Mad Horse Theatre Company, one of Maine’s most extraordinary treasures.” For more information, call 7302389. Order tickets online at www.madhorse.com

‘The Last Romance’ at The Public Theatre

7:30 p.m. “Is it ever too late to find love? The answer is a resounding ‘no’ in ‘The Last Romance,’ the heartwarming romantic comedy about the thrill and complications of love in the later years, now playing at The Public Theatre May 3 -12. Widower Ralph Bellini has a life filled with routine, but life is suddenly a thrill again when he takes a new route on his walk home and spies a lovely lady in a dog park. The traditional ways to woo a woman may be chocolate and roses, but Ralph is no ordinary suitor. Using a few operatic arias and a bar or two of rap music, Ralph puts his heart on his sleeve and leaps headfirst into a last chance at romance. ‘The Last Romance’ is playing at The Public Theatre, Lewiston/Auburn’s Professional Theatre, May 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12. Show times are Thurs/Fri at 7:30, Sat at 8 p.m., Sun at 2 p.m., with an added Sat matinee on May 11 at 2 p.m.” Call 782-3200 or visit www.thepublictheatre.org

Greater Portland Community Dance Series

8 p.m. Contra Dance first Saturday each month at Falmouth Congregational church in Falmouth, Maine. Live Musicians and Guest Caller. Please bring non-street shoes for Dancing! Beginners, new dancers welcome, no partners needed, smoke-free, alcohol-free. Dance instruction review for new or experienced dancers, 7:15 p.m., main dance at 8 p.m. with dessert potluck (bring a treat to share!) at the 9:45 p.m. break. Falmouth Congregational Church Hall, 267 Falmouth Road, Falmouth. Entrance at rear of building. Adults: $10, Under 21: $7, Children 5-12: $5, Children under 5: free. Email: bajmagda@juno.com. Phone 358-9354.

Sunday, May 5 Green Party State Convention

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Maine Green Independent Party 2013 State Convention, featuring Dr. Jill Stein and Pat LaMarche! It will be a blast in Belfast. Belfast Free Library, 106 High St. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. Registration is $25, and if you preregister now for $35 you will get a Maine Green Party t-shirt for free. Pre-registration will start in April. https:// mainegreens.nationbuilder.com/2013_convention

Portland’s Ebune Parade and Celebration

noon. After a year’s hiatus, Portland’s Ebune Parade and Celebration will once again take over Congress Street to honor the return of spring after a long cold winter. On May 5, hundreds of mask-wearers, giant puppets and bands will gather on Casco St. across from MECA at 11 a.m. to prepare for a noontime march to the Eastern Promenade, where there will be food and multicultural music and dance performances. The theme this year is ‘All Peoples, All Creatures.’” Visit Ebune2013.com. see EVENTS page 24


The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013— Page 23

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– 7 p.m. Music at 8 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

Friday, May 3 Worried Well & The Box Tiger at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Thursday, May 9 Jackyl at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $15; Door at 8 p.m. Music at 9 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts

Maia Sharp at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $15 adv/$20 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com

A Band Beyond Description at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Arum Rae at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $10/$20; 8 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

Saturday, May 4

Big Sandy and His Fly Rite Boys at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $15 adv/$20 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com Sky Captains of the Industry, Modern Rust & Joel Carpenter and the Effects at Flask, 117 Spring St., Portland http://flasklounge.com

Jackyl

Jimmy & The Soulcats with Lay Z Gait at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, 7 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com Keller Williams at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $20/$36; 7 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com Clutch with The Sword, Lionize, Never Got Caught at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $20 adv/$25 day of show; 7 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

Sunday, May 5 FIESTA! Cinco de Mayo at El Rayo, El Rayo Taqueria/Cantina, 101 York St., Portland. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. http://elrayotaqueria.com Spacehog with Spencer Albee at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $10 adv/$12 day of show; 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com Dessa at the SPACE Gallery, 538 Congress St., Portland, $10 adv/$13 door; 8:30 p.m. www.space538.org

Monday, May 6 The Players’ Ball at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $3;

Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Tuesday, May 7

Friday, May 10

Sheesham & Lotus, St. Lawrence Arts, 76 Congress St., Portland, Celtic Roots, all shows $15. 7 p.m. www.stlawrencearts.org Cover to Cover: Dark Hollow Bottling Co. covers Old Crow Medicine Show at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $5; 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com Silversun Pickups with Bad Books at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $25 adv/$30 day of show; Doors at 7 p.m. Music at 8 p.m. www.statetheatreportland.com

Wednesday, May 8

Station Eighty-Five with Ginlab & Hutch Heelan at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, Doors at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com An Evening with Eliza Gilkyson at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $20 adv/$25 door; 8 p.m. www.onelongfellowsquare.com ShaShaSha and Old Soul at St. Lawrence Arts, 76 Congress St., Portland, $12 adv/$15 door; 7:30 p.m. www.stlawrencearts.org

Saturday, May 11

Rap Night at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, $3; 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Whitcomb EP Release at ASYLUM, 121 Center St., Portland. $8; Doors at 8 p.m. Music at 9 p.m. www.portlandasylum.com/concerts

Ghostface Killah at Port City Music Hall, 504 Congress St., Portland. $20/$35; Doors at 8 p.m. www.portcitymusichall.com

The Bob Charest Band at Big Easy, 55 Market St., Portland, Doors at 8 p.m. Music at 9 p.m. www.bigeasyportland.com

Josh Ritter & The Royal City at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St., Portland. $24 adv/$29 day of show; Doors at

Tricky Britches at One Longfellow Square, 181 State St., Portland, $12 adv/$17 door; 7:30 p.m.

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– MOVIES–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Friday, May 3

Saturday, May 4

Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Tabu (NR) 6:30 p.m.

Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Tabu (NR) 2:00 p.m.

Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:40, 8:30, 9:20 Pain & Gain (R) 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9:15 Oblivion (PG-13) 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 42 (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:40 The Company You Keep (R) 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 The Sapphires (PG-13) 12:45, 6:15

Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:40, 8:30, 9:20 Pain & Gain (R) 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9:15 Oblivion (PG-13) 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 42 (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:40 The Company You Keep (R) 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 The Sapphires (PG-13) 12:45, 6:15

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Sunday, May 5 Movies at the Museum, Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Tabu (NR) 2:00 p.m. Nickelodeon Cinema, 1 Temple St., Portland Iron Man 3 (PG-13) 1:00, 3:00, 4:00, 6:40, 8:30, 9:20

Pain & Gain (R) 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9:15 Oblivion (PG-13) 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30 42 (PG-13) 1:10, 4:00, 7:00, 9:40 The Company You Keep (R) 1:20, 4:20, 7:10, 9:45 The Sapphires (PG-13) 12:45, 6:15 (The Portland Daily Sun lists Portlandbased cinemas. For details on Cinemagic, visit http://www.cinemagicmovies.com.)


Page 24 — The PORTLAND Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013

–––––– CALENDAR –––––– EVENTS from page 22

Latino Cancer Educational Forums

1:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. The events are sponsored by the city of Portland, the Maine Cancer Consortium and the Portland Community Health Center. For more information about the forums, contact Nélida Berke, Latino Community Health Promotion Specialist at 874-8452 or nrb@ portlandmaine.gov. Sunday, May 5, 1:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. at Sacred Heart Church, 65 Mellen St., Portland; Thursday, May 9, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at El Sinai Church, 837 Brighton Ave., Portland. http:// www.ci.portland.me.us

‘Wittenberg’ by David Davalos

2 p.m. April 30 – May 19. May 4 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 5 at 2 p.m.; May 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; May 11 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 12 at 2 p.m.; May 14-17 at 7:30 p.m.; also May 16 at 2 p.m.; May 18 at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; May 19 at 2 p.m. Portland Stage. ttp://www. portlandstage.org

Famine ships and famine times

2 p.m. Famine ships and famine times, a presentation by Kathryn Miles, author of “All Standing: The Remarkable Story of the Jeanie Johnston, the Legendary Irish Famine Ship” at the Maine Irish Heritage Center, corner of State and Gray streets, Portland. “During the years of the Great Hunger, or the Famine, more than 100,000 Irish men, women and children fleeing starvation perished at sea aboard ‘coffin ships’ bringing them to North America. Yet one ship, the Jeanie Johnston, never lost a single passenger to disease or to the sea in sixteen crossings. How did one ship in this fleet of misery and sorrow keep its passengers safe? Kathryn Miles tells its story. She weaves a history of the Great Hunger from archival material, newspaper accounts and legislative histories with that of one family: descendants of a baby born aboard the Jeanie Johnston the night before it set sail on its first voyage. Kathryn, who was recently featured on NPR’s ‘All Things Considered,’ will be joined by Ellen Murphy, who will show photographs of the replica of the Jeanie Johnston under construction in 1999 in County Kerry.” www.maineirish.com, 780.0118. Free admission.

Cinco de Mayo Cruise

3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Cruise for Cinco de Mayo, aboard Casco Bay LInes Bay Mist. Salsa dancing and instruction, guitarist Chad Cummings. Food, fun, entertainment while cruising the Casco Bay Islands. Rain or shine $30pp contact: Barbara 647-4534, email: cincodemayocruise@ gmail.com. Proceeds benefit NAFSC programs. North Atlantic Figure Skating Club in Falmouth benefits.


Portland Daily Sun, Friday, May 3, 2013