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COMMENTARY: WAR ON DRUGS IS SHOOTING BLANKS

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LOOKING BACKWARD: THE BROADWAY MARKET IN THE 1930S

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CENTERFOLD: LAWRENCE BROSE’S DE PROFUNDIS

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FOOD + DRINK: ABV: MUSIC, WHISKEY, BURGERS, BEER


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THIS WEEK ISSUE NO. 20 | APRIL 1, 2015

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ECOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT: Orin Langelle at ¡Buen Vivir!

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ART: Jozef Bajus exhibit at Manuel Barreto Gallery.

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SPOTLIGHT: Lemuria stops at the Waiting Room.

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EVENTS: A guide to the week’s best music, art, and other goings-on.

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BOOKS: Nigel Hamilton on FDR’s war leadership.

ON THE COVER TOM HUGHES’s Architectural Growth #6: We just made it up is available in the flat files at at BT&C Gallery. The former Buffalonian now lives in Vashon, Washington.

THE PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Playwright Donna Hoke.

THE PUBLIC STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GEOFF KELLY

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If you’re in the market for a practicum on the art of gossip, spend a Monday morning in downtown Buffalo’s courthouses, among the prosecutors and defense attorneys, whose professional obligation to accuracy and confidentiality is belied by what seems a vocational predilection for telling tales out of school. Take as an example this story going around about Erie County District Attorney Frank A. Sedita III. It is the worst-kept secret in Erie County politics that Sedita would like to be a New York State Supreme Court judge, like his father before him; he’s been raising money for this putative future campaign, and his top lieutenants in the DA’s office are making career plans.  According to the wags, Sedita’s bid for a cross-endorsement by Democrats and Republicans has become fouled on his desire to control who succeeds him as DA. He favors Michael Flaherty, his first deputy district attorney. Some Democratic leaders, however, think Flaherty is not the strongest candidate to run against a strong GOP opponent, especially as Republicans have performed so well in countywide races lately. And, the rumormongers say, party leaders resent Sedita demanding a voice in the decision. Isn’t the judgeship enough? Especially for a guy whose political allies include the reviled Steve Pigeon, who has waged hapless but nonetheless damaging war on the current Democratic Party leadership for the last several years. The Pigeon connection is also proving difficult for another of Sedita’s lieutenants, assistant district attorney James Bargnesi, who is looking for a judgeship, too. Sedita, the story goes, needs to back off on Flaherty and show some humility if he wants his party’s blessing to become a judge.  Our sources in the courts and in Democratic Party leadership have heard this story in various iterations. There’s some truth to it, they tell us, and some exaggeration. Sedita’s intention to become a judge may be an open secret but he hasn’t declared yet. His fealty to Pigeon should not be overestimated, they tell us. Lawyers like to talk. Defense attorneys particularly like to talk about Sedita and his policies, which many say lead to inflation of the DA’s apparent success rate while making their jobs difficult and having little effect on serious crime. Too, there is grumbling within Sedita’s own office over the succession plan, should he become a judge. “Gossip,” said Walter Winchell, that despicable old Red-baiter, “is the art of saying nothing in a way that leaves practically nothing unsaid.”  Speaking of Pigeon, we note that a recent column by Buffalo News political reporter Bob McCarthy moved the paper’s editorial board to weigh in on the state’s “corrupt arrangement for selecting judges,” a system that “demands change,” according to the editorial board. No argument here. We were surprised, however, that the editorial board described their exemplar of the problem, Amherst attorney Dennis Ward—formerly a commissioner on the Erie County Board of Elections, elected to the state Supreme Court last fall—as “a local Democratic Party hack.” Ward is a hack, would even tell you so himself, but if funneling money to political parties in exchange for their endorsement

Erie County DA Frank Sedita III

makes a politician a hack, then who isn’t one? Does the News call Governor Andrew Cuomo a hack? Erie County Clerk Chris Jacobs? Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown? State Senator Tim Kennedy? Congressman Brian Higgins? How about every judge from the revered Gene Fahey, who just graduated to the Court of Appeals, to Joe Makowski, who resigned his judgeship in disgrace. Why does Ward earn such sneering opprobrium? 

IF YO THE PLEA AD IS

Erie Community College is desperate financial straits, according to an email its president, Jack Quinn, sent to faculty and staff on March 20. In the email, Quinn said that ECC faces a $1.2 million deficit in the current year and a $7.8 million deficit next year, which will require the school to dip into its fund balance substantially. At the same time, Quinn wrote, enrollment is dropping. “[W]e might conceivably find ourselves with a fund balance at the end of 2015-2016 that would be below the minimum level recommended by Middle States accreditors. This could potentially jeopardize ECC’s accreditation.” Quinn goes on the describe cost-cutting measures his administration intends to pursue: restrictions on new hiring; reductions in allowances for overtime and travel (out of town and even between campuses); cuts in allowances for office supplies, furniture, lunches; and a freeze on “internal construction projects.” This last does not include the construction of a controversial new $30 million facility on ECC’s North Campus, planning for which continues apace. Also entering an austerity period is the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority. Our sources there tell us the administration has ordered what amounts to a purchasing moratorium. Joe Mascia, an elected resident commissioner for the BMHA, has been sounding the alarm in recent months about the authority’s finances, saying its fund balance has fallen below the levels recommended by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, BMHA’s chief revenue source.  Mascia, who has an antagonistic relationship with those of his fellow commissioners appointed by Mayor Byron Brown, nonetheless tried recently to reach out to the mayor on the subject of BMHA’s problems: “Still need to meet with you,” Mascia wrote to Brown last week. “Things are starting to unravel.” In response, the mayor has empaneled a blue-ribbon commission endowed with subpoena powers to investigate fraud and abuse at BMHA and to consider radical changes in its administration and governance. BMHA chairman Mike Seaman and executive director Dawn Sanders-Garrett have been “temporarily suspended,” according to mayoral spokesman Mike DeGeorge, who answered this reporter’s call on the first ring. We’re told Mascia spent seven straight hours giving testimony on Monday to the panel’s attorneys. Just kidding. That last paragraph. That never P happened. April fools.

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NEWS COMMENTARY

R A W E H T S G U R D ON

nks ing bla t o o h s een, s has b y a w l a and ugs is, r D n o e War SON Why th E JACK C BY BRU

Harry Anslinger, the first head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics.

BY BRUCE JACKSON The term “War on Drugs” came into general usage in 1971, when Richard M. Nixon used it as his counterpart to Lyndon B. Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” It wasn’t so near a noble enterprise. Both, in the end, were huge failures.  Poverty is still a major defect in our society, one which Congress—Republican or Democrat—has assiduously avoided dealing with. And drugs are an issue both of them have hid from for decades, mainly by passing one meaningless, expensive law after another, each of them resulting in deflecting law enforcement from going after real villains, clogging our courts and prisons, disenfranchising millions of our citizens, and encouraging the expansion of organized crime, here and abroad. If it is indeed a real war—the US currently budgets about $51 billion for it—it is our longest-running war, dwarfing the decade we’ve been mired in Afghanistan. It has been going on longer than most readers of this article have been alive. The actual cost is actually far higher than that $51 billion, if you factor in court time, lost income, cost of prisons (some people consider that a wash because prison employment is now a major industry in much of rural America), and the incalculable cost of broken lives.  

ANTECEDENTS The antecedent was the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act of 1914, which matched laws already on the books in several states strictly controlling the availability and use of opiates. In 1937, Congress passed the Marijuana Tax Act, banning marijuana completely. Testimony and planted articles of the time were heavily racist, often pointing to the way drugs affected people of color far more than whites. Somewhere in there cocaine— which is a stimulant, not a narcotic—got classified in law as a narcotic.  The first head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN) was Harry Anslinger, a former alcohol agent during Prohibition. He knew booze was going out as an issue. He imported the same rhetoric to drugs. He controlled that federal empire for decades. Congress

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THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

danced to his drum, however little grounded in reality it was.  The Federal Bureau of Narcotics was based in the Treasury Department. Note that the acts named earlier were tax acts: You were sent to prison, in theory, not for having illicit drugs but for not having paid tax on them. But if you tried to pay tax on them, then you went to prison for having illicit drugs. In the 1960s there were major drug scandals in the New York Police Department and the FBN, whereupon FBN was, in 1968, moved over to the Department of Justice, combining with Health, Education and Welfare’s Bureau of Drug Abuse and Control. It got a new name: Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. That was replaced in 1973, when the name was changed to the Drug Enforcement Administration, which it is still called today. It remains in the Department of Justice.  So the basic laws which undergird our drug law enforcement are still tax laws, but the cops who enforce it have nothing to do with tax issues.   

HOW I GOT INTO IT In the late spring of 1966, an economist friend at Harvard mentioned that a mutual economist friend at MIT was working on the narcotics study Lyndon Johnson’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice (LEAA). The commissioners had been appointed in 1965, the research work was going on in 1966, and the final report would be issued in 1967. I said to my friend, “Why don’t they hire me for that? I know a lot about that stuff and I know a lot of people on the streets and in law enforcement.” I’d been doing the research for what would become A Thief ’s Primer (1969), In the Life: Versions of the Criminal Experience (1968), and Law and Disorder: Criminal Justice in America (1985). “I’ll see what I can do,” my friend said. He told me that the field study on drugs had been contracted to the Arthur D. Little Company, a huge consulting company located only a few minutes from Harvard Square.

A week or two later, I was appointed senior consultant to the Drug Field Research Project. Occasionally we met with some of the MIT economics team on the study, but mainly two or three of us traveled the country, hanging out with users and dealers on the streets, riding with undercover cops (city, state, and federal), and visiting jails and prisons. Sometimes we’d all go to a place together; sometimes we’d split up. Some of the places I worked were New York, St. Louis, Austin, Houston, San Antonio, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.  (We were mainly looking at heroin, marijuana, and cocaine. Crack cocaine and crystal meth didn’t exist then. Most of what I know about them I learned from The Wire and Breaking Bad.) A lot of interesting things happened on that job. I’ll tell you just about six of them: —One day I was riding with some undercover NYPD narcs and they stopped to talk to one of their cohorts who was working the street. He got into the car and they started telling stories, one of which had to do with beating a guy until he gave the information they wanted. The guy who had gotten into the car put his finger to his lips and pointed at me. “Oh, that’s Bruce,” the driver said. “He’s all right.” Then he said to me, “We don’t kick the shit out of anybody we don’t know is guilty.” —Later that night we stopped to visit one of their informants in a dilapidated house a few blocks above Central Park. I thought they were going to seek information but they were just going to check on his physical condition. He’d developed a lot of abscesses shooting up with dirty needles. “Let us get you into a hospital,” one of the cops said. No, the man said, no hospital; he was afraid if he went into a hospital he’d never get out and, in any case, he couldn’t score for drugs there. “But you can do me a favor: Get me some penicillin.” Both of the cops shook their heads and shrugged: “We can get you heroin, but for penicillin you need a prescription.” —I was walking through the Village with an undercover narc and several musicians I knew (Al Kooper,


COMMENTARY NEWS

HARRY ANSLINGER WAS AN ALCOHOL AGENT DURING PROHIBITION WHO KNEW BOOZE WAS GOING OUT AS AN ISSUE. HE IMPORTED THE SAME RHETORIC TO DRUGS. mainly responsible for the sound of Blonde on Blonde, and four or five other guys) passed us going the other way. They all said, “Hi, Bruce.” The cop looked at me suspiciously and never talked to me about anything that mattered again. —I was doing interviews in the Federal Bureau of Narcotics Office in Manhattan. An agent I knew from the music business (he did blues reviews on the side) saw me through the glass and came rushing into the office, asking if I were in trouble and if he could help. I explained why I was there. The man I was interviewing, seeing I was friendly with this agent, stood up and said, “I want to show you something.” He told me this was probably the most secure office in New York City. He opened a huge safe and showed me two things: sacks of plastic bags containing the “French Connection” heroin and a small black box containing Jackie Kennedy’s diamond belt. “Sometimes she needs it at night and you can’t get into a safe deposit box then, so she keeps it here. We’re always open.” I don’t know what happened to the belt, but I do know what happened to the heroin: It got moved to the NYPD evidence locker, where 100 pounds of it was stolen one lunch hour and, over time, the rest was replaced with flour. It all disappeared.  —I was in the New York District Attorney’s office talking with the assistant district attorney in charge of drug prosecutions. There was a NYPD detective there, a regular liaison on these cases. As I got up to leave, one of them gave me about an ounce of marijuana. “From one of our cases,” he said. “You used this to send a guy to jail?” I said. He nodded, then said, “Your friends in Cambridge might find it interesting.” I said, “How can you put a guy in jail for this and then give it to me?” One of them said, condescendingly, “They’re not like us, Bruce.” —This last story is the most important of all of them, because it is the one that taught me we were fighting the wrong war in the wrong place. I was in St. Louis. I only knew a few street people there, far fewer than the other places, so I spent most of my time with the cops. They told me heroin was in very short supply that summer, so the addicts were shooting cocaine instead. “That’s crazy,” I said. “Cocaine wires you up; heroin makes the world quiet.” They said they knew that, but nonetheless addicts who a few months ago were shooting smack were now shooting coke. I asked what else had changed. “Nothing,” they said. “Nothing at all?” I asked. “Nothing at all,” they said. Same dealers, same traffic pattern, no violence, same-old same-old. That was when I understood that interdicting the chemical wasn’t addressing the problem. It was addressing a symptom, not a cause. Now, every time I read about killings by the Mexican drug cartels, I see them as a direct consequence of US drug policy. Not of US drug users; they can’t help themselves, but of Congress and the Legislatures, which can.  

THE END OF FACT-BASED POLICY In the end both the field team and the economics analysis team concluded that the social and financial costs of attempting to interdict traffic and punish users and dealers far outweighed simply doing nothing. We suggested selling the stuff legally and taxing it, like alcohol and cigarettes, drugs that do infinitely more harm in all regards than marijuana and heroin. People drunk on alcohol get in fights; they drive cars and kill people. People stoned on marijuana have no interest in fighting and, if they drive, they tend to drive very slowly. People high on heroin have no interest in fighting or driving; they just want to nod out. Our supervisor at the Arthur D. Little Company was not happy with this. The federal narcotics agency was housed in Treasury. Treasury would not like being told that one of its most expensive agencies was perhaps doing the nation more harm than good. Well, we told him, that was our conclusion. He told us to type up a finished report and he would include it in the final report sent to Treasury.

Then something curious happened. We weren’t allowed to see the final report. I went out to the Arthur D. Little Company to pick up my copy the day I knew they’d be ready and the secretary told me they were available only to a limited group, and members of our team were not on the distribution list. A few days later, one of the secretaries dropped by my house with a copy of the mimeographed report. “I thought this would interest you,” she said. None of our recommendations about legalization were in there. I went to the Arthur D. Little Company administrator’s office, steaming. Not to worry, he said. They had decided that since this was such a touchy issue and since the Arthur D. Little Company did not want to anger Treasury (they hoped for more consulting contracts), they would have a sit-down with the contact person at Treasury and tell him everything we concluded. That way, it could be handled internally. And, he said, our conclusions certainly would be included in the planned seven volume report of the commission, to be published the following year.

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I don’t know if that conversation with the official in Treasury ever took place. Two weeks later, he resigned Treasury and took a job in private industry. A few weeks later, he was killed in a plane crash. The following year, the full report of the commission was published, seven volumes with blue covers and a presidential seal. I still have my set. Only the most banal parts of our work were included. Nothing about inefficiency of interdiction, nothing about legalization. A year later, Richard M. Nixon was elected president, and three years after that he came up with the name of our longest war: the War on Drugs.  

CURRENT DOLLARS, BAD WARS AND GOOD WARS In 2010, the Cato Institute published a study by Harvard economist Jeffrey Minton and then-Harvard student Katherine Waldock, The Budgetary Impact of Ending Drug Prohibition. This is the study’s executive summary: State and federal governments in the United States face massive looming fiscal deficits. One policy change that can reduce deficits is ending the drug war. Legalization means reduced expenditure on enforcement and an increase in tax revenue from legalized sales.  This report estimates that legalizing drugs would save roughly $41.3 billion per year in government expenditure on enforcement of prohibition. Of these savings, $25.7 billion would accrue to state and local governments, while $15.6 billion would accrue to the federal government. Approximately $8.7 billion of the savings would result from legalization of marijuana and $32.6 billion from legalization of other drugs.  The report also estimates that drug legalization would yield tax revenue of $46.7 billion annually, assuming legal drugs were taxed at rates comparable to those on alcohol and tobacco. Approximately $8.7 billion of this revenue would result from legalization of marijuana and $38.0 billion from legalization of other drugs. 

That’s $88 billion in 2008 (when the study was done) dollars. That’s $96 billion in 2015 dollars. Round it off to $100 billion. You could fight a pretty good war with $100 billion a year. Not a lousy war, like the War on Drugs, but maybe a War on Poverty. Bruce Jackson is Affiliate Professor of Law at University at Buffalo, where he is also SUNY Distinguished Professor and James Agee P Professor of American Culture.

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NEWS ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT

STRUGGLES FOR JUSTICE Orin Langelle’s photographs open the door on a life engaged in social and environmental justice movements BY JAY BURNEY

Cree elder, Whapmagoostui (Hudson Bay near James Bay), 1993. She is protesting flooding of Cree territory for hydroelectric dams. PHOTO BY ORIN LANGELLE.

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ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT NEWS Orin Langelle is a photojournalist with a life history of working on environmental and social justice issues in the Americas and throughout the world. His early engagements with activism stemmed from the war in Vietnam and the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The police riot against anti-war protestors at that convention was a spark that lit the torch that is Langelle. Since then he has dedicated his life to campaigns for, among other things, forest protection, indigenous rights, and Central American resistance to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In 1994 he was welcomed as one of the few non-indigenous individuals by the Zapatistas in Chiapas, Mexico when they rose up in 1994 against NAFTA, declaring it to be a “death sentence for the indigenous peoples of Mexico.”  His personal philosophy is built on challenging the corporatization of policy agenda by governments, corporations, and the economic elite that they represent. He characterizes globalized economic development schemes—promoted as solutions to poverty, economic discrepancy, and climate change—as “false solutions.”

ORIN LANGELLE: STRUGGLES FOR JUSTICE: FORESTS, LAND AND HUMAN RIGHTS—LATE 80s TO LATE 90s ¡BUEN VIVIR! GALLERY / 148 ELMWOOD AVE. / FRI, APRIL 3 / 7-9PM OPENING RECEPTION / MUSIC BY DAVID ADAMCZYK

that they depended upon were being exploited by the timber industry. In May 1990, a pipe bomb exploded under her seat as she traveled to a demonstration to stop the clear-cutting of redwoods, causing severe injuries to her and her passenger, Darryl Cherney. While in her hospital bed, she was arrested by the FBI and charged with transporting explosives. The FBI claimed that she bombed herself. Bari passed away in 1997 from breast cancer. Her estate sued the FBI after her death. In 2002 Bari’s estate and Cherney were awarded $4.4 million by a federal jury that determined that six FBI and Oakland Police officers tried to frame them in an effort to crush Earth First. Last week I sat down with Langelle and asked him about the gallery and Judi Bari. Tell us about the gallery. The name of the gallery, ¡Buen Vivir!, refers to a concept stemming from indigenous and other cultures of Latin America. ¡Buen Vivir! means life in harmony between humans, communities, and the Earth.

He and his life partner Anne Petermann are the founders of Global Justice Ecology Project (GJEP), of which Anne is the executive director and Orin is the board chair. GJEP is a Buffalo-based organization that is dedicated to promoting system change through exploring the root causes of social injustice, ecological destruction, and economic domination. GJEP is also the home of the international Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees and BiofuelWatch.

The concept of the gallery is to provide a space for education and the preservation of historical realities that are not covered by mainstream media. My work has focused on covering issues and actions that don’t make it to the front page or back page, and are easily forgotten. These are important stories and I use my photographs and this gallery to document, preserve, and tell these stories. This exhibit is dedicated to Judi Bari. It opens Friday, April 3 with a reception 7-9 pm. David Adamczyk will be there playing music to help us have an engaging atmosphere. The Gallery will be open on subsequent Fridays 3-8pm or by appointment until Friday, June 19. Future exhibits may include work from others besides myself.

Langelle and Petermann are the driving force behind the GJEP publication The Green Shock Doctrine. The publication is a profound critical analysis of how capitalism and the markets have brought the planet to the brink of an abyss.

Tell us about Judi Bari. She was a friend and an inspiration for both Anne and myself. She was the principle organizer in 1990 of “Redwood Summer.” The car-bombing of Judi occurred that May. She survived although she was seriously injured.

¡Buen Vivir! Gallery, which Langelle curates, is located at the offices of GJEP at 148 Elmwood Avenue in Allentown. A new exhibit is opening on Friday, April 3, to coincide with the Allentown Association’s First Fridays Gallery Walk. This is the second ¡Buen Vivir! exhibit since the gallery opened last October. The first was titled Climate Change: Faces, Places, & Protest. The new exhibit is titled Struggles For Justice: Forests, Land and Human Rights—Late 80s to Late 90s. It consists of photos that “document the efforts of people on the front lines of campaigns to stop social and ecological injustice. The new exhibit is dedicated to Langelle and Petermann’s longtime friend, the activist Judi Bari. Bari worked to stop the logging of ancient redwoods in northern California. She was one of the founders of Earth First. She brought together workers and environmental activists by demonstrating that they and the redwoods

That summer brought together environmentalists from all over the country to defend old-growth redwood trees from logging by northern California timber companies. Activists blockaded bulldozers and logging trucks and chained themselves to trees. It was a huge act of civil disobedience that threatened the industry.  A big and positive result of Redwood Summer is that Headwaters Forest Reserve near Eureka, California is one of and the largest area of old-growth forest protected. Why do you do the work that you do? As a concerned photographer, I attempt to document and expose the harsh reality of social and ecological injustice. I hope my images inspire viewers to participate in the struggles to stop injustice and exploitation. My work also supports those who are currently engaged in the fight for justice because they know that their efforts are revealed to a larger audience through the images I capture and are published. I place my photographs into the context of social struggle—the struggle for societal transformation toward justice, equity, and ecological balance in order to provide an historical look at social movements, struggle and everyday life.  My photos are designed to counter the societal amnesia from which we collectively suffer; much of which is intentionally brought on by those whose only reality is profit acquired through the oppression and exploitation of both people and the land. I do not want the realities that I have documented be covered up because those with power attempt to control history. If our history is lost we have to start over. If real history is preserved, let it be used as a stepping-stone to a sane future on this planet. My photographs do not merely chronicle history, but call out to inspire new generations to participate in the making of a new history.  For there has been no time when such a call has been so P badly needed.

LEARN MORE ABOUT JUDI BARI: —Who Bombed Judi Bari is a 2011 film chronicling the events of Redwood Summer and its aftermath. GJEP and Burning Books are planning to host a showing of the Film in late May to mark the 25th anniversary of the bombing. —In 2012, Democracy Now used the release of the film to revisit the car-bombing: “Judi Bari Revisited: New Film Exposes FBI Coverup of 1990 Car Bombing of California Environmentalist.” —Read more more at judibari.org. Judi Bari, center, walks on a California beach in California two years after a pipe bomb exploded under the seat of her car in May 1990.

LOOKING BACKWARD: THE BROADWAY MARKET “No, the market is not a quiet place. In fact, it’s noisier than a newspaper editorial room. Or a boiler shop. Oceans of foodstuffs and a babel of tongues. Laughter. Shouting. And invitations to buy.” —Buffalo Times, October 4, 1931

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM.

The Broadway Market, 999 Broadway, shown here sometime in the 1930s, was the largest and busiest of the five public markets operated by the City of Buffalo. This photograph, taken with a Graflex camera by Buffalo Courier Express photographer Wilbur H. Porterfield, depicts farmers on the outer fringe of the market, foodstuffs propped up on crates. The original market building, built in 1890 and replaced in 1956, is in the background. The Broadway Market had space for some 100 permanent and 200 temporary stalls. Arthur Bennett, marketmaster at the Broadway Market, reported that some Saturdays found 50,000 patrons crowding the aisles and open spaces. This Easter weekend, perhaps a similar number will descend on the market for kielbasa, chrusciki, and butP ter lambs. -THE PUBLIC STAFF DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC

7


ARTS REVIEW

IN GALLERIES NOW BY TINA DILLMAN

Cloud

Supernova

NOTHING HAPPENS TWICE Jozef Bajus at Manuel Barreto Gallery BY JACK FORAN Among sculptors, basically, there are carvers and there are constructors. With artist Jozef Bajus, it’s not that simple. Basically, he’s a constructor. He builds forms rather than cuts away to discover and reveal them. But he also often deconstructs as an initial step prior to construction. And sometimes the deconstruction looks a lot like cutting away to discover and reveal. As in his various book works—taking old books and cutting and folding covers and pages in a painstaking process to make sculptural art objects of them. Or cutting or tearing paper sheets and reforming the fragmentary or otherwise disintegral remnants—sometimes by layering, sometimes by sewing or stapling them— into works that hover between sculptures and paintings, three-dimensional and two-dimensional.  For the reformed paper works, maybe a better term than construction would be fabrication, in the literal sense of making fabric. Fabrication in a more general sense seems to work best for some thoroughly three-dimensional pieces in wire, wood, plastic tubing, and the like. Or, unlike, felt. Examples of all these types are on display in the artist’s current exhibit at the Manuel Barreto Gallery, on Delaware Avenue near Virginia.  Including a spectacular construction/fabrication of hundreds of lengths of serious-gauge copper wire, kinked and strung on a cable across the long front window of the gallery and topped—each length of copper wire—with a contrastive short length of grey felt. Like some huge iridescent jewelry piece—a bracelet or necklace—strung out long for display. A piece that hovers between mobile and stabile.  Another work consists of hanging bundles of heavy-gauge wires, kinked again, and tied or linked horizontally across about mid-length with clear plastic tubing. (Another piece that was to be installed several weeks into the exhibit—a literal centerpiece, hanging in the center of the room—consists of two large wood panels pierced with numerous holes through which a single length of plastic tubing is threaded, loosely linking the separate panels. This piece is entitled alternately Big Bundle or My Life after 40.)  Some more painterly items include several torn colored paper works wherein the fragments are rejoined with rows of staples into the reconstituted form of the (supposed) original paper sheet. Like maps of lands with many subdivisions, all of the same color but glittering formal borders.  Layered works with cutouts often in elongated mandorla forms—boat forms— occur in various combinations of black-on-white and white-on-black, with occasional spectrum colors thrown in as if by chance. One white-on-white work and one black-on-black feature differently oriented cutouts—horizontal versus vertical—in their different layers. The central feature in a multi-layered torn paper piece in an overall boat prow form is a kind of crater dig into human or animal flesh imagery, vein-patterned and in lurid colors—reds, yellows, greens.  Among smaller works on shelves are some meticulously folded paper items— they look a little like Rubik’s cubes, but more complicated, harder to figure out how they’re put together—and prototype small-scale models for large-scale sculptures of the basic type with two planar items linked together with plastic

8

THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Artist Jozef Bajus at work.

JOZEF BAJUS: NOTHING HAPPENS TWICE MANUEL BARRETO GALLERY / 430 DELAWARE AVE. FRI, APRIL 3 / 6-9PM / OPENING RECEPTION

tubing, but differently configured planar pieces, and different connection materials, artificial and organic. Wire, twine, tree branches. With sometimes the connection materials—wire or whatever—strung with frill ornamentation fabric.  And most intriguing, dual models for a sculptural work featuring a pyramid form largely enclosed within a rectangular box that opens to better reveal the pyramid form. Essentially a (sculptural) construction exploring and illustrating the essence of (sculptural) carving.  Much of this work has an experimental look. Much by way of variations on a theme. Try this way; try that.  “Nothing is new; everything has already been done,” the artist says in a statement that seems about to affirm futility. But goes on to say how experiment can lead to something new, something that hasn’t been done. Often by chance. “Experiment and chance fascinate me,” he says. “Chance is almost always connected with some surprise element, and many times becomes the animating spirit in solving an artistic problem.”  P The Jozef Bajus exhibit continues through May 15.

= ART OPENING 464 Local Art Gallery & Gifts (464 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 464gallery.com): Wed-Fri: 12-6, SatSun: 12-4, by event or appointment. 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228, photographics2.com/store/ welcome-to-our-studio-1045-gallerystore): Duality, work by Candice Pack & Tom Coyne, on view through Apr 5. Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment. Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222, 8828700, albrightknox.org): Overtime: The Art of Work & Eye to Eye: Looking Beyond Likeness, both shows on view through May 17; Arturo Herrera: Little Bits of Modernism, on view through Apr 5; David Adamo in the Sculpture Court, on view through May 17: Robert Heinecken: Surrealism on TV, on view through May 31. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays until 10pm. Art Dialogue Gallery Custom Framing (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209. artdialoguegallery.com): New work by Donald Scheller, on view through May 29. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 885-2251, wnyag.com): 19th Annual Juried Members Exhibition: Modern Works, juried by Nina Freudenheim. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artspace Buffalo Gallery (1219 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14209): 8th  annual residents’ exhibition 2015, on view through April. Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Atrium 124 Gallery  (124 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201, 631-5777 ext. 698): Works by Julian Montague and Dan Carey, on view through April 9. Opening reception Apr 3 6-9pm.  Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14222, 553-8483, benjamangallery.com): An exploration of regional art over three  centuries, with a focus on the paintings of Robert N. Blair.  Opening reception  Apr 3, 7-10pm;  Thu-Sat 11-5pm, Sun-Wed by appointment. Big Orbit (30 Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit): The Tenant, (A Solitary Experience), UB Thesis Exhibition by Avye Alexandres, opening Fri Apr 3, 8-11pm. On view through Apr 19  (allow 45-60 minutes to experience the work, since there is a walk included). Fri & Sat 126pm and by appointment. Box Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203): Pseudo-Phernalia, installation by Kate Gaudy up through April. BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, btandcgallery.com/): Rare screening of De Profundis by Lawrence Brose, Thu Apr 2, 6:30pm. ¡Buen Vivir! (148 Elmwood Ave. Buffalo, NY 14201): Photographs by Orin Langelle, Struggles for Justice: Forests, Land, and Human Rights—Late 80s to Late 90s. Opening reception Fri Apr 3, 7-9pm. Buffalo Arts Studio (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2496 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833-4450, buffaloartsstudio. org/):  Assemblage by Megan Conley, Binary ConScience by Stacey Robinson, & Jump Start a student exhibition, all on view till May 2, Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm (space will be closed Apr 3 & 4). Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680, buffaloartstechcenter.org): Currently on view, Graham Mitchell Sears, on view through mid-April. MonFri 10am-3pm. Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens (2655 South Park Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14218, 827-1584, buffalogardens.com): Gardens’ Painting Class, included with admission;  Mar 20-May 25, Mon-Sun 10am-5pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 8786011, burchfieldpenney.org): Currently on view: Inquisitive Lens: Marion Faller, on view through Mar 29; Discovering Deco: photographs by Bruce Jackson, on view through Mar 29; When the Self is Not: David Moog, on view through Mar 29; American Artist, Art Deco Painter: Alexander O. Levy, on view through Mar 29; A Chandelier for One of Many Possible Ends: Phillip Stearns, on view through Mar 29;  Charles E. Burchfield (The Font Project)  Richard Kegler/P22 Type Foundry,  on view through May 17; Audio Graphics: Charles E. Burchfield, on


GALLERIES ARTS Handle with Care by Liz Bayan at Squeeky Wheel.

view through Aug 23; A Resounding Roar:    Charles E. Burchfield,  on view through Aug 23; The Scrutiny of Objects: sculptures by Robert A. Booth, on view till Aug 30; Body Norms: selections from the Spong Collection. Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat 10am-5pm, Second Fridays till 8pm, Thu 10am-9pm, Sun 1-5pm. Burchfield Nature and Art Center (2001 Union Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 677-4843, burchfieldnac.org): Fiber Arts Exhibit on view from Mar 2-29. Tue-Fri 10-4pm, Sun 1-4pm. Canisius College Andrew L. Bouwhuis Library (Canisius College 2001 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14208, 888-8412, library.canisius.edu): Broad Matter, by Alixandra Martin, on view through April 3. Hours: Mon-Thur 7:30am-2am, Fri 7:30am-8pm, Sat 10am-8pm, Sun 11am-2am. Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum. org):   a HAPPENING, Sun Mar 22, 2-4pm, Artists View the Falls: 300 Years of Niagara Falls Imagery, on view through Aug 16;  Bring to Light: installation by Kurt Von Voetsch & Michael Beam on view through Apr  26;  Gary Sczerbaniewicz: High Strangeness, on view through May 3. Tue-Sat 11am5pm, Sun 1-5pm. Dreamland (387 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202,  facebook.com/dreamlandarts.buffalo/timeline): Porn Displacement,  appropriation digital art by Christiano Flopes, on view through Mar 28.

El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692, elmuseobuffalo. org): RH Stamps: Friends of Mine Forgotten… …Memories Lost and Found Again, on view through Apr 10. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery  (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Trillium Roads by Matthew Palmo, on view through April 4. Tue & Wed 11-6pm, Thu & Fri 2-6pm, Sat 11-4pm.  Fargo House Gallery (287 Fargo Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14213,  thefargohouse. com, visit website for appointment): Currently on view, Caitlin Cass: Benjamin Rathbun Builds Buffalo, on view through April. Flying Anvil Metalworks (51 Botsford Place, Buffalo, NY 14216, 877-3700, flyinganvilmetalworks.com): Old and New, Furnishings and Sculpture by Resident Artists, on view through Apr 3. Tues-Fri 12-6pm, and by appointment. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org/): Amid/In WNY Part Two, survey of local and regional contemporary artists. Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Impact Artists’ Gallery (Tri Main Building, 2495 #545, Buffalo, NY 14214, 8356817, impactartistsgallery.org): Feb 4-Mar 13, Beyond Reality, fantasy art exhibit. Wed-Fri 11am-4pm, Sat 11am2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572  indigoartbuffalo.squarespace.com): Metamorformations, work by Lynn Northrop, on view till April 25.  First Friday April 3,

6-9pm. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays.  IPRINTFROMHOME Gallery (2630 Elmwood Avenue, Kenmore, NY 14217,  (800) 736-8652): Rotating works by local photographers. Kenan Center House Gallery (433 Locust Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 433-2617 kenancenter.org/arts/gallery.asp): Wood, Paper, Scissors; Book Art, Sculpture and Collage by Diane L. Bond, Jodi Harvey-Brown, Marie Prince & Doris Timkey, on view through Apr 26. Mon-Fri 12-5pm & Sun 2-5pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view: Buffalo Boxers: A Cultural Celebration. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall) (453 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view Maps of the United States, and upcoming Early Maps of the World. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Lockside Art Center (21 Main Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0239, locksideartcenter.com): Currently on view, Made by Hand, sculpture exhibit. FriSun 12-4pm. Manuel Barreto Gallery  (430 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 867-8937, manuelbarreto.com): Nothing Happens Twice, work by Jozef Bajus, reception and book signing April 3, 6-9pm. Exhibit on view through May. Tue & Wed 11am-5pm, Thu-Sat 10am-6pm. 

Market Street Art Studios (247 Market Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0248, marketstreetstudios.com): Finding the Moment, Explorations in Photography, Mar 1-Apr 2. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com): Joe Orffeo (1926-2013): Retrospective Part II (1980-2013). Tue-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm. Native American Museum of Art at Smokin’ Joes (2293 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14123, 261-9251): Open year round and free. Exhibits Iroquois Artists work. 7am-9pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 2827530, thenacc.org): Lewiston-Porter Students Art Exhibition, Mar 21-Apr 18, 2015. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 124pm. Niagara County Community College Dolce Valvo Art Center (3111 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14132, 614-5975): Borrowed History: New Paintings & Sculpture by Bruce Philip Bitmead & Peter Fowler, on view through Apr 15. Mon &  Tue 12-5pm, Wed &  Thu 12-7pm, Fri 12-3pm, Sat 113pm. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 8825777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com): Ground,  by Joan Linder, on view through Apr 29. Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat & Mon open by appointment only. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069, paus-

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aarthouse.com): Elemental, by Rosemarie Bauer Sroka, on view through Apr 25. Thu-Sat 6pm-12am. Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 5230068, project308gallery.com): Solo exhibition by Martin Schmidt. Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Queen City Gallery (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod.com): Rotating members work on view. Tue-Fri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Open late every First Friday from 6-10pm and every Thursday Open Mic, 7-9pm.  River Art Gallery (83 Webster St. North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 260-1497, riverartgalleryandgifts.com)  Northern Reflections: a collection of works by Deanna Weinholts.  Mar  7-Apr  4, WedSat 11am-4pm.  Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 3324838, Sportsfocuspt.com): Visual Parables by Glenn Kroetsch. Open First Fridays April 3 & May 1, 6-9pm. Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Liz Bayan: UB Thesis Exhibition, Handle with Care, opening reception, Fri Apr 3, 6-8pm, show on view through April 25. Open to the Public Tues-Sat 12-5pm.  Stangler Fine Art  (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 8701129,  stanglerart.com): Currently on view,  6 Ways: 6 Women Artist 6 Different Mediums.  Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Bufflao, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): Ubiquitous Benevolence, works by Larry Allen. MonFri 9-4pm. Studio Hart (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 536-8337, studiohart.com): Great Valley Sketchbook, paintings and prints by Tom Rooney, Opening Reception Fri Apr 3, 6-9pm. On  view through  April 25. Tue-Fri 11:30am3:30pm, Sat 12-4pm, and open every First Friday 6-9pm.  TGW@497 Gallery (497 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 949-6604): Refind, metal discoveries by Robert Then & Richard Rockford, opening Fri Apr 3, 6-9pm. Wed-Fri 12-5pm, Sat 12-3pm.  UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754, ubartgalleries.org):  Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic, on view though Dec 31, 2015. Exhibition will include archaeological and ethnographic objects from Annette Cravens collection. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, art. buffalo.edu/resources/lower-gallery): Interstices: The 2015 Rumsey Competition Exhibition:  Lydia Daggett, Kayleigh Fogle, Lauren Goetzmann, Elise Roy & Qiong Wu. Tue-Fri 11am5pm, Sat 1-5pm.  UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Project Space) (201 Center for the Arts, Room 155, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, art. buffalo.edu/resources/project-space): New work by 2013-14 Rumsey Competition winners: Harumo Sato & Amber Sliter. On view through April 18. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm.  Unity Gallery (1243 Delaware Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209): The Journey Continues, a collection of paintings and found object mosaics by Judi Witt, on view through Apr 29. P

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9


MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

Lemuria is Sheena Ozzella, Max Gregor, and Alex Kerns. PHOTO BY RYAN RUSSELL

LEMURIA BY MELISSA MEYER Buffalo’s own Lemuria begins a US tour in support of Tiger’s Jaw this spring, with a stop at The Waiting Room on April 6, followed by a headlining European tour. Formed in 2004, the band released their debut album Get Better on Asian Man Records in 2008. The trio— drummer/vocalist Alex Kerns, guitarist/vocalist Sheena Ozzella, and bassist Max Gregor—signed to Bridge 9 Records, a label responsible for releases by bands like New Found Glory, Agnostic Front, BoySetsFire, and H2O, to release their 2013 record, The Distance Is So Big. With plans for a new record, the band sat down with The Public to talk about touring and their writing process. What is it like to come back to Buffalo? Alex Kerns: It’s different because we know everyone in the crowd. It’s like a little reunion. This show will be a little different because it’s more Tiger’s Jaw show than ours, so it might be more their fans than ours. Where are you looking forward to touring in the US and Europe? Sheena Ozzella: UK is my favorite place to play in the world so far, so I’m really excited to go back. And we’re going to sneak in a few dates for mainland Europe, too. I feel like it’s been too long since we’ve been back there. AK: I really like touring Germany, it’s always my favorite country to play. Is there anything in particular you have to make time for whenever you’re on tour? AK: Food. [Laughs.] That’s kind of like the main thing, is that we always know where we’re going to eat before we even get to the town. Like in Chicago, we always go to the Chicago Diner. Max Gregor: Running, yoga, staying active mostly. I’ve noticed it helps me stay in a better mood, and makes me easier to be in a van with. I really enjoy being in nature—pulling over on tour and going on a quick hike, sitting on the beach. Tour is a great opportunity to get away from city life, even for a minute, by taking a state road through the redwoods. Have you started planning a new album? SO: Yeah, we’ve been recording a couple of demos individually—just ideas because we all live in different cities now. We definitely have a couple songs that we’re getting ready to record demos together. Then we’ll spend a couple weeks really focusing on perfecting the songs that we have, and hopefully write a few more to start on the next album. AK: We’re going to record demos this year, but we won’t make it into the studio until early 2016.

10 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

LEMURIA w/ TIGERS JAW & SOMOS MON, APRIL 6 / 7PM / $13 ADVANCE / $15 DOOR WAITING ROOM, 335 DELAWARE AVE.

How does that work? Do you just send sound files to each other? AK: Video, too. It helps because then when you get together you’re not starting from scratch. You kind of have an idea of what a song might sound like. And then when you get together, you hash everything out and actually play like a real band. Are there any new themes or sounds you’re developing on these new demos? SO: For me, I’ve definitely been trying to focus on playing my guitar a little more nicely, neatly. I feel like I’ve gotten away with being a pretty sloppy guitar player, which isn’t a bad thing, but I’m trying to really focus on getting better at more precise playing. Hopefully on the next record, you’ll hear a little bit more of that. And vocally, to be aware of vocal melodies, especially because Max is a singer in the band now, so we have a lot of options and a lot of different ways we can do vocal styles. AK: I still take drum lessons every week. Every time I take a lesson I feel like a little knot is untied in my brain. I learn like Latin beats and world music, so I think as the albums go on, I try to apply them to some of the songs in a way that doesn’t change the mood of what Sheena writes, but it doesn’t sound like what you’d expect. It’s not your standard 4/4 beat. Sheena and Max, you both moved from Buffalo and are involved in the music scenes in DC and Austin. Do you think being involved in those communities will affect the new album? SO: I still think I write the same old shit, but I feel a definite motivation from the musicians I know [in DC]. I miss living in the same city as Alex and Max, because songwriting was a little more relaxed. I don’t know if the style of songwriting that I do will change very much but I definitely feel a different kind of motivation from living in DC. MG: I’m pretty much only writing alt-country now. Kidding! I think it will for sure. Buffalo, DC, and Austin all have very rich musical communities, and going to shows at all means that each of us will be influenced by those experiences. Lemuria will play the Waiting Room with Tigers Jaw and Somos on Monday, April 6. Tickets are $13 advance, and $15 at the door. For more information visit lemuriapop.com.

TIGERS JAW [INDIE ROCK] A charmer is a person with an engaging personality—an attractive person who uses this trait to impress others. You could say that Ben Walsh and Brianna Collins of Tigers Jaw are charmers. They seem like delightful people when they’re on stage, belting out their emo-tinged rock songs with lyrics like “you left a permeant scar/memories are taped on our walls/as a reminder of how easy it can be when we’re growing apart,” and they even called their latest record Charmer. They may not consider themselves charmers, but their fans certainly do—some even to an overwhelming degree. During a show in New York City last June, a fan rushed the stage and attempted to grab and kiss Collins. It was an unwelcome advance, and Collins responded to the incident the next day by reinforcing that it’s never ok to touch someone without their consent. It was an issue for the band, enough so that they released a statement about the incident, but not a major issue. A major issue might be something like three out of five members of your band leaving, which was the case for Tigers Jaw just before they began recording Charmer. They didn’t miss a beat, though, continuing on as a two piece before filling out the rest of the line up. Despite these obstacles that Tigers Jaw has faced over the last few years, Charmer comes off as an effortless indie-rock record that underlines the band’s maturity while respecting their pop-punk roots—Walsh occasionally sounds like Alkaline Trio’s Matt Skiba, while their less intrusive instrumentals take cues from early emo bands like Saves the Day or the Get Up Kids. Though these emo scars might be permanent, with Charmer the band has positioned themselves in the direction of an even more P substantial future.-CORY PERLA


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Playwright, journalist, crossword puzzle constructor, children’s author, blogger, and Western New York representative for the Dramatists Guild, Donna Hoke has become ubiquitous on the Buffalo theater scene. With plays like Seeds, The Couple Next Door, and Safe, she examines the anxieties of modern living with palpable apprehension about the future, and in that regard, would seem to be the quintessential Buffalo playwright—but with far more foreboding than A. R. Gurney and far less innocent merriment than Tom Dudzick. She is an ensemble playwright at Road Less Traveled Productions, where Seeds,—about twin sisters, one of whom has fertility issues—premiered in 2013 and won the Artie Award for Outstanding New Play. Safe won the Todd McNerney and Naatak National Playwriting Contests and is currently a finalist in the Great Gay Play and Musical Contest; it will debut in 2016. In addition to productions in 27 states and on five continents, locally Hoke’s work has been staged at Subversive, Alt, Road Less Traveled, Alleyway, and Buffalo United Artists, where she is founding co-curator of BUA Takes Ten: GLBT Short Stories.  BUA Takes Ten, a festival of short plays on GLBT issues, is currently running and Hoke’s offering is a six-minute attraction called “Best Interests.” In the play, a mother and a son are able to come to better terms with their relationship when they find that they are both attracted to the same waiter.  At the same time, and in the same theater complex, Hoke has another short work featured in Alleyway’s Buffalo Quickies. In “You Haven’t Changed A Bit,” Lottie has never been to a high school reunion, while Len has been to them all. “Their 70th is a first for them both.”  What word would your friends use to describe you?  A lot of them say “strong,” and I always secretly hope they don’t really mean “bitch.” What character in your current play is most unlike your own personality? The waiter in “Best Interests”—I’ve been told I don’t know how to flirt. What character in your current play is most like your own personality? I didn’t realize until this question that the other four characters in these two plays all represent some facet of my personality, which I guess isn’t surprising. When and where were you the happiest?  March 26, 1995, the day my daughters were born and October 9, 2000, the day my sons were born. Sorry, there’s got to be at least one cliché answer. What is your idea of hell on earth?  Most recently, being stuck without earbuds behind a loud, drivel-spewing biddy on a fourhour-plus flight from Phoenix. Convocations are a close second. What is your greatest fear?  Outliving any of my children. I tear up just typing that. Which talent do you most wish you had?  It would be helpful to be charming and schmoozy and be able to speak intelligently on any topic.

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What would you change about your appearance?  I’d say my teeth, but I guess if I really wanted to do that, I would have done it. I wouldn’t mind having my pre-C section abs back, but they were a small price to pay.  What trait do you most dislike in others?  Unreliability. What do you most value in your friends?  Depends on the friend — I value different things in each of them. What quality do you most value in a good director? The desire that the playwright s/he’s producing be alive. What is your guilty pleasure?  Survivor. Since the beginning, it’s been a family tradition to have tacos and brownies on Survivor night—16 years! Good thing we centered a tradition on a show with such longevity! Who is your favorite fictional hero?  I haven’t had one since Nancy Drew. Who is your real-life hero?  Hero is a little strong, but I’ve always admired Bruce Springsteen for chasing his dream against daunting odds, working his ass off, and standing up for the less fortunate and what he believes. What do you consider to be the most overrated virtue?  Height.

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OM DE PROFUNDIS (DOCK GUY #2) / LAWRENCE BROSE: A rare screening of De Profundis, Brose’s critically acclaimed film will take place at BT&C Gallery on April 2 at 7pm. For more information, visit btandcgallery.com.

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR

LIL BIBBY THURSDAY APR 2

PUBLIC APPROVED

7PM / THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE. / $15-$18 [HIP HOP] Fueled by the high-stakes, high-octane energy of Chicago's East Side, Lil Bibby burst onto the music scene in 2013 with the release of his debut mixtape Free Crack. A collaboration with drill-peer Lil Herb, Free Crack suggested that Lil Bibby would forge his own legacy within the domain of drill-rap—a subgenre characterized by dark, trap-influenced beats and violent lyrical content; think Chief Keef. The mixtape met and exceeded its hype. Listeners were pleasantly surprised by Lil Bibby’s polished versatility as an artist who combines potent lyrics (“day dreaming/stay scheming/I don’t want to live a life with no meaning”) with a low and gravelly elocution that betrays his actual age, 17. The overall message: He’s young but has seen enough. Last July he put out the second volume of his mixtape, Free Crack II, featuring appearances with Wiz Khalife and Juicy J, and received a cosign from Drake. The young rapper is currently embarking on his Get to Know Me Tour, which, to the delight of local fans, includes a stop at Buffalo’s Waiting Room this Thursday, April 2, with support from G Premacy and J. Halkz, courtesy of After Dark Entertainment. Drake dubbed him “the future”—decide for yourself. -JEANETTE CHIN

IN PRINT

JOHNS Grift Marks (Album) Recommended If You Like: Pissed Jeans, the Jesus Lizard, METZ

The dark five-piece celebrated the release of Grift Marks this past Saturday at a packed Sugar City along with Newish Star, Space Wolves, and Fleshy Mounds. Currently available through Peterwalkee Records, Grift Marks was recorded with long-time local engineer Joseph Orlando at his Mammoth Recording Studio.

WZA “I Need That” (Song) RIYL: Chris Webby, Logic, Sir Michael Rocks

Radarada MC Wza released the first track from his forthcoming EP, DUCKPUPPY, early last week. Paired with a creative video that follows Wza down the block in GoldenEye-esque form, look for DUCKPUPPY to drop in the next couple of months through independent branding firm Equality Knowledge & Light.

WEDNESDAY APR 1 Poetics Plus: Aaron Kunin 8pm Hallwalls, 341 Delaware Ave.

[POETRY] Experiencing a poem by Aaron Kunin is like biting down on tinfoil—sharp, painful, and more than a little awkward. His poems come at you with wit, wry humor, and relentless honesty, refusing to look away from whatever mundane horrors they light on. “Sigh no more, moron, sigh no more!” begins one poem; another begins, “Last to know, and out of the mind, always. / …Out of the mind, and wrong from the start”—a sentiment to which we likely can all relate, even as the poem plunges us in media res into some obscure interior crisis. This is what Kunin’s poems do: Deceptively simple in diction and seemingly straightforward in construction, they nevertheless form a passageway though which the reader or listener enters into a Lynchian dreamscape where everything is slightly, tantalizingly askew. Kunin’s recent books include The Sore Throat & Other Poems (2010), Grace Period: Notebooks 1998-2007 (2013), and Cold Genius (2014). He'll will read at Poetics Plus at Hallwalls on Wednesday, April 1. -DAVID HADBAWNIK

The Queers 8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $15-$20

YLXR “BOI” (Song) RIYL: XXYYXX, Flume, RJD2

New-to-the-scene producer YLXR debuted his latest work last week, the dreamy, trip hop track “BOI.” The music video for “BOI” was directed by indemand visual artist Malt Disney, who has previously worked with local artists like Jack Toft and Dr. Ooo, among others.

LOCAL SHOW PICK OF THE WEEK TELEVISIONARIES W/ AARON & THE BURRS, THE HAMILTONES THE GLITTERBOX / FRI, APRIL 3 6PM / FREE

[PUNK] Look no further for proof of punk’s endurance than to New Hampshire’s the Queers. Nearly 35 years on and the trio (sometimes a quartet) continues touring tirelessly with their brand of Bowery-inspired, uncomplicated rock in the Ramones tradition. Speaking of which, former Ramones drummer Richie Ramone’s band will open the show at Mohawk Place on Wednesday, April 1 after a set from locals Newish Star whose slightly more complex, emo-tinted punk should fit in nicely. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

Boy Harsher 8pm Dreamland, 387 Franklin St. $5

[ELECTRONIC] Over the course of two EP releases, Northampton-by-way-of-Savannah duo Boy Harsher, formerly Teen Dreamz, has evolved considerably since beginning as a live-scored storytelling project that approached the realm of performance art. Augustus Muller supplies a dark-but-danceable undercurrent of beats while vocalist Jae Matthews puts a compelling assortment of vocal nuances over the top. The results are solidly gothic without becoming pastiche. It’s a great match for Orations, fronted by former Baby Machines focal point Jess Collins, who’ll share the bill on Wednesday at Dreamland. -CJT

14 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

THURSDAY APR 2 Whiskey Reverb 10pm Tudor Lounge, 335 Franklin St.

[ROCK] Award-winning alt-rock band Whiskey Reverb are just getting started. Earlier this month they released their latest single, "See You Soon,” a pop-rock power ballad that should have the crowd feeling like it’s homecoming night all over again when Whiskey Reverb comes to the Tudor Lounge this Thursday, April 2, with Sacramento, California’s Arden Park Roots. -CP

David Mayfield Parade

7pm Sportsmen's Tavern, 326 Amherst St. $10-$13

[AMERICANA] Mayfield is truly a triple threat of musical dexterity, songwriting chops, and offbeat humor like you've never quite experienced before. As a member of Cadillac Sky, with ties to the Avett Brothers and Mumford & Sons, Mayfield comes from neo-bluegrass stock. His latest, Strangers, out last year on Compass Records, finds him stretching further into edgy, rocking territory, but thankfully nothing seems lost in translation. Instead, the famously thick-bearded troubadour is continuing to find fresh ways of expressing himself, applying his nimble-fingered prowess and knack for storytelling to a genre-straddling niche all his own. The David Mayfield Parade sometimes functions as a trio, sometimes as a four-piece…see which turns up on Thursday, April 2 at Sportsmen's Tavern. -CJT

Andrea Gibson 7pm The 9th Ward, 341 Delaware Ave $13-$15

[SPOKEN WORD] Activist and poet Andrea Gibson made a name for herself as the first winner of the Women’s World Poetry Slam. Since then she's become known as an inspiring force in the spoken-word world, blending readings on sexuality, intimacy, and love. "Before I die, I want to be somebody’s favorite hiding place, the place they can put everything they know they need to survive, every secret, every solitude, every nervous prayer, and be absolutely certain I will keep it safe. I will keep it safe,” she writes in the last lines of her piece, "Bone Burying." The 40-year-old writer from Boulder, Colorado pulls no punches in delivering thought provoking pieces across spoken word and music records including her popular 2011 album Flower Boy and her latest, 2013's Truce. She'll perform live at the 9th Ward on Thursday, April 2, presented by ESI Events. -CP

FRIDAY APR 3 Project Grant FUNraiser 8pm Milkie's, 522 Elmwood Ave $5

[PARTY] The Buffalo startup to host exchange artists from elsewhere to integrate and ingratiate themselves into the local scene is hosting a fundraiser in the deliciously retro environs of Milkie's on Friday, April 3. Joining the party will be Jax Deluca and Kyle Marler as Communication Vault, the irresistible lo-fi rap/rock stylings of Little Cake and Jack Toft, and what has to be one the town’s best producers of original dance music, UVB76. -AARON LOWINGER


CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED

BUFFALO 66 THURSDAY APR 2 7PM / NORTH PARK THEATRE, 1428 HERTEL AVENUE / $9.50-$10.50 [SCREENING] The last time Buffalo 66 played at the North Park—when it premiered there in 1998—Vincent Gallo told me this when I asked him if he now thought of himself as a “filmmaker”: “I’ve always thought of myself as a hustler, a control freak. Being in a movie has a certain amount of impact: it has social status, it has freedom, money, recognition…it gives me validation, it allows me to take revenge on my mother and father, who doubted me.” “I’m really a controlling person. I don’t want somebody else to do the cinematography, I don’t want somebody else to do the poster—I did the poster. I don’t want somebody else to do the trailer—I did the trailer. I don’t want somebody else to do the casting—I did the casting. I don’t want somebody else to produce the movie—I produced the movie. I did the music, I designed the shoes, I controlled everything. No one made any decisions on Buffalo 66, no one physically did anything unless it was my concept, my plan, my idea. That felt really good. Am I a filmmaker? No. A control freak and a hustler is what I really am.“ The North Park will once again screen Buffalo 66 on Thursday, April 2, presented by Buffalo Spree. You can read the entire interview at dailypublic.com. -M. FAUST

Hip Hop Karaoke 7pm Studio at the Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $5

[HIP HOP] Deep Thinka Records' Hip Hop Karaoke is back, and now it's at The Studio at the Waiting Room starting Friday, April 3. Grab the mic and drop your best version of "Nuthin But A G Thang" or "Ms. Fat Booty," or hell, maybe even "The Real Slim Shady" with the help from your very own DJ and even a hype man. The one and only Billy Drease Williams hosts. -CP

Advance Base 8pm Sugar City, 1239 Niagara St. $5

ModDance Company: All That Jazz 8pm Gypsy Parlor, 376 Grant St. $6-$10

[DANCE] ModDance Company is bringing the glitz and glamour with their “All That Jazz” Broadway Revue on Friday, April 3 at The Gypsy Parlor. The dance troupe will dance to a bunch of Broadway tunes, including “All That Jazz,” “Cell Block Tango,” “Steam Heat,” “Mein Herr” and many more. Throughout the night there will be live music and guest singers performing as well. Dancers taking part in the show include Brittini Lee Schreiber, Domini Jay, Alicia Blasi, Jamie Willison, Kristi Marie Carson, Heather Wood, Chris Titus, Lindsay Richert, Megan Ann Kelsey, Marie Katie Dundas, Maegen Michele, Gina Giannetti, and Grace Lou. Tickets are $6 presale or $10 at the door and can be purchased at ModDance Studio located at 2980 Delaware Avenue or by calling 716-551-0530. -VANESSA OSWALD

[ELECTRONIC] Formerly known as Casiotone for the Painfully Alone, Advance Base is the musical project of Chicago's Owen Ashworth. Ashworth's keyboard-based character sketches aren't uplifting, but his knack for capturing the despair he sees in others—as mirrored through his own depression—is as engaging as it is heartbreaking. There's an overarching sense of stuck-ness permeating A Shut-Ins Prayer, which is mainly performed on a Rhodes 54 electric piano and was recorded in a secluded public library performance space. The disc made #19 on MOJO's year-end list for 2012 and subsequent EPs have garnered additional accolades. This isn't music for folks looking to party, but Ashworth's very real ability to evoke an emotional response with his minimalist songs attests to his talent. Sometimes, there's just no happy ending—and that's okay. Advance Base comes to Sugar City, Friday, April 3. -CJT

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 15


EVENTS CALENDAR

JIMKATA FRIDAY APR 3

PUBLIC APPROVED

9PM / THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE. / $12-$15 [ELECTRO ROCK] Jimkata is an electro-rock four-piece whose music, while unique, strikes a chord across jam, rock, electronic, and pop. The band, now getting together material for their latest release, are coming to Buffalo to take the stage at Waiting Room this Friday, April 3. After successfully funding their previous release, Die Digital completely through their fan base, the band is once again reaching out for support to fund their next. With less than two weeks left to pledge money toward the forthcoming album, fans may get a sneak preview of what they might hear on it this Friday. This week, The Public sat down with singer/guitarist Evan Friedell for an interview on the new album and current tour. How has the band’s sound been evolving? We’ve been developing pretty rapidly as a band in the past few months. We took more time off the road than we’ve had in three years this fall and everyone used that time to be creative and further their own production skills. Aaron [Gorsch] and Packy [Lunn] became way savvier with electronic production and composition. I focused a lot on my own songwriting—studying what makes a good song. I saw some fan videos of people covering our songs with an acoustic guitar and began to think that a truly great song should be able to be played or arranged in multiple ways based on the strength of the melodies and lyrics alone. That’s not to say that we’ve stripped back at all. Our sound is actually fuller than ever, especially with the addition of Steve Learson playing bass and synths. We’re just more focused on finding precisely the right sounds to play precisely the right melodies. And Steve has also brought a lot of knowledge to the table in this whole quest. Is the band playing new material on tour? We’ve been playing three of the new songs on this tour but the rest will probably be played as we get closer to the release date. We’ve also released an acoustic video for one of those songs, “Won’t Let You Down,” through our Pledge Music campaign, which is accessible by pre-ordering the new album or ordering any of the exclusive offers we have for our fans. We just finished a five week run of shows and I gotta say it’s a lot of fun playing with this group of musicians. Russ (our manager) also added a new light show and I think the show is at a really high level right now. What do you love about Buffalo? We actually spent a lot of time in Buffalo preparing for the new album and rehearsing for the tour. I recently had a quintessential Buffalo experience: drinking my way through a lake-effect snow storm to get to a bowling alley. My favorite part is that that kind of extreme weather doesn’t really faze anyone when most places would just shut down. There’s a lot of pride in Buffalo and we’ve learned not to ever sound check during a Sabres game. We almost lost a drummer to that. -JEREMIAH SHEA

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PUBLIC APPROVED CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

Avye Alexandres Opening Reception 8pm Big Orbit Gallery, 30 Essex St free

[ART] A locked room in a gallery. A house nearby. A walk in between. These are the words from a press release from artist Avye Alexandres that intrigued me. You should mosey on over to Big Orbit on Friday, April 3, to see what this young, intelligent artist has in store for us. This is a two-part exhibit with instructions, so those who are feeling lazy or impatient can watch the experience of others from the gallery or set up an appointment for a solitary experience (see website), but keep in mind this exhibit is only up until April 19. -TINA DILLMAN

Garcia Project 8pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $11-$14

[ROCK] Creating set lists based on vintage Jerry Garcia Band shows, Garcia Project takes Grateful devotion up a notch with a meticulous eye for detail. Plus, there's nothing like getting a nod of approval from the mothership: 15-year JGB keyboardist Melvin Seals has let Garcia Project's Mik Bondy sit in recently with his still-touring version of the Jerry Garcia Band, and Seals will return the favor at festival dates with Garcia Project this summer. Casual Grateful Dead listeners needn't worry about an esoteric set: the Garcia Band often dipped into the Dead's catalog and had a penchant for covering well-known Motown, soul and blues numbers—a little something for everyone. Local faves Workingman's Dead will do an acoustic warm-up at Tralf Music Hall on Friday, April 3. -CJT

COOKIE MONSTA + FUNTCASE FRIDAY APR 3 8PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $20-$24 [DUBSTEP] Circus Records has facilitated many interesting collaborations—Doctor P and Method Man, Flux Pavillion, and Childish Gambino—but one of the label’s tightest joint ventures has been between Cookie Monsta and Funtcase. The two mainly dubstep DJs from the UK are currently on tour together as part of the Cricus Two album tour, in support of the label’s latest compilation record. Both artists, influenced by their drum and bass backgrounds, have been influential in dubstep’s progress, specifically in the grimey outer edges of the genre. Last time he came to town, Cookie Monsta brought down the house with the help of Doctor P. This time we’ll see how he does with Funtcase by his side as these two grinding dubstep producers bring their hardcore rhythms and and pulsing beats to the Town Ballroom on Friday, April 3 with support from Buffalo’s Stuntman. -CORY PERLA

16 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


CALENDAR EVENTS Cabinet 8pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10-$12

[BLUEGRASS] A jam juggernaut, Cabinet's brand of rock-tinged bluegrass materializes into a unique slamgrass sound. With honeyed harmonies and moving melodies, their high-energy, high-volume live show is amplified thanks to the impeccable instrumental chops of all six Pennsylvanian members. Pappy Biondo’s lightning-quick banjo-picking weaves through layers of Todd Kopec’s bright and richly complex fiddle on fast-tempo crowd favorites like “Celebration!” and “Eleanor." Catch Cabinet at Buffalo Iron Works on Friday, April 3. -KP

PUBLIC APPROVED

Handle with Care Opening Reception 6pm Squeaky Wheel, 617 Main St. free

[ART] ’Tis the season for thesis exhibitions to pop up around town, and this week there are a couple that you should definitely check out. The first one is on Friday, April 3 at Squeaky Wheel’s new gallery space in the Market Arcade Building, for MFA candidate Liz Bayan’s Handle with Care, a multimedia exhibition that you won't want to miss. Her work explores the distancing of human nature due to technological advances, and our dependency on the remote. Her exhibition will depend on your interaction, so come ready to partake. We all know Friday is a big night with the Allentown First Friday Art Walk, but if you are looking for something different than paintings hanging on a wall, or sculptures on a pedestal, come see this. -TD

SATURDAY APR 4 Big Mean Sound Machine 8pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $10

[FUNK] Big Mean Sound Machine is a band whose name perfectly sums up their forceful sound. The group is made up of about ten members, including a full brass section, and plays music which embodies funk, dance, and afrobeat at its core. The band puts on a show that'll leave you full of sweat, as the music has a way of naturally putting bodies in motion. Big Mean Sound Machine takes the stage at the Waiting Room this Saturday, April 4, with support from Jamestown’s funkiest, Smackdab, and the Intrepid Travelers. -JS

PHOTO COURTESY OF DYNGUS DAY BUFFALO

DYNGUS DAY MONDAY APR 6 ALL DAY / VARIOUS LOCATIONS [PARTY] DYNGUS DAY IS NOT STUPID! Don’t listen to what Anderson Cooper tells you, this is a real holiday with real traditions like squirting water guns and… whipping each other with pussy willows. Ok, it sounds stupid, but it’s all got to have some kind of origin story, right? Like, we sprinkle water on each other in honor Polish Prince Mieszko I’s baptism in 966 A.D. It signifies cleansing. The kind of cleansing you’ll need AFTER A HARD NIGHT OF DRINKING! Am I right? Yes. If you’re looking for a place to start your celebration in the Dyngus Day Capital of the World, then try the Anchor Inn in Cheektowaga, which will be serving up authentic music and food beginning at 8am. Polish Villa 2, Magruder’s, Arty’s Grill, R Bar & Grill, Porky’s Lounge, The Polish Cadets club and a million other bars will also be celebrating this hallowed holiday, and you can see the whole list at dyngusday.com. Of course, the Broadway Market is a popular place to get your Dyngus on, as is Corpus Christi Church (169 Sears St.) which will hold the official Dyngus Day Mass prior to the Dyngus Day Parade at 5pm. The 9th Annual Dyngus Day Parade kicks off at the intersection of Memorial Drive and Paderewski Drive with over 120 floats—suggested viewing areas include the Pussy Willow Park Party Tent on Memorial Drive, the Broadway Market, and St. Stanislaus Social Center on Peckham. Then, if you’re looking for an after party, Duke's in Allentown has you covered with the official Dyngus Day After Party beginning at 7pm, which includes a complimentary polish buffet and specials on Polish beverages. May the force be with you. -CORY PERLA

PUBLIC APPROVED Radio Revival 7pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $30

[POP] Although both headliners experienced airwave-inspired success in the previous decade, we're not 100 percent convinced that musical offerings from Ryan Cabrera or Secondhand Serenade could inspire a true "radio revival." But what's in a name? Here's a unique opportunity to see Cabrera, a bona fide pop star, in a super intimate room. Surely he'll perform tracks from his gold-selling disc, You Stand Watching, alongside newer tunes from the just-released EP, Wake Up Beautiful, and an as-yet unnamed long-player that's on the way. John Vesley, aka Secondhand Serenade, will undoubtedly sing his million-selling single "Fall For You," while premiering new songs from the disc he's currently recording, and a few from the albums he's released in between. Additional guests include Spill Canvas' Nick Thomas, Runaway Saints, and Wind in Sails…don't touch that dial. For $30, it all comes together at Buffalo Iron Works on Saturday, April 4. -CJT

SUNDAY APR 5 Bleachers with Joywave 6pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $55-$68

[ALT ROCK] Rochester-based band Joywave will join New York City's Bleachers for a show at the Town Ballroom on Sunday, April 5. Joywave boasts a kaleidoscopic sound, highlighted on “Somebody New," an angsty rocker with growling guitar licks, and “Tongues,” an electro-pop sugar rush. “Bad Dreams”, the indie-noir single off their forthcoming release, How Do You Know Now, features edgy rap verses over an ominous-sounding cathedral choir, sufficiently rendering the sounds of their sophomore album unpredictable. -KP

BIG DATA TUESDAY APR 7 7PM / THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE / $10-$18 [POP] Big Data made its presence known to the electro-pop scene with “Dangerous (feat. Joywave),” conveying distrust in technology and the cloud, despite admitted dependence on both. What’s remarkable about the claustrophobic anthem isn’t its lyrical depth or intellectual backbone, but rather its cascading drum flourishes, funky bass lead, and faded synth surges, making it a hard-grooving hit. It’s easy to subscribe to Big Data’s paranoid lyrical content that scrutinizes the digital age—the chilling reality of which reads like a Ray Bradbury novel. Songwriter and core member Alan Wilkis makes it easy by wrapping his unease over the increasing intrusion of technology on the human experience into a highly enjoyable musical package that sends you straight to the dance floor. On Big Data’s debut album, 2.0, Wilkis serves up a deliciously cool confection of synth-swelled tracks featuring hypnotic, lashing beats, and the vocals of a peerless list of contributors. From the electro-soul banger, “Clean (featuring Jamie Lidell)” and the smoldering, R&B-influenced, “The Glow (featuring Kimbra),” to the pounding synths and infectious chorus of “Snowed In” featuring Weezer’s River Cuomo—paranoia never sounded so good. Catch Big Data with On An On and CHAPPO at the Waiting Room (moved from Showplace Theater) P on Tuesday, April 7. -KELLIE POWELL DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 17


BOOKS REVIEW

President Franklin D. Roosevelt and General George Marshall.

THE MANTLE OF COMMAND Nigel Hamilton sheds new light on FDR’s relationships with generals and other leaders BY GERALD R. RISING

The year 2014 was an excellent year for us World War II history buffs. Four books I have found especially interesting cover overlapping aspects of that war. They are Nigel Hamilton’s The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942; Craig Symonds’ Neptune: The Allied Invasion of Europe and the D-Day Landings; James Hornfischer’s Neptune’s Inferno: The U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal; and Joseph E. Persico’s Roosevelt’s Centurions: FDR and the Commanders He Led to Victory in World War II. All of these books have special meaning to me for I followed newspaper accounts of the events covered by them as a high school student until January 1944 when on my 17th birthday I enlisted in the Navy. Fortunately for me, I only got to the Mediterranean after VE Day but my brother commanded an LST at Normandy and another later in the Pacific. While each book has much to savor, The Mantle of Command towers over the others in its contribution to our thinking about our leaders during that war. It breaks new ground in its analysis of the months before we entered World War II and the early days of that war. I am pleased to find my personal high opinion of it supported by the fact that it is the only one of those titles included among this year’s National Book Award finalists. Hamilton’s central character is, of course, FDR—do readers today fail to recognize those famous initials as representing Franklin Delano Roosevelt?—to whom he assigns highest marks. His book provides plenty of documentation in support of that evaluation. Roosevelt was a masterful political leader who understood the task assigned him, winning the two-ocean war against Japan, Germany, and Italy. He accomplished this goal in his dealings with his contemporaries by strong-arming (for example, by imposing his powers as commander-in-chief ), by gaining public support through his “fireside talks,” by applying his personal charm, and whenever necessary through manipulation. Manipulation indeed. FDR was a master politician, a very bright and knowledgeable (he had been assistant secretary of the Navy) but essentially sly and self-contained man who knew the motivations of those with whom he had to deal and who turned those motivations to gain his own ends. Thankfully, those ends were the same as those of the Free World. I would not want to contemplate what would have happened if FDR’s and Hitler’s roles were exchanged. FDR’s relationships with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Army Chief of Staff General George Marshall, and General Douglas MacArthur form a central part of Hamilton’s story. He sheds new light on FDR’s dealings with each of these important figures. Roosevelt never got to write his memoirs, having died in office on April 12, 1945, less than a month before VE Day when the Germans surrendered on May 7, and five months before VJ Day

18 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

THE MANTLE OF COMMAND: FDR AT WAR, 1941-1942 BY NIGEL HAMILTON HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT, 2014

when the Japanese did so on September 2. But of course Churchill did, in his Nobel Prize-winning six volume The Second World War. Needless to say, Churchill’s story does not match that of Hamilton in important aspects. The view Churchill conveyed to the world (including me) was that he was the essential guide of those opposing Hitler from the west through that war. While Churchill certainly played a supporting role behind those of Roosevelt and Stalin and deserves special credit for sustaining the English through his masterly speeches to the British Parliament, thankfully Roosevelt took Winston’s proposed actions with a rich dose of salt and outmaneuvered him at several key points before and after Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Perhaps the most important of these points was when the two first met in Newfoundland in August 1941. Churchill came hoping to lead FDR to declare war on Germany, an act for which Roosevelt had no chance of gaining support from either Congress or the public; Churchill left instead with Roosevelt’s Atlantic Charter that would, over time, spell the end of the British Empire. This was a terrible pill for the British prime minister to swallow, deeply committed as he was to maintaining that overseas empire, and he would, for example, continue to oppose any compromise with Indian nationals, even when Japanese invasion of that country was threatened. Churchill also took principal credit for the attack on the Axis in northwest Africa—what he termed “the soft underbelly” of the Axis—which would assist General Montgomery’s offensive against Hitler’s powerful General Rommel. No indeed, says Hamilton. Roosevelt had that in mind for some time because America needed a morale boost after suffering a series of losses in the Pacific. And Roosevelt had an election coming up. He tried to get that invasion (Operation Torch) scheduled just before the November 3, 1942 voting but the operation was delayed until November 8. In that election Republicans won the popular vote and gained 47 congressional seats. I am convinced that the wild enthusiasm I ob-

served at the time of that invasion would have completely reversed that vote. But never mind the election, Roosevelt delivered us that sorely needed jolt to our morale.  In fairness to Churchill he dealt from a position of extreme weakness. His armies were poorly led; witness the loss of Singapore to outmanned Japanese, and defeats and retreats in North Africa and in the China-Burma-India Theater as well as a threatened Australia. But his judgments were often wrong. (As Persico points out, for example, Churchill would continue to oppose the invasion of mainland Europe until the ships were at sea.)  In forcing Operation Torch on his professional soldiers Roosevelt had faced down a near revolt. And many of his military leaders including Eisenhower (as well as other historians) did blame his insistence on Churchill’s influence. The US military wanted nothing but the cross-Channel invasion of Europe and they wanted to focus all resources on England. They even tried to blackmail Roosevelt by turning those resources from the European to the Pacific Theater if the president insisted on Africa. But that invasion could not take place for another year at least. In fact, it did not occur for 19 months, so you could blame that additional half year on Torch. By the time of D-Day, however, Montgomery had fortunately convinced Eisenhower and Marshall that they had severely underestimated the forces necessary to insure success. In any case Roosevelt simply brushed aside the threats Marshall conveyed to him. And then there was General MacArthur. I spent 42 months in the service and never once heard a kind word said about him by a soldier or sailor. He was generally known as Dugout Doug for his time deep in the fortress at Corregidor while our troops were starving on the Bataan March. And he lived in luxury in Australia while his forces were mired in Guadalcanal and similar non-vacation resorts. Hamilton takes MacArthur to task for his incompetent response to the invasion of the Philippines a week after Pearl Harbor. He told President Quezon, “I don’t think that the Philippines can defend themselves, I know they can,” and then failed utterly either to prepare for the expected attack or to defend against it. Even worse, MacArthur supported Quezon’s willingness to surrender his forces to the invaders (which Marshall and FDR rejected) and illegally accepted a $500,000 gift from Quezon shortly before reversing his decision to leave Quezon at Corregidor when the two families left by PT boat for Australia.  Here is Hamilton’s telling paragraph: “The President was even more disappointed by MacArthur’s histrionics—the only term that could describe the ‘flood of communications’ (as Eisenhower called it in his diary) the general had transmitted to Washington by wireless since Pearl Harbor. For in their miscalculations, wild exaggerations, grandiose recommendations, and doomsday warnings, MacArthur’s cables had given cause for the President to question MacArthur’s mental health.” But FDR did not dismiss MacArthur. We needed a figurehead in the South Pacific and he would suffice. And indeed MacArthur did get his act together to contribute to the island hopping campaign to retake the southwest Pacific. It would finally be up to Truman to discharge him for “his open defiance” and “insubordination” many years later. The Mantle of Command takes us only through 1942 and the first stages of the African campaign. He tells us that a sequel will cover FDR’s leadership through later stages of the war in Europe. I look P forward to that book.


REVIEW EATS

PHOTOS BY BILLY SANDORA-NASTYN

ABV:

MUSIC / WHISKEY BURGERS / BEER BY DAN GIACOMINI

Buffalo’s ever-resurging bar/restaurant scene welcomed its newest addition last week, when Allen Burger Venture officially opened its doors. Inspired by hipster havens in New York, Chicago, and Montreal, owner Mike Shatzel’s latest venture is the realization of an idea that had been brewing long before he opened Blue Monk or Liberty Hound. “This is something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time,” Shatzel told me. “[Chef ] Dino DeBell, my partner, and I— we’ve been talking about this for probably 10 years.”  Shatzel, who had long dreamed of owning a place on Allen, was notified that the building had become available and knew that the time had finally come for ABV.  But timing, it seems, is never ideal. “I definitely wouldn’t repeat opening two spots at the same time again,” he admitted, referring to Moor Pat, a craft beer bar he just opened in Williamsville.  For a concept that remained in park for decade, it’s hard to imagine a better time for ABV to have finally burst onto the scene. ABV adds new depth and flavor to Allentown, offering a swagger-rich destination that will appeal as much to the 20-something weekend warrior as to the most particular craft beer or whiskey enthusiast. But despite its refinement, ABV aims to embody a certain edge that puts it right at home on Allen Street. Music—namely punk rock—will be as central to the place as craft beer or whiskey, says Shatzel. “It’ll be like, ‘Can you turn the music down? No, we can’t.’” Having made my visit in the afternoon prior to last week’s grand

“I THINK I’M FINALLY AT THE MAX RIGHT NOW,” SAYS OWNER MIKE SHATZEL. “I’LL PROBABLY CALL IT QUITS AFTER THIS FOR A WHILE.” opening, I admit feeling somewhat deprived of what I can only imagine is an incredibly vibrant atmosphere when filled with patrons. Even as an empty bar, with chairs upside down on the tables, it’s easy to imagine. The interior is dark, industrial, and rustic. It’s also meticulously put together and budding with unique idiosyncrasies—from tap handles resembling old iron farm tools to a vintage Pepsi machine that previously belonged to Home of the Hits on Elmwood. The white subway tile behind the bar grabs my attention first, invoking big-city grit. The tile is surrounded by expansive paneling of bucolic wooden planks, old and weathered but also uniform, as if all from a single generous source.  “We bought an old barn somewhere in the Southern Tier,” Shatzel said. “Our general contractor went for a ride and found some beat-up barn…it was quite a process.”  Directly behind the bar hang two large chalkboards, which list the 24 beers currently on tap while completely covering up the large flat-screen TV. The TV apparently remains hidden except to show Bills and Sabres games. 

ALLEN BURGER VENTURE 175 ALLEN ST, BUFFALO / FB: ALLENBURGERVENTURE

For a dimly lit burger bar, the food offering is deceptively sophisticated.  DeBell, whose resumé includes head chef at Blue Monk and Cole’s (another Shatzel establishment), has created a menu centered around 18 creatively diverse hamburger styles ranging from a classic cheese-and-trimmings to the “Chicken Chorizo Burger,” one of nine ultra-eclectic choices from the “Alternative Burgers” section of the menu.  The dry-aged, grass-fed burgers are billed as “hormone and antibiotic-free, sourced from verified humane and sustainable ranches to ensure the highest quality and flavor.”  A few different side options round out the menu, including salads, skillet mac and cheeses, and “shared plates” (fries, wings, and the like).  The drink selection satisfies many different tastes. Like any of Shatzel’s venues, craft beer abounds; there are 24 taps and more than a dozen cans. But equally impressive is the whiskey wall, packed with an expansive (and still growing) lineup of bourbons, single malt scotch, and other whiskeys.  ABV is also one of the only bars in Buffalo to offer wines on tap. Inspired by the tap wine setup at a friend’s bar in Bushwick, Shatzel notes that, compared to bottles, wine taps greatly reduce spoilage, are better for the environment, and actually lower the price point. On tap currently are a chardonnay, a pinot grigio, a pinot noir, and a petite sirah. ABV has been up and running since last Wednesday, but there are still new elements to be added. They’re working on expanding the patio, which they hope to have completed next year. They also aim to embrace Allen Street’s lack of parking options by incorporating bicycle-friendly features such as bike racks, a tire repair station, and even a “bike valet” system. I ask Shatzel, somewhat sarcastically, if he’s already working on plans for his next venue. He lets out a sigh. “I think I’m finally at the max right now. I’ll probably call it quits after this for a while.” After bringing to life a vision that was over ten years in the making, I’d say he’s earned the right to relax. The Public’s weekly beer column is produced in collaboration P with the Buffalo Niagara Brewers Association.

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 19


FILM REVIEW

IN CINEMAS NOW:

Dakota Fanning in Effie Gray.

BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

PREMIERES EFFIE GRAY—Emma Thompson wrote the screenplay for and co-stars in this biography imagining the life of the young woman who spent six years in an unconsummated marriage with the eminent Victorian intellectual John Ruskin. Starring Dakota Fanning, Greg Wise, Tom Sturridge, and Derek Jacobi. Directed by Richard Laxton (Burton and Taylor). Reviewed this issue. Opens Friday at the Dipson Eastern Hills Cinema FURIOUS 7—AKA Fast and Furious 7. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Jason Statham and Michelle Rodriguez. Directed by James Wan (Saw). Opens Friday at local theaters.

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA THE BREAKFAST CLUB (1985)—Apparently if you were a teenage in the 1980s it’s a big deal. Starring Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Judd Nelson. Directed by John Hughes. Sat-Sun 11:30am. North Park DE PROFUNDIS (1997)—Local filmmaker Lawrence Brose’s widely acclaimed experimental film. Called “dense but haunting” by the Village Voice, the film is a multilayered investigation of Oscar Wilde’s project of Transgressive Aesthetics. Incorporating home movies from the 1920’s and early gay male erotica along with images from Radical Faerie gatherings and queer pagan rituals, radical drag performances and images of confinement, the film sets up a haunting investigation of queerness, masculinity, history and sexuality. The screening is being held as a fundraiser for Brose’s defense fund. Seating is limited; to reserve seats contact anna@btandcgallery.com. Thu April 2 7 pm.  BT&C Gallery, 1250 Niagara St. EL NORTE (1983)—Gregory Nava’s Oscar-nominated film remains one of the best representations of the horrors that send so many Latin Americans on the journey to the United States, as well as the difficult situations they face when they get here. In this era of demonizing “illegals,” it should be shown in every high school in the country. Presented by the Buffalo Film Seminars. Tue 7pm. Dipson Amherst Theatre NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959)—Cary Grant is an innocent man on the run from he’s not sure who. Eva Marie Sainte is on hand to help, with James Mason and Martin Landau hovering about. Mount Rushmore, orgasmic fireworks, cropduster chase—you know all this already. Fri-Sat, Tue-Wed 7:30pm. Screening Room

THE UNTOUCHED BRIDE EFFIE GRAY

IN BRIEF

BY M. FAUST

THEATER INFORMATION IS VALID THROUGH THURS APRIL 2

Pull up a chair and let’s chat about John Ruskin, the eminent Victorian art and social critic. Hey, where are you going? Come back! I was just kidding! Ha ha. Who’d want to hear such a dull tale? Let me tell you this other story, about a young, dreamy-eyed girl, eager to get out of dreary Scotland and in love with a family friend 10 years older than herself. Little does she know that he’s a cold fish who would be so repulsed by the sight of her naked body on their wedding night that he would flee the bridal chamber, never to return. She has to stay with him and his dreadful parents for six years before she can get the marriage annulled on the rounds of impotence and remarry a man who gives her eight children in as many years. Of course, that’s Ruskin’s story, or at least the version of it that has titillated the world since 1854. Speculation into his disastrous marriage has been the subject of numerous plays, literary works, an opera, and several movies. So busy is the Ruskin industry, in fact, that Effie Gray, which opens at the Eastern Hills Cinema this Friday, had its release delayed for several years. Filmed in 2011, its release was enjoined while Emma Thompson, who wrote and produced it, was sued by the writer of two other screenplays about the Ruskins’ marriage. In the meantime, we’ve seen Ruskin inexplicably portrayed as a lisping fop in Mike Leigh’s recent Mr. Turner, a biography of the painter whose greatest champion was Ruskin. Thompson’s take is very much on the side of Effie, well played by Dakota Fanning. Expecting to make a home and raise a family with her eminent and wealthy new husband (played by Greg Wise, Thompson’s own spouse), she is disappointed to find themselves under the thumbs of his parents (David Suchet, Julie Walters), from whom John shows no inclination to stray. The 20-year-old Effie finds herself mired in the most stifling conception of Victorian propriety. John is content to spend his days ruminating and writing. Her intellect is clearly not on a level with his, and he shows no inclination to develop it. Travel, to which the Ruskins are addicted, brings no relief. It is only when her husband’s protégé, the young painter John Everett Millais (Tom Sturridge) comes to paint his portrait, that she is roused to find a way out of her situation. Complaining about historical inaccuracies in movies based on fact is a losing game, especially when historians can’t agree on what did and did not happen. A story like this is unlikely to leave a primary paper trail, and it’s never hard to sell a salacious interpretation. The conventional understanding of Ruskin’s non-consummation is that he was appalled by the sight of his bride’s pubic hair, which seems awfully unlikely. The 20 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 1, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Emma Thompson in Effie Gray.

recent book Marriage of Inconvenience by Robert Brownell builds a rather different case in which Ruskin refused to consummate the marriage because he discovered that Effie did not love him and only married him to settle her father’s debts. It’s equally as plausible but no more authoritative than the popular version. Thompson seems to have intended a feminist parable, but it’s hard to believe she couldn’t have come up with a better vehicle. Even taken at face value, this version simply recycles clichés about Victorian repression. The production, which includes sequences in Vienna and the wilds of Scotland, is quite handsome. And the cast is filled with familiar faces, though mostly in little more than glorified cameos—Claudia Cardinale, Derek Jacobi, Robbie Coltrane, James Fox. Given all the trouble it took to get this story to the screen, it hardly seems worth the bother. P

AMERICAN SNIPER—Clint Eastwood’s adaptation of the memoir of Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper), who as a Navy SEAL sniper killed between 160 and 250 targets in Iraq, is hardly the only recent film “based on a true story” to play fast and loose with the facts. But the goal here seems to be less dramatic shaping than hagiography, a disappointment given Eastwood’s more nuanced films of recent years. The script doesn’t only ignore Kyle’s human failings (which is understandable if unfortunate); it erases most of what might have made him interesting as a character. Eastwood remains the consummate craftsman, but the film serves no real point. With Sienna Miller, Jake McDorman, and Luke Grimes. -MF Four Seasons Cinema, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit CINDERELLA—The surprising thing about Disney’s live action version of the perennial is how little it differs from their 1950 animated version or any other traditional telling of the fairy tale, despite the contributions of director Kenneth Branagh and screenwriter Chris Weitz (About a Boy). Branagh’s direction is stolid and tentative, as if he wasn’t sure how to spark things dramatically. The production is heavily opulent but not very striking in appearance. Lily James, from Downton Abbey, makes a serviceable but bland heroine; Richard Madden, from Game of Thrones, is an appealing Prince. Co-starring Hayley Atwell, Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, Stellan Skarsgård, Derek Jacobi, Ben Chaplin and Rob Brydon. -GS AMC Maple Ridge, Flix Stadium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit DELI MAN—A nostalgic celebration of that once-ubiquitous urban culinary institution, the Jewish Delicatessen. This spirited, occasionally poignant documentary examines those distinctive restaurants which have offered a rich, if unpretentious, gastronomic experience for well over a century in America’s larger cities, although, as the movie makes clear, now in greatly diminished numbers. Directed by Erik Greenberg Anjou (The Klezmatics: On Holy Ground). -GS North Park FIFTY SHADES OF GREY—B&D goes mainstream in the movie adaptation of the books that have sold an estimated 100 million copies (even though no one will admit to liking them). Starring Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan and Jennifer Ehle. Directed by Samantha Taylor-Johnson (Nowhere Boy).  Four Seasons,  Regal Quaker, Regal Transit FOCUS—A subdued Will Smith stars as Nicky, veteran con man, who takes on fledgling femme fatale Margot Robbie as a protégé—but who’s seducing whom? As a romance among thieves, Focus at its best has some of the sultry ambiance of Out of Sight: The soundtrack has more smooth funky grooves than a 1970s prom, and if Smith and Robbie are no George Clooney and


PLAYING NOW FILM The Breakfast Club showing at North Park.

Jennifer Lopez, they’re not bad either. Locathe filmmakers choices here are dramatically PADDINGTON—The beloved “short but polite” tion shooting in Manhattan, New Orleans, and conservative and audience-oriented. Co-startalking bear of children’s books comes to the Buenos Aires keeps things looking nice, and ring Keira Knightley, Matthew Goode, Charles big screen in a good-natured movie that will be the story only stumbles in the third section as Dance, and Mark Strong. Directed by Morten beloved by Anglophiles of all ages. Combining writer/directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa Tyldum (Headhunters). -GS Dipson McKinley computer effects with animatronics and voiced (I Love You Philip Morris) go overboard in lulling Mall, Movieland by Ben Whishaw, Paddington’s story stays us off guard prior to their big finale. With Gerald close to the books as he journeys from “darkINSURGENT—Teen dystopian sequel. Starring McRaney, Rodrigo Santoro, and BD Wong. -MF  est Peru” to London in search of a home. For Shailene Woodley, Miles Teller, and Theo James. AMC Maple Ridge, Four Seasons Cinema, Regal dramatic structure the movie borrows from 101 Directed by Robert Schwentke (R.I.P.D.) AMC Elmwood, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Dalmations in the form of Nicole Kidman as a Maple Ridge, Flix Stadium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Walden Galleria Cruella De Vil-ish taxidermist in a snakeskin Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Rejumpsuit. It was co-written and directed by Paul GET HARD—After Unfinished Business and The gal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria King, but don’t expect anything as anarchic as Wedding Ringer, you’d think star-vehicle comIT FOLLOWS—The climax makes no sense, but The Mighty Boosh, the cult comedy show he’s edies would have bottomed out for the year. what’s good in this arthouse horror movie (from best known for: Special effects aside, it’s as Let’s hope the nadir is this tired farce starring the writer-director of The Myth of the Ameritraditional as a cup of hot chocolate. The cast Will Ferrell as a dumbass businessman on his can Sleepover, David Robert Mitchell) is so good includes Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey’s way to prison who hires the only black man that you can almost forgive it. In a suburb of Earl of Grantham), Sally Hawkins, Peter Capalhe knows (Kevin Hart) to teach him survival Detroit, teens are stalked by a murderous entidi, Julie Walters, and Jim Broadbent, along with skills. It’s awash in jokes reeking of racism and ty that can assume any form and is only visible other faces you’ll probably recognize if you’re homophobia, and while I’m sure that the films to the person it is currently stalking. Mitchell a Britcom fan. -MF Dipson McKinley Mall, Four creators would argue that they’re simply trying understands that postmodern horror movies Seasons Cinema, Movieland, Regal Transit to air out these differences, they utterly lack are games, but plays the one he has invented the finesse to walk that line. With Alison Brie RUN ALL NIGHT—Liam Neeson’s fourth action straight-faced: there are more genuine scares and Craig T. Nelson. Directed by Etan Cohen thriller in a hair over one year seems to have here than any movie I’ve seen in a long time. (My Wife Is Retarded). -MF AMC Maple Ridge, been intended to be one of the grittier of the Starring Maika Monroe, Keir Gilchrist, and DanFlix Stadium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara bunch, closer to A Walk Among the Tombstones iel Zovatto. -MF Dipson Amherst Theatre Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Rethan Taken 3. He plays an aging Brooklyn hitKINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE—“Give me a fargal Walden Galleria man who has to try to save his estranged adult fetched theatrical plot any day,” says the villain son from the gangster (Ed Harris) he’s been THE GUNMAN—Remember when winning the to the hero during a discussion of spy movies working for since they were kids. It starts out Academy Award helped an actor’s career? in one of this comic book adaptation’s more as a hard-boiled tale, but by the midpoint diaIt seems to have been all downhill for Sean bluntly self-referential moments. Far-fetched logue and character fly out the window in faPenn since getting his Oscar for Milk in 2008. and theatrical it is, and pretty entertaining to vor of unnecessary action sequences. There’s a In this confused thriller from the director who boot, even if it leaves you feeling slightly soiled great cast for fans of middle aged tough guys: launched Liam Neeson’s action hero career, for succumbing to such excesses as a parade of along with Neeson and Harris, you have Vincent Pierre Morel, Penn plays a special forces veterexploding heads that David Cronenberg could D’Onofrio, Nick Nolte and Bruce McGill, though an turned mercenary assassin turned humannever have imagined. The story is essentially none of them are given nearly enough to do: itarian worker, trying to find the former allies an Anglicization of Men in Black, minus most of I’m willing to bet that a lot of story and dialogue who are now trying to kill him. The endless gunthe sci-fi and the overt comedy. Working from were cut from the script to make room for more fights give him lots of opportunities to grimace the same comic book creators who spawned gunplay and explosions. Directed by Jaume in pain, which I guess counts as acting, and his hit Kick Ass, director Matthew Vaughn pits Collet-Serra (Non-Stop). -MF. AMC Maple Ridge, there are lots of scenes with him displaying his a secret organization of immaculately clad Flix Stadium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara overly  gym-shaped torso, which don’t. EqualBritish spies (suit fetishists will swoon) against Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Rely wasted, if for shorter amounts of time, are Samuel L. Jackson as a frustrated billionaire gal Walden Galleria Javier Bardem, Ray Winstone, Mark Rylance, with a desperate plan to cure global warming. and Idris Elba. -MF AMC Maple Ridge, Flix StaTHE SECOND BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL—The The sequence with Colin Firth slaughtering the dium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, title is its own review for this sequel to the 2011 congregation at a stand-in for the Westboro Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Regal film about British retirees who find a new lease Baptist Church—to the tune of “Free Bird”—is Walden Galleria on life in a run-down hotel in India. Haphazardly probably the most jaw-dropping thing you’ll see and indifferently plotted, it has no more purHOME—Runaway alien meets a girl on the road in all year. With Taron Egerton, Mark Strong, Mipose than to give fans of the original more of this animated feature. Directed by Tim Johnson chael Caine, and Mark Hamill. -MF AMC Maple the same, with the entire cast returning (minus (Over the Hedge). AMC Maple Ridge, Flix StaRidge, Four Seasons Cinema, Regal Elmwood, Tom Wilkinson, of course). The script lays up dium 10, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Regal the role of Maggie Smith, whose role on DownRegal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria ton Abbey has made her the Don Rickles of her Walden Galleria THE LAZARUS EFFECT—A quartet of young medimileu, and evenly parcels the rest of the time THE IMITATION GAME—The story of English mathcal researchers discover a way to bring the reamong Judi Dench, Dev Patel, Bill Nighy, Peematician and logician Alan Turing, who was cently dead back to life. Having apparently nevVISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS REVIEWS >> to nelope Wilton, Celia Imrie, Ronald Pickup, and instrumental in breaking Germany’s Enigma er seen a horror film, they&proceed to do so, newcomers Richard Gere, Tamsin Greig, and code during World War II but was later driven their regret. For a while the scientific gobbledyDavid Strathairn. Caveat emptor: It was made to suicide for being gay. Benedict Cumberbatch gook in this thriller feels reasonably plausible, for fans of the previous film and expects that plays Turing as a kind of comic but poignant geat least by the low standards of the genre, and you remember all the details of its plot. Directnius in a clever and vivid performance. Britain’s the debates among our crew raise interesting ed by John Madden (Shakespeare in Love). -MF stringent secrecy laws kept Turing’s role in the questions about our ideas of life after death. Dipson Amherst Theatre, Dipson Eastern Hills Allied victory a secret until the mid-1970s, since But that all goes out the window for a third Cinema, Flix Stadium 10 which point Turing has become both a hero of act of generic monster movie stuff, with lots of ‘71—Belfast 1971. An inexperienced young British the code-breaking program and as a martyr of build up for presumed sequels. (Don’t count on soldier is separated from the oppressive, sometimes vicious treatment of it: This has been on MORE the shelf since it was filmed VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> his unit during a riot, and his struggle to survive reveal more factions homosexuals in the British Isles. Although the in 2013). Starring Mark Duplass, Olivia Wilde, to “the troubles” than he realized. Debuting dimovie’s dramatic arc is consistently entertainSarah Bolger, Evan Peters, and Donald Glover. rector Yann Demange is less interested in poling, it bears only a limited general resemblance Directed by David Gelb, which is the same name itics than momentum, among the memorable to the more complicated story told in Andrew as the director of the documentary Jiro Dreams set pieces he assembles, perhaps the best is Hodge’s long, dense 1983 Turing biography, of Sushi—can it possibly be the same guy? -MF the street riot that rises as quickly and implacacredited as a primary source. Exaggerating and Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal invention are hardly uncommon in biopics, but Walden Galleria bly as a tsunami. The thick accents and murky

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

lighting will be an impediment to some viewers, but the overall effect is undeniable. Starring Jack O’Connell, Richard Dormer, Sean Harris and Sam Reid. -MF Eastern Hills THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING—As an Oscar contender, this biography of Stephen Hawking, based on a memoir by his first wife Jane, is a model of restraint and inoffensiveness: it’s a shoo-in for the The King’s Speech voters. Hawking’s work takes a back seat to his slow debilitation from ALS and the history of his marriage. But while we go into the film knowing it will end in divorce, the factors driving the couple apart feel elided. It’s as if the filmmakers didn’t want to be disrespectful to a man who is considered one of the great scientific minds of our era. But in that case, why make the film at all? Even the irony that, as presented here, all that ended the marriage of a man so obsessed with the nature of time was time itself seems unintended. With fine but unostentatious performances by Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones as the Hawkings. Co-starring Harry Lloyd, David Thewlis, and Emily Watson. Directed by James Marsh, best known for documentaries like Man on Wire. -MF Dipson McKinley Mall, Movieland WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS— Jemaine Clement (of Flight of the Conchords) and Kiwi filmmaker Taika Waititi (Eagle vs. Shark) are the creators and stars of this mockumentary about slackers who are also vampires. The movie is a bit overlong, and as always in this kind of thing the jokes are hit and miss. But more than enough of them connect to make the laugh quotient worth the ticket price. -MF Dipson Amherst Theatre WHIPLASH—Inspired by his own experiences at a musical conservatory, writer-director Damien Chazelle’s film about an obsessed drum student and his even more obsessive teacher takes its cues less from movies about the arts or academics than the military, starting in An Officer and a Gentleman territory before plunging unexpectedly toward Full Metal Jacket. An excellent performance by Miles Teller as the student is overshadowed by Oscar winner J. K. Simmons in the role of a lifetime as the teacher who believes in pushing students past what they think their limits are. The finale arguably undercuts everything the rest of the movie stands for, but it’s so well executed it’s hard to complain. -MF Dipson McKinley Mall, Movieland WILD TALES—From Argentina, this nominee for the Best Foreign Language Film is an anthology of six stories about people having really bad days. The brief opening segment hits a little harder than expected what with the recent Germanwings incident. But the best segments—an incident of road rage that spirals out of control; a wrathful bride who learns at her wedding that her new husband was unfaithful; an engineer (Ricardo Darín, a familiar face to foreign movie buffs) decides to fight an unfair parking ticket—are little masterpieces of escalation with satisfying climaxes. Hugely enjoyable.  Starring Ricardo Darín, Leonardo Sbaraglia, Oscar Martínez, and Erica Rivas. Directed by Damián Szifrón. -MF Dipson Eastern Hills Cinema P

CULTURE > FILM

VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 1, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 21


PUBLIC MARKET TO PLACE AN AD CALL SEAN AT (716)856.0737 OR EMAIL SEAN@DAILYPUBLIC.COM

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The Public encourages you to use caution while participating in any transactions or acquiring services through our classified section of the newspaper. While we do approve the ads in this section, we do not guarantee the reliability of classified advertisers. If you have questions regarding advertisers in this section please email sean@dailypublic.com.

SARA HEIDINGER PHOTOGRAPHY specializes in weddings, family portraits, business portraits as well as ARCHITECTURE & REAL ESTATE photography. For more information email or call. sara@saraheidinger.com or 984.1534

HORSEFEATHERS MARKET APTS

NEW LUXURY APARTMENTS produced by the Frizlen Group Architects and Developers to be completed in October-November for move in. Garage parking underneath and laundry services in the apartment. Balconies will be offered on some of the units. Please contact Jason to be put on the waitlist for further information. Call 381.9838 or email: Jason@Frizlengroup.com

APARTMENTS NORTH BUFFALO 3 bedroom lower, gleaming hdwds, porch, no smoking, no dogs, incl. range, fridge, washer, dryer. $875. 689.7654 ----------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE FOR RENT 2 bedroom lower in Elmwood Village, owner occupied. 1,100 ft’, living room, dining room, study, hardwood floors and woodwork. New kitchen and bath, W/D in basement. Street parking. $1,200 plus heat and elec. Available March 1. 886.2052

THE ARTS EVENTS & LESSONS

ARTYARD STUDIO offers the most in pottery classes for adults and children, New Try-it and Date Night Pottery, Now registering for spring classes and summer camps. 5701 Main St. Williamsville, NY. Register on line artyardstudio.com or call 634.0989

WNYBAC’S 7TH ANNUAL EDIBLE BOOK FESTIVAL / Sunday, April 12 4-8pm An international family-friendly festival inviting participants to create edible books that are exhibited, documented & then consumed! Creations are ranked by local celebrity judges & prizes are awarded. Interested in participating or attending? wnybookarts.org/ events 634.0989

BOOK CLUB NORMCORE MILLENIAL BOOK CLUB! Anyone interested in a book club for normcore millennials? We are looking for new friends who are into literature and want to talk about what they’ve read. Or maybe just drink! Contact Whitney at whitneycaitlin@gmail.com

WAITING ROOM, Buffalo’s newest live music club is hiring licensed security guards. Pay is $12 - $15 p/h depending on experience. Email info to info@waitingroombuffalo. com. No phone calls or visits please.

ROLLER SKATING TURNAROUND SKATES, a unique roller skate shop on Westside seeks motivated, reliable employees for retail sales, web, & social media! Perks include traveling, incentives, and use of car. We’re a relaxed dog friendly and kid friendly environment. Email Turnaroundskates@gmail.com for full description or send resume.

GOOD NEIGHBOR NOTICES HAPPY BIRTHDAY! BILLY SANDORA-NASTYN COLIN CHAVEL KEVIN THURSTON SIOBHAN BRADY STACEY PRODUM MIKAELA BRADY RACHEL LEBERER MAXWELL COLLINS EMILY DONNELLY!!! RYAN MCQUEENEY KARI CRUNK JUSTIN HOWARD AARON TURNER

“For in this moment, I just knew she could keep a secret. “Sure. She wouldn’t stop yelling. She told me I was crazy. I am not crazy I am not crazy I am not crazy I am not crazy I am not crazy.” 5 lies. The drum silenced.” thedirectionofup.com

ART SUBMISSIONS BUFFALO INFRINGEMENT FEST The Buffalo Infringement Festival is now accepting art, music, film, dance, theatre and literature submissions for the 2015 festival this summer. For more information, visit infringebuffalo.org

SORRY STATE

ABOLITION OF THE STATE 1

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27

46

41 44 48 52

45 49

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53 58

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67 69

68

ACROSS

60. “Hawaii Five-O” locale

1. With 69 Across, current retaliatory action, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme

61. Stand-up at the Old Pink?

7. Anchor Bar partner

66. Lead-in for sees or seas

13. High times?

67. “Paper Roses” singer Osmond

14. “Bonny” belle 16. MR filler 17. Canandaigua ski resort buddy? 19. Political mentor 20. A word before meal 21. Kleinhans group 22. Napoleon’s partner on “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.”

65. Colorful newspaper, in shorthand

38. Alimentary modicum

47. “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” is one

DOWN 1. Hardwired 2. SNL’s Dunn 3. “Stop procrastinating!” 5. Bermuda setting, initially

27. Better quality

6. Belonging to the sports elite

45. Mary’s TV boss

48. Amp feature 50. Answer to “Have the Bills won a Super Bowl?” 53. Where to see JFK 55. ___ up (lay off the fastballs) 56. Words that often follow “what if” 57. “___ Got You Babe”

7. X-ray examiners: abbr.

58. “Fiddler” of Rome

8. Alien subj.

9. Worcestershire warmer?

59. Work at “The Public,” in a way

10. David who played Hutch

61. “Unknown” surname

11. Agile

62. Sisters’ bagfuls

PLEASE EXAMINE THIS PROOF CAREFULLY

39. “A Delicate Balance” playwright IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS

37. When Taste of Buffalo begins?

69. See 1 Across

25. “Wicked” opening?

37. Crusty old fellow

34. ___ and Military Park, Buffalo

40. Accomplish nothing

4. Connections

36. Bitter frost

32. First animal in the Chinese zodiac

68. Early arrivals at Buffalo-Niagara airport

23. “Neet” rival

35. “Psychic” Geller

Meet ! Nemo

50

57

60

32

36

40

56

33. “Checkmate!”

by Nadia Ibrahim. All levels welcome. 716.560.1891 nadiaibrahim.com

35

47

55

31

12

26

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51 54

11

16

43

42

10

22

34 39

9

19

29

38

8

15

25

28 33

37

7

24

29. Part of 21 Across

BELLY DANCE CLASSES

6

Crossword Puzzle by CROSSWORD BY DONNA HOKE DONNAHOKE.COM crosswords at donnah

“Peg ___ Heart”: 1913 12. Seahorse? WHICH ARE ON THIS PROOF, THE 63. song 15. Abbr. on a letter to a THE AD 41.PUBLIC Word withCANNOT soul or BE help HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE soldier 64. High-end cosmetic brand 42.THOROUGHLY “Cubic” Rubik EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. 43. Hollywood’s Kilmer

18. “Madama Butterfly”

� CHECK COPY CONTENT MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER accessory

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BACK ROOM BOOK SALE! $5 bucks a bag! April 1st, 12-8pm through April 5th, 885.9535 rustbeltbooks.com

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44.Thank Debilitating suffix you bugs for advertising 22.�“Suburban” CHECK IMPORTANT DATES P I L O T F L Y F I O O O L A A R A B S THE PUBLIC. 46.with One at Beaver MeadowPlease 23. Marcel Marceau at LinObservatory, say ad and check coln �Center? CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, ET AS AL OI N M RY UD RE A OR M review your any always errors. The original 24. “Entourage” agent Gold S T L O M A N R 49.for Almost PHONE #, & WEBSITE N O R T H B U F F A L O layout instructions have 51. Trendy green I W A S A A O N I 25. Sizable garden been followed as closely as � PROOF OK (NO CHANGES) T E S T B A N T I P 52.possible. “Neva Get ___”PUBLIC (2002 offers 26. Braves’ boss T O W O C Y E T I THE 3LW song) services with two � PROOF OK (WITH CHANGES) J O H N A N D M A design 28. Aetna competitor E D E N S U C K L E 54.proofs Amhertatroad school THE noand charge. D R O N E S T C S A 30. An example of change in V A S C I O H R O B not responsible Russia 57.PUBLIC A certain is clinger E N O O N R E T R O for any error if not notified Advertisers Signature R U N P A E S S A Y 58.within ___ neutrality 24 hours of receipt. 31. “Cheers,” e.g. ____________________________ The production department must have a signed proof in Date _______________________ order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve Issue: ______________________ Y15W13 the freshest and most reliable advertising option in by responding is to boasting this email. Western New York. All ads are “publicly approved,” yielding a safe and that highlights what the public needs to see. THIS PROOF MAY trustworthy ONLY BE USEDmarketplace FOR PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC.

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PHOTOS BACK PAGE

19 IDEAS, 19 COVERS Friday, March 28, Essex Art Center

PHOTOS BY SHAWNA STANLEY On March 28, we joined the marketing and communications firm 19 Ideas to throw a party celebrating The Public’s first 19 issues and the artists whose work appeared on their covers. It was, to put it mildly, a big success. Thanks to 19 Ideas for opening their offices in the Essex Art Center and to everyone who came; thanks to DJ Sike, Hamburg Brewing Company, Big Ditch Brewing Company, Leonard Oakes Estate Winery, Lockhouse Distillery, Ashker’s Juice Bar, Curly’s Bar and Grill, the Acropolis, Cheesy Chick, BuffaloveNotes, Ginny Rose Stewart, and ZoomCopy. Most importantly, thanks to all those who offered art: Blake Dawson, Craig LaRotonda, Chuck Tingley, Max Collins, Stephanie Dubin, Emily Carroll, Sara M. Zak, Jaume Escofet, Rob Lynch, Carol Case Siracuse, the Burchfield Penney Art Center, Julia Wald, Valerie Kasinski, Julie Molloy, Amanda Ferreira, Brendan Bannon, Alixandra P Martin, Stacey Robinson, and Joan Linder.

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