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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY | OCTOBER 19, 2016 | DAILYPUBLIC.COM | @PUBLICBFLO | TODAY IS TACOGEDDON

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IN MEMORIAM: PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY MOURNS KELLY MAURER

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SPOTLIGHT: HELPING REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS WITH DOMESTIC ABUSE

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ART: ANNE MUNTGES'S SKETCHES OF NYC GRAFFITI AND SIGNS

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NEWS: The 60th District used to be quiet. Easy. Take a look at it now.

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FOOD + DRINK: Las Puertas: almost ready to open.

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LOOKING BACKWARD: Scajaquada Creek, pre NYS190, by Wilbur H. Porterfield.

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FILM: Denial, A Man Called Ove, capsule reviews.

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NEWS: Art and play intersect at new West Side playground.

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CENTERFOLD: Jacke Felix, The Chicken and the Egg.

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Stewart Copeland

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Fri. Oct. 28, 10:30am | Sat. Oct. 29, 8pm Mark Laycock, conductor Former drummer for The Police, Copeland’s compositions go beyond rock to include film scores, operas, ballets, and more. He applies his approach for lighting up the stage and bringing down the house to performing his new orchestral composition, “Tyrant’s Crush,” featuring BPO percussionists Matt Bassett, Mark Hodges, Dinesh Joseph, and Robert Cross! The Coffee Concert series is presented by Elderwood.

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LOCAL NEWS

IF JACOBS LOSES, GOP MAY LOSE SENATE MAJORITY BY JUSTIN SONDEL

THE 60TH WAS A NICE LITTLE DISTRICT, UNTIL ANTOINE THOMPSON CAME ALONG AND BROKE IT. THIS YEAR, ONCE AGAIN, IT IS BOTH CRITICAL AND DIFFICULT TO PREDICT. ON A WARM SEPTEMBER EVENING, Erie County Clerk Chris Jacobs stood in a narrow window-front office in Buffalo’s revamped Theatre District, calling his victory over attorney Kevin Stocker in the primary for the Republican line in the race for the 60th state Senate District. Holding a commanding 50-point lead with about 42 percent of the votes counted, Jacobs acknowledged that while nothing was official, he was ready to send his supporters, family and staffers home—it was 9:40pm, and Jacobs felt that it was “getting late.” Tall, slim and blond, the 49-year-old has little in his personal or professional life that political strategists see as a vulnerability. In a brief stint as secretary of state in the Pataki administration, as a candidate for lieutenant governor, as a Buffalo school board member, and now as county clerk, Jacobs has maintained a relatively low profile. Party insiders use words like “spectacular” and “phenomenal” to describe his prospects as a candidate.

Chris Jacobs, the Republican candidate for the 60th state Senate District. PHOTO BY JOED VIERA

“I just want to thank everybody for being here and everybody for helping in this effort,” he said, making a point to acknowledge his mother and each member of his campaign team. Without boasting about his drubbing of Stocker, Jacobs asked the room to help him press on as he looks forward to the general election. “Primaries are challenging. I’ve never had one before,” he said. “The good thing is it gets us out there and it gets us engaged with our constituents. I think I’m a better candidate now than I was three, four months ago to begin the primary.” State Senate Republicans certainly hope that Jacobs is the better candidate on November 8. The conference currently is one seat away from holding an outright majority, and only kept its tenuous grip on power this past session thanks to state Senator Simcha Felder, a Brooklyn Democrat who caucuses with the GOP, as well as a partnership with the breakaway Senate Independent Democratic Caucus. A number of tossup races in Long Island and the Hudson Valley could tip the balance either way, but Jacobs is widely seen as the Republicans’ best chance to pick up a Democratic seat. If no other seat changed hands, a victory by Jacobs would give the GOP absolute control of the chamber. On the flip side, there’s little chance that Republicans can hold the line in the Senate if Jacobs falls short. A loss by Jacobs would have to be offset by pickups in tougher Senate races, and that won’t be easy in a presidential year, when greater turnout tends to benefit Democrats. If the GOP fails to win a numerical majority, it would have to persuade Felder and state Senator Jeff Klein’s IDC to stick with them. Failing there, the last bastion of Republican power in the state would be relegated to the minority. ••• About four miles north of Jacobs’ primary night victory party, Amber Small was celebrating a victory of her own at her storefront campaign office in the increasingly diverse working-class Buffalo neighborhood of Black Rock. Tucking her long brown hair behind her ear, she greeted a supporter with an excited hug, both of them cheering as they embraced.

Small, the 30-year-old executive director of the Parkside Community Association who has never held elected office, had soundly beat political veteran Al Coppola by 34 points in the Democratic primary. Now, she would be Jacobs’s main opponent.  (The only other candidate is James DePasquale on the Green Party line. DePasquale has little political history and as yet no campaign. His nominating petitions were passed by Republicans, some with ties to Jacobs, as well as some unaffiliated supporters. The Greens accused the GOP of party-raiding and tried to have him removed as a party member and a candidate; a judge ruled against that effort, so DePasquale remains on the ballot.) Small told her supporters that their efforts gave her a chance to carry their voice to Albany. “The work is only getting started, but I’m so incredibly confident that we’re going to do this,” she said. While Small was charming and warm with the people who had gathered to congratulate her, she was all business when asked about her opponent. Some of Jacobs’ supposed advantages— name recognition, the ability to self-finance his campaign— could actually be weaknesses, she said, for a “career politician who’s backed by a personal and family wealth of billions of dollars.” The Democrats’ first choice as a candidate was Assemblyman Sean Ryan, who has a strong reputation in the district. But after he declined to run, party members touted Small as a young and energetic candidate. She speaks with the polish of a politician who has been at it for decades, a skill no doubt honed through her involvement with Women Elect, an organization that encourages women to run for elected office. The people of the 60th, she said, want someone with a proven track record of working directly with communities. “I’m excited that I’ve been able to earn the trust of voters in the 60th,” Small said. “But I need to earn it all over again and on a bigger scale.” ••• At the northernmost point of 60th Senate District, a few thousand feet before the Niagara River crashes over the falls, suburban Grand Island splits the waters. A few miles south the district snakes through north and western Buffalo, comprising mostly white neighborhoods—all but cutting out the city’s East Side, a collection of mostly black neighborhoods. The district then continues along the shoreline of Lake Erie, jutting into Republican-leaning southtowns, before reaching its terminus in lush farmland, where anti-Safe Act lawn signs outnumber those supporting any particular candidate. The 60th, which not so long ago was one of the most reliably Democratic state Senate districts, has confounded political analysts and granted power to unlikely candidates in recent years. It has played a pivotal role in the balance of power in the chamber. And this year, it could again determine which party holds the majority. When most politicos talk about the shift of the district from a Democratic stronghold to the frenetic and unpredictable scenarios that have played out in recent elections, they point to the most recent round of redistricting. The redrawn lines cut the registration advantage for Democrats over Republicans from almost 5-to-1 to less than 2-to-1. But that shift was predated by Republican Mark Grisanti’s upset of Democratic state Senator Antoine Thompson, who held the seat from 2006 to 2010. Grisanti, riding a wave of anti-Albany sentiment following the infamous 2009 Senate coup and a series of Thompson blunders, was able to steal away a district that most state GOP prognosticators had initially written off. Thompson had been skewered for using his Senate budget to print out a stack of 100-page books promoting his accomplishments and missed session days to attend what he described as a trade

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mission to Jamaica. But Thompson had an enrollment advantage of 126,545 Democrats to 26,256 Republicans. His stunning loss cost Democrats the majority. John McArdle, a consultant and former GOP staffer who spent two decades working in the Senate, said it wasn’t until two Republican power brokers—former Erie County Executive Joel Giambra and then-state Senator George Maziarz—took a closer look at the race that the leadership began to believe that Grisanti had a shot. Enough factors worked in Grisanti’s favor— Thompson’s implosion, voters’ desire for change— to allow the Democrat-turned-Republican to win a seat that would normally never be in question. The newly elected Erie County Republican Committee Chairman Nick Langworthy, who was initially skeptical, recalled that Grisanti was “lightning in a bottle.” Langworthy also credited Carl Paladino’s insurgent gubernatorial campaign. “Had Carl’s candidacy in ’10 not been so successful in Western New York,” Langworthy said, “there never would have been a Mark Grisanti.” ••• One of the worst-kept secrets of the partisan gerrymandering in 2012 is that Grisanti’s district was redrawn for him to hang onto the seat. He faced a tough re-election fight, despite the advantages of incumbency, because of Republicans’ massive enrollment deficit in the district. Several sources, including one who was in the room where redistricting decisions were discussed, confirmed that Grisanti was going to get as many Republicans as possible drawn into his district. Other Western New York Republican senators took on more Democrats. Maziarz took Niagara Falls, a Democratic island in mostly rural Niagara

County. State Senator Michael Ranzenhofer took part of Rochester. State Senator Patrick Gallivan added Democrats to his suburban and rural Western New York district. For one cycle, it worked. Democrat Mike Amodeo and longtime Democrat Chuck Swanick, who ran on the Conservative Party line, split the ticket, and Grisanti won by 20 points, despite having been one of four Senate Republicans to vote to legalize same-sex marriage. But Grisanti was not able to hang on a second time. After voting in support of the Safe Act, a gun control bill deeply unpopular with many Republicans, he lost the confidence of his party. The Erie County Republican Committee did not endorse a candidate that year. Governor Andrew Cuomo, who had benefited from Grisanti’s bipartisanship on two signature bills, did not publicly endorse him, either. Democrats and their labor allies smelled blood. The state’s powerful teachers’ union ran ads attacking Grisanti from the right, calling him a “RINO.” The state party committee infused cash into Democrat Marc Panepinto’s campaign. Grisanti lost to Stocker in the primary, but continued to run on the Independence Party line. This time the split worked to Panepinto’s advantage, allowing him to win with only a third of the vote. ndeed, the district’s primary matchups have made it one of the most unpredictable in recent years, with candidates continuing minor party bids after missing out on a major party line. “When you have primaries and candidates running on third party [lines],” McArdle said, “you don’t know what could happen.” ••• In the coming weeks it will be seen how committed state parties and their allies are to this race. Despite a significant voter enrollment gap—

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LOOKING BACKWARD: SCAJAQUADA CREEK “There are stretches of the Scajaquada where the maple burns with as ruddy a flame, and the asters smile with as divine a blue, as may be found in any of Nature’s garden.” —Buffalo Express, October 18, 1896

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THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Scajaquada Creek is perhaps the most abused, obscured, and untapped waterfront resource in Western New York. In this undated photograph by Wilbur H. Porterfield, Scajaquada Creek is seen looking north from its southern banks between Grant and Rees streets, well before construction of the NY-198. In the foreground, the creek, surrounded by grassy wetlands, is wider than it is today by several multitudes. A New York Central railroad trestle crosses the creek and passes from view behind a shady tree. In the background, at 1 Howell Street, the still-extant factory of the American Buffalo Robe Co., maker of Buffalo fur and astrakhan robes and lap blankets, is visible. The creek was not celebrated then, except perhaps by photographers like Porterfield. Then as now, and even as early as 1896 when the Buffalo Express penned the following, “Those unfamiliar with this modest stream may laugh at the idea of beauty on its banks; but beauty it still has, and rare picturesqueness.” In a matter of time, the asphalt, aluminum guardrails, and concrete viaducts that make up the Scajaquada Expressway will reach the end of their lifespan and require replacement. Citizens will then have a choice: rebuild the expressway in-kind, or remove it entireP ly and restore the creek as an open space resource. -THE PUBLIC STAFF


LOCAL NEWS 90,791 Democrats to 52,480 Republicans, according to the most recent Board of Elections data— many observers believe Jacobs, with his political experience, wealth, and name recognition, has the edge, which could divert resources to other Senate Republican candidates. Jacobs, a self-described moderate who has proven his crossover appeal in winning a countywide seat in Erie County, which has similar enrollment numbers to the 60th, has advantages. As a scion of the family that owns Delaware North Cos., the food services giant that has contracts with state and national parks and entertainment venues around the world, he has access to almost all the capital he would ever need as well as business and personal connections through the company. Jeremy Jacobs Sr., his uncle and the company’s chairman, owns the Boston Bruins and has strong ties to the University at Buffalo. The family name will adorn the university’s new medical school, nearing completion in the heart of Buffalo’s medical campus, a collection of higher learning institutes, medical technology companies, and healthcare providers often trumpeted by politicians as a sign of progress in the city. In 2014, the three-way race between Panepinto, Grisanti, and Stocker saw more than $4 million spent, one of the most expensive races in Western New York history. While it remains doubtful that spending will reach that level in 2016, this cycle is shaping up to be costly. Jacobs spent more than $242,000 during the primary and was the beneficiary of mailings paid for by the state GOP committee and radio advertisements bought by outside groups, while Small spent a relatively paltry $80,000. But Small could have significant money spent on her behalf after picking up the endorsement of the New York State United Teachers, which spent more than $1 million to help Panepinto win office two years ago. And the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee was another heavy contributor to Panepinto’s campaign last time around, and could be again this year, depending on where the party sees its best chances to take back seats. The most recent filings show Jacobs getting significant help from the state Senate GOP, from which nearly $120,000 was transferred to his campaign account this month. Small has yet to receive any funds from the Senate Democrats, though she raised $12,000 in recent weeks, most of it from PACs and the campaigns of Buffalo Mayor Byron

Brown and Panepinto. As it stands now, Small has $24,000 on hand after spending $15,000 in the time covered by the filing, while Jacobs still has $243,000 after spending $225,000. State Senator Michael Gianaris, who oversees the Senate Democrats’ statewide campaign efforts, said the party is still optimistic about Small. While Jacobs may have fundraising advantages and better name recognition, Small will benefit from the presidential year down-ticket voting, especially given Hillary Clinton’s bid to become the country’s first female president, he said. “We think Amber is very dynamic and represents the future,” Gianaris said. “We’re excited about her candidacy.” The Democratic enrollment advantage should also have a big impact in a year when there are only two party-supported candidates to vote for, he said. Jacobs’ advantages “only gets it to the point of making it a competitive district. It doesn’t put it in the bag for them,” he said. State Democrats’ support for Small will come down to how well she performs in coming weeks, but she is “on the radar,” Gianaris added. “We’re constantly looking at the full board and making decisions about resources as the races show themselves to be more or less competitive.” Amber Small, the Democratic candidate for the 60th state Senate District. PHOTO BY JOED VIERA

When candidates began to come forward for the 60th District race this year, the contest was shaping up to be another wild one. The Democratic side of things looked to be a three-way race between Small, Panepinto, and Coppola. But Panepinto, who had been dogged by accusations that he had voted on bills benefitting his private law practice, announced just days before the deadline that he would not run, despite already securing his party’s endorsement. The senator said he wanted to spend more time with his family, though rumors of sexual misconduct between staffers in his office were also circulating. On the Republican side, Stocker was viewed as a

threat to Jacobs after his 2014 upset of Grisanti. But Jacobs won, and Stocker failed to secure the Conservative Party line, preventing a third-party campaign that might have hurt Jacobs. Now, Jacobs and Small have three short weeks to win over voters.  The most prominent point of contention this year is education policy. Jacobs has expressed support for charter schools, as a city school board member, a co-founder of one of the city’s first charter schools, and as founder of the Bison Fund, a charitable organization that promotes charters and private schools. He has proposed a pilot program for community schools in Buffalo, perhaps to be done in cooperation with Assemblywoman Crystal Peoples-Stokes and others who secured funding for community schools across the state last year. “The reality is that charter schools are here in New York State and have been here for 15 years,” Jacobs said in an email. “The reality also is that charter schools are but a very small percentage of public schools, so my main focus if elected to the State Senate will be to help the schools that the overwhelming majority of our children attend and that is traditional public schools.” Beyond that, he has steered clear of controversial issues. Small has stood with local teachers demanding a new contract and joined in a call for the state to make good on payments to districts guaranteed by a court decision. “It’s not my place to tell a parent where they should send their child to school,” Small said at a recent event. “But, we have a system that is set up to siphon money out of district schools and make them weaker.” Small has defended same-sex marriage, women’s reproductive rights, and a host of other progressive issues, but has no record to attack, given her newcomer status. ••• Still, some punches have already been thrown. Small last month sent out press releases tying donations from people charged in US Attorney

2016–17 Art of Jazz: Steve Coleman and Five Elements

Justin Sondel is a reporter for City & State, P with which The Public shares content.

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Preet Bharara’s wide-ranging bid-rigging criminal complaint to Jacobs, noting that he had received campaign money from developer Louis Ciminelli and his brother, as well as companies they own and other related businesses. The Jacobs campaign fired back that Ciminelli has donated to politicians of all stripes over the years, including Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz, who has in turn donated to Small’s campaign. And donations directly from Louis Ciminelli, which came during Jacobs’s campaigns for county clerk, have since been donated to the United Way. Last week, a flier paid for by a state teachers group slammed Jacobs for his positions on public education; the photo of Jacobs is doctored to make him look devilish. A mailer paid for by state Republicans tried to tie Small to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio through use of a consulting firm; de Blasio’s campaign financing is currently under investigation. Small is hoping that the skills and relationships she has built through her nonprofit work will help her. As she sees it, her candidacy represents an opportunity to reject the notion that money and connections are qualifications for elected office. “We’ve got a lot of dark money in these races now, groups and PACs that have really glossy names, but they stand for things that our community does not stand for,” Small said. “It’s deceptive, and it’s just not right.” During a campaign stop to talk about community schools, Jacobs said that while experts’ prognosis that he has an edge in the race is encouraging, he has a hard road ahead of him. The man the GOP has put up as one of their best chances to win a pivotal seat and help secure an outright majority is familiar with tough races, having lost as William Weld’s running mate in his 2006 gubernatorial bid after serving as the secretary of state under Gov. George Pataki. As Jacobs sees it, his mission in this race is to keep downstate Democrats from leaving Western New York high and dry. “I just think it’s so critically important for this area to keep this Senate seat, to be part of keeping the majority as it is,” he said. “If we lose the Senate voice for upstate and Western New York, that’s going to be very, very detrimental.”

Steve Coleman has been internationally recognized for his compositions and recordings that straddle numerous genres.

artofjazz16/17 Art of Jazz is produced by Jon Nelson and organized by the Albright-Knox Art Gallery. It is supported by Hunt Real Estate.

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DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

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NEWS IN MEMORIAM

REMEMBERING KELLY MAURER BY THE PUBLIC STAFF

ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, KELLY MAURER DIED OF COMPLICATIONS RELATED TO PNEUMONIA, SURROUNDED BY FAMILY. MAURER WAS A PILLAR OF BUFFALO’S PROGRESSIVE COMMUNITY, SMART AND COMMITTED, FUN-LOVING, HONEST IN HER FRIENDSHIPS AND HER APPRAISALS. THE FRUITS OF HER LABOR SURROUND US, AS ILLUSTRATED BELOW IN THE REMEMBRANCES WE SOLICITED FROM FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES: HEATHER GRING past employee of Buffalo First! 

Kelly Maurer was an incredible force in our progressive community, though so many people may not know it. Her guidance and pragmatism helped those who wanted to live their lives differently find a way to make it happen. Kelly was quick with both compliments and concerns, and always focused on the long view. I’ve met few people more intentional in how they want to live their lives and share their resources—both financial and emotional. 

REV. DEACON STEPHEN LANE

formerly of Trinity Episcopal Church Kelly Maurer did not like being in the spotlight. If she knew that we were honoring her, she would be embarrassed and ask us to turn the spotlight on what it was that she did. Well, I value her more for who she was than what she did. Yes, she was a big advocate for social justice and she didn’t just talk about it, she acted on those beliefs. Kelly’s efforts on behalf of our community epitomized the slogan “City of Good Neighbors”; she was a great neighbor. Her efforts on the behalf of the people of Buffalo are many, but that is not what I will miss. I will miss her ever ready smile and infectious laugh. Kelly was a steady and calm presence in the midst of storms. She was quite the pragmatist yet she loved to spend hours dreaming of a new reality where people came before corporations, where caring for others came before selfcentered interest. While Kelley was not overly religious, she epitomized what it is to love your neighbor as yourself. What we will miss is her connectedness to our community and we are all the less for her absence.

MICHAEL ZAK Buffalo GroOperative

I first met Kelly Maurer 10 years ago when I started an account at the Buffalo Cooperative Federal Credit Union and I surely didn’t know at that point how much she would change my life. Every time I went to the credit union she always talked to me about world events, social change, and why community is important. Over time she and the other credit union staff became my family that was always there to listen to my woes or crack some jokes. Kelly was always willing to impart knowledge and wisdom when I needed it, as I so often did. Through time I became enamored with the co-op movement and the possibilities that it entailed for changing our community to be more inclusive, caring, and respectful. I didn’t have many positive role models growing up and I would often find myself lost and unsure of what I should do with my life. That all changed when Kelly asked me to get some coffee and talk about the world and how we can change it. Soon she became my mentor and one of the most positive forces in my life. Through the years I began to learn how much Kelly was involved in the community, whether it was being on the board of directors of Buffalo First!, Fillmore Forward, Buffalo Cooperative Federal Credit Union, Farmer Pirates, and countless others or just being an avid supporter of anything positive happening for social or environmental justice and the arts. It’s hard to think of a group that wasn’t touched by Kelly’s kind and thoughtful soul. Kelly’s selfless and relentless volunteerism has inspired me to go above and beyond in my own life while giving me the inspiration and empowerment to push past normal boundaries of social and environmental activism. Most people speak about the problems that are ever present in society but Kelly was the one person in my life that talked about solutions and actually was doing something about it.  I am forever indebted to and grateful for having Kelly in my life and I know there are countless others that feel the same way. Buffalo shines brighter because of Kelly and will continue to shine for many generations to come because of her. I wish you peace wherever you are, and thanks for believing in me, Kelly…

KEVIN GARDNER Five Points Bakery

Being poor without any debt experience, no bank would loan my wife and me the $25,000 to start Five Points Bakery, so we asked Kelly, who had gotten us the loan for our first home through the Buffalo Cooperative Credit Union. She told us the credit union wasn’t able to take on the commercial loan but then offered to loan it to us personally. She loved the idea of building community and saw the potential in the bakery, the West Side, and us personally when no one else did. She even gave us $35,000 instead of the $25,000 we asked for, in case there were unforeseen expenses (which there were). Three years later, when we wanted to buy the property across the street to expand, Kelly and her husband Eric, who were working on forming Buffalo Commonwealth, a business dedicated to funding projects just like ours, piloted their new business with a $75,000 loan to us to buy the property, which was appraised at $36,000; she saw the potential. Every day I wake up and walk down to open Five Points Bakery, living a life that was just a dream 10 years ago, and I owe it all to her. Thank you, Kelly, I will never forget what you did for us and our community.

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THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

MICHAEL ANUSZKIEWICZ Buffalo Cooperative FCU

I only knew Kelly for a little while, but her vision for the way Buffalo can be was inspiring to me. She was involved with the Buffalo Co-operative Credit Union for more than 20 years, and her contribution is a big part of why we’re still here. Everything she did was with an eye toward helping the Buffalo community. She saw how the credit union could do more to help Buffalo’s underbanked population, and helped us to enact that vision. I am a better person for having known Kelly Maurer. She will be greatly missed.

RAHDNE ZOLA (Rodney Bogardus)

Kelly Maurer was unconditional; Kelly was genuine; Kelly was selfless. Working with her professionally and knowing her personally was a life-altering pleasure. She would share in your joy wholeheartedly and bear the burden of your devastation. To take you by the hand and guide you through the darkness takes a special person. Kelly was that person. Stepping into her home felt as comfortable as stepping into your own, and her door was always open. Her passing is a loss to those of us who knew her, who could recognize her voice and her unmistakable laugh instantly, but to her community, the seeds that she planted through her efforts will blossom for many years to come. It is only fitting that she went out with the Super Moon, given how she was a beacon for so many. Like the moon, her surface wasn’t flawless, but she still reflected all of the light given to her. Thank you, Kelly. In peace, in sorrow, in gratitude.

HARPER S.E. BISHOP Open Buffalo

I’ve heard from many people in Buffalo today about the impact that Kelly Maurer had on their lives, and on our city. She had a brilliant mind. She was practical and visionary at the same time. She educated countless people on local economic systems. She invested in social enterprises, cooperatives, and other nonextractive models alternative to capitalism that would generate community control and build wealth in neighborhoods and marginalized communities.  What I always greatly admired about Kelly was the fact that she never did it for any other reason than that she thought it was the right thing to do. Years later, I am still grateful for the many lessons she taught me about life and the movement as a young executive director (of Buffalo First!). The many conversations—both abstract and administrative—that we had over pints with our friend and comrade Andrew Delmonte. The biggest and most sage advice she ever gave me, and it’s what I’ll hold tightly to, is when she looked at me, in the most Buffalo way possible, and said, “Don’t be a martyr for the cause. You’re too young for that.”  She’s an unsung heroine in Buffalo’s progressive community. She is already missed.


IN MEMORIAM NEWS

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KAREN J. LEWIS I worked with Kelly at Buffalo First! Kelly was an inspiration, a mentor, a leader, a diplomat, an organizer, a negotiator, and a community pillar.  She was an advocate for justice, a believer in the missions of the organizations she volunteered with, and had the desire and the plans to make her community and the world a better place. She placed her family and friends first! Personally, Kelly was my friend, my confidante, and my breakfast buddy. Her life changed and influenced my life in so many ways.  I will be eternally grateful to have met this beautiful, selfless, humorous woman that I had the honor of calling my friend!

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Kelly Maurer was a great combination of dreamer and pragmatist. She believed in building an alternative to capitalism through grassroots efforts, project by project. Kelly had a knack for attending to the overlooked details that make organizations successful and she offered constant, level headed advice. She was incredible at diffusing tension within a group and keeping people working together. As a member of Farmer Pirates remarked, Kelly kept us in line. This was not an easy task as many of the people devoted to alternative projects tend to be misfits one way or another. She did all this while being a warm, kind person always eager to crack jokes and keep us in merry spirits. Her departure has left a void that will take many people to fill.

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TIM BARTLETT Lexington Cooperative Market

Through the years, the co-op community in Buffalo has cultivated and benefited from the leadership of so many people. But Kelly Maurer stands out as one of the most dedicated and resilient. Kelly did the dirty work, often stepping in when times were toughest to keep different co-ops afloat and moving forward. It’s fair to say that Lexington, Buffalo First!, and the Buffalo Co-op Credit Union may not be here today without the passion and efforts of Kelly Maurer. We have lost a great one. And like all community efforts, the baton has been passed, and it’s now up to us to continue the good work that she devoted her life to. 

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JENNY BRUCE Lexington Cooperative Market

Kelly was my friend for nearly 30 years. The day I met her at the back of a truck outside the Lexington Co-op at the corner of Lexington and Ashland, I knew I would hire her as the store manager. We worked at the Co-op together in the mid ’80s to the early ’90s. I can easily say that without Kelly the Co-op may not have survived those days. Kelly cared deeply for the world and the people in it and she generously gave her time and energy to organizations that would have an impact on local lives. She brought her big heart to everything she did; her friends, her family, and the people she connected with every day.  I am honored and fortunate to have called her my friend. 

MICHAEL GAINER ReUseAction As a friend mentioned to me today upon hearing news of Kelly’s passing, “I thought about it, and I’m quite confident I’ve never had a negative interaction with Kelly in all the years I’ve known her.” In fact, Kelly’s kindness was unconditional and unwavering, consistent and loving.  Increasingly, I find it so rare that people sit and just listen, when others need an ear, a shoulder, or a crutch of support. Kelly provided this to me, and in recent days I’ve heard stories of all the others that have been influenced by her. I’m convinced so much of her wisdom was collected from these opportunities to listen, love, and give back to each person she encountered in our community. This quality will stand in my mind as Kelly’s gift to Buffalo. Read more at dailypublic.com

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NEWS SPOTLIGHT

“WE FELT LIKE THE IMMIGRANT AND REFUGEE COMMUNITY HAD A HARD TIME NAVIGATING THE COURT SYSTEM, AND WERE SCARED OF IT. LIKEWISE, FAMILY COURT NEEDED A BETTER UNDERSTANDING ON HOW TO DEAL WITH REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS.”

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April Arman, one of the founders of RAHAMA.

RAHAMA BY SARA ALI

SHARE YO U R EVENT

A BUFFALO SUPPORT GROUP SEEKS TO BUILD A SHELTER GEARED TOWARD MUSLIM WOMEN IN ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIPS seemed louder than usual, and my anticipation is building. I’d never spoken to a survivor of domestic violence before, and this is a month dedicated to shedding light on this issue. October is officially Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and a brave survivor was awaiting my call. 

“I was in the ER six days after having our second child. I had a herniated disc, I almost lost my right eye, and I lost two teeth,” she said. Shortly after that beating, she sought refuge at a shelter. The shelter, however, could not accommodate her cultural and religious needs, such as providing her with a place to pray. “That was something that I needed, something that kept me sane.” She stressed the importance of having Resources and Help Against Marital Abuse (RAHAMA), an Islamic organization dedicated to providing emotional support to survivors of domestic violence. She is a former volunteer of RAHAMA, and a current board member, even though she now lives in New Jersey, where she was born and raised. 

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RAHAMA.ORG RAHAMAHOUSING

THE SOUND OF THE PHONE RINGING

She answers the phone cheerfully, and she is delighted to speak to me. Her courageous tone was comforting and made the conversation easy. Aan American-born citizen with a Pakistani background, she shares with me intimate details about her experience in an abusive relationship. For safety reasons, she has chosen to remain anonymous. 

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RAHAMA

She was living in Michigan when she was with her ex-husband. After she won custody of her kids, she moved to Buffalo to live with her brother. That is when she learned about RAHAMA and began to help other Muslim women who were also suffering in abusive relationships. She says RAHAMA is a necessity

THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

to the community that is way past due. “I’m so grateful to be an American Muslim. Most of these victims don’t speak English and they don’t have friends or family, leaving them without support in a strange country and a new environment. They need to learn how to survive. Many of them have children for whom they are responsible for.”  Rahama is an Arabic word that means mercy. However, it has been said that Allah’s messenger understood the term as an emotion closely tied with motherhood. “We wanted to be a mercy to other women who are suffering in the community,” said April Arman, one of the founders of RAHAMA. The birth of the organization was the idea of Kathy Ahmed, the founder and former principal of Universal School on Genesee Street, which serves Buffalo’s Muslim population. The group started in 2006; the staff at Universal School used to have a Muslim Women Night and would send out surveys to see what topics interested women. Many women brought up the issue of domestic violence, and the group decided it was something they needed to address.   RAHAMA provides counseling, support groups, a crisis hotline, and education to the community. They sponsor workshops that teach imams what to do and what they need to know when a victim of domestic violence consults them. RAHAMA has also provided training for the Department of Social Services, CPS, and case workers to provide a multidisciplinary presentation focusing on issues related to the immigrant and refugee population. This was a collaboration between RAHAMA, local imams, and the Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC). 

“The core collaborative came together because we felt like the immigrant and refugee community didn’t know about family court, had a hard time navigating the court system, and were scared of it. Likewise, family court needed a better understanding on how to deal with refugees and immigrants, language issues, cultures issues, and access issues,” Arman said.  Their current endeavor is to build a shelter for American-born, refugee, and immigrant Muslim women to accommodate their religious and cultural needs. As part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month and in the effort to build this shelter, RAHAMA has begun the “Dollars for Scents” campaign. Renew Bath and Body (927 Elmwood Avenue) is selling 100 percent locally made goat’s milk soaps. They are selling wonderful scents, such as lemongrass sage and lemongrass blueberry. All the proceeds will go towards RAHAMA’s efforts to build the shelter.  “With everything going on in the world, I want to play my small part and make a difference. I think RAHAMA is a great cause. Through April, I learned the religious aspect of it. This gives women who have nowhere to go a safe space for them and their children. It is one-ofa-kind,” said Tom Akers, the owner of the shop.  Assiyia Ali, another founder of RAHAMA, said many Muslim woman won’t go to a shelter if they know their needs won’t be accommodated. “There is the issue of not being able to eat halal food, having pork around the kitchen, and not having a space to pray.” Arman said one goal of the shelter is to minimize the barriers that prevent women from leaving their abusers. Women who come from an immigrant or refugee background often don’t know they have the right to be safe in their own homes and that abuse is against the law. Many women may be fearful to reach out to law enforcement due to negative experiences with the police in their own home countries. Another significant issue is the language barrier, a hurdle for all refugees, men and women.  According to Sarah Syed, another board member of RAHAMA, the refugee population in Buffalo is growing tremendously and it is hard for the current shelters to keep up with the diversity. “We are able to bring that to the table.”  RAHAMA is unique in that its counselors bring cultural competency to the work that they do with their clients. “We are extremely blessed to be located here because of the wide array of services that are available as supports. We are proud to be able to collaborate with many other agencies in the work that we do,” Arman said.  RAHAMA is looking to raise $150,000 for a shelter. The current campaign is only one of many future efforts. For more information about RAHAMA and to learn how you can contribute, check out their website: P rahama.org.


LOCAL NEWS

OCTOBER 20 / 5PM-7PM CORNER OF AUBURN & HOYT, BUFFALO

CIRCLE as stemming from the broadest definition of playgrounds as “spaces which can be used to liberate the individual from the realm of the generic and at the same time offer opportunities for the enrichment of the ordinary.” By “bringing a piece of playground equipment together with the charged spatial arrangement of political round-tables and corporate conference rooms, the installation takes the playful construct and positions it in the adult world.”

Artist’s rendering of the sculpture/playground.

FULL CIRCLE: THE ART OF PLAY BY KRISTEN PENMAN

AT THE CORNER OF HOYT AND AUBURN, ARTISTS USE A VACANT LOT TO EXPLORE THE INTERSECTION OF ART AND PLAY “You can discover more about a person in an hour of play, than a year of conversation.” —Plato THE CORNER OF Auburn Avenue and Hoyt

Street on Buffalo’s West Side is seeing a huge transformation. This past spring, years of planning culminated in a new playground for International School #45. The vibrancy of the space can be seen daily, as a diverse group of children play on the apparatus. The corner is about to see even more positive rebirth, as a group of local artists is creatively re-envisioning a vacant lot with an interactive art installation. FULL CIRCLE is the brainchild of artists Coryn Kempster, Julia Jamrozik (ck-jj. com), and the curator Claire Schneider of C.S.1 Curatorial Projects (cs1projects.org). Taking its cue from the playful concept of a traditional metal swing-set, FULL CIRCLE twists the reference to become an abstracted and engaging spatial installation. The interactive sculpture fits into a much larger context of art installations through CEPA’s West Side Lots Project—“an exciting series of temporary site-specific public art commissions that will transform vacant lots—remnants of what was once urban blight on Buffalo’s West Side into vibrant, engaging, and interactive, public displays,” according to the project’s statement. The projects are designed to be community-driven and aim to create vibrancy against the blank canvas of a vacant space within West Side neighborhoods.  FULL CIRCLE quite literally plays with the theoretical concept of play and its purpose. This is not a novel leap; the connection between art and play is a conceptual framework that is growing on an international level. Major exhibitions, such as 2013’s Carnegie International Playground Project, have been devoted to engaging in a widened conversation about how we as a society view play, risk, and public space. The

connection of this conceptual framework is not limited to the art world. Parents, schools, and community organizations are engaging in these types of conversations about the changing face of play and children’s access to the natural environment. Free-range parenting movements, adventure playgrounds, campaigns against play deserts, and federal initiatives devoted to engaging children in nature seek to combat side effects of urban density and a technology infused world. There is a growing body of research looking at play, types of play, and absence of play, attaching these factors to future mental and physical health. Jamrozik and Kempster push this conversation further as defining play as important to the human experience, not only as a developmental tool of childhood. They look at FULL CIRCLE as taking play seriously. “Play is a mechanism that brings people together, where they are most likely to interact because of a playful situation or object, then they would otherwise,” the artists’s staement says. The artists define FULL

An introduction of this interactive artwork must also pay attention to its location. The diversity of this corner of the West Side adds another layer to the social experiment that happens as people from multiple countries with multiple languages engage with the playful sculpture. Claire Schneider of C.S.1 Curatorial Projects captures the essence of the piece and how it fits within the landscape of public art in Buffalo: “What I love about FULL CIRCLE is that it is a perfect piece, which comments on Buffalo’s artistic legacy, while providing a much-needed space to convene at a point in the neighborhood where all of these neighborhoods and cultures converge.” Schneider looks at the growing body of interactive art and compares that to the evolution of abstract sculpture in Buffalo. “There are the classic pieces of the 1960’s that sprinkle the lawn of the Albright-Knox—Kenneth Snelson’s silver “pick-up sticks” and Tony Smith’s Cigarette. These are austere and balanced compositions, which more recently artists have commented upon by inviting the viewer to be a central component of the work. Franz West’s Meeting point 3, 2004 is a great example. It is meant to be sat on and is purposely a bit awkward, cartoonish, body-like—human.” This is a beautiful convergence as the art becomes almost dependent on lived experience. And with this co-dependency, the location adds another layer. The Jamrozik and Kempster sculpture has found a home that invokes a certain magic about its intentions. Built to comment on political and corporate roundtables while injecting the concept of play into the human experience, FULL CIRCLE has found it’s home next to a school educating children from 70 countries and speaking 44 languages. The wellness team within this school is a persistent advocate of play and a healthy environment that is accessible to the community. It is a wonderful symbiosis. Let the playful, creative, diverse, interactive discussion begin.  FULL CIRCLE opens October 20. The opening celebration (5-7pm) will feature music, zumba, games, the Halal Foodtruck, and James the ice cream cycle dude. Come dance, play, and interact with art and people and celebrate comP munity!

FULL CIRCLE under construction at Hoyt Street and Auburn Avenue.

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FULL CIRCLE

OPEN HOUSE

SAT 12-2pm

OPEN HOUSE

SAT 1-3pm

AMHERST: New Price! 4BR, 2 full & 3 half BA w/ 3700 sq. ft. Curved staircase, LR, DR, fam rm, eat-in kit & 1st flr lndry. Cov’d patio & 2car garage. 72 Four Seasons W, $399,900. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c)

ELMWOOD VLG: 3BR 2.5BA Victorian. Grand foyer w/ gas fp & orig. wdwrk. Lrg LR w/ pocket doors to DR. Kit w/ granite & expos. brick. Fin. 3rd flr w/ bth. 128 Highland, $474,900. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) HAMBURG: 4BR 2BA in Orch Pk schls. 1st flr ste (poss. in-law), new fam rm leads to deck, lrg LR, fin bsmt, good mechs. 3830 Lynn, $146,999. Robert Karp, 553-9963(c) LANCASTER: 4BR 2BA. Forml DR, lrg deck w/ hot tub. Home warranty incl. in sale. 146 Irwinwood, $159,900. Joe Sorrentino Jr, 207-2994(c)

NEW LISTINGS

KAISERTOWN: Well-maint 3BR 1.5BA Cape. AC, fin/ insul. gar, fin. bsmt w/ bar & bth, wireless secur. system. 33 Cable, $99,900. Bryan Bollman, 472-9936(c) WEST SIDE: Classic 2/2 Double all reno’d! Customdesign kit w/ granite & bamboo flrs. Upd. bths, mechs & some windows. Front porches & 2car garage. 360 Hoyt, $189,900. Thomas Needham, 574-8825(c)

CITY LISTINGS

DELAWARE DIST: Spect. views from 10th flr 2-story 3BR co-op w/ 2400 sf, priv. terrace, formal DR, hi-end kit, bonus rm w/ full bth, 2 parkg spaces. 925 Delaware #10B, $749,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) EAST SIDE: LOT! Versatile 30 x 95 lot near Cayuga. 6 Milton, $5,000. Thomas Needham, 574-8825(c) ELMWOOD VLG: Corp. Rental. 3BR 2BA Colonial in exclusive area. LR, frml DR, den w/ sliders to deck, 1st flr BR & lndry. Full dry bsmt. 27 Lincoln Woods, $2,300/ mo +. Susan Lenahan, 864-6757(c) GATES CIRCLE: Roomy unfurnished 1 BR apt w/ garage parkg. $800/mo. Robin Barrell, 986-4061(c) LOVEJOY: Solid 3BR w/ eat-in kit, 1st flr lndry, ample rm sizes & updates (i.e., weatherization by insulat. co). This one won’t last! 112 Gold, $32,900. Richard Fontana, 605-2829(c) NORTH BUFFALO: Rental. Nice 1BR unit on 3rd flr w/ hrdwd flrs and upd. kitchen & bth. 2448 Delaware, $650+. Christopher Lavey, 480-9507(c) WEST SIDE: 3BR 1.5BA on quiet st. New kit, sun porch, mechs & half of roof. Move In or use as Investment Opportunity (tenants want to stay)! 14 Congress, $69,900. Robert Karp, 553-9963(c) WEST SIDE: Large 3-unit walk to Elmwood Vlg. Priced to sell! New tearoff roof & furnaces. Off street park. 190 Baynes, $179,900. Robert Karp, 5539963(c)

SUBURBAN LISTINGS

AMHERST: Charming 4BR 2BA. Wmsvl schls. Morning rm w/ golf course views. 2car gar, rear deck & patio. 8 Sandhurst, $271,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) CHEEKTOWAGA: 4BR 1BA on 2 acres! 1st flr BRs, formal DR, 2.5 car garage. Adj. 2 acre lot also for sale. 1228 Losson, $165,000. James Collis, 479-0969(c) EAST AURORA: Sprawling 25 acre estate &horse farm w/ barn & 3BR 2.5 BA open plan house. Cathed. ceilg LR, cherry flrs, dbl fp w/ DR & solarium window. In-grnd pool w/ spa. Granite kit. 8-stall barn w/ tack rm! 705 Willardshire, $1,075,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 8646757(c) HAMBURG: Investment Opp! 2/2 Double w/ eatin kits, formal DRs & LRs. Lrg barn/gar for storage. Sale includes adj. commerc. lot! 4275 Clark, $141,000. Dragica “Dee” Stare, 316-9995(c) LAKEVIEW: New Price! Move-in ready 3BR 1.5BA. Granite kit, fam rm w/ cath. ceilg, gar w/ screen door, deck & fenced yrd. 6411 Mayflower, $199,000. Christopher Lavey, 480-9507(c) ORCHARD PK: LOT. Residential lot on quiet street 140’ x 120’ for single or double home. 175 Windom, $42,900. Dragica “Dee” Stare, 316-9995(c) WHEATFIELD: Upd. 3BR 2.5BA on wooded lot w/ pond. LR, DR & fam rm w/ loft. Deck off kit, mstr ste w/Jacuzzi. A/C, full bsmt, 2car gar. 7158 Marigold, $220,000. Brigitte “Gitti” Barrell, 8032551(c)

716-819-4200 431 Delaware Avenue Buffalo, NY 14202

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

9


ARTS REVIEW

ME, MY PEN, AND I

ME, MY PEN AND I WESTERN NEW YORK BOOK ARTS CENTER 468 WASHINGTON ST, BUFFALO 348-1430 / WNYBOOKARTS.ORG

BY JACK FORAN

AT WNYBAC, ANNE MUNTGES’S DRAWINGS OF SIGNS AND GRAFFITI ENCOUNTERED IN  NEW YORK CITY THEY’RE LIGHT ON SPELLING AND PUNCTUATION—except

for a liberal use of the exclamation point—but nonetheless communicate loud and clear, the varieties of impromptu public signage— including plentiful graffiti—former Buffalo artist Anne Muntges has discovered in her walks around New York City of late, and reproduced in several score ink-on-paper drawings currently on show at the Western New York Book Arts Center. Strong language expressing strong if not always quite well articulated sentiments, from the simple and straightforward “Fuck You” on a fire hydrant, to the slightly more nuanced “Fuck the Government” on a brick wall, to a hand-lettered poster on a tree on a street of tidy brownstones:  o NOTICE o Putnam Ave Block Assn Please do not urinate here Curb your pets and yourself 

IN GALLERIES NOW = ART OPENING 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228-1855, photographics2.com/store/welcome-to-our-studio-1045-gallerystore): Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment. Albright-Knox Art Gallery(1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700,  albrightknox.org): Shade: Mark Crawford and Clyfford Still, through Oct 2. Operation Sunshine: Joan Linder, through Oct 30.  Claudia Joskowicz: Every Building on Avenida Alfonso Ugarte—After Ruscha, on view through Feb 5, 2017. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) until 10pm. 

Amid some startlingly lovely sentiments: “RIP Grandma and Gramps” in black paint on a temporary-looking plywood partition wall along a sidewalk. And some heartbreaking: “Pregnet n Hungry Please Help” on a brown paper beggar’s bag discarded among street trash.  Various laundromat instruction signs to customers—or more like desperation pleas—often with a plastics subtheme. “Do Not Put Snakers or Anything Plastic in the Dryer.” Or a crudely hand-lettered sign above a scrap jumble post-conflagration remnant of a dryer, in the slightly frantic voice of the dryer personified: “Things Like This Happen When You Put Rubber and Plastic in Me No Rugs No Sneakers in Dryer Fire!!! Fire!!! No rugs No Sneakers.”  In a different—non-laundromat—context, the plastics subtheme delves into the philosophical/scientific question of just what is or isn’t plastic. On an apartment window above a row of the apartment building’s trash cans: “Note Styrofoam Is Not Plastic!” Debatable, I would think.  A commercially printed sign on a door above a stoop staircase reads: “No Sitting On This Stoop At No Time!” A hand-lettered message on a poster states succinctly: “We’re Fucked.” And paint graffiti on a building wall declares that “Even Jesus Drank.”

Amy’s Place Restaurant (University Heights Arts Association) (3234 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214,  716833-6260,  uhartsgroup.com/amysplace):  Every day: 7:00am-9:00pm. Art 247 (247 Market Street, Lockport, NY 14094, theart247.com): Voice of Domestic Violence, Oct 15 through Nov 13. Reception Fri, Oct 28 5:187:18pm. Wed-Fri, 10am-5pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Art Dialogue Gallery  (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209 wnyag.com): Transitions, work by Joyce Hill. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-8852251,  wnyag.com):  25th  Annual Juried Regional Artists Exhibition, on view through Nov 11. Opening

10 THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Some cases of secondary messaging via editing of an original message. “Do More” in heavy black letters is followed up with “Or don’t.” On a carefully lettered sign on a deteriorating wall “Please Help Keep the Neighborhood Graffiti Free,” the word “Free” has been graffiti slashed out.  “Death Pussy” sounds like a rock group. Usually communicate loud and clear, that is. Except when the signer waxes poetic, as in “All the Tendernesses Pooling.” Or the one about somebody with a magical testicle, though which one—which testicle—is a question. A few of the drawings are wordless, but perhaps not messageless. One of an elegant kitty on a wall above some cultivated lush greenery. And one of a freshly dead and still integral youngish-looking rat on the street next to an empty plastic (Styrofoam) coffee cup. Dead before its time, it looks like.  Muntges’s recent previous art has been about domestic interior spaces. In an artist’s statement she says that “something about [New York City] has forced me to adapt to looking beyond the space I occupy to start to find how I fit into a greater whole.”  The show is called “Me, My Pen, and I,” and continues through P October 27.

reception Fri, Oct 14, 7:30-9pm. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Ashker’s on Elmwood (1002 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-886 -2233, ashkersbuffalo.com):  Group 263: works by Brian Boutin, Kathleen Corff Rogers, John Lloyd, Gethyn Soderman, Rick Steinberg. MonSat 7am-10pm, Sun 9am-5pm. Betty’s Restaurant  (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 362-0633,  bettysbuffalo.com): R x R Graffiti, photos by Ann Kutner on view through Nov 19. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Benjaman Gallery  (419 Elmwood Avenue  Buffalo, NY 14222,  thebenjamangallery.com): Over the Fence, paintings by  Jackie Felix and Bruce Adams, on view

through Nov 1. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm. Big Orbit (30d Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222,  cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit): Lily Dale, installation by Flatsitter. Fri-Sun 12-6pm. Blue Plate Studio (69 Keil Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120): Mary Louise Wyrick and Eric Evinczik, opening reception Fri Oct 21, 6-8pm.  BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183,  btandcgallery.com): Early One Morning: Roberley Bell, on view through Oct 22. Fri 12-7pm, some Sat 12-4, or by appointment. Box Gallery  (667 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203): Final Frontier, a collaborative piece by Gary Nickard, Reinhard Reitzenstein, and Patty Wallace. Open 4pm10pm daily.


IN GALLERIES NOW ARTS

ARTISTS SEEN: A PROJECT BY DAVID MOOG

FELICE KOENIG Felice Koenig is a visual artist and educator. She was born in Highland Park, Illinois, and received a BFA from Southern Oregon University in 1999 and an MFA from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2003. She moved in 2007 to Buffalo, where she is a faculty member at Daemen College. The meticulously constructed paintings for which she is best known are created by adding layer after layer of acrylic paint onto the canvas. Koenig has exhibited her paintings internationally, and she is represented in the permanent collections of the Albright Knox and the Burchfield Penney, as well as private collections throughout the US. For more information on her work, visit felicekoenig.com or burchfieldpenney.org. -THE PUBLIC STAFF Artists Seen: Photographs of Artists in the 21st Century is an ongoing project by photographer David Moog in partnership with the Burchfield Penney Art Center at SUNY Buffalo State. Moog has set out to make portraits of every self-identified working artist and arts professional in Western New York. To be included in the project, call David Moog directly at 716-472-6721 or contact the center at 716-878-4131. Artists working in all media are welcome; visit burchfieldpenney.org for more information.

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¡Buen Vivir! (148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, photolangelle.org): If Voting Changed Things, photographs of protests at the 1972 Republican National Convention and the 2004 Democratic and Republican National Conventions by Orin Langelle, on view through Dec 2. Tue-Fri 1:30-4:30pm, Fri 6-8pm, Sat 1-3pm. Buffalo Artspace Gallery (1219 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14209): Ron Westlake,  Who Gets to Call it Art?  Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Buffalo Arts Studio  (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2496 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833-4450,  buffaloartsstudio.org): Craft Art Field Day, structural, collaborative work by Ani Hoover on view through Nov 7.  Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Buffalo Brush Paint & Sip (2533 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216,  buffalobrush.com): Painting classes taught by Julia Douglas.  Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680,  buffaloartstechcenter. org): Sandy Ludwig:  Portraits, Places and Pleasures​, on view through Sep 28. Mon-Fri 10am-3pm. Buffalo & Erie County Central Library (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900,  buffalolib.org): Celebrating 400 Years of Shakespeare: Reflecting on the Life of the Bard.  Milestones on Science: Books That Shook the World! 35 rare books from the history of science, on second floor.  Mon-Sat 8:30am-6:00pm, Sun 12-5pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center  (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY  14222, 878-6011,  burchfieldpenney.org): Jozef Bajus: Nothing is Going Away (through Jan 29, 2017) and Babs Reingold: The Last Tree (through Feb 26, 2017),   Blistering Vision,  Charles E. Burchfield’s sublime American landscapes through Oct 23. Artists Seen: photographs of contemporary artists by David

Moog. Aries Press of Eden NY, through Sep 11.  Sequel on view through  Sep 18.  The Birthday Party: A Community of Artists, on view through Nov 27. 10am5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Café Taza (100 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201): New paintings by Bobby Griffiths. Carnegie Art Center (240 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, carnegieartcenter.org):  Buffalo Society of Artists fall exhibition, celebrating the BSA’s 125th anniversary. On view through Oct 15.  Casa de Arte (141 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, 240-9248,  casadeartegallery.com):  Mexican Movements: Carlos Mérida and his Compañeros. Mon, Wed, Fri 10-3pm, or by appointment.  Castellani Art Museum  (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200,  castellaniartmuseum.org): Sara M. Zak: An Overwhelming Familiarity,  on view through  Jan 11, 2017.  Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 8562717,  cepagallery.org): The Structure of Things,  Biff Henrich,  monument, photographs by bobCollignon, both on view through Dec 17. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Daily Planet Coffee Company (1862 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, 716- 551-0661): Works by  Mary Ann Kammer on view through Nov 13. Dana Tillou Fine Arts  (417 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 716-854-5285,  danatilloufinearts.com):  The Old and the New: 180 Years of Painting and the Arts. Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204,  etjgallery.com): Tue-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 11-4pm.

Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): Text-based paintings by Amy Greenan, Eric Magnuson, Brad Phillips,  and  Betty Tompkins.  Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm, Closed on Sundays & Mondays. On view through Oct 28. TueFri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com): Terrain: recent work by Jeffrey Vincent on view through Nov 5. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays.  Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North St., Buffalo, NY  14201):  The invention of the telegraph and the railroad. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall)  (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201):  Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.  Lockside Art Center  (21 Main Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0239,  locksideartcenter.com):  Niagara Arts Guild Exhibition through Nov 19. Fri-Sun 12-4pm. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com):  Raymond Bonilla and Richard Kersting:  Observe & Imagine, on view through Oct 15. Tue-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm. Native American Museum of Art at Smokin’ Joe’s  (2293 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14123, 2619251) Open year round and free. Exhibits Iroquois artists work. 7am-9pm. Nichols School Gallery at the Glenn & Audrey Flickinger Performing Arts Center (1250 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14216, 332-6300, nicholsschool.org/artshows?rc=0): Everyday Places,  photographs by George K. Arthur on view through Nov 14.  Mon-Fri 8am-4pm, Closed Sat & Sun. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 882-5777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com): Duayne Hatchett, sculptures. Opening reception Sat Oct 22, 6-8pm. On view through Nov 23. Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat & Mon open by appointment only. Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, parablesgalleryandgifts.com): Paul M. Chlebowbowski:  Color & Form Fuse with Vision, on view through Oct 31.  Tue-Thu, 11am-6pm, Fri 11am-7pm (11am-9pm on first Fridays), Sat 11am-5pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069, pausaarthouse.com): Flesh and Water:  Markenzy Julius Cesar  Live Music Thu-Sat. See website for more info. Pine Apple Company  (224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648,  squareup.com/store/pine-apple-company): Work by  Thomas James Holt,  Yames Moffitt,  Esther Neisen,  Mickey Harmon,  Mike West, and  Sarah Liddell.  Wed & Thu 11am-6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Queen City Gallery (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183,  queencitygallery.tripod.com):  Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, John Farallo, Chris McGee, Tim Raymond, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Redenbach, Barbara Lynch Johnt, Kisha Patterson, Sara O’Brien, Michael Mulley.  Tue-Fri 11am-4pm and by  appointment. River Gallery and Gifts (83 Webster Street, North Tonawanda, 14051, riverartgalleryandgifts.com): On the Horizon: MJ Myers, Kaitlin Frisicaro, Dana Tyrell, Mary Myers, Mike Schroeder on view through Oct 29. Wed-Fri 11am- 4pm. Sat 11am- 5pm. RO Home Shop  (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387, rohomeshop.com):  Coffee and Cabal, mixed media illustrations by Alexander G. Perry, on view through Oct 31. Tue-Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am4pm, closed Mondays. Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 332-4838, sportsfocuspt.com): Susan Q. Liebel “large colorful textured abstract paintings.” On view  through  Dec 27. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, 6-9pm on first Fridays. Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203,  squeaky.org): SEND BLANK TAPE,  featuring works by the Videofreex, as well as individuals and collectives such as Raindance, Ant Farm, John Reilly, Community Video, and Ladies Home Journal. On view through Nov 1 and guest curated by Liz Flyntz.  Stangler Fine Art (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129, stanglerart.com): 63rd Annual Fall Members Exhibition on view through Oct 22. Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm, closed Sundays.  Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): Mathew Sharp with Daniel Maysonet and John Giangreco from Autism Services Inc. on view through Nov 11. Mon-Fri 9-4pm.  Studio Hart (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 5368337, studiohart.com): Notebook Sketches by Chuck Tingley on view through Oct 29. Curated by Gerald Mead. Tue-Fri 11:30am-3:30pm, Sat 12-4pm, and open every First Friday 6-9pm. Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, buffalosugarcity.org): Everything Is Chemical: new works by Joshua Nickerson.  On view until October 29th. Open by event.  UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754,  ubartgalleries.org): Situations: Lydia Okumura on view through Jan 8, 2017. Opening reception Sat Sep 10, 11-1pm.  Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic, on view through Dec 31. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, ubartgalleries.org):   The Measure of All Things,  sixteen artists  on view through Dec 10. Situations: Lydia Okumura on view through Jan 8, 2017.  Screen Projects:  Rodney McMillian on view through Nov 13.  Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 9611833): Accumulate, Ani Hoover. On veiw through Nov 18. Opening reception Fri from 5:30-7:30pm. Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 10am-5pm. Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430,  wnybookarts. org): Me, My Pen and I,  work by Anne Muntges on view through Oct 14. Wed-Sat 12-6pm. 

To add your gallery’s information to the list, please contact us at info@dailypublic.com.

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DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

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DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 13

JACKIE FELIX’s The Chicken or the Egg, part of an exhibit at Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue) called Over the Fence, which also features work by painter Bruce Adams.


EVENTS CALENDAR CIA agents, gang members, unemployed receptionists, politicians and operatives—and tied them to a signature historical moment: the assassination attempt of Bob Marley in 1976. This was born James’s Man Booker Prize-winning A Brief History of Seven Killings, a sprawling 700-page work told by his rotating cast of voices, many of whom speak in a distinctive Jamaican patois. Beyond the big prize, James has collected accolades and acclaim from around the literary world for A Brief History and his other books, and he’ll be joining Buffalo’s literary conversation this Wednesday, October 19 for the 2016 season’s inaugural BABEL event put on by Just Buffalo Literary Center at Kleinhan’s Music Hall. Read our interview with Marlon James at dailypublic.com. -AL

PUBLIC APPROVED

THURSDAY OCT 20 TEDX: Perceptions 5pm Asbury Hall, 341 Delaware Ave. $8

MALLWALKERS

WHITE FANG THURSDAY OCT 20

“No Pity (In The Funky City)” video Recommended if you like: Big Boys, Chain & The Gang, Rocket From The Crypt

Buffalo funk-punk band the Mallwalkers returned with a new single and video this week. The song, “No Pity (In the Funky City)," is high-caliber punk music with a groovy finish—complete with horn blasts and male/ female call-and-return vocals. The video, created by local visual art cooperative Flatsitter, is a gritty yet psychedelic view of Buffalo and the insides of some of Buffalo’s grocery stores and thrift stores. The song comes from the band’s upcoming full-length record Dial M For…, out soon on Peterwalkee Records.

8PM / MOHAWK PLACE, 47 E MOHAWK ST. / $10 [PUNK] At first White Fang will make you cringe, like a shot of tequila without a chaser, but power through and you’ll find the buzz you’re looking for. The party-punk band from Portland, Oregon play songs with titles like “Bong Rip” and “Wrecked”—as in “get wrecked”—and the substance of the songs don’t go much beyond those themes, but it’s hard to deny that it’s just good punk rock music. It’ll make you laugh, it’ll make you want to shotgun a beer and puke into your own American flag hat, and then you’ll finish off the night with some Taco Bell and wake up in the morning and want to start your own band. Because these guys just look like they’re having a lot of fun. Their new LP is called Chunks but start with their 2011 album Grateful to Shred. In all honesty, you’re not going to need to know these songs to enjoy them. White Fang comes to Mohawk Place on Thursday, October 20 with support from No Parents and the Pepperoni Boys. -CORY PERLA

WEDNESDAY OCT 19 Buffalo Books and Beer 7pm Gene McCarthy's, 73 Hamburg St.

YELLOW HOUSE

[LIT] Talk about a perfect niche. Local authors and journalists Matt Higgins and Brian Castner tailored Buffalo Books and Beer (B3 for short) for Buffalo’s beer-loving, literary hipsters back in 2015 in an attempt to broaden the appeal of author events. This Wednesday, October 19, B3 presents two local writers, Timothy Bohen, author of Against the Grain, and Bill Metzger, author of Microbrewed Murder, who will offer an informal chat about their beer-bent books at Metzger’s historic tavern, Gene McCarthy’s at 7pm. -MB

Yellow House is a new band from a few notable local musicians including Matt DiStasio, Quinn Moore, and Jesse Kaufman. Their debut single, “Human Error,” dropped this week and comes from the band’s unreleased seven-track record Songs From Limbo. The full-on indie-punk comes out DO YOU MAKE MUSIC? HAVE A RECOMMENDATION? swinging and never lets up. Look for a release party from the band CONTACT CORY@DAILYPUBLIC.COM  at Dreamland on November 16 TO BE CONSIDERED IN OUR and some underground shows WEEKLY PUBLIC PICKS. before that.

7:30pm UB Center for the Arts, 103 Center For The Arts $10-$20

14 THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

7pm Sportsmen's Tavern, 326 Amherst St. $10-$12

[AMERICANA] Rod Picott is the son of a welder from rural New England and spent years in the construction business before deciding to pursue his music full-time. He drove the merch truck for Alison Krauss and Union Station during their late 1990s peak and earned a following with occasional opening slots for AKUS, with whom he also shared a management company. He’s self-released over a half-dozen collections of his own songs since and a duo disc with former romantic partner Amanda Shires, earning a solid reputation as an Americana underdog. His latest, 2015’s Fortune, was recorded quickly: He cut six songs during his first day in the studio and finished the entire album within a week and a half. Though he has most often used his songwriting to tell other people’s stories, Fortune finds him turning the pen on himself with a raw mix of ugly realities and wry, self-deprecating humor—a compelling mix that makes it his strongest set to date. Picott ended 2015, a year of heavy touring, by posting a note to his website that’s punctuated with the telling statement, “All I’ve learned in this world is this: Driving around playing songs for a living beats the shit out of hanging drywall. Don’t even argue with me about it.” Thursday, October 20 at Sportsmen’s Tavern. Willie Schoellkopf opens. -CJT

8pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $22-$25

Zodiaque Dance [DANCE] UB’s Theater and Dance Department presents Zodiaque Dance Company’s 43rd Fall Season performance. Works by local and non-native professionals alike were created for the performance, including a new work by Bessie Award winner Jennifer Nugent. UB faculty members and alumnus Melanie Aceto, Kathleen Golde, Shelley Hain, and Kerry Ring contributed to the piece, along with local hip hop artist James Levy. New York City’s Jennifer Golonka has work in the piece as well. This year marks a change in the leadership of the Zodiaque Dance Company as Tom Ralabate and Tressa Gorman Crehan step down from their roles as directors. The show runs this Wednesday, October 19 thru Sunday, October 23. -MB

Rod Picott

Arnez J

“Human Error” single Recommended if you like: Wavves, METZ, Ringo Deathstarr

[LECTURE] Previously thought to be sold out due to a technical glitch, this promising showcase at Babeville’s Asbury Hall on Thursday, October 20, brings together nine speakers and one performer to share their ideas in the TED Talk format. It’s a chance to familiarize yourself with movers and shakers from different disciplines across the region— and possibly have your mind blown by how they think. Falling under the theme of “Perceptions,” topics for the sixth annual event range from using virtual reality to enhance your appreciation of history to handling the internet-born misinformation that soaks our consciousness every day. -CJT

Babel: Marlon James 8pm Kleinhans Music Hall, 3 Symphony Circle $35-$100

[LIT] For years Marlon James wrestled with the voices in his head—voices of characters speaking to the life and struggle of the Jamaica of his youth. It wasn’t until after writing several disparate short stories and novellas that a friend hinted he was hitting a common thread. And then James bought a “really big notebook” and started compiling narratives and characters, dozens of them—

[COMEDY] Arnez J’s curiously observant nature primed his comedy career after a baseball- and basketball-filled youth that almost brought him to the attention of Philadelphia Phillies baseball scouts. However, his chance to build a career off his natural talents and instinct came after a stint as a flight attendant, during which he impersonated various characters and stereotypes for the benefit of the airplane passengers. After realizing how much he enjoyed the entertainment business, J began showcasing his skills in Atlanta and eventually landed a spot as the host for BET’S comedy series ComicView. His profanity-free style involves a lot of acting, slapstick, and moving around, and deals a lot with growing up in the inner-city. J recently released his comedy special Racially Motivated on Netflix. He will be appearing at the Helium Comedy Club on Thursday, Oct. 20 through Sunday, October 23 for six shows. -MB


CALENDAR EVENTS

PUBLIC APPROVED

P E T C

ASBURY HALL

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Tha PUB che inst as p ser PUB not pro pro this ema �

LUCIUS WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE CACTUS BLOSSOMS

SHEEPDOGS SATURDAY OCT 22

WED 10/26

7PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $17-$22 [ROCK] Having won a contest to be the first unsigned band to grace the cover of Rolling Stone in 2011, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan’s Sheepdogs enjoyed a profile boost that surely had a huge impact on their career. But the truth is that they’d eventually have penetrated mass consciousness anyway, given their signature mix of sweet harmonies and bluesy, riff-laden southern boogie—a classic rock fan’s wet dream. After an album for Atlantic in 2012, Future Nostalgia came out on Warner Music Canada last year in partnership with the indie imprint Dine Alone. The album, which brings the Sheepdogs to Town Ballroom on Saturday, October 22, is an epic, 18-track stunner of superbly executed rock-and-roll. Perhaps the most refreshing thing about the Sheepdogs is that they’re not trying to reinvent the wheel, but rather, just to roll with the one that already exists. Nashville’s Blank Range will open with a set of melodic garage rockers. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

$20 ADVANCE / $25 DAY OF SHOW GA STANDING

Big Mean Sound Machine

9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $15

8pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $12-$15

[BLUEGRASS] Cabinet guitarist Mickey Coviello once described his band as “slamgrass,” which, despite its cringeworthiness as a genre description, actually fits pretty well. That’s because the seven-piece band combines bluegrassy sounds with a rowdy live show that includes two drummers and a whole lot of strings. Though their latest album, Celebration, might seem like a throwback to another era of music, there’s actually a lot of fresh material in there too. Cabinet comes to Buffalo Iron Works on Thursday, October 20. -CP

[FUNK] Reveling in a mixture of forward musical thinking and old-school ideas, the Ithaca-born Big Mean Sound Machine collective has grown to include more than 15 artists who prefer analog realness over digital tricks. It’s a difficult to pin-down mix of jazz and world beats that keeps bringing people out to their shows, including an upcoming appearance with special guests at Buffalo Iron Works on Friday, October 21. Expect the unexpected. -CJT

FRIDAY OCT 21

DOORS 7PM / SHOW TIME 8PM VISIT BABEVILLEBUFFALO.COM FOR COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS TICKETS: TICKETWEB.COM / BABEVILLE BOX OFFICE (M-F 11AM-5PM) / RUST BELT BOOKS (415 GRANT) TERRAPIN STATION (1172 HERTEL AVE) OR CHARGE BY PHONE 866.777.8932

341 DELAWARE AVE (AT W. TUPPER) BUFFALO, NY 14202 • 716.852.3835

TOWNBALLROOM

The Life Ecstatic: A Night of Hip-Hop Culture at Milkies 9pm Milkie's, 522 Elmwood Ave $5

[HIP HOP] Some talented local rappers and hip hop heads come to Milkie’s on Elmwood for a special showcase titled "The LIfe Ecstatic: A Night of Hip Hop Culture" this Friday, October 21. The show, presented by Yace Booking, features Short Moscato, Truey V, Jae Skeese, Don Scuzz, A.M., and Mile High Musik. -THE PUBLIC STAFF

THIS SATURDAY!

THE

SHEEPDOGS SATURDAY OCT 22

TWO NIGHT STAND! FRI & SAT OCT 28 & 29

THURSDAY NOV 3

U2 Symphony Experience 8pm Kleinhans Music Hall, 3 Symphony Circle $39-$75

[SYMPHONIC] Fans of U2 are in for a treat as the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra takes on the famous Irish rock band’s catalogue for their show the U2 Symphony Experience as part of the Orchestra’s BPO Rocks series. Expect rich, re-envisioned orchestrations of your favorite U2 songs from all of the band’s eras, from “Sunday Bloody Sunday” to “Elevation” and beyond. The U2 Symphony Experience debuts to Kleinhans Music Hall on Friday, October 21. -CP

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THIS WEEK'S LGBT AGENDA THURSDAY OCTOBER 20

KNOCKTURN ALLEY FEST 2016 8PM-12AM at Dreamland, 387 Franklin St.

For four days, Dreamland transforms into an immersive environment set in the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. No wizarding costume, no entry. Donation bar featuring butter beers and other magical potions, parking lot quidditch with a human snitch (bring your own broom) and performances by Muggle Snuggle. For adults (and youth on Sunday, 2 p.m. - 6 p.m.). Tickets: $10, www.dreamlandarts.org. Special pricing on Sunday.

FRIDAY OCTOBER 21

DINNER AND DEATH

PROM OF THE DEAD: GILT SATURDAY OCT 22 [PARTY] Just your basic dance party with costumes, music, candy everywhere, and the dead, no big deal. The party’s been going on for six years strong now, to benefit the cutting-edge work done by Torn Space Theater, a theater and performance production engine that continues to churn out post-industrial paeans for the dead, undead, and the barely alive. Buffalo loves its theater, and Torn Space simply can’t put on its run of shows at the Adam Mickiewicz Polish Library and Dramatic Circle and its summer spectacles at Silo City without throwing its big damned Prom of the Dead party, with this year’s theme being gold. On Saturday, October 22, the elegant ballroom of Dnipro Ukrainian Cultural Center will be transformed into a Gilded Age throng of the beglittered dead, with prizes awarded for the most gloriously gilt. Photos of golden dead prom couples will be made available at the event, the music will go all night, and of course there will be performers, provocateurs, and merry-makers. Doors open at 9pm, and your first drink comes with admission. Like many Torn Space events, this party will pool the talents of the city, and blur the lines between audience and performer, and still never for one second stop being a party. -AARON LOWINGER

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Join members of Silver Pride Project for a healthy lunch in collaboration with Erie County Senior Services and Pride Center of Western New York. Meal choices are set by the program and do not reflect the venue’s full menu. For more information, call the Pride Center at 852-PRIDE.

10:30 am Hydraulic Hearth, 716 Swan St.

[BRUNCH] Hydraulic Hearth spent the summer killing the brunch game, and that trend continues this fall with the return of Bagels & Brooze on Saturday, October 22. The brunch series features a collaboration between the Larkinville restaurant and BreadHive, the local bakery co-op that serves up monstrous bagels—which means there’ll be a full “design your own bagel” menu featuring all sorts of tasty selections. The brunch will also feature the music of DJs Shane & Tone, as well as specials from Community Beer Works. The brunch will run on most Saturdays through April. -CP

SUNDAY OCT 23

MONDAY OCT 24 Garrett Klahn 9pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $8-$10

MONDAY OCTOBER 24

KILL THE NOISE SATURDAY OCT 22 10PM / LIFT NIGHTCLUB, 257 FRANKLIN ST. / $10

LOOPMAGAZINEBUFFALO.COM

Bagels & Brooze

[COMICS] On Sunday, October 23, Gutter Pop Comics on Elmwood will hold a comic book release party for Scorched Earth, the new comic by Tom Van Deusen. Described by the artist as “a slapstick portrait of human puerility,” the book was released by Denver Colorado’s Kilgore Books. Van Deusen will be on hand signing copies of the book and free refreshments will be provided. -CP

1-2PM at Preservation Pub, 948 Main St.

A monthly meet-up and open discussion for the gender diverse — Western New York’s gender warriors and revolutionaries.

SATURDAY OCT 22

7pm Gutter Pop Comics, 1028 Elmwood Ave.

SENIORS’ HEALTHY LUNCH

7-10PM at No Labels Clothing, 224 Allen St.

[ROCK] You may well have heard the Record Company covering the O’Jays classic “Love Train” in a Coors Light commercial back a few years, but as the LA-based trio’s debut for Concord proves, they aspire to something grittier and significantly more potent than watery brew. Released this past February, Give It Back to You launched the single “Off the Ground,” which went on to top Billboard’s Adult Alternative Songs chart. With drums and bass making up two-thirds of the band’s tone, the melodies are left to frontman Chris Vos, who decorates above the prominent rhythm section with guitars, lap steel, pedal steel, and harmonica. His low-end pipes create a dead serious, bluesy ethos that’s garnered daunting comparisons to John Lee Hooker. Edgy fem-duo Muddy Magnolias will open for them on Friday, October 21 at Tralf Music Hall, supporting their anticipated debut, Broken People (Third Generation), out last week. Their sound has been described as something likened to Indigo Girls inhabited by the Glimmer Twins—too good to miss, so arrive early. -CJT

Scorched Earth Book Birthday Release Party

MONDAY OCTOBER 24

BUFFALO GENDER WARRIORS

7pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $15

9PM / DNIPRO UKRAINIAN CULTURAL CENTER, 562 GENESEE ST. / $20-$25

6-11PM at Brent House Mansion, 3105 Main St.

Join the Western New York AntiViolence Project for a pasta dinner and tour of the haunted Bent House mansion. Tickets: $10, advance (call 948-5744); $13, at the door.

The Record Company

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Frantic bass-heavy EDM coupled with electro house is the foundation of Occult Classics, the latest album from Rochester’s Kill the Noise. In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, the producer talked about how he crafts his unique sound, which sometimes includes distortion pedals and guitars—inspiration from unlikely sources like Nine Inch Nails and Tame Impala. “All the stuff that I’ve really loved is using things in an unconventional kind of way,” he says in the interview. As collaborator, the artist has worked with well known acts like Mike Angelakos of Passion Pit, Skrillex, and AWOLNATION. His songs have also been featured on Adult Swim and in films like the latest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Though he got used to playing big festivals over the summer, he’ll come to the more intimate Lift Nightclub on Saturday, October 22. Local support provided by Wooli. -CORY PERLA

16 THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

[ROCK] Most fans probably know Garrett Klahn as singer and guitarist of the post-hardcore band Texas Is the Reason. Earlier this year Klahn released his first solo record, and if there is one thing the maturing musician knows, it is how important just one record can be. Texas Is the Reason is now highly praised as one of the pioneers of emo music, but the band only existed for three years and released just one LP, 1996's Do You Know Who You Are. On his solo record, Klahn does not aim to recreate that magic— he aims more so to summarize a career so far. That means pulling some of those emo sentiments and matching them with rock or psych-folk sounds to create a record that emotionally affects as much as it physically moves. Garrett Klahn comes to Mohawk Place on his first full band tour with his band the Surrounding Areas on Monday, October 24 with local support from Del Paxton and the Good. -CP


CALENDAR EVENTS

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WEDNESDAY

OCT 19

Andy Timmons Band, Travis Larson Band 9PM $10

The Good Neighbors, Slow Motion Breakdown, Jim Levinthal Band

THURSDAY

OCT 20

9PM $5

LA SERA WEDNESDAY OCT 26 7PM /MOHAWK PLACE, 47 E MOHAWK ST. / $12 [INDIE] Punk duo La Sera will come to Mohawk Place on Wednesday, October 26 to showcase their latest album, Music for Listening to Music To. The married couple, Katy Goodman of Vivian Girls and Todd Wisenbaker, formed the band in 2010 in Los Angeles, but the project seems to be in Goodman’s hands. The former Vivian Girls bassist shares songwriting duties with Wisenbaker but it is her energy and positivity that comes across the strongest in music videos and on stage. Her sweet, clear voice carries lovely melodies set against catchy guitar riffs and poplike drums. A honeyed, sped-up Smiths influence is definitely conveyed. Goodman’s music deals with love and breakups and all the uncertainty that comes with relationships. And for a married couple, the lyrics are quite tragic. However, it seems like the duo spends enough time apart. Goodman has a master’s degree in physics education and works part time as a computer coder, and it’s obvious that her brains and wit have translated splendidly into her music. Music for Listening to Music To was produced by Ryan Adams on the Los Angeles Polyvinyl Record Co. label. -MARISSA BEINHAUER

PUBLIC APPROVED

Happy Hour w. Jony James 6PM FREE

FRIDAY

OCT 21

10PM $5

SATURDAY

OCT 22

Vibe & Direct, Lesionread

MONDAY

Jazz Happy Hour w. Mark Filsinger

10PM $5

OCT 24

5:30PM FREE

WEDNESDAY

YALI, Erica Wolfling, Wild Pink The Lady, or the Tiger? 9PM $5

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

OCT 28

Intrepid Travelers & Folkfaces Halloweekender Kickoff! Happy Hour w. the fibs 6PM FREE

Infringement Poster Release Party

Major Aracana, Much Band, chloroform, Scott MacCallum, Fragrance and Juan, Stevie Fleck, Dashuri & Jenevieve, Music for Ultras, Lalalangue 10PM

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERY SUNDAY FREE

FIRST SUNDAYS: THE JAZZ CACHE 6PM. ANN PHILIPPONE 8PM . DR JAZZ & THE JAZZ BUGS (EXCEPT FIRST SUNDAYS)

EVERY MONDAY FREE

8PM. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 9PM. OPEN MIC W. JOSH GAGE

EVERY TUESDAY 6PM. SAD HAPPY HOUR

[POP] The latest album from Brooklyn’s Lucius is called Good Grief and it’s appropriately titled. It’s not a Charlie Brown reference, but more a reference to the way we bask in our own depression and anguish. In that context, the record, which is mostly about anxiety, mental illness, and heartbreak—song titles include “Madness” and “Gone Insane”—is actually pretty ecstatic and ironically gleeful as opposed to bleak and sorrowful. The record also stands in contrast to their 2013 debut, Wildewoman, which was rooted in retro vibes and organic soul sounds, where as Good Grief is far more a contemporary pop album. The band, led by look-alikes Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig, comes to Asbury Hall on Wednesday, October 26. Minneapolis country-folk duo the Cactus BlosP soms open the show. -CORY PERLA

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Buffalo’s Premier Live Music Club ◆ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19 ◆

9PM $5

8PM / ASBURY HALL, 341 DELAWARE AVE. . $20-$25

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Austin, TX Experimentalist My Empty Phantom + Indie Folk from PA The Crew of the Half Moon, OCT 27

LUCIUS WEDNESDAY OCT 26

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Scott Valkwitch, Dildon’t 8PM ◆ $5

◆ THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20 ◆ ESI Events presents: From Portland, Oregon

White Fang

From LA No Parents + The Pepperoni Boys 8PM ◆ $10

◆ FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 ◆

Mr. Conrad’s Rock’n’Roll Happy Hour 5PM ◆ FREE

From Chapel Hill, NC, Bloodshot Records Recording artist, ex-Flat Duo Jets From Fl One Trip Little From boston

Dex Romweber Thirty Silver

+ Chloroform, MeNyou , Dead Lounge

8PM ◆ $8 ADVANCE/$10 DAY OF SHOW

◆ SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 ◆ Cleveland metal

Bound By Fate + As Summer Dies,

From Erie Storms Within, NARWHAL BLOODBATH 8PM ◆ $5

◆ SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23 ◆ Seattle Hip-Hop

Onry Ozzborn

From NYC Rob Sonic + Upgrade,

W/ KATHRYN KOCH (FREE) 8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS $3

Rafael Vigilantics, Frigid Giant & MCKP, Sleep Close Death, DJ Drop D

EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE

◆ MONDAY, OCTOBER 24 ◆ Ex-Texas is the Reason, Ex-Buffalonian

6PM. TYLER WESTCOTT & DR. JAZZ

EVERY THURSDAY FREE

5PM. BARTENDER BILL PLAYS THE ACCORDION, PAUL SCHMID ON BASS

EVERY SATURDAY FREE

4:30-7:30PM. CELTIC SEISIUNS

248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

NIETZSCHES.COM

6:30PM ◆ $12

Garrett Klahn & the Surrounding Areas + Del Paxton, The Good

8PM ◆ $8 ADVANCE/$10 DAY OF SHOW

◆ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26 ◆ ESI Events presents: both From Los Angeles

La Sera

+ Springtime Carnivore

8PM ◆ $12 ADVANCE/$14 DAY OF SHOW

47 East Mohawk St. 716.312.9279

BUFFALOSMOHAWKPLACE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/MOHAWKPLACE

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 17


FOOD + DRINK FEATURE

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Victor Parra Gonzalez of Las Puertas. PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAS PUERTAS

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BY TIM FENSTER

ALLENTOWNPIZZABUFFALO.COM

CHEF VICTOR PARRA GONZALEZ IS NEARLY READY TO OPEN LAS PUERTAS. A HIGH-CONCEPT MEXICAN RESTAURANT ON RHODE ISLAND STREET

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notion of Mexican food conjures up mouth-watering images of simple food. Tacos shoveled down mere seconds out of the drive-thru line. IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ARE ON THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINEburritos THE AD from Moe’s or the nearest Bountiful Lloyd truck. Nine-dollar platters of enchiladas THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. or tostadas, usually accompanied by a pitcher or Advertisers Signature two of sugary margaritas. � CHECK COPY CONTENT MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER Thank you for advertising with THE PUBLIC. Please review your ad and check for any errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The production department must have a signed proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve by responding to this email.

Whatever it is, it’s usually cheap, fast, and fill-

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gover lunches. Rarely do we gather around Mexican food for anniversaries or graduations _______________________ or other special occasions.  restaurateur Victor Parra Gonzalez is trying Y15W22 ______________________ to change.

“We say in Mexico, ‘It’s not only tacos that we feed ourselves.’ Whereas here most of the Mexican very protein-driven, in our country THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BEfood USEDisFOR it’s actually PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC.a very great balance,” says Parra Gonzalez. “We’re not going to eat four times a day protein from animals; we’re going to find it in different things. And I think we can showcase that through our menus.” A native of the seaside restore city of Acapulco, Mexico, Parra Gonzalez brought Mexican fine dining to Western New York with Youngstown’s Jaguar at the Bistro. The restaurant gained a strong local following with its blend of traditional Mexican cuisine and French cooking techniques. Think duck breast with a dark mole confit sauce, or octopus slow-cooked with chorizo and potatoes.  The cuisine caught on so well that after two years with Jaguar at the Bistro, Parra Gonzalez began looking for a location in a bigger market: Buffalo. He is now on the verge of opening Las Puertas, a small West Side restaurant which he says will offer a rotating menu of classic Mexican cuisine with unique French twists.

18 THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

LAS PUERTAS 385 RHODE ISLAND ST, BUFFALO LASPUERTASBUFFALO @LASPUERTASBUF

“We’re going to try to push some buttons with the customers to sort of challenge them to try something that they either have not heard of or that they never had the opportunity to try,” Parra Gonzalez said. Parra Gonzalez acknowledges that there are challenges to recreating one’s native cuisine in another country, especially in a city so far from US southern border. The first is the risk of alienating, or outright terrifying, one’s customer case. Some traditional Mexican dishes, like ceviche—a citrusy


FEATURE FOOD + DRINK

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RESIDENTS, AND REALLY GIVE THEM THAT FEELING OF CONVIVIALITY. THE DESIRE WAS TO BE IN THE COMMUNITY AND MAKE A COMMUNITY RESTAURANT.”

RISTORANTE LOMBARDO

1198 Hertel Ave, Buffalo ristorantelombardo.com Known for its impeccable menu and fantastic patio, Lombardo’s is also well respected for its remarkable wine list, precise cocktails, and the kind of attentive, conscientious service that can turn either of those things into a memorable experience.

seafood dish that’s popular in seaside Central American cities like Acapulco—would probably be welcomed by Buffalonians. But others, such as escamoles—ant larvae and pupae— would probably send many diners running for the hills. The second challenge is that many ingredients common in traditional Mexican cuisine—such as purslane, quelites, and epazote, herbs that are fixtures of Central American diets—are hard to come across up here. Complicating the problem further is the fact Parra Gonzalez wants to use locally sourced ingredients, a rarity among local ethnic restaurants. “What is it that we have to work with, and how do we make that Mexican food? That has been the biggest challenge yet,” he said. Amazingly, Parra Gonzalez was able to find two local farmers, Promised Land CSA and Plato Dale Farm, that grow purslane and other Mexican herbs. “When I saw that he was able to produce [purslane], I almost jumped and hugged him. For three years I’ve been trying to get my hands on this thing,” Parra Gonzalez said.

PROVIDENCE SOCIAL

490 Rhode Island St, Buffalo theprovidencesocial.com Home to a brunchtime bloody mary few can stack up to, ProSo’s cocktail program pairs well with its fun menu of food offerings, including wings in miso peanut sauce and its take on the everpopular lettuce wrap.

Of course, locally sourced ingredients are not available year-round. Rather than relying on produce shipped from across globe, Parra Gonzalez plans to offer a rotating menu based on whatever is available at the moment. Typically, this will consist of about 15 items, with a nice balance between sweet and savory dishes. As for the restaurant itself, Las Puertas, at 385 Rhode Island Street, will consist of just 35 seats, and will have an open space floor plan, including an open kitchen, to allow guests to interact with the staff. Parra Gonzalez said this is meant to reflect the togetherness and family-focused nature of Mexican dinners. It is also part of his plan for a neighborhood restaurant with a friendly, inviting atmosphere. “We wanted to stay honest to the residents, and really give them that feeling of conviviality. The desire was to be in the community and make a community restaurant,” he said.

VERA

220 Lexington Ave, Buffalo verabuffalo.com The granddaddy of Buffalo’s young craft cocktail scene, Vera wins new fans every day with its menu of classic and modern drinks. Stop in for Chartreuse on tap (for real), an excellent cocktail, and some of the friendliest bartenders in the city.

This wish is partly driven by the support Parra Gonzalez has received from the community. Thousands of area residents, mostly regulars of Jaguar at the Bistro, helped get Las Puertas off the ground by donating thousands of dollars. This fundraising drive helped Parra Gonzalez avoid the need for a business loan. It also inspired the name, which means “the doors,” because of all the diners’ homes they visited during the drive. “It’s been an amazing thing to see how much excitement there is for [this] project,” Parra Gonzalez said. “Hopefully we nailed it, hopefully we give everybody something they’re excited about, something they can get behind (and something) they love.” For more information about Las Puertas, like P the restaurant’s page on Facebook. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 19


FILM REVIEW

Rachel Weisz in Denial.

DISMEMBERING THE PAST DENIAL BY GEORGE SAX DENIAL QUALIFIES AS A HOLOCAUST MOTION PICTURE

even though it depicts events that occurred, as one of the movie’s characters observes, over half a century after Adolf Hitler and Germany’s unprecedentedly evil efforts to expunge the Jewish people from Europe. At the close of the Second World War in Europe in 1945, somewhere from 5.5 to 6 million Jews—along with several million non-Jews—had been murdered. Hitler had promised to eradicate European Jewry, and, as one historian has bitterly commented, it was by far the promise he came closest to keeping. But over the last several decades, an assortment of individuals and groups, variously deluded and/or cynically exploitive, have persistently challenged the historically validated extent, and even the existence of the Holocaust. British writer David Irving (Timothy Spall, appropriately loathsome) has been one of the most successful, and contrary to reasonable and moral expectations, had even achieved a small degree of respect for his historical works on Hitler and the Third Reich, despite widespread and growing distaste for his claims on behalf of Der Fuhrer and Nazi Germany. This instructive, frequently absorbing and unexpectedly relevant

AT THE MOVIES A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues

BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

OPENING THIS WEEK DENIAL—Historical drama based on the true story of a British academic (Rachel Weisz) who was charged with libel for calling “Bullshit” on Holocaust denier David Irving (Timothy Spall). Directed by Mick Jackson. Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK—Tom Cruise (5’ 7”) returns as the 6’ 5” vigilante hero of Lee Childs’s novels. With Cobie Smulders, Danika Yarosh, and Ninja N. Devoe. Directed by Edward Zwick (The Last Samurai). Area theaters. KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES—Zach Galifianakis and Isla Fisher as a suburban couple whose lives get hectic when they learn that their new neighbors (Gal Gadot, Jon Hamm) are spies. With Patton Oswalt and Matt Walsh. Directed by Greg Mottola (Superbad). Area theaters A MAN CALLED OVE—Sweden’s entry for the next Academy Awards, a comedy-drama starring Rolf Lassgård as a curmudgeon who feels he has reason to live after losing his wife and his job. Directed by Hannes Holm. Reviewed this issue. Dipson Eastern Hills OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL—Is it Halloween already? Starring Henry Thomas, Elizabeth Reaser, and Doug Jones. Directed by Mike Flanagan, whose 2011 Absentia is one of the creepiest movies I’ve ever seen. Area theaters

movie deals with a lawsuit Irving filed in the late 1990s against Deborah Lipstadt, an American historian at Emory University who had labeled Irving a Holocaust denier and Hitler apologist in one of her books. Irving claimed critical damage to his reputation and career. Denial, adapted by playwright David Hare from Lipstadt’s book about her legal ordeal, is a superior example of the docudrama genre—not only for its generally finely done narrative, but because the movie offers a curiously apropos lesson in the power of demagoguery to mystify events and arouse in mass audiences illusory, emotion-driven ideas and behaviors. Irving has never achieved anything like the numbers of believers Donald J. Trump’s ugly agitation has, but attempts to rehabilitate Hitler and fascism have been disturbingly persistent. As Denial makes all too clear, Irving has been among the most effective farright radical instigators. And he had a very important advantage in British courts. The alleged libeler has to prove her charge, without the protection of the American First Amendment. The aggrieved party need not prove the injury. This legal principle gives the movie much of its interest and dramatic propulsion.

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948)— Though it was hated for years by horror buffs for reducing their favorite movie monsters to stooge for comedians Abbott and Costello, this lighthearted parody is now well regarded. With Lon Chaney, Jr. as the Wolfman, Glenn Strange as the monster, and Béla Lugosi in only his second and last appearance as Dracula. Directed by Charles Barton. SatSun 11:30 m. North Park ARMY OF DARKNESS (1992)—Sam Raimi’s third Evil Dead movie sends Ash (Bruce Campbell) back to medieval times, where he has to use his shrinking resources to battle the same demons. Raimi designed the movie as a parody of/tribute to the campy adventure movies of the 1960s, and it really looks like the kind of lousy movie you might have seen at a Saturday matinee in 1962. It’s not a bad movie, it just looks like one, a distinction that was lost on most audiences when this was first released. Sat-Sun 9:30pm. North Park THE DRUMS OF WINTER (1988)—UB faculty member Sarah Elder co-directed (with Leonard Kamerling) this documentary exploring the traditional dance, music, and spiritual world of the Yup’ik Eskimo people of Emmonak, a remote village at the mouth of the Yukon River on the Bering Sea coast. The film was added to the National Film Registry in 2007. Presented by the Buffalo Film Seminars. Tue 7pm. Dipson Amherst EVIL DEAD II (1987)—Less a sequel to the original The Evil Dead than a remake with a bigger budget. Bruce Campbell is the cinema’s greatest punching bag since Curly Howard, and Sam Raimi demonstrates a contagious glee in his craft that rivals Orson Welles’s “boy with an electric train set” work in Citizen Kane. Sat-Sun 7pm. North Park HATCHET FOR THE HONEYMOON (Italy, 1970)— Mario Bava’s typically stylish early giallo stars Stephen Forsyth as the owner of a bridal shop who is driven by sexual frustration to kill his customers. With Dagmar Lassander, Laura Betti, and Femi Benussi. Sat 9:30pm. Screening Room

20 THE PUBLIC / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

The case preparation scenes—including a sequence where the defense attorneys and Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz) travel to the site of the Auschwitz death camp—are surprisingly absorbing. They’re greatly enhanced by the compellingly controlled performance of Tom Wilkinson as Lipstadt’s Barrister and Andrew Scott as her quietly blunt and incisive solicitor. But Denial has acquired what must be an unintended currency due to its release during this year’s ugly and disruptive presidential election. The parallels are disconcertingly obvious. When Irving tells someone that, to rev up an audience response, he claims that “More women died in the back seat of Edward Kennedy’s car at Chappaquiddick than in the gas chambers at Auschwitz,” or complains that he’s unfairly branded a racist since he’s dated females of color, “and they all had fine breasts,” it’s difficult not to make the connection with Trump’s truth-and-fact ravaging performances. Denial is a very good introduction to the subject of the Holocaust even though it’s set much later in time. And it’s also an implicit lesson in contemporary provocateur politics and popular confuP sion and anger.

HORROR OF DRACULA (Great Britain, 1958)—Christopher Lee became an international star for his elegant but feral interpretation of the vampire aristocrat in the movie that set Hammer Studios on the way to a long string of classic monster updates. With Peter Cushing, Michael Gough, and Carol Marsh. Directed by Terence Fisher. Sat-Mon 2pm & 4:30pm, Tue 2pm. North Park JULIE & JULIA  (2009)—Meryl Streep as Julia Child and Amy Adams as a contemporary housewife trying to work here way through every one of the 524 recipes in Child’s  Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  The parallelism sometimes results in strains,  with Streep’s entertaining impression of the singular Child taking us out of the other, more serious story. Co-starring Stanley Tucci, Chris Messina, Mary Lynn Rajskub, and Jane Lynch. Directed by Nora Ephron (Bewitched).  –GS Wed-Thu  2pm & 4:30pm. North Park KIZUMONGATARI 2: NEKKETSU-HEN—In this anime sequel, a boy seeks to save the life of his vampire girlfriend by retrieving her four severed limbs from the vampire hunters who took them. From the manga by Ishin Nishio. Directed by Tatsuya Oishi and Akiyuki Shinbo. Wed Oct 26 7pm. Dipson Eastern Hills MACBETH—Surrealistic production of Verdi’s opera based on Shakespeare’s play. Starring Ludovic Tézier, Martina Serafin, Vitalij Kowaljow, Saimir Pirgu, Albert Casals, and Anna Puche. Directed by Christof Loy. Thu 8pm. Dipson Amherst OASIS: SUPERSONIC—From the producers of the Oscar-winning Amy, a documentary about the 1990s band, enormously popular everywhere in the world except the United States, that was known as much for their music as for the incessant fighting between sibling leaders Noel and Liam Gallagher. Wed Oct 26 7pm. Dipson Amherst PRINCESS MONONOKE (Japan, 1997)—Hayao Miyazaki’s epic historical fantasy was his first animated feature to reach a wide audience in the United States, despite having a darker tone than most of his work. Mon 9:30pm. North Park

ROOM 237—Documentary probing the various theories and interpretations regarding Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of Stephen King’s The Shining. Directed by Rodney Ascher. Fri 2pm, 4:30pm, 7 pm. North Park ROPE (1948)—Alfred Hitchcock used Patrick Hamilton’s play based on the Leopold-Loeb murder case for an experiment in attempting a single-shot film, with reel changes disguised by invisible cuts. Starring James Stewart, John Dall, and Farley Granger. Mon 7pm. North Park THE SHINING (1980)—Stanley Kubrick was probably too busy experimenting with his new Stedicam and thinking of ways to parody Last Year at Marienbad to notice that Jack Nicholson was ad-libbing a more entertaining performance than the one called for by Stephen King’s novel. But hey, either way it’s some kind of a classic. With Shelly Duvall and Scatman Crothers. Fri 9:30pm North Park TRANSFORMERS: THE MOVIE (1986)—There has to be a limit to 1980s nostalgia, but I won’t assume to speak for those who were kids in that decade. The voice cast includes Judd Nelson, Leonard Nimpy, Eric Idle, Robert Stack, and, in his final appearance, Orson Welles. Wed-Thu 7 pm & 9:30 pm. North Park YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974)—Mel Brooks’s best film was this parody of the classic Universal monster movies of the 1930s that includes some of the original sets used on those films. Co-written by Gene Wilder, who stars with Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, Madeline Kahn, and Kenneth Mars. Sat, Tue 7:30pm. Screening Room

CONTINUING THE ACCOUNTANT—The premise sounds like a Monty Python skit: an action film whose hero is a member of the world’s least dangerous profession. But the result is surprisingly entertaining, with Ben Affleck as an austic savant raised by a military father who had his own ideas on how to prepare him for sur


REVIEW FILM

THE 59-YEAROLD MAN WHO CLIMBED A CHAIR & TRIED TO HANG HIMSELF

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com

A MAN CALLED OVE

HALLWALLS 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 hallwalls.org

BY M. FAUST AFTER THE HUGE INTERNATIONAL SUCCESS last year of the Swedish

HAMBURG PALACE 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 hamburgpalace.com LOCKPORT PALACE 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 lockportpalacetheatre.org MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 amctheatres.com MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall Hamburg / 824-3479 mckinley.dipsontheatres.com

Rolf Lassgård in A Man Called Ove.

that enforcing parking regulations isn’t enough of a reason to live. He puts on his best suit and prepares to hang himself. But something comes up. Ove keeps trying to kill himself through most of the film, and circumstances keep getting in the way. At first it’s the arrival of his new neighbors and their children, who are unable to back their vehicle into the designated space, just the kind of failing that Ove is duty-bound to correct. When people aren’t ringing his doorbell, he stumbles into other tasks that have to be done before he can shuffle of the mortal coil and join his wife.

comedy The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, you’d be forgiven for suspecting the Swedes of mining similar territory with this film about another testy old curmudgeon. But this entry for the Oscar’s Best Foreign Language Film category turns out to be quite a different jar of herring.

If attempted suicide doesn’t strike you as funny, don’t worry, that’s not where A Man Called Ove goes for laughs. It’s tone is more sentimental than comical, as he remembers his past, scenes from which take up the bulk of the movie: his relationship with his father, who also worked at the train yard, and how he met his wife.

Ove (Rolf Lassgård) is well short of centenarian status: At 59, he’s comparatively a spring chicken. But he’s grumpy beyond his years, spending his days monitoring his neighbors in the housing development where he lives. You might wonder why they put up with the old grouch, but be patient, all will be revealed.

Need I say that none of Ove’s attempts at self-termination come to fruition? Of course not—this clearly isn’t that kind of movie. Nothing here fails to go just where you expect it to, other than it proceeds on its way with more depth of emotion that you were probably expecting. If it has a flaw, it’s that the final reel lays it on a bit thick, with enough emotional climaxes for a half-dozen tearjerkers. Your handkerchief will get a good workout at this one. Opening Friday at the Dipson Eastern Hills Mall Cinema. P

Turns out that Ove is a widower who can’t move past the death of his beloved wife. And when he is forced into early retirement from his job as a train engineer, a job he has held since he was a teenager, it seems to him

NORTH PARK THEATRE 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 northparktheatre.org

vival in a cruel world. The character’s backstory troleum, which last year agreed to pay $18.7 billion unfolds along with the present-day one that ties in in fines, exercised pressure over the production to mobsters, government agents, and crooked busikeep that part of the story off the screen. At any REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 nessmen, and the result is finally a bit overstuffed: rate, it’s a huge disservice to history. Starring Mark 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 It’s a 130-minute movie that you wish was longer, Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, John Malkovich, and Kate if only so that every member of the first-rate cast Hudson. Directed by Peter Berg  (Battleship). –MF regmovies.com could have more screen time. Along with Affleck, AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Rethat includes J. K. Simmons, John Lithgow, Anna gal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 Kendrick, Jon Bernthal and Cynthia Addai-RobinWalden Galleria 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls son. Directed by Gavin O’Connor (Jane Got a Gun). THE DRESSMAKER—Kate Winslet as a haute couture –MF AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, 236–0146 dressmaker who returns to her small town AusRegal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Reregmovies.com tralian home to exact revenge on the people who gal Walden Galleria drove her away. Here and there, the film seems to AMERICAN HONEY—Winner of the jury prize at this be channeling a combination of Frederick DurrenREGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 year’s Cannes Film Festival, American Honey is a matt’s female-vengeance play  The Visit  and the 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 sprawling, overlong, perverse mess. And I mean drag queen movie  The Adventures of Priscilla, that in the nicest possible way. Inspired by several Queen of the Desert. There are even brief hints regmovies.com driving trips across the American midlands, Britof a Sergio Leone movie. Moving in fits and starts ish filmmaker Andrea Arnold (Fish Tank) decided through broad-beamed humor to sentimental baREGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 to explore the space between the coasts through nality and on to gonzo Gothicism, by the time the the eyes of a young woman (first-time actor Sasha Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 finale arrives it’s rather anti-climactic. With Liam Lane) who joins a crew of unmoored young people Hemsworth, Hugo Weaving, Judy Davis, and Kerry regmovies.com travelling from city to city selling magazine subFox. Directed by Jocelyn Moorhouse (How to Make scriptions. There isn’t all that much plot to it; it runs an American Quilt). –GS Dipson Eastern Hills REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 163 minutes, and could easily have been half that THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN—Positioned to be “this year’s length, or twice it. You wish it had spent less time One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga Gone Girl,” this adaptation of a best-selling psychowith Star and her romance with crew leader Jake 681-9414 / regmovies.com logical thriller makes an engrossing cinematic stew (Shia LaBeouf in a commanding performance) and out of what in the end is trashy material. Emily Blunt more with their peers. And you have to wonder why does sold work with the tricky title role, a woman RIVIERA THEATRE Arnold decided to use the squarish Academy ratio who sees a clue to a murder from the window of for an ensemble story dominated by the western 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda a commuter train. The complications, including her landscape. (Like I said, perverse.) Is it a good mov692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org link to the victim and her alcoholism, are exploited ie? It’s a fascinating one, and that’s close enough. for all they’re worth by scripter Erin Cressida Wil–MF Dipson Amherst son and director Tate Taylor (The Help). It doesn’t THE SCREENING ROOM THE BEATLES: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK—THE TOURING YEARS— take you anywhere memorable, but the trip itself is 3131 Sheridan Dr., Amherst / 837-0376 There may not be a lot that’s new about the Beatworth the ride.  Co-starring Haley Bennett, Justin les in Ron Howard’s documentary, at least not for screeningroom.net Theroux, Rebecca Ferguson, Laura Prepon, Allison longtime Beatlemaniacs, but the film is filled with Janney, Edgar Ramírez, and Lisa Kudrow. –MF Aurorestored performance clips and enough footage of ra, AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Amherst, Dipson Flix, SQUEAKY WHEEL the Fabs joking with the press that it’s pretty much Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, irresistible. Yes, it’s already on Hulu, but it’s a rare 712 Main St., / 884-7172 Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria treat to see it on a big screen. And most importantVISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> squeaky.org KEVIN HART: WHAT NOW?—The comedian in a live ly, the theatrical version is followed by a complete performance in Philadelphia. Directed by Tim Stoand newly remastered version of  The Beatles at SUNSET DRIVE-IN ry and Leslie Small.  AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Shea Stadium, the long-unseen film of their historic Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, performance in front of 56,000 fans. –MF  Dipson 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport 735Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria Eastern Hills 7372 / sunset-drivein.com THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN  is a remake of the classic DEEPWATER HORIZON  is a big-budget disaster epic western from 1960, itself a remake of Akira Kurosaabout the April 2010 explosion at the oil rig in the TJ’S THEATRE Gulf of Mexico in which 11 men were killed. The film wa’s glorious  The Seven Samurai, none of which is 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 tries to lay out a complex narrative, at least until likely to matter as much to ticket buyers as the fact newangolatheater.com the explosions start and it turnsFILM chaotic, LISTINGS It’s filled VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE REVIEWS that&the ensemble cast>> of this western is headed with special effects and likeable characters to root by Denzel Washington and Chris Pratt. The bigger for. But what it lacks, amazingly, is any mention question is, how do you get a modern audience to TRANSIT DRIVE-IN of the most important aspect of the incident: the see a western? Changing the villain of the piece 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport 200 million gallons of oil that spilled into the Gulf from a bandit to a mine operator certainly helps, 625-8535 / transitdrivein.com over a period of three months, doing incalculable because where you have mines you have dynamite, damage to one of the most fragile parts of the which means you can blow stuff up in the climax. country’s ecology. One has to wonder if British PeThe character interplay is wan—you would be for-

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

given for expecting more from co-screenwriter Nic Pizzolatto, creator of HBO’s True Detective—but the size of the cast maintains interest until the rootin’ tootin’ finale. With Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, Haley Bennett, and Peter Sarsgaard. Directed by Antoine Fuqua (Southpaw). –MF  AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Palace Hamburg, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit MASTERMINDS—Kristen Wiig, Kate McKinnon, and Leslie Jones (all of the leading cast of  Ghostbusters except for Melissa McCarthy) are joined by Jason Sudeikis, Owen Wilson, and a ridiculously bewigged Zach Galifianakis in this bank robbery comedy that was heavily promoted for release in 2015 but delayed due to the distributor’s financial problems. Directed by Jared Hess (Nacho Libre).  Regal Elmwood, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria MAX STEEL—Teen superhero stuff. Starring Ben Winchell, Maria Bello, and Andy Garcia. Directed by Stewart Hendler. Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN—A new film by Tim Burton. Remember what that was something to look forward to? Starring Eva Green, Asa Butterfield, Samuel L. Jackson, Judi Dench, Rupert Everett, Chris O’Dowd, and Terence Stamp. Aurora, AMC Maple Ridge, Regal Elmwood, Regal Walden Galleria, Dipson Flix, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit SULLY—Clint Eastwood’s trademark low-key approach to filmmaking is pleasurably displayed in this thoughtful look at the so-called “Miracle on the Hudson,” the 2009 incident in which a damaged airplane made an emergency landing on the Hudson River with no loss of life. Though pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger (Tom Hanks) was lionized by a public that had long been starved of unambiguous heroes, behind the scenes he was subjected to interrogation by flight officials who questioned his judgment in the face of what their computer models say he should have done. It’s not hard to read a political subtext into this, that we should trust people of proven skill and experience instead of Monday morning micromanaging them (and at the age of 86, Eastwood is entitled to that opinion). But if the story’s drama is built on a shaky pivot (was the second engine functional?), the way it unfolds is smoothly engrossing. With Aaron Eckhart, Laura Linney, Jamey Sheridan, Valerie Mahaffey, and Anna Gunn. –MF AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Amherst, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, ReP gal Quaker, Regal Transit

CULTURE > FILM

VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> DAILYPUBLIC.COM / OCTOBER 19 - 25, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 21


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SERVICES BLUE BRUSH STUDIOS painting and handyman services. Call 2629181 or visit bluebrushstudios.com.

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belmonthousingwny.org/artspace_buffalo_lofts FIVE POINTS BAKERY is hiring experienced FT/PT workers. Come in for an application, 44 Brayton Street, Bflo. ----------------------------------------------ILLOS PIANO PT 1-6 + Sats. Must read music, have knowledge of music history and theory. Positive demeanor, excellent customer service skills a must. 832-0013. ----------------------------------------------THE REFINERY located at 77 Saranac Avenue in Buffalo is looking to hire a NYS cosmetology licensed stylist. Commission based pay. Email therefinery77@gmail.com or call 716.783.9051.

FOR RENT BUSTI AVE. 1/2/3 BRS, off st. pkg, W/D, large porch. No smkg/ pets, proof of renters ins. req’d. $825/$950/$1200 +util. (716) 9136342 ----------------------------------------------WEST SIDE 3BR, W/D, HW, private house with patio. No smkg, small dog ok w/ pet dep, proof of renters ins. req’d. $1075+util. (716) 913-6342 ----------------------------------------------KLEINHANS/D’YOUVILLE Upper 2BR w/AC, pkg, laundry, & stainless/ granite kitchen w/dw. $900+. Call Carrie @ 585.415.3197 ----------------------------------------------BIDWELL PKWY 2200 SQFT, 3 BR/2BA (W/I closets), W/D, HW, patio, no smkg, no pets, $1800 /mo., incl. heat + H2O. 882-3292. Avail. 12/1. ----------------------------------------------1001 LAFAYETTE 2BR, off-street pkg, 3rd fl, pd. elec., no pets, no smkg. $800. 698-9581. ----------------------------------------------ALLENTOWN/MEDICAL CAMPUS 1 BR inc. heat, appl, A/C, H2O, trash. No pets. Call 254-4773. ----------------------------------------------ALLENTOWN/MEDICAL CAMPUS Studio incl. heat, appl, A/C, H2O, trash. No pets. Call 254-4773. ----------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE/PEACE BRIDGE AREA

ELMWOOD VILLAGE Colonial Circle/Livingston. 1 BR, HW floors, new appl., coin-op laundry. MUST SEE! $875 incl. all util. No smkg, no pets. Please call 912-2906.

IMPACT ARTISTS GALLERY Call for artists to exhibit at the new Casa de Art Gallery, located at 141 Elmwood Avenue. Membership information at impactartistsgallery.org/. -----------------------------------------------

COMMUNITY THE MAIZE WNY’s original corn maze. No gate/parking fees. Sat/ Sun 12-6. Storytime, Superhero/ Princess meet and greet, face painting and more. More info. at www.wnymaize.com.

THE ARTS FREE YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS Tuesdays and Thursdays 3:30-6pm. Open to writers between ages 12 and 18 at the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 Washington Street - 2nd floor, Buffalo 14203. Light Snack Provided --------------------------------------------EL MUSEO Call for artists interested in exhibition opportunities. We especially welcome submissions from emerging and mid-career artists of color. We are currently booked through 2017. In order to be considered for our 2018 exhibition season, submissions are due by February 1, 2017. Contact Curator Bryan Lee for more information at bryan@elmuseobuffalo.org, or visit.elmuseobuffalo.org/forartists/open-call-for-work/.

EAST AURORA ARTS SOCIETY Members will present their Fall Library Art Show from Saturday, Oct 1 until Nov. 10 in the Community Room of the East Aurora Town Library, 550 Main St., East Aurora. The public will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite painting. Sue Larkin, chairperson for the show can be reached at suelarkinstudio@ icloud.com with any questions.

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LOCAL ACTIVISTS TAKE A KNEE WITH KAEPERNICK BY THE PUBLIC STAFF This past Sunday, October 16, 60 or so activists marched from Lot 4, Section H3 to Gate 5 at New Era Field just before the kickoff of the game between the Buffalo Bills and the San Francisco 49ers. When the first notes of “The Star-Spangled Banner” drifted over the stadium walls and the din of the sellout crowd, the activists kneeled, in solidarity with 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who has made national headlines this season for his refusal to honor the national anthem. The action was coordinated by Just Resisting and the local chapter of Showing up for Racial Justice, or SURJ. The activists where met with some derision, most of it from a distance. “Black Lives Matter,” one person yelled, walking away, then made a raspberry. Another said, “I never voted but I’m voting for Trump.” Again, walking away. There was confusion, as well: quizzical readings of the protestors’ signs. At the tailgate party the activists threw before they marched to Gate 5—plenty of food, no booze—occasionally a couple of people, beer in hand, would hang out for a spell, drawn in by a trio of African drummers, not fully aware of the purpose of the gathering. There was support, too: “I’m with them all day long,” said one person, waiting for friends before entering the stadium. “All day long.” The action drew both local and national media attention (The Nation, ESPN, Huffington Post, the AP, and more), somewhat balancing coverage of more unpleasant welcomes extended to Kaepernick’s continuing protest in the New Era parking lots that day.

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