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TOP Contents - Tailored for YOU Latest News Headlines…                     

LSU rice specialist focuses on new varieties. Sacramento Valley will be a patchwork of planted and barren land Vietnam to re-negotiate rice contract with Philippines Winter-spring rice sees high yields despite bad weather BAAC expects to complete rice payments within this week BAAC to propose rice field insurance scheme to NCPO Rice market to be range-bound Wheat, rice basmati weaken on subdued demand TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi- Jun 02 Nagpur Foodgrain Prices - APMC & Open Market-May 30 Exports soar as Italy’s rice fields find ‘niche markets’ Sierra Leone News: Japan funds USD1.25m rice project in Port Loko Irrigation is a key to self-sufficiency in rice production Harden Addresses 79th Annual Delta Council Meeting Crop Progress: 2014 Crop 89 Percent Emerged CME Group/Closing Rough Rice Futures Genetically modified crops could help improve the lives of millions Government to announce MSP of paddy & other crops by June 15 BAAC has paid out B35bn to farmers Mid-South rice this week - June 2, 2014 Farmers call for new rice price pledge

News Detail…

LSU rice specialist focuses on new varieties LSU AgCenter Rice Research Station director Steve Linscombe said providing viable varieties of rice for Louisiana growers is one of his main missions.―Variety development is an ongoing endeavor that started over 100 years ago,‖ Linscombe said.When the Rice Research Station was established in 1909, rice germplasm from

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across the world was tested to determine varieties suitable for southwestern Louisiana conditions, Linscombe said. Since then, the station has released 51 varieties.Linscombe said a variety is considered good if it remains an acceptable choice for seven to 10 years and very good if it lasts 20 years. The variety Cypress, released by the LSU AgCenter in 1992, had yield and quality advantages along with seedling vigor beyond anything grown at the time. It became the predominant choice for three to four years, Linscombe said, and it still remains in use.Cocodrie, released by the LSU AgCenter in 1998, replaced Cypress with better yield, and it continues to be grown.Linscombe said varieties don’t change for the worse through years of growing seasons. ―It’s inevitable that factors affecting a variety tend to change over time,‖ he said.He explained every variety is susceptible to different disease pathogens that are able to thrive on a new variety. Those pathogens increase in population with each growing season until they eventually affect a variety’s ability to produce a crop.To stay ahead of diseases, Linscombe said, it’s essential to develop new varieties. Linscombe said when he evaluates new lines of rice for their potential as new varieties, he’s not focusing on just yield, plant height, disease resistance or quality. ―I’m looking for everything,‖ he said.Often, rice breeding requires a compromise among different traits. And sometimes a trait makes a line of rice an obvious choice for development.For example, Linscombe said a line of rice that is ready for harvest 10 days earlier than usual is a big advantage in Louisiana where farmers want to get their crop out of the field as early as possible to beat the possibility of hurricanes and possibly to get a second crop started. Linscombe said variety development at the Rice Research Station has also led to introducing new specialty varieties, such as Jazzman I and Jazzman II, which are now being improved with a Clearfield Jazzman. The specialty varieties have specialized characteristics such as aroma and grain shape that appeal to niche markets.

Sacramento Valley will be a patchwork of planted and barren land Drought impacts some growers more than others By Heather Hacking hhacking@chicoer.com

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The fading tan hills and flat pasture lands of the valley already give a glimpse of things to come.This time of year, the rice is just barely reaching up from flooded fields, a shade of green familiar to those who grow an average of 525,000-530,000 acres of rice throughout the state.This year rice acreage in the Central Valley will be down about 100,000 acres, and rice in Butte County looks like it will be down 17 percent, estimated Navid Khan, deputy ag commissioner.If you travel past the Sacramento River westward, you'll see tens of thousands of acres of barren land, where normally tomatoes, sunflowers and vegetables are grown.

The impact on communities that depend on agricultural jobs will be profound, Kahn said.Crop dusters said planting flights are down 15-22 percent. Butte County Rice Growers Association told Kahn rice seed sales have dipped 15-18 percent. Industries that sell fertilizer, pesticides, tractors and trucks will be in a slump. Many growers aren't hiring a full crew, he added."For communities on the west side – Dunnigan, Arbuckle, Williams, Maxwell, Willows, Corning, Red Bluff – ag is the foundation of the local economy," said Jeff Sutton, manager of Tehama-Colusa Canal Authority, which received zero water and will buy just enough water to keep orchards alive.It's the farmers further down in the water hierarchy who are hurting the most.Orland-Artois Water District will see about half the 29,000 acres barren this year, said manager Emil Cavagnolo. The district received a zero allocation but was able to buy some transfer water from other growers.Farmers will focus on orchard crops. When water normally goes for $45 an acre-foot, growers are paying $425 when contract and service fees are included.Cavagnolo said there are many drilling rigs in the area, digging new wells and deepening others.In rice-growing land, the aquifers are relatively full because surface water is applied yearafter-year, said Anjanette Martin, of Western Canal Water District, a senior water rights district.Yet, Cavagnolo's district near Orland has a different crop mix and different soils."Our aquifers used to have a fair amount of groundwater in this area, then people started drilling wells where they had to go deeper."Our district (over the Tehama Aquifer) has a lot of holes in it," the water manager of 20-plus years said.Drilling companies from Oregon have come to the area, but there's still a "huge backlog on wells. People just see well rigs everywhere ."A few growers in the district have decided to take out trees 3-4 years earlier than planned, to wait through the drought. Others who intended to plant new trees "just didn't plant," Cavagnolo said."That's what you have to do."Once they pay for a new well, which can run a few hundred thousand dollars, the cost to lift the water adds up. Electric wells are best, perhaps costing $50 to pump one acre-foot of water. But in remote areas, only diesel pumps are available, with a cost of $100-$200 for fuel, he said.The story is similar for growers within the 150,000 acres of the Tehama-Colusa Canal Authority, which runs 110 miles along the west side of the valley, including land in Tehama, Colusa, Glenn and part of Yolo counties.Sutton said about 80,000 acres will go

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barren this year. The rest is planted in permanent crops.The district also received zero water allocation.Other growers in the valley agreed not to plant and will transfer water to the district, including Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, Reclamation 108, Conaway Ranch, Sycamore Water District and others.Sutton said the price ended up around $400 an acre-foot, including costs to the Bureau of Reclamation.One acre-foot of water is 325,851 gallons, and enough water to cover one acre of land one acre deep.Without transfers within the water basin, Sutton said it would have been a lot worse.There was "a lot of rallying" to sell water within the area, Sutton said. "We've found a lot of folks preferred to sell in basin."Due to the soils in the Tehama-Colusa Canal territory, most growers do not have the option of drilling wells, Sutton said.Growers are thankful for the water to save their trees, but this can't go on for very long."Never in the history of the project (which dates to the 1960s) have we received anything less than 25 percent allocation," Sutton said."It really took everyone's breath away."With careful water planning, manager Thad Bettner said planted acreage will be down about 18 percent.Some water will be used again, including having a notch at the end of a field that allows water to flow into a neighboring field. Also, there will be no flooding allowed after July 1. In a normal year the water levels will be adjusted more often to spray for weeds.The district itself will not be pumping groundwater, but Bettner said individual farmers will pump at about 5,000-6,000 acre-feet, as of his most recent update.Another 5,000 acres will be transferred, including the deal with Tehama-Colusa.Along the Feather River, growers received 100 percent of their senior water rights.From those districts, water transfers are planned. Western Canal Water District, for example, plans to fallow 10,700 acres – about 20 percent of the district lands. The 35,000 acre-feet of water will be transferred to other parts of the state at $500 an acrefoot.When land is fallowed for a transfer, farmers will choose fields that can use work, such as leveling to prevent deep pockets where rice grows thin, and shallow areas where weeds grow thick, explained Steve Rystrom, a grower in the Richvale/Nelson area.If a grower is considering going organic, now is a good time for it, as it takes three years to transition the land, he said. Contact reporter Heather Hacking at 896-7758. Image: Experimental rice grows as rice farmers particpate in a previous LSU AgCenter Rice Research Station's Field Day Crowley. / GANNETT LOUISIANA

Vietnam to re-negotiate rice contract with Philippines VietNamNet Bridge – The Vietnam Food Association (VFA) and the Ministry of Industry and Trade have told the Northern and Southern Food Corporations (Vinafood 1 and Vinafood 2) to re-negotiate their contracts with

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the National Food Agency of the Philippines to export 800,000 tons of rice, a member of the VFA was quoted as saying in Thoi Bao Kinh Te Saigon. Rice companies, however, are not hopeful about the outcome.Lam Anh Tuan, director of Thinh Phat Company Ltd, said that it would be very difficult to persuade NFA to adjust the delivery requirements set in the contract to facilitate Vietnamese exporters.The VFA and MOIT told Vinafood 1 and Vinafood 2 to re-negotiate with NFA after many rice exporters in the Mekong River Delta refused to implement rice export contracts authorized by Vinafood 1 and Vinafood 2. Exporters said they were certain they would incur losses under such contracts. The Tien Giang-based Viet Hung Company Ltd, for example, ―quit the game‖ because of two reasons: the overly low bid that Vinafood 1 & 2 made to the Philippines to win the contract, and the strict requirements in the contract.―Under the contract, after rice is delivered to NFA, exporters could be fined $3 per every ton of rice which has a proportion of broken rice higher than one percent than agreed to in the contract,‖ Tuan said.The fine would be $6 per ton if the broken rice proportion is 2 percent higher, and $30 per ton if the broken rice ratio were higher than 10 percent.Tuan said he was still waiting for the outcome of the new negotiations before making a decision on authorizing new export contracts. Meanwhile, the domestic 2014 summer-autumn rice supply has increased in the Mekong River Delta, which has caused prices to fall.A merchant collecting rice from farmers in An Giang said fresh IR 50404 was selling at VND4,200 per kilo late last week. The price fell further by VND150 per kilo from earlier last week.Meanwhile, IR 50404 material rice was bought by export companies at VND6,600 per kilo.inafood 1 and Vinafood 2 have been severely criticized for offering overly low bids in an effort to obtain the contract with the Philippines.Analysts believe that Vietnam made a major mistake when analyzing the situation, which then led to the wrong decision. Tuan of Thinh Phat pointed out that Thailand was the major rival of Vietnam in the bid for the rice export contract because it was nearer to the Philippines than India and Pakistan, which allows savings on transportation costs.However, Tuan said Thailand should not have been considered a threat to Vietnam. NFA said that the Philippines would only accept rice harvested no earlier than four months ago. Thailand stopped collecting rice in February 2014.―This means that Thailand only had rice harvested in 2012 and 2014, and that Vietnam was the only seller in the market,‖ Tuan said. VNN/TBKTSG

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Winter-spring rice sees high yields despite bad weather Farmers nationwide are reporting high yields for their winter-spring rice crop despite unfavourable weather in many provinces, including a cold wave and a plant-disease outbreak in the north.

Two prolonged cold spells in February and cool weather in March in the north have extended the growing period of rice before the blooming stage by seven to 10 days.Despite this, farms have had high yields as farmers have used special cultivation techniques, a representative of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) said at a meeting in central Thanh Hoa province earlier this week to review the northern region's rice output.The north has had an average yield of 6.2 tonnes a hectare, up 50 kilos against last year's winter-spring crop, the ministry said. Northern provinces have planted more short-term rice and high-quality rice varieties this year, and the cultivation of hybrid-rice varieties has increased productivity and output.Deputy Minister Le Quoc Doanh said farmers should closely monitor their fields to prevent disease outbreaks.The northern region has planted over 1.1 million ha of rice, down 1,500 ha against the 2012-13 winter-spring crop.In the central region, rice yields in many provinces like Quang Nam and Quang Ngai have reached a record high.Quang Ngai has planted over 38,800ha of rice in the winter-spring crop, harvested an average yield of 5.7 tonnes per hectare, said the province's agriculture department. The department attributed the high productivity rate to several factors, including high-quality and diseaseresistant seeds, appropriate cultivation methods and sufficient irrigation water.The province has faced several unfavourable weather conditions, such as prolonged rain, floods and cold spells after initial planting, and drought in the middle of the crop.In Quang Nam province, the winter-spring crop has achieved a record-high yield, said the province's Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.The province's rice output is expected to reach 244,000 tonnes, up 6,500 tonnes against last year. The ministry said farmers in the Mekong Delta, the country's rice basket, had completed the harvesting of 1.6 million ha of the winter-spring crop, with an average yield of 6.8 tonne per ha, an increase of 0.3 tonnes over the estimate by the ministry's Plant Cultivation Department.The delta this year also expanded the area of largescale rice fields to over 100,000ha for the winter-spring crop, up 34,000 ha against last year, according to the Steering Committee for Southwest Region.An Giang province and Can Tho city have the largest areas of largescale rice fields in the delta. Farmers of these fields sign contracts with companies to grow high-quality rice for export.

BAAC expects to complete rice payments within this week Date : 2 มิถุนายน 2557

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BANGKOK, 2 June 2014, (NNT) - The Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) expects to use up its fund reserved for payment to farmers in the rice pledging scheme within this week. Executive Vice President of the BAAC Supat Eauchai reported that during May 26 - May 31 the bank had paid 34.7 billion baht to 345,000 farmers. The sum was part of the 40-billion-baht budget the bank has allocated from its liquidity fund for the purpose. Mr. Supat expected the allocation would be exhausted within June 5th. He said the the Public Debt Management Office under the Ministry of Finance would be in charge of seeking a loan of 50 billion baht to pay for the remaining debts the government owes to farmers, while reassuring farmers that payment would still be completed within June 22nd. All the 11 branches of the Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) in Nakhon Phanom province, opened over the weekend to speed up payments to farmers under the rice-pledging scheme. A total amount of 650 million baht has been paid to around 7,000 farmers in this province while another 700 million baht will be paid to 7,000 more farmers within three days after the allocation is available, said Surachai Paijithathai, director of the BAAC branch in Nakhon Phanom.Meanwhile, Miss Jularat Suthithorn, Director General of the PDMO, is looking into ways to pay back the 40 billion baht sum to the BAAC. She is initially considering to issue 1-3 year short term bonds to replenish the BAAC's liquidity.

BAAC to propose rice field insurance scheme to NCPO BANGKOK, 2 June 2014 (NNT) – The Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) is proposing a rice field insurance scheme to the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) that would carry a 494 million baht budget. BAAC Manager Lak Wajananawatch said that the bank is planning to propose an insurance scheme for nationwide rice fields insurance comprised of 7 types of coverage. The coverage is divided into two levels; coverage for damages from the government at a rate of 1,113 baht per Rai and coverage from insurance companies at a rate of 1,111 baht per Rai. In the plan, farmers would have to pay 60-100 baht per Rai for insurance premiums depending on area conditions, the rest of the premiums will be paid by the government. The budget of 494 million baht will cover 1,500,000 Rai of rice fields. Mr. Lak added that Air Chief Marshal Prajin Juntong, the economic chief of NCPO, is interested in policies that help farmers in the scope of fiscal discipline that don't distort the mechanisms of the market.

Rice market to be range-bound OUR CORRESPONDENT

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KARNAL, JUNE 2:

The rice market may see only need-based buying and prices may rule with marginal fluctuations in the coming days, according to traders.Sluggish demand, coupled with ample availability of stocks, pulled aromatic and nonbasmati rice prices down by ₹50 and ₹300 a quintal on Monday.Amit Chandna, proprietor of Hanuman Rice Trading Company, said lack of buying at all levels pulled rice prices down. Market sentiments are weak. The market is unlikely to see any recovery in rice prices, he said. Traders now believe that the market may continue to rule around current levels with marginal fluctuation, Chandna said. In the physical market, Pusa-1121 (steam) dropped ₹200 and was sold at ₹ 9,000 a quintal, while Pusa-1121 (sela) was quoted at ₹7,500 a quintal, down ₹300. Pure Basmati (raw) eased by ₹150 and was quoted at ₹12,150 a quintal. Duplicate basmati (steam) was sold at ₹7,000 a quintal, down ₹200. Pusa-1121 (second wand) was sold at ₹7,100, Tibar at ₹6,000, and Dubar at ₹5,200 a quintal. In the non-basmati section, Sharbati (steam) was down ₹100 and was sold at ₹4,600, while Sharbati (sela) was quoted at ₹4,200 a quintal, down ₹50. PR varieties dropped by ₹50-100 down; Permal (raw) sold at ₹2,200 a quintal; Permal (sela) at ₹2,350 a quintal; PR-11 (sela) sold at ₹2,500; and PR-11 (raw) at ₹2,600 a quintal. PR14 (steam) was sold at ₹2,800 a quintal. (This article was published on June 2, 2014)

Wheat, rice basmati weaken on subdued demand Press Trust of India | New Delhi May 31, 2014

Weak conditions prevailed on the wholesale grains market today with prices of wheat and rice basmati drifting owing to reduced offtake by flour mills and stockists against increased supplies.Traders said reduced offtake by flour mills against increased supplies on reports of higher procurement, mainly led to the fall in wheat prices. Sluggish demand against adequate stocks position kept pressure on rice basmati prices, they said. In the national capital, wheat dara (for mills)fell by Rs 10 to Rs 1,515-1,520 per quintal. Atta chakki delivery followed suit and traded lower by the same margin to Rs 1,520- 1,525 per 90 kg. In the rice section, basmati common and Pusa-1121 variety eased to Rs 8,200-8,700 and Rs 7,100-8,800 against last close of Rs 8,600-9,000 and Rs 7,400-9,100 per quintal, respectively on sluggish demand against adequate supply.

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Following

were

today's

quotations

per

quintal:

Wheat, MP (deshi) 2,160-2,360, Wheat dara (for mills) 1,515-1,520, Chakki atta (delivery) 1,520-1,525 Atta Rajdhani (10 kg) 220, Shakti bhog (10 kg) 220, Roller flour mill 810-830 (50 kg), Maida 830-850 (50 kg) and Sooji 920-940 (50kg). Basmati rice (Lal Quila) 10,400, Shri Lal Mahal 10,000, Super Basmati Rice, 9,500, Basmati common new 8,200-8,700, Rice Pusa-(1121) new 7,100-8,800, Permal raw 2,150-2,200, Permal wand 2,200-2,300, Sela 2,750-2,850 and Rice IR-8- 1,800-1,850, Bajra 1,315-1,320, Jowar yellow 1,450-1,475, white 2,325-2,525, Maize 1,340-1,345, Barley 1,320-1,330.

TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi- Jun 02 Mon Jun 2, 2014 2:52pm IST TABLE-India Grain Prices - Delhi - Jun 02 Rates by Asian News International, New Delhi Tel: 011 2619 1464 Indicative Grains

Previous

opening

close

(in rupees per 100 kg unless stated) ---------------------------------------------------------Wheat Desi

2,000-2,600

2,000-2,600.

Wheat Dara

1,600-1,700

1,600-1,700.

Atta Chakki (per 10 Kg) Roller Mill (per bag)

1,500-1,600

Maida (per bag) Sooji (per bag)

220-250

1,650-1,850 1,850-2,050

Rice Basmati(Common)

220-250. 1,550-1,650. 1,650-1,800. 1,800-2,000.

8,000-9,100

8,000-9,100.

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Rice Permal

1,800-2,400

Rice Sela

1,800-2,400.

1,500-1,700

I.R.-8

1,900-2,200

Gram

3,020-3,520

1,600-1,700. 1,950-2,200. 3,000-3,500.

Peas Green

3,200-3,300

3,200-3,300.

Peas White

3,150-3,350

3,150-3,350.

Bajra

1,500-1,700

Jowar white

1,500-1,700.

1,400-1,550

2,000-3,500.

Maize

1,600-1,700

1,600-1,700.

Barley

1,350-1,650

1,300-1,600.

Source: Delhi grain market traders.

Nagpur Foodgrain Prices - APMC & Open Market-May 30 Fri May 30, 2014 3:18pm IST Nagpur, May 30 (Reuters) - Gram and tuar prices in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) firmed up again on renewed demand from local millers amid weak supply fromproducing regions. Fresh rise on NCDEX, weak overseas arrival and reported demand from South-based millers also helped to push up prices, according to sources. *

*

*

*

FOODGRAINS & PULSES GRAM * Gram varieties ruled steady in open market here but demand was poor. TUAR

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* Tuar varieties quoted static in open market matching the demand and supply position. * Wheat mill quality recovered smartly in open market on good marriage season demand from local traders amid weak supply from producing regions like Punjab and Haryana. * In Akola, Tuar - 4,100-4,300, Tuar dal - 6,300-6,500, Udid at 6,100-6,500, Udid Mogar (clean) - 7,200-7,700, Moong - 8,200-8,400, Moong Mogar (clean) 9,500-10,200, Gram - 2,400-2,600, Gram Super best bold - 3,300-3,600 for 100 kg. * Other varieties of wheat, rice and other commodities remained steady in open market in thin trading activity, according to sources.

Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg

FOODGRAINS

Available prices

Gram Auction

2,300-2,460

Gram Pink Auction Tuar Auction

n.a.

2,300-2,420 2,100-2,600

3,900-4,200

Moong Auction

n.a.

Udid Auction

n.a.

Masoor Auction

3,840-4,290 5,200-5,500

4,300-4,500

n.a.

Gram Super Best Bold Gram Super Best Gram Medium Best

Previous close

2,600-2,800 4,000-4,200

4,000-4,200

n.a. 3,850-3,950

Gram Dal Medium

n.a.

Gram Mill Quality

3,500-3,600

3,850-3,950

n.a. 3,500-3,600

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Desi gram Raw

2,850-2,950

Gram Filter new

2,850-2,950

3,200-3,400

Gram Kabuli

3,200-3,400

8,500-10,500

Gram Pink

7,700-8,100

Tuar Fataka Best

8,500-10,500 7,700-8,100

6,500-6,700

Tuar Fataka Medium

6,500-6,700

6,300-6,400

Tuar Dal Best Phod

6,300-6,400

5,800-6,000

Tuar Dal Medium phod

5,800-6,000

5,400-5,700

5,400-5,700

Tuar Gavarani

4,400-4,500

4,400-4,500

Tuar Karnataka

4,350-4,450

4,350-4,450

Tuar Black

7,800-8,000

Masoor dal best

7,800-8,000

6,200-6,400

Masoor dal medium Masoor

6,000-6,200

n.a.

9,900-10,500

Moong Mogar Medium best

Moong dal Chilka

9,900-10,500

9,200-9,700

9,200-9,600

9,000-9,400

n.a.

Moong Chamki best

8,000-9,100

n.a.

Udid Mogar Super best (100 INR/KG) Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG)

9,200-9,700

9,200-9,600

9,000-9,400

Moong Mill quality

Batri dal (100 INR/KG)

6,000-6,200

n.a.

Moong Mogar bold

Moong dal super best

6,200-6,400

8,000-9,100 8,000-8,200

6,600-7,400

5,500-5,800

4,700-6,000

8,000-8,200 6,600-7,400

5,500-5,800

4,700-6,000

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Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg)

3,050-3,150

Watana Dal (100 INR/KG)

3,300-3,400

Watana White (100 INR/KG)

3,300-3,400

3,500-3,600

Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG)

3,050-3,150

4,800-5,300

1,200-1,600

Wheat Mill quality(100 INR/KG) Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG)

3,500-3,600 4,800-5,300

1,200-1,600

1,300-1,600

1,200-1,500

1,300-1,500

Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG)

1,300-1,500

2,000-2,150

Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG)

2,000-2,150

1,700-1,800

n.a.

n.a.

MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 2,800-3,000 MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG)

1,700-1,800

2,800-3,000

2,200-2,700

2,200-2,700

Wheat 147 (100 INR/KG)

1,100-1,400

1,100-1,400

Wheat Best (100 INR/KG)

1,700-2,000

1,700-2,000

Rice BPT (100 INR/KG) Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG)

3,600-4,000 1,900-2,100

3,600-4,000 1,900-2,100

Rice Swarna old (100 INR/KG)

3,000-3,200

3,000-3,200

Rice HMT (100 INR/KG)

3,800-4,100

3,800-4,100

Rice HMT Shriram (100 INR/KG)

4,600-5,400

4,600-5,400

Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 10,400-13,900 Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) Rice Chinnor (100 INR/KG) Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG)

10,400-13,900

7,300-10,000

5,500-5,800 1,300-1,500 1,600-1,700

7,300-10,500

5,500-5,800 1,300-1,500 1,600-1,700

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WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 45.2 degree Celsius (113.3 degree Fahrenheit), minimum temp. 28.2 degree Celsius (82.7 degree Fahrenheit) Humidity: Highest - n.a., lowest - n.a. Rainfall : 0.0 mm FORECAST: Mainly clear sky. Maximum and Minimum temperature likely to be around 46 and 29 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.--not available (For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices.)

Exports soar as Italy’s rice fields find ‘niche markets’ AFP June 02, 2014

VERCELLI: The rice fields around Vercelli in northern Italy stretch as far as the eye can see with the snowcapped Alps behind.The first shoots coming up will eventually end up as fragrant risotto on gourmet tables as far away as China.Italy is Europe’s top rice producer and exports are growing thanks to small-scale farmers who grow premium rice varieties popular with health conscious connoisseurs. ―It’s considered a chic product for people who have money,‖ said Sandro Guerrini, who farms 80 hectares with his three brothers on a farm started by their grandparents.Their production is tiny — just 400 kilogrammes a year — but the ―Baraggia‖ variety that they grow commands a far higher price thanks to its EU quality assurance label.Another variety produced in the area — ―Vialone Nano‖ — sells for around 2,000 euros a tonne wholesale, according to the Milan commodities exchange — compared to a World Bank benchmark price index for rice of 425 euros a tonne ―It’s our great treasure here,‖ said Davide Bonato, chef at ―Massimo‖, a restaurant in the village of Trino in the floodplains of the mighty Po River which crosses the region.―Rice needs a lot of work! It really is an ancient tradition,‖ said Bonato as he cooked up a varied feast of rice-based delicacies — from starters to desserts.There are 250,000 hectares of rice fields along the Po and production last season was around 1.6 million tonnes, according to official data from the agriculture ministry.The main export market in Europe is Britain — 45,718 tonnes sold last year compared to 32,074 the year before.Exports outside the European Union rose to 119,510

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tonnes last year from 100,053 tonnes the year before.They shot up by 139 percent to Turkey — the biggest market for Italian rice — and by 47 percent to Russia .Rice sold to China was just 25 tonnes — a symbolic amount in a market seen as having a lot of potential for Italy.The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development said the recent rise in European and US rice exports in the world were helped mainly by ―new food habits in developed countries and new market niches in developing countries.‖That translates into much-needed jobs in Vercelli, a town of 50,000 people that even has a ―Rice Exchange‖.―When my parents were running it, a farm like ours employed my father and my uncle. Now after a re-organisation, it employs four people,‖ said Guerrini, adding that he now also makes rice cakes, flour and ready-made risottos.Local guide Cristian Ferraris, who organises bike tours of the rice fields, said the soil in the region is particularly appropriate for rice cultivation.

―The land is flat and the soil has a lot of clay which means the water stays on the surface,‖ he said, adding that the water also offers protection for the rice shoots.Rice cultivation was introduced by Cistercian monks from France in the 12th century but it really took off with an irrigation mechanism designed by none other than Leonardo da Vinci — better known for painting the Mona Lisa.The centuries that have passed have still not managed to dislodge pasta as the favourite on Italian tables, however.Asked if rice would ever take over from pasta, Bonato smiled: ―It would be great if that was already the case. But we’re Italians.‖

Sierra Leone News: Japan funds USD1.25m rice project in Port Loko Efforts by the Japanese Government to render support to Sierra Leone’s food security drive has resulted in the implementation of a mega rice project, totaling $1.25m specifically in Buya Romende Chiefdom-Port Loko District.Residents of villages in the Chiefdom were, in the past week, fascinated by a high-powered delegation comprising officials from the World Food Programme (WFP), Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and a representative of the Japanese Consul, who stormed Makin Village in Buya Romende to perform the official launching of the multi-million Leones project. The sustainable rice production project, which is going to be implemented for a period of five years, is a financial support provided by the Ministry of Agriculture in Japan to WFP to actualize the government’s food security drive through the distribution of seed rice to farmer households in the chiefdom.Other implementing partners including Brac and Cotton Tree Foundation have been contracted in the implementation of the project in Inland Valley Swamps which is targeted at distributing 150 tons of rice within the period of five years.The bilateral project aims at rehabilitating 106 hectares of unproductive swampland and train farmers to improve rice production and post-harvest management techniques within the target period, and link the rice production with markets to facilitate commercialization through the WFP’s Purchase for Progress Initiative.

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The WFP Country Director, Gon Myers noted that the project; being implemented in both Sierra Leone and Liberia, further aims at benefiting 450 households. He said that irrigational facilities and other farming technologies that will enhance sustainable rice production will be provided through training opportunity in the course of the project.He said that at the start of the project this year, 70-80 tons of rice will be given out to farmer households, with each receiving about 3kilogram of rice per day based on the magnitude and quality of work. The Director assured that the project will provide support for vegetable production to ensure nutritional value and balanced diet.As a result, he said, the WFP has given out a consignment of locally produced rice bought from organizations belonging to government’s Agri-Business Centers (ABC’s) that are promoted by smallholder commercialization Programmes to be used for feeding purposes within the life-span of the project. Representative of the Japanese Consul, Yukari Hara said that apart from the Japanese Government’s effort in helping Sierra Leone in its post-war recovery drive through JICA projects.She said that their country’s bilateral relationship has also facilitated the implementation of the food security project for smallholder farmers so that they can help in the improvement of the quality of life.She anticipated that before the expiration of the five years project, the Government will be delighted to see a significant gain in the area of food security in Sierra Leone, so that it will be used as a paradigm for similar projects in other parts of Africa. The Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, Lovell Thomas, in his keynote remarks and official launching of the project said that ―the beneficiaries should count themselves very lucky for such a project at their door-steps.‖ He urged them to harness the opportunity so that the drive of the prosperity Agenda will quickly be realized.However, he assured the implementing partners of the ministry’s technical support for the project, being that its element is part of the agricultural drive of the nation. And that they will ensure that the project becomes a success story so that it will be implemented in other parts of the country. By Poindexter Sama Monday June 02, 2014

Irrigation is a key to self-sufficiency in rice production The Ghana Irrigation Development Authority (GIDA) said irrigation farming holds the key to Ghana’s self-sufficiency in rice production.Dr Ben Vas Nyamadi, GIDA Chief Executive Officer (CEO) said currently, the nation is generating 56 per cent of its rice needs of which 30 per cent is from irrigation farming.He observed that, so far the measures government had put in place to fill up the short fall of 44 per cent were beginning to yield good returns, declaring that with emphasis being placed on irrigation farming the nation would be self-sufficient in rice production by the year 2018.Dr Nyamadi was

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speaking to the Ghana News Agency in Accra on Friday and said current strategies to grow the sector by 13.2 per cent would lead to 100 per cent production by 2018. He attributed the increase in local rice production to the crucial roles agri-businesses played in its production and processing.He stated that for this year, the government had made available to the Authority GH? 40 million, which would be used for honouring outstanding payments and for rehabilitating dams and dug-outs in the country.Dr Nyamadi said the Export Development and Agriculture Investment Fund had also given GIDA twenty million Ghana cedis for a review of previous studies on potential irrigation fields in the country; and also to take up three projects which were initiated by the Millennium Development Authority, but could not be completed due to time constraint. He said areas that would be tackled include the construction of a dam at Tamni in the Guru-Tempani District of the Upper East Region; rehabilitation of the Nasia and Libga dams in the Northern Region; Amartey in the Afraim Plains of the Eastern Region and Mprumem in the Central Region.The CEO said the study, which would cover the Ho-Keta plains and Kpli in the Volta Region, Sebele in the Northern Region and Kamba in the Upper West Region, would be completed within the year. Dr Nyamadi said the feasibility studies would promote public-private partnership in irrigation farming in the country.He said the Authority is collaborating with Social Opportunity Project in Labour Intensity Public Works, by providing them with services for the rehabilitation of dams and dug outs in 49 districts, which would soon be scaled up to 60. He said GIDA would soon roll-out a Food and Agriculture Organization programme for the provision of dams and dugouts in conflict prone zones such as Bawku and Yendi, to engage the youth in agriculture, so as to help promote peace in these areas.He urged government to invest more in irrigation farming in order t ensure food security and to provide employment opportunities for the teaming youth of the country.

Harden Addresses 79th Annual Delta Council Meeting CLEVELAND, MS -- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden was the keynote speaker at the 79th Annual Delta Council meeting on May 29. Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant said of Harden in his introduction, "She knows the business of USDA and she gets things done." Harden said she sees her job as advancing the economy through the viability of farming and reminding people every day about the 1 percent who feed the 99 percent. Harden discussed 2014 Farm Bill implementation and highlighted the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) as a "shining new conservation program.

" The previous day Harden had toured Mississippi farms already utilizing innovative conservation practices and said that Mississippi would be central to this new public private partnership approach. She praised the Delta Council for "setting

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the bar for agricultural organizations by having a clear focus and a strong plan and vision for the future."Out-going Delta Council President Gibb Steele's busy year of leadership was highlighted in a video demonstrating the breadth of regional issues the Council confronts each year. Steele serves on the USA Rice Producers' Group board of directors and the USA Rice Federation board of directors and executive committee.hievement awards for 2014 were awarded to Mississippi leaders in agriculture including Outstanding Rice Producer Marvin Cochran and Outstanding Conservation Farmer Buddy Allen. Image: Gibb Steele and Krysta Harden at the 2014 USA Rice Government Affairs Conference last February.

Crop Progress: 2014 Crop 89 Percent Emerged WASHINGTON, DC -- Eighty-nine percent of the nation's 2014 rice acreage has emerged, according to today's U.S. Department of Agriculture's Crop Progress Report. Rice Emerged, Selected States Week Ending

State

May 18, 2013

May 11, 2014

May 18, 2014

2009-2013 average

Percent Arkansas

84

86

94

90

California

82

50

70

62

Louisiana

97

97

98

98

Mississippi

69

83

86

90

Missouri

95

84

88

89

Texas

94

95

99

92

Six States

86

80

89

86

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CME Group/Closing Rough Rice Futures CME Group (Preliminary): Closing Rough Rice Futures for June 2

Month

Price

Net Change

July 2014

$14.865

- $0.120

September 2014

$14.350

- $0.025

November 2014

$14.495

+ $0.010

January 2015

$14.640

+ $0.020

March 2015

$14.800

UNCH

May 2015

$14.800

UNCH

July 2015

$14.800

UNCH

Genetically modified crops could help improve the lives of millions By Editorial Board,

GENETICALLY MODIFIED crops have increased the productivity and improved the lives of farmers — and the people who depend on them — all over the world. Now, they are banned in two counties in Oregon.Voters in two Oregon counties have chosen to outlaw the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in the productive Rogue Valley. They are not the only ones going in the wrong direction. Several places in California, Hawaii, Maine and Washington state also have bans in place, though the Oregon counties are the first in which GMOs had been

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actively cultivated. Farmers have a year to remove the genetically modified crops from their fields. Several states also have or are considering a requirement that food containing genetically modified crops be labeled. There is no mainstream scientific evidence showing that foods containing GMOs are any more or less harmful for people to consume than anything else in the supermarket, despite decades of development and use. If that doesn’t convince some people, they have the option of simply buying food bearing the ―organic‖ label. There is no need for the government to stigmatize products with a label that suggests the potential for harm. Outright bans, meanwhile, are even worse than gratuitous labeling.The issue is not just one of agribusiness profits, though some companies certainly stand to make money by creating and selling GMOs.

The application of current biotechnological tools to agriculture offers a wide array of benefits , benefits that are only beginning to be seen. There is the potential to create crops that are easier to grow, better for the environment and more nutrient-rich. Smart genetic modification is one important tool available to sustain theworld’s growing multitudes. Making good on that promise will require both an openness to the technology and serious investment in GMOs within wealthy countries. The prospect of helping to feed the starving and improve the lives of people across the planet should not be nipped because of the self-indulgent fretting of first-world activists. As with any field, there’s room for reasonable caution and study using real science. But there is nothing reasonable about anti-GMO fundamentalism. Voters and their representatives should worry less about ―Frankenfood‖ and more about the vast global challenges that genetically modified crops can help address.

Government to announce MSP of paddy & other crops by June 15 By PTI | 2 Jun, 2014, 05.47PM IST "We will announce the minimum support price (MSP) of kharif (summer) crops for the 2014-15 crop year by June 15," Singh told reporters here. ET SPECIAL: NEW DELHI: Government will announce by June 15 minimum support prices of 14 crops, including paddy, for the 2014-15 crop year (July-June), Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh said today. On delayed arrival of southwest monsoon and possibility of drought in some areas, the minister said that the correct picture can be

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ascertained after the Met Department comes out with its update monsoon forecast next week. "We will announce the minimum support price (MSP) of kharif (summer) crops for the 2014-15 crop year by June 15," Singh told reporters here.

Although the government is working on a new formula to fix MSP of agri-crops to guarantee 50 per cent profits to farmers, the support price of kharif crops to be announced would be determined based on the existing formula adopted by the government's statutory body CACP, he said. MSP is normally announced during sowing time to help farmers plan their choice of crop to sow. Sowing of kharif crops such as paddy begins with the start of the southwest monsoon from June and harvesting starts from October. On delayed monsoon, Singh said, "We will get the correct picture about monsoon situation after Met Department releases its forecast on June 9. Thereafter, we will formalise what further steps need to be taken." Currently, the government is in touch with states to be ready with contingency plans, he added. As per the official forecast, the country is expected to have below normal monsoon this year with rainfall projected to be 95 per cent because of the El Nino effect, which is generally associated with the warming of ocean water. According to sources, the Commission for Agricultural Costs and Prices (CACP), which recommends MSP of agri-crops to the Agriculture Ministry, has suggested a moderate hike in the MSP of paddy by Rs 50 to Rs 1360/quintal for 2014-15 and up to Rs 100/quintal raise in pulses MSP. It has also proposed a Rs 50 per quintal increase in cotton MSP at Rs 3,750 for medium staple and Rs 4,050 for long staple for 2014-15 crop year. CACP has proposed a marginal hike in maize MSP by Rs 30 at Rs 1530/quintal for hybrid variety and Rs 1550/quintal for maldandi variety for this year as its MSP was raised sharply two years back. Similarly, it has suggested a Rs 50 raise in ragi MSP at Rs 1550/quintal for 2014-15 from over last year. However, it has recommended retaining the existing MSP of bajra and maize at Rs 1250/quintal and Rs 1310/quintal, respectively, for 2014-15 crop year. It has also proposed keeping the MSP of groundnut and soyabean unchanged for this year at Rs 4,000/quintal and Rs 2,500-2,560/quintal, respectively. For pulses, the CACP has recommended a Rs 50 hike in the support price of 'Tur' and 'Urad' at Rs 4350/quintal each for 201415. It has recommended a Rs 100 increase in MSP of 'Moong' at Rs 4600 per quintal for this year to keep intercrop parity within kharif (summer) pulses.

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BAAC has paid out B35bn to farmers All outstanding rice payments by June 22 Published: 2 Jun 2014 at 13.02 | Viewed: 3,098 | Comments: 7 Online news: Writer: Online Reporters

The Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives has paid around 35 billion baht to almost 350,000 farmers over the past week and it expects to pay off all overdue payments for pledged grain by June 22, BAAC president Luck Wajananawat said. A statement issued by the bank on Monday said since receiving the first tranche of money from the government after the May 22 coup, the bank has paid out a total of 35.03 billion baht to 348,384 farmers. Order of payments is based on the running numbers of receipts farmers hold after pledging their grain from the main crop 2013/14 under the previous government led by Yingluck Shinawatra.The bank had initially received 40 billion baht and expected another 50 billion baht to be allocated soon by the military junta for overdue rice payments. Mr Luck said n the statement a total of 1.69 million farmers pledged 11.81 million tonnes of main crop rice from the 2013/14 harvest for a total of 195.45 billion baht. The BAAC, as of Sunday, had paid a total of 139.35 billion baht to 1.1 million farmers who deposited 8.51 million tonnes of unmilled rice with the government.To finance the payments, the bank received 145.5 billion baht from the government, of which 115 billion was from the budget and rice sales by Commerce Ministry, 10.5 billion from the BAAC’s initiative farmer assistance fund, and 20 billion baht from the government’s central budget.The Public Debt Management Office would on Tuesday start the process of borrowing another 50 billion baht from financial institutions, and then deliver the funds to the BAAC for further payments to farmers, he said.Keep up-to-date with the latest on coup d'etat with Bangkok Post SMS News. Call *451391000 to subscribe – 39 baht/month (7 days free, available in Thailand only) Bangkok Post SMS News: Deliver only trustworthy news on SMS

Mid-South rice this week - June 2, 2014 What to ask before applying fungicide to your rice Jun 2, 2014Ed Phillips | Delta Farm Press

As the week began, Mid-South rice planting was nearing completion. USDA reported that as of May 24, planting was 95 percent complete in Arkansas, 99 percent in Louisiana, 91 percent in Mississippi, and 95 percent in Missouri.Then rains set in Tuesday and continued through the week.Many rice fields in Arkansas were on the verge of being ready for a permanent flood as the rain system approached, says Jarrod Hardke, Arkansas Extension rice agronomist.―The short window to make both preflood herbicide applications and preflood nitrogen applications

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likely led some to wait until the system passed to move forward.‖ A big jump in flooded acreage will occur this week if farmers can get the ground dry enough to fertilize, he says.

Rice disease management checklist LSU AgCenter’s Don Groth provides a checklist (10 questions I should ask before applying a fungicide) to help farmers deal with diseases in their fields. Find answers to questions such as ―What disease is in my field?‖ and ―Is my fungicide timing correct‖ in the latest Rice Disease Newsletter.

Delayed phytotoxicity syndrome Groth also discusses severe herbicide damage to rice. If your rice is suffering from delayed phytotoxicity syndrome, find out what measures to take in the Rice Disease Newsletter.

Sheath blight management Conditions are right for the development of sheath blight in rice, says Yeshi Wamishe, Arkansas Extension rice plant pathologist. He provides information for identifying sheath blight and what you can do to manage it in Pointers for sheath blight management.A recent report says that to replace the contribution to wildlife habitat of flooded rice land would cost over $3.5 billion. Find out more about the value of your rice fields in Delta Farm Press Editor Elton Robinson’s Value of rice lands to waterfowl – something to quack about.

Herbicide injury and rice water weevils Seeing herbicide injury in your fields? Rice water weevils? Read about what to watch for and what you can do in the latest Arkansas Rice Update. Three rice field days in June Rice farmers can learn about LSU’s AgCenter research projects that can help them produce better crops more efficiently at three field days in June. Find out which one best fits your schedule at LSU AgCenter’s three rice field days. Arsenic and rice FDA and Consumer Reports released tests in September 2012 revealing levels of inorganic arsenic in rice. Consumers were confused and concerned. They need not be, says a prominent food safety and toxicology consultant. Read a report on his findings:Concerns unwarranted over effects on health from inorganic arsenic in food.

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Farmers call for new rice price pledge Junta asked to pay B10,000 per tonne Published: 2 Jun 2014 at 06.04 | Viewed: 5,973 | Comments: 33 Newspaper section: News Writer: Apinya Wipatayotin

Farming industry leaders have called on the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) to issue a policy guaranteeing rice sales at 10,000 baht per tonne for the next crop, amid fears the price of the grain is falling. Farmers dry grain in an open field. (Bangkok Post file photo) Growers made the demand after the NCPO began to pay long-overdue funds to farmers owed cash under the former government's rice pledging scheme, which guaranteed a rice price of 15,000 baht per tonne in 2011.Songpon Poonsawat, chairman of the Council of Farmers in Ang Thong province, said his organisation would propose short-term assistance packages for the NCPO to consider, to help farmers suffering as a result of low rice prices.―We would be happy if the NCPO could guarantee our rice price at 10,000 baht per tonne for the next crop. Each farmer has invested at least 5,000 baht per rai,‖ Mr Songpon said."If not, we may suffer big losses from selling the rice, because the current market price is about 5,000-6,000 baht per tonne."Mr Songpon suggested the intervention be carried out for the next two crops, until the market price of rice returns to normal. He argued the situation would improve if rice stockpiles were sold off.According to Ministry of Finance inspectors, the rice-pledging project is projected to have cost the country 500 billion baht, while millions of tonnes of rice have disappeared from stocks. Mr Songpon said the former government tried to sell a huge amount of rice stock, which forced the market price of the grain to drop.In the long-term, he said the new government should draft a policy educating farmers on how to reduce the cost of rice production, while officials should also encourage so-called rice zoning, which promotes the planting of rice in certain areas to improve the quality of the product.He said farmers are currently planting low-grade rice, because they want to produce enough yield to join the rice pledging scheme, but this is harming Thailand's reputation for producing premium-grade rice.Ubonsak Bualuang-ngam, chairman of the Committee on Central Agriculture, said the next government should support co-operatives for farmers, to strengthen the farming industry. Mr Ubonsak said the co-operative system empowers farmers to set their own prices and encourages them to plant more premium rice.Reducing or eliminating the use of chemicals in rice production would help reduce the cost of production, he said, adding that organic rice zones must be developed to promote and support chemicalfree rice and benefit people's health.

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2nd june,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine