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FREE EVERY OTHER THURSDAY | APRIL 11, 2019 | DAILYPUBLIC.COM | @PUBLICBFLO | SILENCE IS THE WIT OF FOOLS

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UPS & DOWNS: GOOD NEWS, GOOD PLANNING, BAD FORMS

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COMMENTARY: WEAPONIZED SOCIAL MEDIA AND FASCISM

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ART: HUMBLE AND HUMAN AT THE ALBRIGHT-KNOX

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SPOTLIGHT: THINGS TO DO ON RECORD STORE DAY!

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ON DAILYPUBLIC.COM: IT’S THE WILDEST, MOST WIDE-OPEN ELECTION SEASON THE CITY OF BUFFALO HAS SEEN IN YEARS. LET US SORT OUT WHO’S WHO FOR YOU, ONE RACE AND CAST OF CHARACTERS AT A TIME…

THIS WEEK ISSUE NO. 208 | APRIL 11, 2019

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LOOKING BACKWARD: Pristach’s Tavern, circa 1937.

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NEWS: Former Buffalo mayor Tony Masiello’s lobbying conflicts grow complicated.

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FILM: Ramen Shop, plus a WNED documentary about the Richardson complex.

CROSSWORD: Another devilish puzzle by Matt Jones.

CENTERFOLD: Daniella Saeva at 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts.

ON THE COVER: PHOTOGRAPHER MEGANE ROY’S SHOW, NATURE MORTE,OPENS FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 7-9PM, AT 1045 ELMWOOD GALLERY FOR THE ARTS.

EVENTS: The Church, the Continental Reunion, and many more things to do and see.

THE PUBLIC STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GEOFF KELLY MUSIC EDITOR CORY PERLA MANAGING EDITOR AARON LOWINGER FILM EDITOR M. FAUST CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AT-LARGE JAY BURNEY QUIXOTE PETER SMITH

SPORT DAVID STABA PHOTOS JOHANNA C. DOMINGUEZ

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES CAITLIN CODER, BARB FISHER PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNER DEEDEE CLOHESSY KNUTSEN

COVER IMAGE MEGANE ROY

COLUMNISTS ALAN BEDENKO, BRUCE FISHER, JACK FORAN, MICHAEL I. NIMAN, GEORGE SAX, CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

CONTRIBUTORS ROB GALBRAITH

DEPARTMENT OF CRITICAL THINKING: PAR PUBLICATIONS LLC

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THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


LOCAL NEWS

THIS WEEK’S UPS AND DOWNS BY THE PUBLIC STAFF

UPS: The development of NEW PARKLAND along a former ELEVATED DL&W RAIL LINE just south of downtown, the so-called “Del,” has perked us up in recent days. It’s not just the prospect of having parkland that joins Canalside to Red Jacket Park in the context of grain silos and the expansive Tifft Nature Preserve to the south: The design process itself has been exciting. The WESTERN NEW YORK LAND CONSERVANCY released 92 designs it received after a call for proposals, and the community gets to vote on their favorites; an empaneled jury of local and national experts will pick the top three to get awards. Best yet: The final design of the park, funded by a mix of private and public dollars, will be free to borrow elements from “winning” and “losing” proposals alike. It’s a sweet thing to set our minds on this spring: the development of public space that is both creative and collaborative—and, for now, absent any local politician claiming credit or, worse, asserting ownership of the project. These are difficult and strange times for journalism, and while there’s a lot we could (and do) nitpick about the Buffalo News—like Bob McCarthy’s flagrant omission of Vanessa Glushefski as a candidate for city comptroller—we’d like to hand it to reporters MATTHEW SPINA and MARY PASCIAK for their recent, dogged work on the hairy mess surrounding the COMMUNITY ACTION ORGANIZATION OF WESTERN NEW YORK. A nonprofit that largely serves a pass-through for public money aimed at anti-poverty programming, mostly its preschool Head Start programs throughout the region, CAO’s executive director is NATHAN HARE, who enjoys a six-figure salary and a cozy relationship with the Buffalo Mayor BYRON BROWN. The four-term mayor has allies in all over town, of course, including Hodgson Russ attorney ADAM PERRY, the beneficiary of sustained contracts for outside legal services to carry the mayor’s water and insulate him from dirtier business. Perry successfully sharpelbowed the CAO board that was trying to dispose of Hare last fall, interrupting a forensic audit that News reporting seems to show had already begun, though Hare now denies it. The former board members smelled a rat in the Head Start funding specifically, and Hare, and by extension City Hall, is trying to throw cold water on everything CAO, because it’s all fire. The FBI is currently investigating the situation, and it’s in no small part due to the work done by the Spina and Pasciak. Keep digging.

DOWNS: Erie County Legislature Chairman PETER SAVAGE announced this week that he would not seek re-election to his current seat but rather would seek an appointment to Buffalo City Court. A hat tip to politics blogger KEN KRULY (politicsandstuff.com), whose work we sometimes republish here: Kruly predicted the Savage withdrawal several days before Savage made it public. Kruly observes that the race for Savage’s seat has just become much more interesting and unpredictable as a result: Two candidates filed petitions to challenge Savage, and Savage’s committee on vacancies can put up a candidate to replace him on the ballot. The process of replacing Savage as Legislature chairman may be even more chaotic. The Democratic majority will name an interim legislator to take Savage’s seat once he officially resigns; that new legislator will then join the entire Legislature in voting for a new chair from among the members of the Democratic caucus. “Here’s where the complication comes in,” writes Kruly: The Democratic members of that Caucus are or would be: Savage’s replacement – a rookie April Baskin, current Majority Leader who is a freshman in only her 16th month as a legislator. Baskin has a primary coming up in June. John Bruso, who is also a freshman in only his 16th month as a legislator. Tim Meyers, a recent appointee who took Pat Burke’s place in December. Barbara Miller-Williams, who is leaving the Legislature as she runs for Buffalo Comptroller. Tom Loughran, who is retiring from the Legislature at the end of this term. Kevin Hardwick, who is still technically a Republican. What a mess. But not as messy as this: We’ve heard that there is A SERIOUS DEFECT SHARED BY SEVERAL NOMINATING PETITIONS filed by candidates for Buffalo Common Council supported by WOMEN ELECT, a group that helps women seeking elected office in Western New York. Apparently, rather than use the petition forms provided online and in the office by the Erie County Board of Elections, the candidates and their supporters used petition forms of the sort used for nonpartisan Buffalo school board elections, which differ slightly from those used for party primary elections. There is language in the latter which the former lacks—for example, a statement averring that the witness to the signatures is a member of (in these cases) the Democratic Party. The defect is tricky to resolve: Election officials and judges can use discretion when evaluating the validity of individual signatures on a page. Use the wrong form for a nominating petition, however, and those pages are invalid. It’s an embarrassment for the candidates, and it’s an awkward position for their opponents, all male, who risk looking like jerks who want to throw first-time women candidates off the ballot. It’s even more awkward for JEREMY ZELLNER, who is both Erie County Democratic Party chair and the Democratic commissioner for the Erie County Board of Elections. Zellner and his Republican counterpart, Ralph Mohr, could examine and invalidate the defective petitions themselves, sparing the incumbents and other candidates—again, all male—from being the heavies who file challenges to those petitions. But Zellner’s role as Democratic Party chair brings to the surface a conflict that’s been lamented since he took the job as elections commissioner: None of the women who filed the forms in question were supported by Democratic Party headquarters. They’re all running against headquarters-endorsed candidates. If Zellner tosses those petitions, he’s wiping the ballot of challengers (all women) to candidates he supports (all men). Of course, the most awkward position of all is occupied by the person who gave all these candidates bad paper to pass… P Do you have ups and downs to share? Email us at info@dailypublic.com.

MJPeterson .com

OPEN HOUSES

SAT 1-3PM NO. BUFFALO: New! Classic 5BR 3+BA. Vintage details. Lrg LR & encl. porch, DR, granite kit w/ b’fast rm, XL mstr ste, fully fin 3rd flr, bsmt rec rm. 166 Jewett Pkwy, $499,900. Susan Lenahan, 864-6757(c) SAT 1-3:30PM AKRON: New! 3BR 2.5BA farmhse on 1.5 acres w/ garage & fam rm w/ vaulted ceilg. 13952 Bloomingdale, $170K. Patrick Stanchak, 949-5452(c) SUN 1-3PM DEPEW: 4BR 1.5BA w/ eat-in kit, 1st flr BR, bsmt rec rm w/ bar. 441 N. Creek, $139,900. Bryan Bollman, 605-2829(c)

NEW LISTINGS

KENMORE: 4BR 1.5BA Colonial. Bright LR, formal DR, nat. wdwrk, 1st flr BR/ ofc, good sized BRs! Upd. mechs incl windows, elec, furn, plumbing, HWT, etc, etc! 79 Kenton, $200,000. Kara Neidel, 574-6339(c)

BY APPOINTMENT

ALLENTOWN: Multi-Use for Investors – club, apts, retail, offices, etc! Bldg w/ club & ofc space on 2nd flr and att’d 3 unit bldg w/ parkg for 22. 26 Allen, $1,800,000. Mark W. DiGiampaolo, 887-3891(c)

BRANT: Lakefrnt compound on 5.7 acres w/ main 4BR/2.5BA house (3480 sf), a 3BR/2BA house, water tower & a 1BR/1.5BA barn home. Main hse has LR w/ fp, formal DR, upd. kit, fam rm, sun rm, garage & patio w/ outdoor kit. Pool rm, IG gunite pool, spa, waterfall & whole hse gen. 10650 Lake Shore, $1,125,000. Bret Llewellyn 909-1785(c) OR Britt Konczyk, 955-0284(c). CLARENCE: 3BR 1BA, 1500 sq. ft. on 1.3 acre lot. Lg garage w/2 bays. 9064 Main. Rent: $1800+ util. Buy: $270K. Patrick Stanchak, 949-5452(c) DELAWARE DIST: Amazing 3BR 2BA Park Lane unit w/ hi-end kit, LR w/ fp, hdwd flrs, AC, in-unit lndry & beautiful mstr ste. 33 Gates Cir #6E, $885K. Susan Lenahan, 864-6757(c) EAST AURORA: LOT! 234’ x1956’ scenic, part. wooded w/ creek. Util’s at street. V/L Center, $699K. Mark Warnes, 449-1801(c) ELMWOOD VLG: 2-story commercial bldg for retail, ofc, etc. Newer roof, windows, AC, insul, etc. 1045 Elmwood, $415K. Roseann Scibilia, 903-1464(c) ELMWOOD VLG: Rental. Nice 1+BR unit w/ porch & office. 688 Potomac, $800+. Annette Falasa, 868-6104(c) EVANS: Secluded 22 acre LOT. Utilitiess at street. VL Eastwood, $35K. Britt Konczyk, 955-0284(c) NIAG. FALLS: Attn Investors! 3/2 Double w/ separate 3BR Bungalow. Part. fin. attic in both. 1809 Ontario, $64,900. Linda Crist, 812-9800(c) NO. BUFFALO: Lrg 5BR 2BA Victorian used as ofc space. 2732 Main, $265,000. Mark DiGiampaolo, 887-3891(c) ORCHARD PK: 3BR 2BA reno’d brick Ranch. Lrg deck, 3car gar on 7+acres. Great rm w/ vaulted ceilg. 5857 Powers, $465K. John Fox, 481-6464(c) ORCHARD PK: Last residential (or mult) bldg lot in Hazel Court/Koch sub-division. 100x200’. 2274 Southwestern Blvd, $59,990. John Fox, 481-6464(c) ORCHARD PK: Grand Natale-built 4BR 4.5BA. 8000+ sf. Indoor saltwater pool w/ wet bar & bath. LR, DR, fam rm off kitch, mstr ste, garage/barn. 10 Robinhood. $1,245,000

716-819-4200 431 Delaware Avenue Buffalo, NY 14202

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / THE PUBLIC

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NEWS COMMENTARY defending Mosul fled before the first Toyota Hilux rolled into town, leaving the bulk of their American weapons, including six Blackhawk helicopters and 2,300 Humvees, behind. Then ISIS arrived, killed the few remaining soldiers and police officers, and posed for selfies with their spoils. The ensuing images proved powerful as visual props spread on social media, enabling ISIS to recruit 15,000 fighters from dozens of countries in the year following the capture of Mosul. War would never be the same again. ISIS didn’t invent the strategy of weaponizing social media. Perhaps that credit goes to the Israeli military, which had been trolling social media since at least 2008. In 2012, they took their game to the next level, live tweeting and uploading a snuff video to YouTube of a drone assassination against a Hamas leader. Unlike the Iraqi soldiers in Mosul, however, Hamas had responded to the social media campaign in-kind. Both sides enlisted help from their web fans, ultimately generating a pandemic of online hate involving millions of posts. By the end of 2012, the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) was running a global social media propaganda unit executing operations on every major platform. Today, hip young Israeli soldiers complete their mandatory military service as part of the IDF’s International Social Media Desk, trolling, for example, American college students supporting Palestinian rights movements such as BDS.

SOCKPUPPETS, BOTNETS, AND TROLLS, OH MY…

WORLD WAR F: WEAPONIZED SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE AGE OF FASCISM BY MICHAEL I. NIMAN I WAS BLINDSIDED a few weeks ago by a video of the New Zealand mosque massacre showing up on my screen—courtesy of Facebook. I really don’t have language to succinctly describe what it is, filmed by a self-described “fascist” hoping to pull viewers into his deranged hate-ravaged point-of-view, immortalizing the captured images of terror on his victims’ faces at the second their stolen lives flashed before them. The murderer also captured images of his victims and used them as a weaponized meme, which is now forever preserved as a cultural artifact. Making it was likely a driving force behind the massacre. This visual meme brought a white supremacist’s horrific battlefield into my home and the homes of millions of others who either willingly or unwittingly watched this horror. Welcome to World

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War F.

THE WEAPONIZATION OF SOCIAL MEDIA, FROM ISRAEL TO IRAQ In 2014 the two-millennia-old Iraqi city of Mosul, with a multicultural population of almost two million people, defended by approximately 30,000 American-trained and armed Iraqi troops, fell to a disheveled band of about 1,500 poorly armed ISIS fighters sporting a small fleet of stolen Toyota Hilux pickup trucks. But the war was essentially over before they arrived—won on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, aided by a slick viral propaganda video telling a fictitious story of an invincible army. As ISIS fighters advanced on

THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Mosul, they posted gruesome videos from villages on their path, not unlike the New Zealand one, but peppered with beheadings.

By 2016, sophisticated propagandists utilizing artificial intelligence algorithms driven by a seemingly limitless trove of data points on damn near every internet user, revolutionized social media-based psych-ops campaigns. And we got some new vocabulary words, like “sockpuppet.” That’s a human internet warrior purporting to be all sorts of folk they ain’t—like the sockpuppet operating out of St. Petersburg, Russia, who formed and facilitated the Twitter group, “@ Ten_GOP,” the fake “unofficial Twitter Group of Tennessee Republicans.” At its zenith, it had 10 times the following of the real Tennessee Republican Party’s group. @Ten_GOP spread misinformation memes and incendiary stories, including 3,107 of its own psych-ops messages, while amassing and identifying 136,000 followers to use as viral vectors, retweeting the St. Petersburg messages 1,213,505 times.

Before reaching Mosul, their hashtag #AllEyesOnISIS topped the Arabic language trending charts on Twitter. What ISIS pulled off on social media was a virtual blitzkrieg or shockand-awe grade terror campaign, projecting an illusion of overwhelming force. The result was as effective as a real bombardment. Iraqi soldiers and civilians in Mosul, glued to the little screens in their palms, thanks to a new cell tower network built with US aid, descended into rabbit holes of fear and terror.

One famous sockpuppet persona, the fictitious Jenna Abrams, became an American mainstream media fave. Described by the Guardian as an “all-American, Trump-loving, segregationsupporting, Confederate-defending Twitter star [who] does not really exist,” Jenna appears to be another St. Petersburg creation. As such, “She” was quoted by the New York Times, the Washington Post, Huffington Post, USA Today, BET, the New York Daily News, and a host of others. Once established as a lovable, personable, witty trusted young Twitter star, “her” repertoire turned socially toxic, empowering millions of other racist haters on social media.

Haunted by images of ISIS winning the battle before it was fought, almost all of the Iraqi soldiers

Then there are bots, which are robotic versions of sockpuppets. They come complete with


COMMENTARY NEWS fabricated identities, like the John McCainhating Confederate monument-loving American Trump supporter Angee Dixson, who was exposed by ProPublica as a Russian bot. Powered by artificial intelligence, bots like Angee successfully engaged with human trolls. As a presidential candidate, Donald Trump quoted such bots 150 times.

WHEN BOTS TWEET Since a bot is just an algorithm residing on a computer server, it’s easier to replicate. In fact, they can be tasked with replicating themselves. Once established as a network, or “botnet,” they can almost instantly propel any tweet or post into mega-virality by robotically seeding a seemingly organic viral orgy of reposting—enough to trick social media site algorithms into seeing the messages as naturally trending, and thus, make them actually trend into millions of news and social feeds. So, when ProPublica outed the Angee Dixson bot, a replacement bot’s tweet attacking ProPublica was instantly propelled by Angee’s 60,000-strong bot cell, eventually reaching more readers than the ProPublica exposé of Angee. Welcome to the future. It’s sort of fucked. State actors on the World War F battlefields— like Russia, Israel and China—tend to dominate our national discussion of online propaganda. They’re the virtual elephants—lumbering giants that you just can’t miss. The Israelis used glossy ads to recruit social media commandos, while the Russians, for all of their sophistication, just didn’t hide themselves well, with a bunch of Russian sockpuppets cluing investigative journalists in to their whereabouts by keeping bankers’ hours in Russian time zones. We certainly can’t claim any moral high ground against the Russians, however, as whatever they’re accused of doing, we did it to them first and exponentially more successfully using old-school tech in the 1980s, then shamelessly gloated for two decades after the USSR came apart. We’ve since meddled in their elections—shortsightedly raising Putin to power through our support of the imbecile Boris Yeltsin. Major world powers have historically targeted each other with propaganda—and it’s easy to spot. The Russians are also suspected of using their army of sockpuppets to promote the Brexit withdrawal from the European Union, but an Oxford Internet Institute study contends that while they did exploit Twitter and Facebook during the 2016 US election, there’s no strong body of evidence that they did the same with Brexit. And while France wants to tar the popular Yellow Vest movement with accusations of nefarious Russian support, there’s still not much evidence to support that claim. Researchers at the Oxford University Computational Propaganda Research Project

argue that while governments do target the internal politics of other nations, authoritarian regimes primarily focus on targeting their own populations, with bots controlling, for example, 45 percent of Twitter activity in Russia. Mark Zuckerberg’s reaction to complaints about Facebook propaganda is to call for more government control over the internet. Appeasing governments in this way would, not coincidently, keep global markets open for Facebook, while strengthening the propaganda power of governments and preventing anymore nasty outbreaks of democracy, such as the Arab Spring.

FEAR YOURSELVES While authoritarians use social media propaganda campaigns to target their own populations, the Oxford researchers argue, “almost every democracy in this sample has organized social media campaigns that target foreign publics,” while leaving the targeting of their own populations to “political-party‐ supported campaigns.” Looking back at our concerns over our own 2016 and 2018 elections, while Russian interference was real and documented, its impact paled in comparison to the more effective propaganda campaigns launched by Breitbart and Fox. Our myopic focus on Russia’s obnoxious sockpuppets led us to take our eyes off the larger faster harder ball on the field. World War F is global, but if you really want to fear someone, fear your fellow Americans. Fear yourselves. State-to-state disinformation battles are not the major threat in World War F. States, almost by definition, are inherently corrupt. They jockey for leverage and advantage and are always willing to compromise their stated values or buy each other off, because they have too much vested in maintaining an orderly status quo of trade and banking. At the end of the day, they generally don’t want to blow the world up. By contrast, the Reagan-Bush-Clinton-Bush-Obama-Trump economic policies have hollowed out much of the US, leaving economically disenfranchised communities populated by angry people poisoned by despair, and vulnerable to authoritarian and fascist leaders skilled at deploying precision propaganda to channel such anger. Unfortunately, this is what social media does best.

TECHNO-UTOPIAN FASCIST DREAMS Social media now gives the assholes who used to live in seething isolation the ability create community—online, as futurists promised. Nurtured by community, haters empower each other and make hate part of mainstream discourse. Algorithm-driven social media silos curate customized worlds where hate festers among people who all spend their lives spreading it. From Islamophobes to white supremacists to “incels” (self-described “involuntary celibate” misogynists who believe they have a right to sex with women) to ISIS—social media amplifies the ugliest voices, delivering them to your children’s bedrooms. This is World War F. But above everything else, World War F is about bullshit. More Americans now claim to get their news on Facebook than from any other venue. During the 2016 election season, fraudulent sites and fascist posts got more Facebook reads than the top 19 news sites reporting verifiable reality put together. Why not? It makes sense. This column would be much easier to write and far more interesting to read if I could just make wild shit up. Meme factories in the business to score clicks, and propagandists wanting to manipulate you, can do just that, while journalists are limited to reporting reality. A story about the Clintons having an island of sex slaves, or running a child sex trafficking ring out of the basement of a basement-less pizzeria is a much more interesting read than me arguing that Hillary Clinton doesn’t represent working people because she was on the board of Wal-Mart. Falsehoods are the currency of fascism. For corrupt authoritarian regimes, truth is the enemy: Truth is the weapon that, when wielded,

will cut them down. For authoritarians, first and foremost, truth has to be destroyed. This is at the core of World War F. World War F is a war on empirical reality. Unconstrained by any pretenses to accuracy, weaponized memes are engineered to excite and incite while poisoning democracies with disinformation. Algorithmic targeting coupled with data-mining and data analytics allows liars to micro-target individuals with propaganda psycho-engineered just for you. And they can micro-target the people most likely to believe their lies. Without a shared reality, we can no longer engage in the reasoned discussions and deliberations that sustain democracy. When reason gives way to rage, people navigate solely by emotion, and too many start to speak the language of fascism. When you promote a lie, no matter your politics, you’ve chosen your side. This is World War F. It’s a false reality fueled by Facebook, fascism and fraud. It’s entered our homes, it’s glowing in our palms, it gave us Donald Trump, Sean Hannity, Sarah Huckabee-Sanders, Jair Bolsonaro, Viktor Orbán, and Alex Jones, and it tells us we’re fucked. This is World War F. If it conquers reality, we have nowhere left to fight. If you stand up to lies and liars, welcome to the fight. This column is an expanded version of the original which appears on Truthout.org. An online version of this column is available on dailypublic.com with hyperlinked reference links. Michael I. Niman is a professor of journalism and critical media studies at SUNY Buffalo State College. His previous columns P are archived at mediastudy.com.

MARQUIL / EMPIREWIRE.COM

People are more likely to both share and react viscerally to things that anger or frighten them, as opposed to things that inspire them or give them hope. Propagandists know this. And despite decrying their own roles in spreading hate and fascism, social media executives also understand that their business model is based on clicks—and haters are the most voracious clickers. Social media executives seem remiss to mess with this metric—unless their hands are forced. Perhaps that’s why it took Facebook until March 2019 to ban white nationalism—70 years after the end of the Nuremberg trials.

LOOKING BACKWARD: PRISTACH’S, CIRCA 1937 Pristach’s operated at 1634 Bailey Avenue until 2010, and as far back as 1934. A classic East Side tavern, Pristach’s is clad in soot-besotted blond brick. A curved building corner denotes a chamfered entrance, glass block frames barroom windows, and a tin ceiling remains virtually untouched. In this photograph, dated to about 1937, the Pristachs gather with customers to enjoy a few brews. A 15-cent shrimp or oyster cocktail is advertised behind the bar, still intact. The tavern recently reopened as Macky’s Shamrock Room. - THE PUBLIC STAFF PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM.

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LOCAL NEWS developers seeking subsidies and tax breaks, from the city. One tax break used by Masiello’s clients, the 485-a property tax exemption, will cost Buffalo homeowners and renters $63.5 million through 2029, as we reported last year. Some of Masiello’s lobbying clients with business before the city include Bradley Termini, the investor behind a planned cannabis operation on Buffalo’s waterfront, real estate developers Sinatra & Company and Creative Structure Services, stun-gun and police body camera manufacturer Axon (formerly known as Taser), and waste hauler Modern Corporation.

LITTLESIS

MASIELLO’S POTENTIAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST BY ROB GALBRAITH FORMER BUFFALO MAYOR Anthony Masiello

has been hired by the City of Buffalo to advocate its interests in Albany, creating significant conflicts of interest with several of his other clients who have hired him to lobby the city and state governments on their behalf. The conflicts have so far gone unnoted in the press or by public officials responsible for the decision.  Masiello’s lobbying portfolio will include “providing advice on legislative and governmental strategy, monitoring legislative

activities, identifying revenue generating opportunities, providing input on the city’s annual state legislative agenda, and providing advice and advocacy on issues identified by the city,” according to the $60,000 one-year contract approved at the March 5, 2019 Buffalo Common Council meeting. In particular, Masiello’s work identifying revenue opportunities for the city conflicts with his role advocating for businesses and real estate

Cannabis legalization was named specifically by the Buffalo News as a policy issue for which the City of Buffalo was hiring Masiello to advocate. Masiello’s contract with the city was approved shortly after the Buffalo Urban Development Corporation, the public body that manages Buffalo’s brownfield land holdings, executed a contract with Masiello’s client Bradley Termini’s firm in February to sell 72.4 acres of waterfront land for the waterfront cannabis growing project. Other Masiello clients Sinatra & Company and Creative Structure Services (CSS) are real estate developers working together on a number of projects, including a large development on Jefferson Avenue on Buffalo’s east side that has received $20 million in subsidies and financing from public agencies, including Empire State Development and the Buffalo Urban Renewal Agency, according to the Buffalo News. Sinatra & Company was also recently designated the developer for a valuable parcel of land in Buffalo’s Canalside district by the Erie Canal Harbor Development Corporation, which agreed to sell Sinatra the property for $1. When this deal was announced in August 2018, we reported that Sinatra owed nearly $300,000 in past due city property taxes. Just a few months earlier, in April 2018, Sinatra & Company paid more than $1.2 million in city and county

property taxes after we reported that they owed them, calling the choice “a business decision.” Further, both Sinatra & Company and CSS are beneficiaries of Buffalo’s 485-a tax exemption. As mentioned above, we estimated last year that the 485-a tax break will cost Buffalo homeowners and renters $63.5 million in property taxes exempted for big developers. This number is certain to increase as these developers and others continue to take advantage of it for new projects. In late 2018, the city of Buffalo signed a contract worth more than $2 million to buy 550 police body cameras from Axon, which is represented by Masiello. Another of Masiello’s clients, Tesla, is the primary beneficiary of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s largest Buffalo Billion project: a $750 million factory built with public money on a brownfield that had been formerly owned by the city. This is not the first time we have raised questions about conflicts of interest in Masiello’s lobbying. In 2014, while serving on the board of the Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority, which runs the Peace Bridge, Masiello was also registered to lobby on “Peace Bridge reconstruction matters” on behalf of a local construction trade group. This time, Masiello is not in a position of decision-making authority for a public body that he is also lobbying on behalf of private clients. Still, as a paid advisor to the city on legislative and governmental strategy and revenue generating opportunities, Masiello is situated to access inside information and otherwise advance his other clients’ priorities. Rob Galbraith is senior research analyst at the Public Accountability Initiative. LittleSis, a PAI project, is a free database detailing the connections between powerful people and organizations.  P

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / THE PUBLIC

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ART REVIEW

HUMBLE AND HUMAN AT THE ALBRIGHT-KNOX BY JACK FORAN IT’S A BIT of an odd title for an art exhibit. Humble and Human. The exhibit at the Albright-Knox in memory of Buffalo Bills founding owner Ralph Wilson, of troves of Impressionistic period works from the Detroit Institute of Arts—Ralph Wilson was originally from the Detroit area and continued to make his home there—and the Albright-Knox.

What does the title refer to? To Wilson the man, first comes to mind. As decent a sort of mogul—from all reports and indications—as joined with the other NFL owners in decisions about what team to move to what market next, to further increase team and league already obscene revenues. Wilson had numerous chances over the years to thus relocate the Bills, and in so doing markedly augment his personal fortune. But he didn’t do it. Basically, it seems, out of appreciation and respect for the ardor and loyalty of the Bills’ largely blue-collar fan base.

might have mentioned in combination somehow with adolescent exquisite grace—of the figure. No hint of awkwardness with the Spanish dancer. All elegance and performance aplomb. And Monet. From the Albright-Knox, his depiction of mud season on the towpath at Argenteuil. While from the Detroit gallery, his Rounded Flower Bed dazzle amalgam of reds and pinks— geraniums and gladioli—and deep greenery and butterflies, foreground, and background diminutive figure of a woman in a blue dress and with parasol, stopped to admire.

But as much as to Wilson, to Impressionist art. The first art—in the history of art—about the art itself, not the subject matter of the art. Not about some politically or historically or religiously significant personage or narrative. Not commemorating or memorializing something or other. But depicting everyday scenes and scenarios, life and leisure activities of peasants and bourgeois alike, work activities, nature, plants, animals, nonmonumental architecture. Painting and sculpture not as invisible representational media, but about the representational process and product. Wherein you can discern the artist’s individual brushstrokes, discover his or her theoretical ideas as to how the human eye sees and the mind perceives colors, forms. The science behind the art. In sculpture, visualize the clay dab by clay dab and smudge effects modeling procedure.

Among so-called post-Impressionists—diverging from strict Impressionism, but toward just what next stage of Modernism would remain unclear until Cubism came along and definitively indicated the direction, namely, toward full-fledged abstraction— from Detroit, Gauguin’s small statue of a Parisian woman. But nothing to vie with his curious magnificent Breton-inspiration Yellow Christ and Tahitian-inspiration Manaò tupapaú (Spirit of the Dead Watching), both from the Albright-Knox. And Cezanne. From the Albright-Knox, several Cubism precursor works, including The Pool at Jas de Bouffan and Morning in Provence. While from the Detroit gallery, The Three Skulls and a Mont Sainte-Victoire version strikingly different from the numerous other paintings he did of that same mountain, his favorite painting subject. First off, in that all the others are in a horizontal format, so basically landscapes, the mountain central, at a remote distance. This one in a vertical format, concentrating on just the distinctive—slightly askew—snowy mountain peak, at not so great a distance, it seems. More of a sense of proximity than distance. More of a sense than in the landscape versions of numinous presence. A work more in the vein—not as to look, but effect—of paintings by Pollock, or Rothko.

Great and famous works here by the greatest Impressionist artists. Van Gogh’s head and chest Portrait of Postman Roulin with luxurious bifurcated beard, and Self-Portrait in a straw hat and looking distrustful at the viewer, or maybe just the artist painting the portrait, from the Detroit museum. Against the familiar but nonetheless wonderful La Maison de La Crau from the AlbrightKnox. Superb sculptures in bronze by Degas. From the AlbrightKnox, his nude version study for the famous dressed—in fabric tutu—little ballet dancer, and his Horse with Head Lowered, frisking. Against the Detroit museum’s Spanish Dance—or dancer—in castanet pose. The label copy for the study version ballet dancer talks about the adolescent awkwardness—but

Copious other works by these titan artists and other artists of slightly less extraordinary gifts or achievement or for whatever reason renown. Such as Pissarro. In the handful of his works on show, you can follow his career changes in direction—not necessarily always for the better—from proto-Impressionism— two stunningly lovely early paintings, Farm at Montfoucault and Kitchen at Piette’s, Montfoucault—to thralldom to Seurat’s pointillist variety post-Impressionism—Peasants in the Fields, Éragny, and The Path. Seurat, of course, is here as well, in works including Study for “La Grande Jatte” (the Sunday in the park painting) and Study for “Le Chahut,” (cabaret chorus line dance scenario).

IN GALLERIES NOW

from the collection. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm.  Big Orbit  Project Space (30d Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/about-big-or= ART OPENING = REVIEWED THIS ISSUE bit): Sat 12-6pm.   Albright-Knox Art Gallery  (1285 Elmwood BOX Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700, al- St, Buffalo, NY 14203): Inflatable Sculptures by brightknox.org): Htein Lin: A Show of Hands, City Honors students. Opening reception Thu through April 28. Christine Sun Kim and Mar 28, 4-8pm.  Thomas Mader: To Point a Naked Finger, ¡Buen Vivir! Gallery (148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffathrough April 21; Humble and Human: An lo, NY 14201, buenvivirgallery.org): In Between Exhibition in Honor of Ralph C. Wilson Jr., the Middle, #notwhite collective. Tue-Fri 1:30through May 26; We the People: New Art 4:30pm, Fri 6-8pm, Sat 1-3pm. from the Collection, through Jun 30. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) un- Buffalo Arts Studio (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2495 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833til 10pm.   4450, buffaloartsstudio.org): Obsidian Bellis: Anna Kaplan Contemporary (1250 Niagara Street, Apothecary for Sis, on view through May 3. Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, annakaplan- Annie Bielski: Joes & Anns, on view through contemporary.art): Here We Are: Katherine May 3.Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, McMahon, Gordon Shadrach, Adam Week- Fourth Fridays till 8pm. ley. Opening reception Thu, Apr 11, 6-9pm. Buffalo Big Print (78 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY Wed-Fri 11am-3pm or by appointment. 14201, buffalobigprint.com): Modular InteracArgus Gallery (1896 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY tive Paintings in Energy Symbols by Ross Dra14207, 882-8100, eleventwentyprojects.com/ go.  argus-gallery): Sat 12-3pm, or by appointment. Buffalo & Erie County Central Library (1 Lafayette Art Dialogue Gallery (5 Linwood Avenue, Buf- Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900, buffafalo, NY 14209 wnyag.com): Tue-Fri 11am- lolib.org):  Buffalo Never Fails: The Queen City 5pm, Sat 11am-3pm.  & WWI, 100th Anniversary of America’s Entry Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Art- into WWI, on second floor. Building Buffalo: ists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, Buildings from Books, Books from Buildings, 716-885-2251, wnyag.com): Western New York in the Grosvenor Rare Book Room. Catalogue Artists Group 23rd Annual Juried Members available for purchase. Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Exhibition, Modern Works installation. Juried Sun 12-5pm. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10amby Robert Hirsch. On view through Apr 19. Tue- 2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood AveBetty’s Restaurant (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, nue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldNY 14201, 362-0633, bettysbuffalo.com): 14th penney.org): Opening Fri, Apr 11, recpetion Annual Staff Family and Friends Exhibition. 6-8pm: Victor Shanchuk: Chemical Light and Through May 19. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am- Charles E. Burchfield: Home on My Bicycle, 10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. both on view through Jul 28. Ongoing: ConBenjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, temporary Portraiture, through June 2; DaNY 14222, thebenjamangallery.com): Works vid Pratt: Fantastic Landscapes, through Jun

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THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of Postman Roulin, 1888.

Works by different artists of similar style or sensibility are sometimes displayed side-by-side for comparison/contrast purposes. Such as Childe Hassam’s Church at Old Lyme, Connecticut, and Willard Leroy Metcalf ’s The White Veil (rural or small town New England and snowing softly). Or Mary Cassatt’s In the Garden and Berthe Morisot’s Woman Sewing (domestic activities permitted and/or assigned to women in the pre-modern age). Or in Renoir’s case, two comparable works by the same artist, his Little Blue Nude and Woman in an Armchair. The Impressionist art from two galleries exhibit continues through May 26.

HUMBLE AND HUMAN THROUGH MAY 26 ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY 1285 ELMWOOD AVENUE, BUFFALO NY ALBRIGHTKNOX.ORG

30; Portraits From the Collection, through Jun 30; Small Paintings From the Collection, through Jun 30; Display: Sculpture by Anne Currier, through April 28; Charles Cary Rumsey: In Motion, through Oct 27; Working on a Seam: Monica Angle, through Jun 30. M & T Second Friday event (second Friday of every month). Mon-Sat 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Caffeology Buffalo (23 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY, 14201, caffeology.coffee): Emily Finlan: Ghost Girl.  Carnegie Art Center (240 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120): Wed & Thu 6-8pm, Fri & Sat 12-4pm. Recent Paintings: Mary Wyrick and Eric Evinczik. Wed & Thu 6-8pm, Fri & Sat 12-4pm. Canvas Salon & Gallery (9520 Main Street STE 400, Clarence, NY 14031, 716-320-5867): Michael Mandolfo: A Distant Voice, photographs. Mon-Fri 10am-8pm, Sat 8am-5pm. Castellani Art Museum  (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org):  The Higner Maritime Collection: 25 Years of Shipbuilding, through Mar 17; Of Their Time: Hudson River School to Postwar Modernism, through Dec 31; Fashioning Identities: Ethnic Wedding Dress in Western New York, through June 9. Tue-Sat 11am5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 8562717, cepagallery.org): ANGO’TG: installation by Julia Rose Sutherland; Horizon: Beyond the Boundary of Sight, Nathan Ely. Eyes on Ukraine: Five Contemporary Ukrainian Photographers, on view through May 11. MonFri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Corridors Gallery at Hotel Henry:  A Resource:Art Project (second floor of Hotel Henry, 444 Forest Avenue, Buffalo NY 14213, 716-8821970, resourceartny.com): Open to the public

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during business hours.  Dana Tillou Fine Arts (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285, danatilloufinearts. com): Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am4pm. Duende at Silo City (85 Silo City Row, Buffalo, NY 14203, 235-8380, duendesilo.city): Sarah Liddell: Through the Thicket. Thu & Fri 3pm-12am, Sat  12 pm-12am, Sun 12-7pm. Eleven Twenty Projects (1120 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 882-8100, eleventwentyprojects. com): Blake Baxter: Points in Time, through May 3. Artist’s talk Thu May 2, 7pm. TueFri, 10am-4pm, or by appointment. El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692, elmuseobuffalo.org): Elevate: A side-by-side exhibition of work by Buffalo Public Schools teachers and students. Wed-Fri 126pm, Sat 1-5pm. Expo 68 (4545 Transit Road, Williamsville, NY 14221, expo68.com, 458-0081): Drawing Closer: a colorful collaborative by Alex & Victoria Tkaczevski. Through May 2. Flight Gallery (Flying Bison Brewery, 840 Sen-

eca Street, Buffalo NY 14210): Sara Heidinger: Without Time, photographs, on view through May 30. Opening reception Sat April 13m 6-9pm. GCR Audio Recording Studios (564 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14201): Adam Mojeski and Bob Kotas: Board. Fri, Apr 5, 6-10pm. GO  ART! (201 East Main Street Batavia, NY 14020): Juried Art Exhibit: Art of the Rural, Mar 14-May 4; Members’ Challenge Art Exhibit: Wonderland Mar 14-Jun 8. Thu & Fri 11am7pm, Sat 11am-4pm. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): Alexandria Smith: Of Water and Spirit, through Apr 26. Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm.


GALLERIES ART The Harold L. Olmsted Gallery, Springville Center for the Arts (37 N. Buffalo Street, Springville, NY 14141, 716-592-9038). Wed & Fri, noon5pm, Thu noon-8pm, Sat 10am-3pm.  Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com):Adapt: new work by Dorothy Fitzgerald, on view through Apr 13. Wed 12-6pm, Thu 127pm, Fri, 6-9pm Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays. The Intersection Cafe (100 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14201): New works by Kayla Ortiz. Open weekdays 7am-6pm, weekends 8am6pm. Jewish Community Center of Buffalo, Holland Family Building (787 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14209, 886-3172, jccbuffalo.org): Mon-Thu 5:30am-10pm, Fri 5:30am-6pm, Sat-Sun 8am6pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall)  (220 North St., Buffalo, NY 14201): The Young Abraham Lincoln, the drawings of Lloyd Ostendorf. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.   Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall)  (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201): Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.  Kenan Center (433 Locust St., Lockport, NY 14094, 433-2617, kenancenter.org):Buffalo Arts Studio Invitational, featuring eight resident artists from BAS. Main Street Gallery (515 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203): Online gallery: BSAonline.org. 

Nichols School Gallery at the Glenn & Audrey Flickinger Performing Arts Center (1250 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14216, 332-6300, nicholsschool.org/artshows): Mon-Fri 8am4pm, Closed Sat & Sun. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Lenox Hotel, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-8825777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com): New work by John Opera, through May 3. TueFri 10am–5pm.

Maison Le Caer Hertel (1416 Hertel Ave, Buffalo, NY

14216, 617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203): Numero / iXpress: works by the students of Aspire WNY. Through Jun 2. Maison Le Caer Downtown (Market Arcade, 617

Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203): Numero / iXpress: works by the students of Aspire WNY. Through Jun 2. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com):  Rixford U. Jennings (1906-1996), through Apr 20. Tue-Sat 9:30-5:30pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 282-7530, thenacc. org): Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 12-4pm.

Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop (37 South Grove Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-6523270, norbergsartandframe.com): Regional artists from the gallery collection. TueSat 10am–5pm. Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, parablesgalleryandgifts. com):  Abstraction, a group exhibit, through Apr 27. Wed-Sat,12-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069 pausaarthouse. com):  Archipelago: paintings by J. Tim Ray-

mond, on view through Apr 27. Thu, Fri & Sat 6-11pm. Live music Thu-Sat. Pine Apple Company (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648, pacobuffalo.com):  Cirque: Ceramic work by Reann Nye. Wed & Thu 11am-6pm, Fri & Sat 11am11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 523-0068, project308gallery.com): Molly Sheehan: Beyond the Music, photos of musicians. Through Apr 13. Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Queen City Gallery  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod. com): Art by: Neil Mahar, Candace Keegan, Chris McGee, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Liebel, Barbara Lynch Johnt, John Farallo, Thomas Busch, Sherry Anne Preziuso, Michael Shiver, Madalyn Fliesler, Kenn Morgan, Michael Mulley et alia on view through May 2. Tue-Fri 11am4pm and by appointment.  Revolution Gallery (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, revolutionartgallery.com): On the Edge of Oblivion: Edgar Marquez, Michael Mararian, Gabi de la Merced, through May 4. Thu 12-6pm, Fri and Sat 12-8pm.  River Gallery and Gifts (83 Webster Street, North Tonawanda, 14051, riverartgalleryandgifts. com): Wed-Fri 11am-4pm Sat 11am- 5pm.  Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Black Quantum Futurism (Camae Ayewa a.k.a. Moor Mother, and Rasheedah Phillips a.k.a. The Afrofuturist Affair) through Apr 20. Tue-Sat, 12pm-5pm. TueSat, 12pm-5pm.  Stangler Fine Art (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129, stanglerart.com): Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am3pm. Closed Sundays. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware

Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, starlightstudio. org) Forgotten Beauty: photograpjy by Stephanie Kaempf. Opening reception Thu, Apr 18, 6-9pm.  Automatic, a side-by-each exhibition featuring the artwork of Jennifer Ryan, Shirley French, Sonya Lewis. On view through April 12. Mon-Fri 9-4pm.

Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, buffalosugarcity.org): Open by event and Fri 5:30-7:30. Pixels of Ambivalence, work by UB MFA thesis candidate Brian Nacov. Through Apr 20. Open by event and Fri 5:307:30. The Terrace in Delaware Park (199 Lincoln Parkway, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-886-0089, terAbstraction/Landscape, racebuffalo.com): Michael Pijanowski through Apr 19. WedFri 4-11pm, Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 11am-5pm.  UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754, ubartgalleries. org):Photographic Recall: Italian Rationalist Architecture in Contemporary German Art, through May 22; Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic;  Electric Avenue (In Blue). WedSat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (103 Center for the Arts, First Floor, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, ubartgalleries.org): Jillian Mayer: TIMESHARE, on view through May 11. Screen Projects: Ezra Wube. TueFri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Undergrounds Coffee House and Roastery (590 South Park Avenue, Buffalo NY 14210, undergroundscoffeebuffalo.com): Mon-Fri 6am5pm, Sat & Sun 7am-5pm. Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833, villa.edu/campus-life/gallery): Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 10am-5pm.  Weeks Gallery (Jamestown Community College, 525 Falconer Street, Jamestown, NY 14702, 338-1301, weeksgallery.sunyjcc. edu): Mon-Fri 11am-4pm, Sat 11am-1pm. Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washing-

ton Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430, wnybookarts.org): Trees & Bees, paintings by Mark Lavatelli, through May 18. Opening reception Fri Apr 19, 5-9pm. Encaustic workshop with the artist on Sat May 4, 2-4pm. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.  To add your gallery’s information to the list, please P contact us at info@dailypublic.com.

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A student and SUNY Buffalo State. Her current exhibit is called Concerning Fate, at 1045 Elmwood Gallery of the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue) through April 16. There’s an opening reception Friday, April 12, 6-9pm. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / THE PUBLIC

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EVENTS CALENDAR

PLEASE EXAMINE THURSDAY APRIL 11 PUBLIC APPROVED THIS PROOFNick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets CAREFULLY

6:30pm Shea’s Performing Arts Center, 646 Main St. $46-$122

LIVEMUSICEVERYNIGHTFOROVER30YEARS!

spring string night series w/ jackie rae daniels & thee new buffalo stringers

WEDNESDAY

APR 10

8PM DOORS/8:30PM SHOW $5

THURSDAY

baby gramps, green schwinn

APR 11

8PM DOORS/9PM SHOW $10

FRIDAY

reggae happy hour: the neville francis band

APR 12

6PM FREE

herbie hancock night w/the truth travelers

(feat. members of intrepid travelers & the truth)

& jon lehning band 10PM $5

1039 Presents:

SATURDAY

Dynohunter K-Rog of Space Junk

APR 13

w/special guest

9PM DOORS/10PM SHOW $10 ADV/$12 DAY OF

jazz happy hour

MONDAY

APR 15

w/alex mcarthur trio 5:30PM FREE

WEDNESDAY

APR 17

spring string night series w/ heatwave + brendan gosson & sarah hulse 8PM DOORS/8:30PM SHOW $5

THURSDAY

nickel city jazz

APR 18

8PM DOORS/SHOW $5

FRIDAY

happy hour: jony james band

APR 19

6PM FREE

sonic garden

w/todd eberwine

9PM DOORS/10PM SHOW $10 SATURDAY

APR 20

THE CHURCH FRIDAY APRIL 12

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MONDAY

APR 22

WEDNESDAY

APR 24

loderpalooza ‘90s festival

[ROCK] Released in June of 1968, Pink Floyd’s second album, A Saucerful of Secrets, is a MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER snapshot of transition, a storied period of time during Thank you for advertising with THE which Syd Barret was losing his mind and Dave Gilmour came on board to save the PUBLIC. Please review your ad and day. According to Floyd drummer Nick Mason, check for any errors. The original layout it’s his favorite of the band’s releases and instructions have been followed as closely thus he’s named his new five-piece touring as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design outfit after the album. Mason’s new band services with two proofs at no charge.ofTHE consists familiar faces, including Floyd and PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if man, Guy Pratt. Also on board Gilmour bass not notified within 24 hours are of receipt. The Ian Dury/Blockheads guitarist Lee Harris, production department mustSpandau have a signed Ballet’s Gary Kemp and producer/ proof in order to print. Please sign and Dom fax Beken. The material chosen composer this back or approve by responding to this for these shows spans Floyd’s pre-Dark Side email. of the Moon era, from Barrett’s early, fairytalelike psychedelia up to the expansive Meddle � CHECK COPY CONTENT (1971), which established Gilmour’s musical � CHECK IMPORTANT DATES personality and set the stage for what was to come next. Showtime is listed as 7:30pm, which means � CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE #, &doors will likely open an hour earlier for 7PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $29 Mason and Co. at Shea’s Performing Arts WEBSITE Center on Thursday, April 11. $46 - $122. -CJT [ROCK] It’s hard to believe that the Church’s most successful single, “Under the Milky Way” (famously � PROOF OK (NO CHANGES) covered by Sia not that long ago) turned 30 last year, along with the album it came from, Starfish. Starfish went gold in the US, signaling a triumphant turnaround after the Australian quartet had�been dropped by Warner, PROOF OK (WITH CHANGES) Lynda Barry at Canisius College 7pm Montante Cultural Center, 2001 Main leaving them without a label in this country (until Arista took a gamble, putting a $500,000 investment into Street Free the making of Starfish). Though they lost co-founder Marty Wilson-Piper in 2013, they went on to release [LECTURE] The New York Times described Advertisers Signature a new record with Powederfinger’s Ian Haug, Man Woman Life Death Infinity, in 2017, and are celebrating Lynda Barry as “among the greatest conjoiners of words and images, known for plumbing all ____________________________ the anniversary of Starfish with a fairly extensive tour that brings them to Town Ballroom on Friday, kinds of touchy subjects in cartoons, comic April 12. Although thought of as a psychedelic revival or “paisley underground” band, the Church is also Date _______________________ GEOFF / Y19W6 strips, and novels, both graphic and illustrated.” known for its blend of melodic jangle-pop with bits of new wave peppered in, reminiscent of early R.E.M. She is giving a reading and talk Thursday, April 11 at the Montante Cultural Center at Issue: _____________________ Frontman Steve Kilbey’s delicate-gravel vocal delivery tends to add an air of addictive mystery that colors Canisius College at 7pm. Free and open to all of their output. Curiously, “Under the Milky Way” was tampered with to create a much denser mix than IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICHthe AREpublic. ON In her comic strips and books, in a what the Church had originally intended: Arista let an in-house engineer monkey with the backing track style and manner somewhere between Roz THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT Chast BE and Robert Crumb, she tells stories on a then-brand-new Synclavier sequencer, filling up the space with additional sound until he was satisfied HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE AD puts it, “a lot of trouble in them.” having,THE as she (according to the story, backward bagpipes are part of the mix). Although a bit more slick than what the has authored numerous books, been a THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD ISShe A PICK-UP. Church normally got up to, Arista mogul Clive Davis insisted it was a hit. And he was right. Starfish remains commentator on NPR, written regular features THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USEDfor FORmagazines such as Esquire and Mother a crowning achievement—a snapshot of the Church balancing their underground tone with something more PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC. Jones, and been a frequent guest on the Late polished and accessible, but not to the point of being awash in 1980s production trademarks (and unadorned Show with David Letterman. She adapted her with strings, unlike their previous release, 1985’s lush Heydey). For the tour, the band is playing the album first novel, The Good Times Are Killing Me, into a long-running off-Broadway play, and her book in its entirety followed a second set of career-spanning cuts. There’s no opener listed on the bill, doors are at One! Hundred! Demons! was chosen as the 7pm., $29. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY freshman all-read title at Stanford University. Her novel Cruddy was called “a work of terrible beauty” by the New York Times reviewer, and has been widely translated. Barry’s current project is a book about the creative process, called Making Comics. Following the reading and talk, a question-and-answer period and reception and book signings. –JF

SATURDAY APRIL 13

jazz happy hour w/kristen smigielski

Gays at Shea’s with BGMC and Laura Noack

5:30PM FREE

spring string night series w/ twenty thousand strongmen + the haight street gamblers

6:30pm Shea’s Performing Arts Center, 646 Main St. $35 (single) $60 (pairs)

8PM DOORS/8:30PM SHOW $5

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NEYLA PEKAREK FRIDAY APRIL 12 7PM / THE 9TH WARD, 341 DELAWARE AVE / $18/$20 [FOLK] From 2010-2018, Neyla Pekarek played in the Lumineers as cellist and enjoyed an increasing role as a featured vocalist as time went on. Eventually she began contributing her own songs to their catalog. Pekarek, who began playing cello at the age of nine, has expressed frustration about being the sole female member of an otherwise male ensemble, citing the same discriminatory elements of the music industry that have existed for far too long. Last year, she announced her departure from the Lumineers and her solo debut, Rattlesnake, dropped on S-Curve Records in January. Intended as a soundtrack of sorts to a “folk opera,” the album is essentially a historical concept album about Katherine McHale Slaughterback, (“Rattlesnake Kate”). A World War II nurse from Colorado, Rattlesnake Kate is famed for a particular incident wherein she frantically killed some 140 migrating rattlesnakes that crossed her path while she was traveling horseback with her child. Later, she raised snakes and sold their venom to scientists for research. The songs are based on extractions from 40 years of love letters between her and Colonel Charles D. Randolph (a.k.a. “Buckskin Bill”), although the two apparently never met. Pekarek has been commissioned by the Denver Center for the Performing Arts to deliver a full musical from her new songs. Don’t miss your chance to catch her as she develops this project on her first headlining solo tour, Friday, April 12 at Babeville’s 9th Ward. Doors are at 7:00 p.m. for a seated show, $18/$20. Local songstress Sara Elizabeth will open. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

12 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

[CHORAL] This is the annual semi-fancy fundraiser for the Buffalo Gay Men’s Chorus, and it gets held throughout the gorgeous lobby at Shea’s Performing Arts Center on the evening of Saturday, April 13. Not a formal concert, per se, the evening will feature shorter performances from the Chorus (who will be teasing their Singing With Pride program, coming later in the Spring) and a silent auction on some great locally made visual art. A cash bar will be open throughout to complement some delicious finger foods. Additionally, BGMC just announced guest vocalist Laura Noack will perform at the event. Noack is a skilled soprano with a master’s degree in Voice Performance from ASU and a bachelors in Music Education from SUNY Fredonia. She has appeared in festival lineups at the Vancouver International Song Institute as well as the Halifax Summer Opera Workshop and has performed abroad in professional chamber choirs. In 2014, she attended the revered Franz-Schubert-Institut in Baden bei Wien, Austria, which afforded her the opportunity to perform in masterclasses for opera and chamber royalty like Christina Ludwig, Elly Ameling, Helmut Deutsch and Rudolf Jansen, among others. Locally, she’s a staff singer at Westminster Presbyterian Church and a teacher of vocal music, K-8, at the Iroquois Central School District. This isn’t a black tie event, but the Chorus loves it when people get dressed up to hang out with them at

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED PUBLIC APPROVED PRESENTS

PEACH PICKS SAGE’S PICK: Running Upon the Wires by Kate Tempest Bloomsbury Publishing | 2018 | poetry Westminster-born poet Kate Tempest reveals an unseen piece of herself in her most recent poetry collection, Running Upon the Wires. Named a Next Generation Poet by the Poetry Book Society and the youngest ever recipient of the Ted Hughes Award, Tempest has made it very clear that she knows her way around the language of poetry. Previous work, like Hold Your Own (2014), exhibits her ability to be vulnerable with her readers, but Running Upon the Wires is an entirely new category of honest. Invoking her style as a recording artist and spoken word performer, many of the pieces within the collection follow a lyrical pattern, creating a melodic rise and fall within each line. Tempest’s work draws you in from the first line—“Even the rain was quiet”— and creates a feeling of trust between writer and reader in which anything can be shared. A poem that sticks out to me is “Aftershowparty,” which touches on Tempest’s music career and the complications that arise when sex, emotions, drinking, and performing are mixed. She ends the poem with a vulnerable plea: “Please find me here beside the stage, take me by the floating hands, lead me to a private place and fuck my heavy brains out.” Unafraid to draw attention to herself, Running Upon the Wires packs a brutally unguarded look into Tempest’s purest human emotions, making it, in my opinion, her most powerful collection to date.

SINGLE MOTHERS SUNDAY APRIL 14 7PM / REC ROOM, 79 W. CHIPPEWA ST. / $12 [PUNK] It took over five years for the ballsy Ontario punk outfit Single Mothers to finally release a debut full-length—2014’s Negative Qualities—due to recurring lineup issues and frontman Andrew Thomson having taken some time off from the band to mine for gold (no joke!). The time away did nothing to mellow Thomson’s laundry list of resentments and irritations, and that’s a good thing since the ferocious tunes these guys churn out require some demons to keep the fire burning. Two full-lengths, an EP, and a few singles later, Single Mothers have only gotten better, finding innovative ways to keep their sound compelling while Thomson comes up with new words to articulate his rage. All the while, there’s no question that this is a hardcore band, and the lack of indulgence in modern production trends— forever sanding the edges off of punk’s necessary sneer—is all the proof anyone needs. Single Mothers embody the spirit of boredom, disgust, frustration, and abandon that motivated the very beginnings of punk while carefully avoiding over-noisy devolution. They return to Buffalo in support of last fall’s Through a Wall at the Rec Room on Sunday, April 14, with Rebuilder, The Eaves and Worse Things

as openers. All ages, doors are at 7pm, $12. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

Buffalo’s Premier Live Music Club ◆ WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10 ◆

loud instrumental from oakland, md

8PM◆ $7

◆ FRIDAY, APRIL 12 ◆

mid-life crisis happy hour w/dj ann marie 5PM ◆ FREE

yace booking presents

johnny & the man kids

ep release show passed out, halo nellie, award show 8PM ◆ $8 INCLUDES A COPY OF THE EP!

◆ SATURDAY, APRIL 13 ◆

ftmp events presents

lexxi raine cd release show lost like lions, beaches of europa, mindchaser, chief j., avidd the band

PUBLIC APPROVED

6PM ◆ $8 ADV/$10 DAY OF SHOW

◆ SUNDAY, APRIL 14 ◆ west virginia stoner/sludge/doom

horseburner

MATTHEW’S PICK:

yanari, tines, malarchuk

Cherry

7PM ◆ $7

by Nico Walker Alfred A. Knopf | 2018 | novel Nico Walker’s debut novel Cherry is an intensely romantic first-person account broadcast from the new American gutter. Walker’s unnamed narrator is a sincere burnout of a human, instantly failing at anything he puts his hands to, whether it’s school, work, or romance. From the outset, we know this story will devolve into crime and addiction, but there is a gruff sweetness in Walker’s prose that effortlessly cuts through the narrator’s tough guy routine, and makes his entire descent feel heartbreakingly relatable: “There are countless women in the world. At times it’s more than I can bare to think about: that there should be so many and they all start out the way they do, with all their brightness and their own invisible worlds and secret languages and what else they have, and that we ruin everything. And I have been mangled by vicious killers in my time, but I haven’t ever doubted it was only that someone had killed them first. Someone like me.” The book can be read as loosely autobiographical; like his narrator, Walker is an Iraq war veteran, and wrote the novel while serving an 11-year prison sentence for armed robbery. There is no real redemption to be found in the pages of Cherry, not in the usual sense. However, there is a bright and honest new voice making a plea for humanity beyond horror, and that’s truly something to be heard.

FOR RACHELLE'S PICK AND MORE, VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM. PEACHMGZN.COM

cavern

settlement, westward journey, black hand

◆ MONDAY, APRIL 15 ◆

ftmp events presents

chris huglin, darth nater,

milo duhn, astrabula, zachary crimi 6PM ◆ $8 ADV/$10 DAY OF SHOW

◆ TUESDAY, APRIL 16 ◆

jeremy enick, tomo nakayama

LAURA JANE GRACE & THE DEVOURING MOTHERS MONDAY APRIL 15

7:30PM DOORS ◆ $16 ADV/$18 DAY OF

◆ WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 ◆

west coast americana

david rosales

& his band of scoundrels

sara elizabeth, philip stephen

6:30PM / REC ROOM, 79 W. CHIPPEWA ST. / $22.50

7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW◆ $5 ADV/$10 @DOOR

◆ FRIDAY, APRIL 19 ◆

[ROCK] Laura Jane Grace affectionately refers to the debut release from her Devouring Mothers

happy hour: ryan kaminski

trio, Bought to Rot (Bloodshot records), as her “Scorpio” record—redolent in sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll. The 14-track set, which has garnered praise from outlets far and wide—The New York Times,

Stereogum, and NPR among them—is being celebrated for the balance it achieves between familiarity and broadened musical horizons. Coming from a solid punk footing throughout the Against Me! years,

5PM ◆ FREE

tour kick-off

8PM ◆ $5

◆ SATURDAY, APRIL 20 ◆

Bought to Rot begins this new chapter with a trove of musical possibilities, skirting around the edges

nine layers deep

of punk and paying tribute, here and there, to hero Tom Petty (Full Moon Fever, Petty’s solo debut, was Grace’s first owned album). Grace says she let emotion dictate the feel of the tracks rather than trying to stick with genres or templates, allowing her to formulate something akin to a mixtape. The results

release show

Stone Priest, Greefer, Chelseigh 8PM DOORS/9PM SHOW ◆ $8

are fresh, allowing LJG to flesh out material that doesn’t fit the Against Me! schema while remaining recognizably manic all the while. In Paste, Lizzie Manno summed it up well: “Grace doesn’t graduate from punk on Bought to Rot—she expands and elevates it with explicit revelations, fervent melodies, head-banging chord progressions and unruffled tenacity.” Laura Jane Grace and the Devouring Mothers come to the Rec Room on Monday, April 15, with New Jersey’s Mercy Union (featuring members of Gaslight Anthem and The Scandals) and Philly post-punk trio, Control Top. It’s a 16+ show, doors are at 6:30, $22.50 -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

science man

facility men, nervous tick, quitman

4.21 4.23 4.24 4.25

◆ UPCOMING SHOWS ◆ Peelander-Z, The Molice, TONY ROCKY HORROR Weedeater, The Skull, High Tone Son Of A Bitch Courage My Love The Slackers

47 East Mohawk St. 716.312.9279

BUFFALOSMOHAWKPLACE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/MOHAWKPLACE

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR

PEELANDER 2 SUNDAY APRIL 21

PUBLIC APPROVED

7PM / MOHAWK PLACE, 47 E MOHAWK ST. / $10/$12 [PUNK] A little bit comedy, a little bit sci-fi, and a lot of Japanese punk mixed in with some wrestling

(they’ve been featured in Kaiju Big Battel), Austin’s Peelander Z has been touring around boggling minds for 20 years. Though solid with a core trio lineup for the first 10 years, there’s been rotation among the Peelander Players since 2008, the resulting tumult having been documented in the film, Mad Tiger. Maintaining their color-specific identities (“Peelander Red,” “Peelander Blue,” etc.—they refer to it as skin) has shrouded the actual performers in mystery, but the Peelander saga has soldiered on, recruiting new members (Green, Purple) to keep the band alive and touring. Shows often involve audience participation and, at times, even require attendees to play instruments while the Peelander folks act something out. Definitely not for the shy…but for extroverts with a taste for absurd humor, this is nirvana. Peelander Z will bring the epic shenanigans to Mohawk Place on Sunday, April 21 (because what else could you possibly be doing on a school night?) with the Molice and Tony Rocky Horror. Doors are at 7pm, $10/$12.-CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

BUCKETHEAD WEDNESDAY APRIL 24

PUBLIC APPROVED

7PM / ASBURY HALL, 341 DELAWARE AVE. / $25-$30 [ROCK] Buckethead lands somewhere between myth and reality, fiction and truth. The virtuosic

guitarist, known for wearing a bucket on his head to hide his identity—at one point he switched to a plain white bucket from a KFC bucket, which begs the question of whether or not that was some kind of ingenious marketing cross-over or some kind of commentary on the eating habits of Americans—is a master at what he does. His music, of which there is tons, defies genre and convention, often moving from funk to progressive metal or bluegrass in a single turn of chord. He’s a prolific by any definition of the term, releasing around 50 albums since 2011 alone. In all, the 48-year-old guitarist, real name Brian Carroll, has released 274 albums. Many of the albums are part of his solo series of Pike albums, which most fans compartmentalize separately than his proper “studio” albums, the most recent of which is Bucketheadland 5-13 10 31, released in 2018. He’s not just a solo artist, as he’s done many collaborations as well, with bands and individuals from Guns n Roses to Viggo Mortensen. This one, which is scheduled for Wednesday, April 24 at Babeville’s Asbury Hall, is coming up quickly, and Buckethead has a P history of selling out his Buffalo shows, so don’t sleep on grabbing tickets. -CORY PERLA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 Shea’s. Cocktails start at 6:30 p.m. with singing to follow an hour later. Tickets are $35 for singles and $60 for pairs and can be ordered by clicking though to the events page at the BGMC website, www.buffalogaymenschorus. com/events. -TPS

BPO Premiers Passion of Yeshua

with opener Matt Heckler. Doors are at 7pm, $10/$12. -CJT

THURSDAY APRIL 18 Brandon Santini 6pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $10/$15

[CLASSICAL] This weekend's Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra program underscores its growing stature in the world of prchestral music: The Passion of Yeshua is a full-scale oratorio that tells the story of the last days of Jesus's life, using Jewish and Christian texts. The piece was commissioned especially for the BPO, and the composer is Grammy award winner Richard Danielpour. The performance will be recorded for the BPO's Naxos recording label, the featured sporano will be Hila Plitmann, and the full Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus will join the orchestra under the baton of JoAnn Falletta. There are performance on Saturday, April 13 at 8pm and Sunday, April 14 at 2:30pm at Kleinhans Music Hall. -TPS

[BLUES] Granted, there aren't as many releases vying for spots on Billboards Blues Album Chart as there are on the mainstream ones, but that doesn't lessen bluesman Brandon Santini's good fortune, having his brand new album The Longshot debut at #7 early this month. It's a collection of songs that finds Santini embracing more of a blues-rock hybrid than ever before and paying homage to heroes like The Allman Brothers. The Rolling Stones and Creedence Clearwater Revival, while still making good use of his trademark harmonica. Fresh off a stint playing on Joe Bonamassa's Keeping the Blues Alive at Sea cruise during the late winter months, Santini joins the April Howlin' at the Tralf lineup at Tralf Music Hall on Thursday, April 18 with Growlers Blues Band featuring Noah Moses. Doors are at 6pm, $10/$15. -CJT

Big Mood: Redux Edition

Boo Ray

8pm Kleinhans, 3 Symphony Cir. $29-$85

9pm Duende, 85 Silo City Row $5-10

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Big Mood, the electronic music dance party held regularly at Duende, is back again this month, this Saturday, April 13. This time they’ll be featuring the residents of underground dance music collective, Redux. Detroit’s IYB comes in for this one along with Buffalo-based DJs A.MO, and 2ZB. If you’ve been to this before, you know how it goes down: these events start relatively early, at 9pm, and goes until 2am. -CP

TUESDAY APRIL 16 Lost Dog Street Band 7pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10/$12

[ROOTS] Essentially a husband-and-wife duo born from a former busking quartet, Spit Shine, Lost Dog Street Band makes music steeped in the bygone-era sounds of heartbreaking, noir-country. Think guitar and fiddle with natural, unprocessed-sounding vocals and an occasional kick drum to keep things moving. Now based out of Kentucky, these two are about as organic as it gets. Hear for yourself at Buffalo Iron Works on Tuesday, April 16

7pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $7/$10

[COUNTRY] Alt-country troubadour Boo Ray is old school. For his new Tennessee Alabama Fireworks, he hones in on the hollow ‘selfie age’ culture that’s plaguing us and stilting our means of communicating with one another. Tracked live-to-tape over five days at Nashville’s Welcome to 1979 Studio, (Rodney Crowell, Steve Earle, Jason Isbell are all recent visitors), Tennessee Alabama Fireworks is both grim and hopeful, as the best country records often are. In his spare time, the artist does custom leather work, making hand tooled guitar straps and belts for customers like Johnny Knoxville, Juliette Lewis, and Billy Gibbons. Catch his earthy tone at Buffalo Iron Works on Thursday, April 18 with special guests. Doors are at 7pm. $7/$10. -CJT

14 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

FRIDAY APRIL 19 Curtis Lovell 8pm Pausa Art House, 19 Wadsworth St. $10 cash only at the door

[MUSIC] Last fall, singer Curtis Lovell released an album recorded during a live performance at Buffalo's GCR recording studio, which is worth a listen: Lovell, who performs solo with an amp, a looper, and a microphone, is liveperformance phenomenon. Which is to say, best just go see her live on Friday, April 19 at Pausa, which is the perfect venue for Lovell's intimate, intricate songs. -TPS

SATURDAY APRIL 20 Continental Reunion 7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $15-$20

[ROCK] It’s been about three years since the last one, but the Continental Reunion is back. For those that don’t know, the Continental was one of Buffalo’s original punk, post punk, and new wave rock clubs. The club closed its doors for good in 2005, the memories were not left behind and the close community of punk still congregates regularly to celebrate this legendary Buffalo venue. The Continental Reunion show will be held at the Town Ballroom on Saturday, April 20 and will feature a whole bunch of great Buffalobased bands including Pauline & the Perils, the Enemies, Irving Klaws, Johnny Revolting, Virus X, 53 Days, Iron Fist, Monkey Wrench, Painkillers, Evil Rufus K, and Orations. -TPS

it all happened in some murky cavern deep below the earth's surface on April 20 with like-minded openers Stone Priest, Chelseigh and the premiere performance of newcomers Geefer. Music gets underway at 9pm, $8. This is an 18+ event and you MUST have ID. -CJT

Loderpalooza '90s Festival 10pm Nietzsche’s, 248 Allen St. $8-$10

[ROCK] This is a festival in the way a show featuring only one band can be a festival: This one band, Kurt and the Loders, will play the music of 18 bands. How did they choose which bands to cover? Well they went with Lollapalooza headliners, of course. So, starting with the year 1991, the band will play music by some of the most iconic bands that have graced the Lollapalooza stage. 1991 brought us music by Jane’s Addiction and the Violent Femmes. Then 1992 came along with the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Soundgarden, Pearl Jam, and Nirvana—a pretty good year if you ask me. This, of course, was followed by 1993, which featured the music of Alice in Chains, Tool, and Rage Against the Machine. Sonic Youth, Hole, and Pavement rounded out 1995. 1996 came with a little bit of punk from Rancid and some straight up rock from Screaming Trees and finally, 1997 featured Failure, Beck, and Eels. If you’re a fan of 1990s rock, this one is obviously for you. Check out the Loderpalooza 90’s Festival at Nietzsche’s on Saturday, April 20. -CP

MONDAY APRIL 22 Ana Popovic 6pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $19-$23

Nine Layers Deep 8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $8

[METAL] BOOM, cuz, y'know, some stuff just lands with a thud. Nothing lightweight happening here, Folks. The faint of heart can move along, but fans of the heavy, sludgy stoner stuff should stick around for the debut release from local trio Nine Layers Deep, who recently had the honor of opening Clutch's Town Ballroom gig. Newly signed to Helmet Lady Records, their Sludge Life: 1 (a play on Tupac's Thug Life, yes indeed) drops just in time for a Saturday, 4/20 gig at Mohawk Place—no coincidence, we're pretty sure. For the uninitiated, 9LD hangs it low and long, but not to the point of becoming too tangled up. Instead, the band blends their signature dark tones with strains of familiar influences like the Melvins, Soungarden, Tool and, of course, early Sabbath. You'll swear

[BLUES] Although Ana Popovic hails from Belgrade, Serbia, her musical affinity is for American blues, something handed down by her father…and she's cultivated an audience here by playing Buffalo at least once a year. Before going solo, she fronted the band Hush, melding a blues sensibility with funk grooves that proved to be a hot European touring commodity until disbanding in 1998. Her solo career eventually landed her in Memphis, where she has since made her home and where her second album, Comfort to the Soul, was recorded. 2016's ambitious triple album, Trilogy, was divided among three genres— funk, blues-rock, and jazz—and featured Joe Bonamassa and Robert Randolph among other big name guests. A new, Nashville-recorded set was released last fall entitled Like It On Top, produced by Keb Mo, and it's a concept album about female empowerment. Popovic delivers the goods at the Tralf Music Hall on Monday, P April 22. -CJT


SPOTLIGHT RECORD STORE DAY

RECORD STORE DAY 2019 BY CORY PERLA IT’S THAT TIME of year again: Record Store

Day is upon us! Collectors have likely already made their want lists for the limited edition releases and will be lining up while it’s still dark out on the morning of Saturday, April 13, but don’t let that stop you from getting in on the fun. Yes, there are lots of collectible goodies coming out on Saturday (visit recordstoreday. com to see the list), but even if you’re just a passive collector or someone who likes the idea of having record stores around, RSD is for you, too. The purchasing frenzy starts a bit early for the rock crowd—8am for both Revolver Records locations (1451 Hertel Avenue and 831 Elmwood Avenue) as well as at Black Dots (363 Grant Street), but live music doesn’t get going until the afternoon. Black Dots usually has some beer going on, and the temperature looks to be reasonable on Saturday (as of “press time”), so it’s a good day just to be out and about. Below you’ll find some information on RSD-related events, and some of the Record Store Day exclusives to look for. Celebrate the spirit of indie retail and the culture of record stores with RSD 2019 and check the related Facebook pages for more specific details. 

RECORD STORE DAY AT REVOLVER RECORDS You can’t go wrong hitting up either of Revolver Records locations on Record Store Day. On top of the boatloads of records they’ll have stocked up, both locations will also have a full afternoon of live music performances. The newly opened Elmwood location will kick things off at 11am with live music. Expect music from the Space, Cherisse and Tim, Urban Planning, Johnny Hart and the Mess, the Good, Tough Old Bird, Theica, and Space Diner. Simultaneously, the Revolver Records store on Hertel will also have music by Nurse Joyful, the Tim Britt Band, Tyler Bagwell, Over & Out, the Water Dogs, Kanuton, Bighorn Sheep, and Great Lakes. Both live music events go until 4:20, just in time to head back home, put on those records, and do whatever else it is that adults do at 4:20 in the afternoon.

RECORD STORE DAY AT BLACK DOTS Word on the street is that Black Dots will not only be carrying a whole bunch of RSD releases—expect to find over 200 record store day releases—but they’ve upped their stock of used records for this weekend, too. On top of that they’ll host a live DJ from noon until 3pm, and then, weather permitting, some outdoor live music. At noon, the Anderson’s food truck will show up to start slinging beef on wecks and ice

cream. The store will also be open for five more hours than usual, from 8am until 9pm.

RECORD STORE DAY WITH POLAR PIZZA PARTY Once you’ve maxed out on record purchases, head over to Community Beer Works where DJs Cutler and LoPro will be spinning some of their favorites on wax. Grab some Polar Pizza while you’re there and some cold CBW brews.

10 RECORD STORE DAY EXCLUSIVES TO LOOK FOR Air - “Surfing on a Rocket” French pop-band Air will release a special picture disc version of their single, “Surfing on a Rocket,” from their 2004 record, Talkie Walkie. The colorful picture disc features four versions of the track, including a remix by Juan MacLean. Bob Dylan - Blood on the Tracks Bob Dylan fans will be lining up to grab this exclusive record: an exact replica of a test pressing of his 1975 record, Blood on the Tracks. Only 7,500 copies of this were printed, so if you see it, grab it. Captain Beefheart - Trout Mask Replica Captain Beefheart’s profoundly weird yet hugely influential 1969 record, Trout Mask Replica, will see a special release for record store day. The album, which has been out of print for 10 years, has been remastered and pressed onto LPs. Cheech & Chong - “Up in Smoke” It’ll be hard to miss this one on the shelf. This special issue of the theme song to Cheech and Chong’s 1978 stoner film will be printed on a seven-inch, marijuana-leaf-shaped picture disk. This 40th anniversary edition comes

complete with a marijuana-scented scratch-and-sniff sticker. Only 4,500 were printed as an RSD exclusive.

Queen - Bohemian Picture Disc

Death Grips - Crouching Tiger, Hidden Gabber Death Grips, the experimental punkhip-hop duo, will release their 2017 noise EP, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Gabber, on vinyl. This will be the first time the record will be released in physical from. It’ll feature two additional formerly YouTube-exclusive cuts, More Than the Fairy and Electronic Drum Solo Dub Mix. Grateful Dead -  The Warfield, San Francisco, CA 10/9/80 & 10/10/80 Hardcore Dead fans will line up for this one. This Record Store Day exclusive features two complete acoustic sets from the band’s October 1980 shows at the Warfield in San Francisco. Limited to 10,000 LPs. Green Day - Woodstock 1994 Maybe this is their way of celebrating the 25th anniversary of their seminal record, Dookie. Green Day will release a live recording of their 1994 performance at Woodstock on vinyl as a special Record Store Day exclusive. Look for one of the 6,800 copies.

set from Live Aid.

Rhapsody

If you loved the film, then you’ll want to look for this special two-LP picturedisc version of the original soundtrack to Bohemian Rhapsody. The package also includes a “never before released”

Sly & the Family Stone - Live at Woodstock Sunday August 17, 1969 If you’re collecting Woodstock recordings this Record Store Day, you’ll have to grab this one. Sly & the Family Stone took the stage at 3:30am on August 17, 1969 and laid down an out-of-this-world live set. Own it on double vinyl this Record Store Day. Sigur Rós - 22° Lunar Halo and Variations on Darkness Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós is putting out two exclusive records this year. The first is 22° Lunar Halo, which was written as a soundtrack to an interpretive dance piece by Taiwanese choreographer Cheng Tsung-Lung. The second is another piece written for dance, Variations on Darkness, which soundtracks a series of dances by the Iceland Dance Company. Only 2,000 of each will be sent out to stores.

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FILM REVIEW Calamansi juice instead of rice vinegar for chicken rice sauce). The opening night show comes with the opportunity at 6:30pm to enjoy a bowl before the movie courtesy of Sato Ramen—a $30 ticket includes ramen, a fountain drink, and your ticket. If you don’t partake but as the movie progresses wish you had, I’ll save you the trouble of looking it up: The Main Street location of Sato is open until 10pm. •••

ONE REASON I can’t imagine ever leaving Buffalo, where I was born, is because I look forward to so much of its architectural history being rediscovered and restored. Most exciting of these are the buildings fallen into near-ruin that we’ve overlooked until someone put the time and energy into restoring them.

Ramen Shop.

MORE MOVIES ABOUT BUILDINGS AND FOOD RAMEN SHOP • “REIMAGINING A BUFFALO LANDMARK” BY M. FAUST IN RECENT YEARS, the North Park Theater has become a showplace for Japanese cinema, especially anime, so it was probably a no-brainer for them to book a movie called Ramen Shop.  After all, what could be more Japanese than a bowl of ramen noodles?

Quite a lot of things, as I learned from watching the movie. The wheat noodles actually originated in China, booming in popularity in Japan after World War II when US government shipped large amounts of wheat flour to deal with food shortages. And while the Japanese cinema is rife with stories of young chefs struggling to learn perfect ramen techniques (one of thee, the venerable Tampopo, was revived at the North Park a few years ago), Masato, the hero of Ramen Shop, does something unthinkable for that genre: He leaves Japan for Singapore. That’s where his father met his mother, and he wants to track down the parts of their history that are unknown to him—his mom died

young, and his father seldom spoke to him about anything other than the ramen the two prepared at their restaurant. Delving into national as well as family history, he learns that the two countries have wounds that have not entirely healed since the Japanese occupation of Singapore. He also learns that food is the cure for—well, just about everything. The plot of Ramen Shop is not what you would call surprising, nor is it handled with the equivalent of a knife edge sharp enough to cut dough. You could take your grandmother to see it (and probably should—she’d be guaranteed to make you a nice meal afterward, or at least buy you one). But as food porn, it can’t be beat. The name of Gordon Ramsey is invoked at least once, and you know he would approve of the movie’s attitude toward crosspollination of cuisines. You will learn more about Singaporean street food than ramen, sometimes in such detail that you’ll wish you had brought a notebook (I leaned that one should always use

Premiering this weekend on WNED-TV, the 30-minute documentary “Reimagining a Buffalo Landmark” introduces most of us to one of the city’s most spectacular sites, the Richardson Olmsted Campus. I say “introduce” because, while we’ve all noticed the easily visible Richardson Towers, how many of us knew that those are only the centerpiece of a sprawling development of 11 buildings on a green site that once took up 200 acres? Even if you’ve been to visit the Hotel Henry that is the first step in the campus’s rebirth, you may not have gained a sense of the scope of the project that was once the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane. You also may not know that behind that Bedlamesque name was a treatment facility that was far ahead of its time in regarding mental illness as something amenable to care and understanding. The documentary is eye-opening about all of this, combining a history of both facility and grounds with aerial photography that provides some astonishing perspective on an architectural masterpiece that, like the Darwin Martin House, escaped our attention for far too long. “Reimagining a Buffalo Landmark” will air on WNED-TV Friday April 12 at 9pm, and again on Saturday at 4:30am and 6:30pm, and Sunday at 3:30pm. As of this writing, tickets are still available for a free event at 5:30pm on Thursday, April 11, that includes a preview screening of the program and a questionand-answer session with members of the program’s production team and representatives from the Richardson Olmsted Campus. P To register for the event, visit EventBrite.com.

AT THE MOVIES

ed by Garth Davis (Lion). Dipson Eastern Hills RAMEN SHOP—Reviewed this issue. North Park

Rory Kinnear, Maxine Peake, Pearce Quigley, and Tim McInnerny. Dipson Eastern Hills

A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues.

OPENING APRIL 19 

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA:

OPENING APRIL 12 HELLBOY—Reboot/remake/whatever. Starring David Harbour, Milla Jovovich, and Ian McShane. Directed by Neil Marshall (The Descent). AMC Maple Ridge, AMC Market Arcade, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria LITTLE—Comedy starring Regina Hall as a stressed-out executive who gets to return to being a teenager. With Issa Rae and Marsai Martin. Directed by Tina Gordon (Peeples). AMC Maple Ridge, AMC Market Arcade, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria MARY MAGDALENE—For those of you who have always wondered what a movie with Joaquin Phoenix as Jesus Christ would be like. Now go and sin no more. With Rooney Mara in the title role and Chiwetel Ejiofor as Peter. Direct-

THE CURSE OF LA LLORONA—More horror from the folk who gave you Annabelle. Starring Linda Cardellini, Raymond Cruz, Marisol Ramirez and Sean Patrick Thomas. Directed by Michael Chaves, now working on the next Conjuring sequel. Area theaters LOVING VINCENT—Return engagement for the popular film in which 100 artists hand painted the backgrounds, settings, and the costume details and hairdos of the characters in the Expressionist style of Vincent van Gogh, whose story the film recounts. Paired with The Impossible Dream, a one-hour documentary about the making of the film. North Park MEOW WOLF: ORIGIN STORY—Documentary about a Santa Fe, NM art collective whose socially conscious large-scale exhibitions gain them the support of George R. R. Martin. North Park PETERLOO—Writer/director Mike Leigh (Naked) opts for an uncharacteristically epic canvas to explore the events leading up to the 1819 Peterloo Massacre in Manchester, where 60,000 Brits gathered to demand political reform in the face of rising poverty. Starring

16 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Thursday, April 11: TABU (2012)—Portuguese filmmaker Miguel Gomes’ complex historical idyll unfolds slowly as a dying woman’s final wish leads to a glimpse Portugal’s colonial years in Africa. If most reviews are to be believed, it’s worth seeing for the black and white cinematography alone. Presented by Cultivate Cinema Circle. 7pm. Hallwalls Friday, April 12: THE GODFATHER (1972)—If you need me to tell you what it’s about, you probably wouldn’t be interested. Starring Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan, Robert Duvall, Sterling Hayden, Diane Keaton, and John Cazale. Directed by Francis Ford Coppola (The Bellboy and the Playgirls). 7:30pm. Screening Room MAJOR LEAGUE (1989)—From a time when playing ball with Charlie Sheen meant something entirely different. With Tom Berenger, Corbin Bernsen, Margaret Whitton, James Gammon, Rene Russo, and Wesley Snipes. Directed by David S. Ward (King Ralph). 9:30pm. North Park

MY DARLING CLEMENTINE (1946)—The Old Chestnut Film Society’s salute to Henry Fonda continues with this John Ford retelling of the events leading up to the infamous gunfight at the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Fonda’s Wyatt Earp is supported by a cast that features Victor Mature, Linda Darnell, Walter Brennan, Tim Holt, Ward Bond, Alan Mowbray, John Ireland, and Jane Darwell. 7:30pm. Museum of disAbility History, 3826 Main St. Saturday, April 13: LEGEND OF THE DEMON CAT—From the great Chinese director Chen Kiage (Farewell My Concubine) and writer Huang Huiling (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon), a $200 million epic that combines period drama, fantasy, horror, mystery and romance in seventh-century China. Starring Xuan Huang, Shôta Sometani, Yuqi Zhang, and Hao Qin. 7pm. Screening Room MAJOR LEAGUE—See above. 9:30pm. North Park VILLAGE OF DREAMS (Japan, 1996)—Live action drama about twin boys growing up in rural Japan in the years after World War II. Starring Mieko Harada, Keigo Matsuyama, Shogo Matsuyama and Kyôzô Nagatsuka. Directed by Yôichi Higashi. Presented by the Buffalo Cherry Blossom Festival. 11:30am. North Park


IN THEATERS FILM Sunday, April 14:

Wednesday, April 17:

OF GOD AND MEN (France, 2010)—In this fact-

THE BREAKING POINT (1950)—A more faithful

based drama that won the Grand Prix at

adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s To Have

Cannes, Trappist monks living in Algeria must

and Have Not than the Bogart film that used

decide whether to stay in the community

that title, starring John Garfield as the cap-

where they are working with the poor under

tain of a charter boat who becomes involved

an increasing threat of death by terrorists.

with criminals to get himself out of a financial

Starring Lambert Wilson, Michael Lonsdale

bind. Co-starring Patricia Neal, Phyllis Thax-

and Olivier Rabourdin. Directed by Xavier

ter and Wallace Ford. Directed by Michael

Beauvois. Presented by the Roycroft Film So-

Curtiz (Casablanca). Part of the Noir Essen-

ciety. 4pm. Parkdale Auditorium, 141 Girard

tials series 7:30pm. Dipson Eastern Hills

Ave., East Aurora www.roycroftcampuscorp.

Thursday, April 18:

com PENGUIN HIGHWAY (Japan, 2018)—A nine-yearold boy investigates the sudden appearance of penguins in his town in this anime directed

LEGEND OF THE DEMON CAT—See above. 7pm.

Screening Room Friday, April 19:

by Hiroyasu Ishida. English subtitled version.

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (1952)—The one Hollywood

11:30am. North Park

musical that everyone likes, even people who

Tuesday, April 16:

hate musicals. A story parodying the movies’ transition from silents to sound is the back-

BAUHAUS SPIRIT: 100 YEARS OF BAUHAUS—A

drop for some still astonishing dance num-

new documentary celebrating the centenni-

bers featuring Gene Kelly and Donald O’Con-

al of the radical utopian design/architecture

nor (whose “Make ‘Em Laugh” sequence

school/communal social movement. Direct-

remains one of the most amazing things

ed by Niels Bolbrinker and Thomas Tielsch.

you’ll ever see.) With Debbie Reynolds, Jean

The screening will be introduced by Elizabeth

Hagen, Rita Moreno and Cyd Charisse. 7pm.

Otto, UB Associate Professor of Art History

Screening Room

and Visual Studies. 7 pm. Hallwalls

Saturday, April 20:

LEGEND OF THE DEMON CAT—See above. 7 pm.

PENGUIN HIGHWAY—See above. English dubbed

Screening Room

version. 11:30am. North Park

MONTY PYTHON’S THE MEANING OF LIFE (1983)—

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN—See above. 7pm. Screen-

The troupe’s final film was underrated as be-

ing Room

ing “merely” a series of sketches when it was

Sunday, April 21:

first released. The theme given in the title

PENGUIN HIGHWAY—See above. English dubbed

may be loose, but it contains some of their

version. 11:30 am. North Park

sharpest and most memorable bits, and even the ones that aren’t as memorable as Mr. Creosote and the Oliver!-style musical number in protest against contraception have aged

Tuesday, April 23: EYES WIDE SHUT (1999)—Stanley Kubrick’s final film, starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman

AVAILABLE NOW FROM THE PUBLIC BOOKS AND FOUNDLINGS PRESS:

as a well-to-do couple who experiment with

quite well. With, as usual, John Cleese, Terry

sexual infidelity. It was not well received on its

Gilliam, Graham Chapman, Eric Idle, Michael

release: Will the post-screening discussion at

Palin, and Terry Jones, who also direct-

this Buffalo Film Seminars presentation con-

ed. Presented by the Buffalo Film Seminars.

clude that it is an overlooked masterpiece?

7pm. Dipson Amherst

7pm. Dipson Amherst

P

WHERE THE STREETS ARE PAVED WITH RUST Essays by Bruce Fisher about Rust Belt economies, environments, and politics. The financial decline of the middle class is the issue of our time. Bruce Fisher’s Where The Streets Are Paved With Rust is a must read for anyone

LOCAL THEATERS

NORTH PARK 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo (836-7411) REGAL ELMWOOD 

AMHERST THEATRE (Dipson) 3500 Main St, Buffalo (834–7655) AURORA THEATRE  673 Main St, East Aurora (652–1660) EASTERN HILLS MALL (Dipson) 4545 Transit Rd, Williamsville (632–1080) FLIX (Dipson) 4901 Transit Rd, Lancaster (668–FLIX) FOUR SEASONS CINEMAS   2429 Military Rd, Niagara Falls (297–1951) HALLWALLS  341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo (854-1694) HAMBURG PALACE THEATER   31 Buffalo St., Hamburg (649–2295) LOCKPORT PALACE THEATRE   2 East Ave., Lockport (438-1130) MAPLE RIDGE (AMC)

2001 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo (871–0722) REGAL NIAGARA FALLS  720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls (236–0146) REGAL QUAKER CROSSING   3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park (827–1109) REGAL TRANSIT  Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster (633–0859) REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA  Galleria Mall, Cheektowaga (681-9414) RIVIERA THEATRE  67 Webster St, North Tonawanda (692-2413) THE SCREENING ROOM in the Boulevard Mall,  880 Alberta Drive, Amherst (837-0376) SQUEAKY WHEEL  617 Main St., Buffalo (884-7172) SUNSET DRIVE-IN 

4276 Maple Rd, Amherst (888-262-4386)

9950 Telegraph Road, Middlesport (735-7372) CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

MARKET ARCADE (AMC)

TRANSIT DRIVE-IN  

639 Main St (803-6250) MCKINLEY MALL CINEMA (Dipson) McKinley Mall, Blasdell (824–3479)

seriously trying to understand why it happened and how to fix it. —Ted Kaufman, former United States Senator and advisor to Vice President Joe Biden

To understand Rust Belt politics, you can’t do better than to read Bruce Fisher’s excellent essay collection. —Catherine Tumber, Senior Research Associate with Northeastern University’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Fellow with the Massachusetts Institute for a New Commonwealth’s Gateway Cities Innovation Institute, and author of Small, Green, and Gritty

Available at TALKING LEAVES BOOKS 951 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo tleavesbooks.com Also available through https://gum.co/SCKj or foundlingszine@gmail.com

6655 S. Transit Road (Route 78), Lockport (625-8535) CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 11 - 24, 2019 / THE PUBLIC 17


CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AN AD EMAIL CLASSIFIEDS@DAILYPUBLIC.COM OR CALL (716)480.0723 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM/CLASSIFIEDS THE PUBLIC’S NOTICE The Public encourages you to use caution while participating in any transactions or acquiring services through our classified section of the newspaper. While we do approve the ads in this section, we do not guarantee the reliability of classified advertisers. If you have questions, email classifieds@dailypublic.com.

HOUSE FOR SALE TONAWANDA: 242 Dupont Ave. KenTon schools. 3 beds, bath, living rm, dining rm, kitchen, fenced yard great for kids or dogs. Garage with workshop. $97,800. Call Charlie: 716826-0395.

FOR RENTWEST SIDE: 1 bedroom, appliances, water, trash. No pets/smoking. $400+ security. 475-3045.

ROOM FOR RENT: $450/month, private bath, all utilities, kitchen, laundry, parking privileges, located off NF Blvd in Amherst, 440-0208. No smokers. ------------------------------------------------DELAWARE PARK: Beautiful 1BR. Appliances. Laundry. Hardwood. Granite. Porch, ceiling fan. $950 includes utilities. No pets/smoking. 866-0314.

--------------------------------------------------OXFORD/WEST FERRY: Private 3rd flr 2 BR, newly updated, w/appliances, off street parking. Convenient to medical corridor, Canisius College, bus routes. 875 + utilities. 716-254-4773.

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HERTEL AVE/N. BUFFALO: 3 BR upper. $900+utilities & sec dep. No pets, off-street pkng. Call 716.308.6870

BAYNES/MANCHESTER PL: Large 3BR upper, hdwd floors, with appliances incl.

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NORTH BUFFALO: Immaculate 2 BR: C/A, fresh decor, fireplace, hrdwd flrs, eatin applianced kit, office, porch+parking. MUST SEE. $895+ 875-8890. -------------------------------------------------

LINWOOD: Large, bright 2 BR, entire floor of a brick mansion, 1,300 sq ft. Hardwood floors in BRs and LR. Offstreet parking, laundry. Convenient to UB, Canisius, Medical Campus. $975 includes all utilities. 1 month security, lease, no pets, no smoking. 886-1953.

HELP WANTED

gmail.com.

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS: Updated large 3BR. Off-street parking, appliances, semi-furnished, water, garbage. Laundromat across street. Bus stop in front, close to metro. 716-553-2570.

BRYANT STREET: Spacious 1 BR very nice, class & charm. Hdwd floors, appliances & more. $1000 includes utilities. No pets or smokers. 548-6210.

-----------------------------------------------------

for rent. 600 sq ft, $800 electric included. 716-803-3046.

LOVEJOY AREA: Beautiful 2 BD with appl,carpet,porch,laundry,parking,no pets, 650+deposit. 406-2363, leave message.

--------------------------------------------------

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D’YOUVILLE AREA: 2 BR, porch, water, trash. No smoking/pets. $590 security. 475-3045.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Storefront/office

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY: Artpark is seeking a female counselor to work with the ALADDIN THEATRE ACADEMY. Must be 18 or older. Academy hours & location: July 8-August 2, Monday-Friday 9am-4pm; Artpark Mainstage Theater (450 South 4th Street, Lewiston NY 14092) with performance dates Saturday, August 3 at 2pm & Sunday, August 4 at 2pm. Ages for the participants in the camp range from 10-18. Please send application which can be found at www.artpark.net under employment to Paschal Frisina at artparkacademy@

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COMMERCIAL

-------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Lancaster Ave. 3 BR upper w/2 porches, natural woodwork, w/d hookups. No pets, no smoking. $1100+utilities. Apartment of the week. 716-883-0455. --------------------------------------------------NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: Freshly painted 1BR, carpets, appliances, mini-blinds, parking, coinop laundry, sec. sys. Includes water & elec. No pets, no smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175.

NON-PROFIT

SUPER-MARKETEER

NEEDED: A major part of the fun involved will initially be helping to define the job. It is very unlikely that it will ever pay much, and so it is most likely that the person who gets it will have other sources of income. If this sounds at all interesting to you, please

to grow a supportive community in Drag Kings and performance art. Performances include but are not limited to male impersonation, singing, poetry, comedy and burlesque. Queen City Kings Drag welcomes people of all shapes, sizes, any ethnicity, and orientation and aims to be an open safe space for novice and seasoned performers to push beyond gender boundaries. No auditions or experience needed just a desire to learn and grow. www.queencitykingsdrag.com.

-------------------------------------------------TEXTURE PAINTING CLASS: Learn how to use a wide variety of acrylic paint and mediums. At Parables Gallery & Gifts, 1027 Elmwood, Buffalo. For more info: parablesgalleryandgifts.com. -------------------------------------------------CALL FOR ARTISTS: The 20th Annual Elmwood Avenue Festival of the Arts is seeking Artists, Craftspeople, Musicians, Dancers, Community Groups, Food Vendors and more. For information and to apply, please go to: https://elmwoodartfest.org. The Festival always takes place on the weekend before Labor Day weekend. --------------------------------------------------

EXPERIENCED COOK: Experienced

FREE YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS Tue and Thur 3:30-6pm. Open to writers between ages 12 and 18 at the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 Washington Street, 2nd floor, Buffalo 14203. Light snack provided.

cook wanted. Call Joe @ 716.308.6870

--------------------------------------------------

for more details.

CALL FOR WORK: Parables Gallery & Gifts, 1027 Elmwood Ave, Bflo. Artists & craftsmen all mediums

check out thiselectionmatters.org, and then write to Box 861, Buffalo 14203 to find out more. --------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------BOOKKEEPER: experienced

Looking man

or

for

an

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bookkeeper/payroll, needed urgently.

welcome. For more info go to:

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ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Lancaster, lg bright 2BD upper, hrdwd flrs, laundry, parking. $1200 incl all. 884-0353.

For more info kindly email: justin.

FESTIVAL SCHOOL OF BALLET

smith3433@gmail.com.

Classes for adults and children at all

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Norwood Ave. 2 BR, study, porch, appliances, must see. No pets/smoking. $1,350+util. rsteam@roadrunner.com or 716-886-5212. ----------------------------------------------------ROOM FOR RENT $400 Per Mo. Incl. util/kitchen privileges Commonwealth off Hertel, 390-7543.

RETIRED PSYCHOLOGIST available

games, healings. Williamsville. Begins

to assist adults in light daily

5/19. 807-5354 Marina Liaros Naples

living. Please call for details at

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883-3216.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAULA PARADISE MARION WERNER GEOFF KELLY ANNE DAIGLER MARGARET MCGOWAN TIVI ABOSCH MISSY GERACE BOB KIEKBUSCH JEREMY SPINDLER MARTIN MCGEE LAURIE TANNER SANDI PACK JIM ANDERSON DARLENE FILARECKI FEINEN SEAN MORT JAMES FOLAN VICKY WALTERS CARL EDHOLM JR. MARK GRIFFIS MATT LINCOLN ORIN LANGELLE THERESA ANN ZABAWA ADAM ARENSON H. M. BATEMAN BRIAN HAHL

MAGGIE ALCACER JP PIERRE TOM FAHRENHOLZ MIKE SCHRAFT SANDRA BISSONTZ ERIC WYMAN NEIL MAHAR PAUL COLEMAN JOSH ROBISNON MARTHA HAHL PETER VULLO DAVE DEBO MAGGIE OTT-DUFFY PATRICK LAUERMAN KATIE MARSHALL MARIA PROVENZANO JESS KELLY DAVID TOTDENHAGEN BILL KINGSFIELD HAZEL MOTES DARYL CROSS RAY BOUCHER CHRIS HAWLEY BRITTANY KIRKLEY

Meet ! Maeve

parablesgalleryandgifts.com.

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AGES 5-17 learn meditation, ESP

IF P TH

M

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THE ARTS CALL FOR PERFORMERS: There will be an informational meeting of the new Queen City Kings Drag group on 4/14, 1pm. Both meetings will be held at the Spot Coffee 227 Delaware Ave. Buffalo. Queen City Kings Drag is an LGBTQ performance based group looking

PHOTO BY TOM SICKLER

Welcome to The Public, Partner.

1586 festivalschoolofballet.com.

SERVICES BLUE BRUSH STUDIOS PAINTING AND HANDYMAN SERVICES: Call 262-9181 or visit bluebrushstudios.com.

is a gentle Looking for a cat who will worship the ground you walk on? Maeve She’ll step all people! from n attentio loves who tabby gray red long-hai old 4-yearanywher e in the over you if you lay down. She’ll jump in your lap if you sit with heryou might not be thinks she if hand your in head her put will She vicinity. nearby giving her your full attentio n. Come meet this sweethe art at the SPCA!

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ACROSS

47 Quit being serious

12 Train tracks

48 Open a little

18 Zero, in rugby

50 Important

23 Patriotic memorabilia

51 Colorado resort town

24 Former Cowboy Smith

7 Site for some trivia events

54 Create cartoons

26 Emulated Cicero

10 “So frustrating ...”

56 Character co-created by 63-Across

13 Sugarloaf Mountain locale

58 Hands out hands

14 Coach Parseghian

61 He did Solo work

15 Make up stuff

62 Bird bill

16 Mauna ___ (Hawaiian volcano)

63 Late comics maven whose career spanned eight decades

1 Celebrity news site 4 “___ the season”

17 Character co-created by 63-Across

65 “Foucault’s Pendulum” author Umberto

28 “Need You Tonight” group 29 1890s gold rush city 31 Two-letter pair 33 Moved sinuously 36 Get going 37 “I don’t want that” 38 “The Book of Mormon” co-creator Parker 41 Ballet great Vaslav

19 Abbr. on toothpaste boxes

66 Sport ___ (4x4)

44 Pesto ingredient

20 ___-Wan Kenobi

67 Cassis-and-white wine cocktail

49 Detection methods

21 Sasha’s older sister

68 December 31, e.g.

51 Beyond pale

22 Character co-created by 63-Across

69 Court partition

52 First word of a “Star Trek” opener

25 “Here, I’ll get that”

70 It gets steamrollered

53 Wine variety

27 Auguries

71 Magic 8-Ball response

28 “Canterbury Tales” site

72 Liquor flavored with juniper

54 “Late Night with Seth Meyers” writer/performer Ruffin

30 Great Lake name 31 Borrow (forever) 32 Starts to drop off

55 Pin in the back 57 EGOT winner Moreno

DOWN

59 Jeans maker Strauss

1 Quick haircut

60 Noticed

34 Dir. of this clue

2 Actress Sorvino

64 Knot up

35 “Incorrect”

3 Ben Stiller character with signature looks

39 Group of characters co-created by 63-Across

4 Dish served in cornhusks

40 With “The,” character co-created by 63-Across

5 Glass on the radio

42 Character co-created by 63-Across

7 Lean on the horn

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

6 Sub, e.g.

43 Mexican blanketlike shawl

8 Assistant

45 Round fig.

10 Mitt

46 Recording

11 ABC host Roberts

9 Digital data display

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The Public - April 11, 2019  

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