The Public - 2/13/18

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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY | FEBRUARY 14, 2018 | DAILYPUBLIC.COM | @PUBLICBFLO | REVOLUTION IS NOT A ONETIME EVENT

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NEWS: WILL BPD’S HOUSING UNIT BE NEXT TO GO?

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INVESTIGATIVE POST: THE DEATH OF POLICE DIVER CRAIG LEHNER

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ART: BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS AT THE ALBRIGHT-KNOX

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SPOTLIGHT: OF COURSE WE’LL TALK TO MARV LEVY!

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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LOOKING BACKWARD: Remembering the IRC.

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THE GRUMPY GHEY: The great holiday pie caper— and its aftermath.

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COMMENTARY: The Environmental Impact Statement is nearing extinction.

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FILM: Double Lover, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, plus capsule reviews.

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THEATER: A quick guide to what’s playing on area stages.

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ON THE COVER: DINDGA MCCANNON will give a lecture at the Albright-Knox on Friday, February 16 at 7:15pm. Read more on page 16 and dailypublic.com.

ART: The cup runneth over: five shows at CEPA Gallery.

THE PUBLIC STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GEOFF KELLY MUSIC EDITOR CORY PERLA MANAGING EDITOR AARON LOWINGER FILM EDITOR M. FAUST CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AT-LARGE JAY BURNEY QUIXOTE PETER SMITH

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THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


LOCAL NEWS

THIS WEEK’S UPS AND DOWNS BY THE PUBLIC STAFF

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UPS: 1. STEVEN MEANS. Word has it that the Grover Cleveland High School and University at Buffalo product and now Super Bowl champion was in his alma mater Community School 53 the next day after the championship parade in downtown Philly. Means went class to class in the East Side elementary school he moved up from 2004, spreading the love and a huge smile.

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2. MAYOR BYRON BROWN. Buffalo’s mayor did the right thing by disbanding the Strike Force. While the decision was apparently made by interim Buffalo Police Commissioner Byron Lockwood, there’s no way Brown didn’t have direct say over what had become one of his police department’s signature strategies. He campaigned on “zero tolerance” policing in 2005 and formed a police unit that would target violent gangs, high grass, and outdated vehicle inspections with the same resources and energy. Let’s hope the wind blowing between Franklin Street and Niagara Square keeps kicking up change and reform. 3. LOVE. It’s Valentine’s Day. What’s it all for but to love and love fiercely?

DOWNS: 1.

DEMOCRATIC

CONGRESSIONAL

CANDIDATE SEAN BUNNY. And, for

that matter, fellow candidates NICK STANKEVICH and JOAN ELIZABETH Bunny canceled his SEAMANS. scheduled appearance at a meet-thecandidate forum this past Sunday, hosted by Sister District of WNY at the Merriweather Library on Buffalo’s East Side. According to a statement he put out jointly with Seamans and Stankevich on social media on Saturday, Bunny canceled because one of the event’s organizers is a partisan of Grand Island supervisor Nate McMurray, who is increasingly the favored candidate in the Democratic derby to take on Congressman Chris Collins in the 27th District. (The event was to be moderated by a nonpartisan Democrat.) Bunny accused that partisan (he called her “a surrogate”) of demonstrating bias, fundraising for McMurray, and trying to poach campaign staff from McMurray’s competitors. Facebook reaction to the cancellation was swift and damning: Candidates are free to call out other candidates, the consensus seemed to be, but calling out Democratic party activists and leveling unsubstantiated claims of untoward behavior (if what he described even qualifies as untoward) is unfair and unseemly, and unproductive in the shared cause of unseating Collins. And who is so thin-skinned, so fearful of being sandbagged, as to cancel a public appearance because some in the audience might not be your supporters? Isn’t that what Collins is famous for? 2. Special marks for JOAN ELIZABETH SEAMANS because, while Bunny and Stankevich posted the joint statement to their campaign Facebook accounts, Seamans did not. While Bunny and Stankevich spent Saturday afternoon weathering (and, in Stankevich’s case, responding to) the slings and arrows of fellow Democrats, Seamans was posting links to articles about trickle-down economics and the Trump tax plan. Way to stand united, team. 3. IRONWORKERS LOCAL NO. 6. Good for the Ironworkers Local No. 6 for hosting a rally last Friday in support of workers who were laid off by Cheektowaga’s Wendt Corporation after the workers voted to unionize. Bad that the local, at the late last minute, asked Erie County Legislator Pat Burke, who was listed on the press release for the event as a speaker, not to come. Why was Burke disinvited? Because the local has endorsed Erik Bohen, the son of the local’s treasurer, to fill the New York State Assembly seat vacated by Mickey Kearns when he became Erie County Clerk. Burke is also seeking that seat. (Burke won the endorsement of the Erie County Democratic Committee on Monday evening; Bohen, a registered Democrat, is likely to run in the April 24 special election on the Republican and Conservative lines.) To have both candidates at the event would have been, what? A show of solidarity? Of unity behind the labor movement? Instead, petty politicking prevailed. P DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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NEWS LOCAL According to police data obtained by The Public, the Housing Unit wrote 14,383 traffic violations, nearly 4,000 parking tickets, and 258 city ordinance violation tickets in 2017. The city budgets for 35,000 traffic violations every year. In 2017, BPD logged a total of 5,100 fingerprintable misdemeanor arrests, and the Housing Unit was responsible for 626 of them. But not included in that tally were 3,278 traffic misdemeanor arrests made by the Housing Unit, arrests that are not fingerprinted or tracked by the state’s Division of Criminal Justice Services. While more serious incidents like felony arrests, misdemeanor arrests, and weapons seized decreased by nearly half comparing 2013 to 2017, minor offenses like traffic misdemeanors, violations, ordinance fines, and parking tags increased at least twofold. In 2015, a state law went into effect that allowed municipalities to keep their fine revenue. In 2013, Housing police recovered 47 weapons. In 2017, the figure was down to 27.

“The City of Buffalo has to find another source of revenue other than off the backs of poor people ,” says Larry Threat.

DISBANDING STRIKE FORCE IS JUST JOB ONE NEXT UP: BUFFALO HOUSING POLICE BY AARON LOWINGER

THE CITY’S CONTROVERSIAL STRIKE FORCE IS BEING DISBANDED. WILL THE CLOSELY ALLIED HOUSING UNIT FACE A SIMILAR FATE? IN 2017, a small unit of Buffalo Police assigned to patrol

public housing projects throughout the city were responsible for an outsize share of the city’s misdemeanor arrests, traffic tickets, and parking tags.

The actions of the Housing Unit, along with its sister squad Strike Force, have caused some East Side residents to feel targeted for punitive fines and penalties. The 21-member Housing Unit, which represents around three percent of the total number of officers in the department—and which polices the three percent of the city’s population who live in public housing—was responsible for 12 percent of the city’s misdemeanor arrests, and at least 42 percent of the city’s total traffic violations.

Buffalo Police are currently under investigation by the state attorney general’s civil rights bureau for an alleged pattern of unconstitutional and discriminatory policing, an investigation prompted by a two-year study by the Cornell and SUNY at Buffalo law schools with a special focus on the BPD’s Strike Force and Housing Units. The study resulted in legal action on behalf of the Buffalo chapter of Black Lives Matter. Last week, BPD interim commissioner Byron Lockwood announced the disbandment of its Strike Force unit, saying that those officers would be reassigned to the department’s traffic institute. One of Strike Force’s chief engagements has been the implementation of so-called “traffic safety checkpoints,” interventions that were often joined by the Housing Unit. Strike Force and Housing Unit share office space and command structure; both are overseen by Chief Aaron Young. Housing Unit officers are also often active in other areas of the city, but the lion’s share—roughly 95 percent—of their

LOOKING BACKWARD: THE IRC BUS

The International Railway Company (IRC) owned and operated Buffalo’s transit system prior to 1950. In 1930 the principal means of public transportation was the streetcar, of which 900 traveled along 415 miles of track—by comparison, the Metro Rail today runs along 6.4 miles. When the IRC began to dismantle the streetcar system in favor of “modern buses” in 1935, the cost-saving measure had to be promoted as progress. A step up, not a step down. This IRC promotional photograph of happy transit riders boarding the new #15 Seneca bus is one example—in the background, the factory complex of the Larkin Company. The Seneca streetcar was PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM.

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THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

ripped out in 1941.- THE PUBLIC STAFF


LOCAL NEWS interventions take place on Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority properties.

After plans to disband Strike Force were announced, BPD information officer Captain Jeffrey Rinaldo expressed uncertainty to The Public about the future of checkpoints in Buffalo. “Not sure a decision has been made on the checkpoints,” he wrote in an email. An analysis by The Public last fall showed that the data released by the city demonstrated that minority beighborhoods were disproportionately subjected to checkpoints. The residents of BMHA properties are overwhelmingly minorities. Many of the same community organizations that celebrated the announcement of Strike Force being disbanded have called on the city to eliminate the Housing Unit, too. A joint statement issued by the Partnership for Public Good and Open Buffalo claimed that “Strike Force and Housing [Unit] have generated huge numbers of arrests and citations for low-level offenses, as well as major misconduct and excessive force cases.” The two officers involved in the shooting death of the unarmed Jose Hernandez Rossy last May, Justin Tedesco and Joseph Acquino, are both assigned to the Housing Unit.

POOR NEIGHBORHOODS TARGETED FOR MINOR, COSTLY INFRACTIONS A 2016 report by The Public focused on the Housing Unit’s disproportionate arrest rate, as well as its focus on trespassing charges that would often shrivel when brought into the light of a courtroom. One East Side family recently sat down with The Public to discuss how they had been ticketed by police for having snow on sidewalks. Larry Threat said on January 13, he got a ticket an hour after city snow plows buried his sidewalk, which he said is only 30 inches from the street. Written on his ticket was “SF,” for Strike Force.

family should not be ran off this side of town through people coming in here and buying up the properties, driving up the rents, and everything else. Why should we be forced to move?” Michael Threat said.

CALLING FOR A SHIFT FROM “ZERO TOLERANCE” Disbanding the Strike Force, interim Commissioner Lockwood said, wasn’t due to criticism, but rather his desire to remold the department to become more community-minded. “Every officer is going to be a community police officer,” he told the Buffalo News. The Partnership for Public Good has been calling for exactly that since 2016, writing in a statement last week that “the Buffalo Police Department should require all officers to devote a certain number of hours each week to community policing activities, such as foot and bike patrols, attending community meetings and events, collaborating on community improvements, and mentoring youth.” “It’s also central to a badly needed shift from ‘zero tolerance’ and militarized policing to community policing focused on the needs and dignity of residents,” the joint PPG and Open Buffalo statement read. Disbanding just Strike Force, which has long been lauded by Mayor Byron Brown’s administration and city lawmakers for targeting both the city’s most dangerous criminal activity and its most benign infractions, won’t go far enough to change

the culture in the BPD, according to civil rights attorney Anjana Malhotra, who authored the report on the BPD called “Authority without Accountability.” “The end of the Strike Force and adoption of ‘community policing’ will be an empty gesture if its officers are merely transferred to another unit, without real accountability,” she wrote in a statement to The Public. “Mayor Brown and Commissioner Lockwood need to do much more to transform the policing culture in this city.” “If Commissioner Lockwood wants to understand why his Homicide squad’s clearance rate is abysmally low, he should recognize that the Strike Force has destroyed the department’s credibility.” Malhotra also called on Erie County District Attorney John Flynn to “be called to account for his prosecutors’ willingness to bring cases based on the illegal conduct, and false testimony, of Strike Force officers, and explain how he intends to enforce constitutional standards going forward. And the Common Council should create a real citizen oversight board, to identify and bring public attention to policing problems before they grow into an epidemic.” Advocates are also calling for an end to checkpoints and stop and frisk policing, the decriminalization of marijuana and other minor drug offenses, and a transparent process with community input in the selection of a permanent P police commissioner.

MARQUIL, 2018 / EMPIREWIRE.COM

“You gotta give us 24 hours to clear it, okay?” said Threat, who said he has a medical issue which makes him unable to clear the snow. “I made a call to my plow guy, and he came right away.” But still after the timestamp of the ticket he discovered only the next morning. “My problem with this here is, our mayor and the City of Buffalo has to find another source of revenue other than off the backs of poor people in the inner city of Buffalo and I think it is so unfair that they’re out targeting our poor citizens on the East Side of Buffalo,” Threat continued. Threat’s brother and sister-in-law, Michael and Marva Threat, have received two such tickets this winter for their home on Detroit Avenue, one was marked “SF” and one left blank. On either side of their property are vacant, city-owned lots with sidewalks that are never cleared, they told The Public. On a recent visit by The Public, the sidewalks on either end of their home were completely covered with snow. The Threats have previously received tickets from the Strike Force for improper placement of garbage totes and high grass, even as the same city-owned lots neighboring their property go unmowed for most of the warmer months. The special attention authorities have paid the Threats make them feel unwanted in their own neighborhood, even as Marva is the president of her sprawling 14-block block club. “I’ve been down here all my life since 1968, and I feel that my

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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THE DEATH OF POLICE DIVER CRAIGPLEASE LEHNER EXAMINE

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EXPERTS SAY LEHNER WAS ILL EQUIPPED FOR A TRAINING EXERCISE TO WHICH HE SHOULD NOT HAVE BEEN SUBJECTED THE RAPID-MOVING and debris-filled water

of the Niagara River was unfamiliar territory to Officer Craig Lehner. His previous dives were in relatively calm and contained waters like the Buffalo River and the clear, warm Caribbean where he got his scuba certification. Last October, Lehner was training with the Buffalo police’s Underwater Recovery Team in the Niagara River, the first time the team had trained there in over a year. While the team’s commander, Detective Leo McGrath, has more than 30 years of diving experience, he is not certified to teach public safety diving. Underwater, Lehner lacked the equipment to communicate verbally with his teammates and would have been limited to making signals with the tether line connecting him to his colleagues onshore. Lehner also did not have a piece of equipment that might have enabled him to free himself in the event his tether became tangled and trapped him under water. Lehner drowned and his body was recovered five days later after a frantic search by his teammates and other law enforcement agencies. Investigative Post reviewed more than 130 pages of police records obtained through the state Freedom of Information Law and

THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Thank youprofessionals for advertising with THE did not The diving interviewed PUBLIC. Please review your ad and want to speak to the specifics of Lehner’s check for any errors. The original layout drowning. But the best practices they described instructions have been followed as closely foraspublic safety operations elsewhere possible. THEdiving PUBLIC offers design stand in contrast to what’s done here in Buffalo. services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLIC is not an responsible any in David Concannon, attorney forbased error if not who notified within 24 hours of Pennsylvania investigates diving fatalities, receipt. The department must questioned whyproduction Lehner dove in such hazardous have a signed proof in order to print. conditions for a training exercise. Please sign and fax this back or approve

“Inbymy professional opinion, responding to this email. you don’t put somebody into harm’s way to train them for � CHECK COPY CONTENT something that’s unlikely to occur without really takingIMPORTANT additionalDATES precautions,” said � CHECK Concannon. “You don’t trigger an avalanche � CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE #, to help, to see, to rescue someone from an & WEBSITE avalanche. It’s unnecessary, it’s unsafe.” �

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Three weeks ago, Lehner’s family filed a notice of claim against the city and police department, preserving their right to file a lawsuit. The claim argues that the Underwater Recovery Team acted with “negligence, recklessness, and carelessness.” The notice also alleges that “unreasonably dangerous conditions” in the Niagara River, coupled with insufficient equipment, lack of “proper communication” and “incompetent” oversight of the dive led to Lehner’s death. Buffalo police officials declined to interviewed, citing the possible lawsuit.

Lehner’s death brought about an outpouring of public grief. People hung blue lights outside their homes. Thousands attended his funeral at the downtown hockey arena and lined Delaware Avenue to watch the procession pass to his burial site at Forest Lawn Cemetery. McGrath spoke at the funeral. “Since day one on the team, Craig was always calm, cool, and collected,” he said. “He had so much confidence, you would have thought he was on the team for years.”

RECEIVED LIMITED TRAINING The Underwater Recovery Team searches and retrieves evidence and bodies and performs the occasional rescue. The team is a secondary duty for its 18 members, whose primary assignments range from patrol to narcotics to the K-9 unit, where Lehner was deployed. Trainees are required to have baseline scuba skills to join the team. Many members got their initial qualifications with Dip ‘n Dive, a local dive shop staffed with certified instructors. Lehner, a 34-year-old National Guard veteran who served in Iraq, received an advanced scuba diving certification in 2014 from a dive shop located at the US Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Even with an elementary background in diving, experts told Investigative Post that trainees should increase the difficulty of their dives incrementally and first learn how to manage crises in easy environments. Records obtained by Investigative Post show that while Buffalo police did conduct five training sessions with Lehner in placid waters, questions remain as to whether he was prepared to dive in the Niagara River’s swift currents and whether his teammates were capable of rescuing him in the event of an emergency. It’s common practice to start trainees in what’s referred to as “confined water.” “It means an easy entry, no turbulence on the surface, no waves, no added problems for a new diver,” said Michael Sieverman, a public safety diving instructor and retired police officer based in California. “Learning how to dive is learning how to solve problems, to either overcome them once they present or avoid them all together before they become a problem.” According to a dive team record, Lehner “did well” but “came up too fast” on his first training dive in the Buffalo River in May 2017. Between that first session and September, Lehner dove four more times in the Union Ship Canal and the Buffalo River. Those waters are different from the rapid current of the Niagara River, which flows 10 to 15 miles per hour and has a lot of debris on the riverbed,

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INVESTIGATIVE POST NEWS including cars. “You can’t really train someone to experience something unless they actually experienced it, but you don’t have to throw them in the deep-end,” said Concannon, the attorney. “You can start in the shallow end and work your way down.” The team’s training dives conducted in the twoand-half years preceding Lehner’s death would not have necessarily prepared them for the incident in October. A majority of the team’s training sessions were focused on recovery and practicing “search patterns,” which involves practicing how to search and retrieve evidence or bodies. Most were in more placid waters like the Erie Basin Marina, the Union Ship Canal, and the Buffalo River. The team’s training in the more dangerous waters of the Niagara River was limited to two dives in August 2015 and July 2016. Dive logs show that the last time the team was called out for an operation there was in May 2017 for a “body search.” The record states there were “reports of person screaming in river.” Police did not provide additional information about that incident. The team trained in rescue techniques three times between January 2015 and September 2017, according to the documents obtained by Investigative Post. Another four training sessions were conducted in emergency procedures, like switching to backup air tanks. All seven sessions were conducted in relatively tranquil and confined waters, including one session in February 2015 at a city pool near Cazenovia Park. The records have limited detail and police would not provide additional information about these sessions or if there were other instances of emergency and rescue trainings that were not fully documented. Four members of the dive team received training in swift water surface rescue, two in 2015 and two in 2017. Such experience would be helpful if someone were drowning near the surface in fast-moving water, for example. Lehner, however, was diving well below the surface, at a part of the river about 25 feet deep, according to the Buffalo News. The diving professionals interviewed raised concerns about the prudence of having a trainee dive in swift water. “If it’s searching for evidence or some other type, or it’s a recovery, there’s really no pressing reason to get in the water and push divers that hard,” Sieverman said. “If you have a mission to accomplish, ensure your risk is worth the reward. And for swift water, there are a multitude of dangers that come with that.”

INSTRUCTOR NOT CERTIFIED McGrath, the commander of the Underwater Recovery Team, has been diving since the 1980s and has taken advanced courses, including one on “aquatic death and homicidal drowning investigation.” But he is not certified to be a scuba instructor, let alone a public safety dive instructor, a police source confirmed. The police source maintained that formal certification is unnecessary. However, diving industry professionals said it’s preferable for those overseeing training to have official diving instructor qualifications. Jeff Morgan, a public safety diving instructor based in Utah, said it’s better for an instructor to get “accreditation from some type of training agency that would give that in-house training instructor some level of knowledge above and beyond just the general experience that they he or she may have.” Concannon said that, generally speaking, a person might also pass on bad habits to trainees without formal instructor training. “If you haven’t had an instructor development course by an instructor trainer, you may never be aware that you’re teaching somebody incorrect information.” A police source told Investigative Post that the department plans to send one of its new dive team members to a training course in Florida before the end of the year to become a certified public safety diving instructor. McGrath

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Lehner went underwater without two pieces of equipment that might have prevented his death: electronic communications and hardware that lets divers easily free themselves from their rope if it gets tangled.

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Soon after Lehner dove into the Niagara River, the rope connecting him to his teammates tightened, likely a result of getting snagged on debris, according to press reports.

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“Anytime you dive in swift-moving water or strong current, there is a heightened risk,” said Morgan, the public safety diving instructor and former commander of the San Bernardino County Sheriff ’s dive team. “You need to make sure that your divers are prepared with the proper equipment and the proper procedures and certainly the proper training to perform in that environment.”

Issue

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For Morgan “the biggest advancement in public safety diving in recent years” is a particular mask built for electronic communications. Lehner was not wearing one for his dive in the Niagara River, however. The Buffalo News reported that had he worn one, the currents would have “ripped” it off. “When you’re in swiftwater,” said Concannon, the attorney, “you’re in a dangerous situation, every single time, and you need to be able to communicate effectively.” Lehner’s sole means of communicating was a rope connecting him to his colleagues onshore. “A regular old rope which you would use in placid still water in a canal is not going to cut it,” Concannon said. The second piece of equipment Lehner lacked was “quick-release snap shackle.” As its name suggests, it’s a piece of hardware that lets a diver easily disconnect from whatever line they are attached to. A police source confirmed Lehner did not have that equipment. Instead he was attached to his tether with a harness ring, according to the Buffalo News. Divers are trained to cut the rope when they need to free themselves, a challenge when under stress and in strong currents. A police source said that the department doesn’t use quick-release snap shackles because they can be dangerous when diving under surfaces such as ice. In those situations a diver who detaches no longer has a rope to guide him to his entry point into the water. Lehner was not diving under ice, but relatively warm waters that are about 65 degrees in October. The circumstances of Lehner’s death are still under investigation by the Buffalo police and the Public Employee Safety Health Bureau in the state’s Department of Labor. Those investigations, and the possible lawsuit by his family, could determine precisely what role his training and equipment played in his death. Daniela Porat is a reporter for Investigative Post, a nonprofit investigative journalism center focused on issues of importance to Western New York. P DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

7


CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR DRINKING? IS ALCOHOL CAUSING YOU PROBLEMS? Research Treatment Available for Qualified Participants Addiction Treatment Services at the University at Buffalo is offering the Point to Recovery Project, a confidential outpatient program which includes free individual counseling sessions for those who qualify. This abstinence-based treatment spans a 14-week period.

NEWS COMMENTARY

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development agency, school district, or any other local government agency in Erie County issued a “Positive Declaration” and required preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) prior to approving a proposed development project, enacting a new law, or adopting a change in land use policy. Zero. That’s also the number of times in 2017 a local government agency in Niagara County issued a “Positive Declaration” and required preparation of an EIS for a proposed project or law. As a matter of fact, a review of the Environmental Notice Bulletin [ENB]—published by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation [DEC]—reveals that during 2017 only two Positive Declarations requiring a proposed action to undergo the EIS environmental review process were issued for proposed projects and laws in the six counties comprising DEC’s Region 9—Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Erie, Niagara, and Wyoming counties. And it’s not only the hundreds of local agencies in the six-county Region 9 area that spent an entire year without requiring a project sponsor— including the government entities themselves— to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. Not one New York State agency issued a Positive Declaration during 2017 for an action proposed for Region 9’s six counties. Not the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Not the New York State Urban Development Corporation/ Empire State Development. Not even the DEC, the state department entrusted with the duty of promulgating SEQRA regulations and protecting New York State’s environment and its human and community resources. [Click here for my compilation of DEC Region 9—2017 SEQR and Other Notices] The EIS is accurately characterized by New York’s courts as “the heart of SEQRA.” It is a document which provides government agencies, the project sponsor, and the public a means to systematically consider potential environmental impacts, alternatives to a proposed action, and appropriate mitigation measures to eliminate or substantially reduce adverse impacts. Whenever a proposed project or policy—referred to by 8

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SEQRA as an “action”—may have the potential for one or more significant adverse environmental impact, the SEQRA mandates that the “lead agency” issue a “Positive Declaration” and require preparation of a draft EIS. But the letter and spirit of SEQRA are being avoided—not followed—by local or state agencies. For example, the desire of the City of Buffalo to be “developer friendly” and place virtually every land use project on a “fast track” to approval has led even the most conscientious member of the city’s Planning Board, Cynthia Schwartz, to apologize to a developer’s lawyer during a public hearing for even mentioning her belief that a massive project on the shore of Lake Erie needed an EIS. And it doesn’t matter how large a proposed project is, or how sensitive ecologically the site of the proposed development may be. In 2014, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration— with the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering serving as “lead agency”—allowed construction to proceed at the 90-acre, nearly one-million-square-foot manufacturing and research and development complex at South Buffalo’s RiverBend site without preparation of an EIS. This glaring disregard of SEQRA’s requirements occurred despite the project’ location along the Buffalo River’s highly sensitive “Area of Concern” (AOC), one of the most toxic hotspots in the Great Lakes region. Given the State’s approach to the Riverbend project, it’s not surprising that the Governor’s economic development engine, Empire State Development, concluded in April 2017 that an Environmental Impact Statement wasn’t needed for the proposed Athenex Manufacturing Project in the Chautauqua County Town of Dunkirk. After all, how could there possibly be a potential adverse impact to the environment when clearing a 33.5-acre site near Lake Erie and constructing a 40-foot high, 320,000-square-foot pharmaceutical manufacturing facility housing manufacturing, warehouse, laboratories, office and central utilities spaces? The paucity of EISs should be troubling to anyone who cherishes New York’s natural and manmade resources, who believes that our government officials and agencies are obligated to objectively and fairly comply with state law, or who believes that zoning, land use, and development decisions should be made by fully-informed agencies following meaningful public scrutiny and review. Arthur J. Giacalone has been living, practicing law, and challenging authority in Western New York for four decades, and currently resides in the City of Buffalo’s Cazenovia Park neighborhood. He write about the law and the P environment at withallduerespectblog.com.


ON STAGES THEATER

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A Master Harold and the Boys February plays An Act of God runs through 11 February 15-18 at Shea’s 710 Theatre. at O’Connell & Company.

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Kesselman’s revised version of the play by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. Through February 18 at Lancaster Opera House, 21 Central Avenue, Lancaster, 683-1776, lancopera.org. FAR AWAY: What better time for a play about government-instilled fear, paranoia, and “parades”? Caryl Churchill’s play opens February 16 at Torn Space Theater, 612 Fillmore Avenue, 812-5733, tornspacetheater.com. MASTER HAROLD AND THE BOYS: Athol Fugard’s

modern classic, set in South Africa during apartheid. Master Harold is a 17-year-old white boy; the “boys” are two middle-aged black servants in his parents’ household. Playing February 15-18 at Shea’s 710 Theatre, 710 Main Street, 847-0850, sheas.org/710. ROSE: Martin Sherman’s play tells the

story of a remarkable Russian Jew’s emigration—to the Warsaw ghetto, then to the United States. Through February 25 at Jewish Repertory Theatre, 2640 North Forest Road, Getzville, 650-7626, jewishrepertorytheatre.com. SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE: Jukebox musical featuring the songs of Lieber and Stoller. Through March 11 at MusicalFare Theatre, in residence at Daemen College, 4380 Main Street, Amherst, 839-8540, musicalfare.com. THE WAKE: Get tickets now for the Irish Classical’s annual party to die for, before it sells out. The fundraiser takes place Friday, February 23 at the Atrium @ Rich’s. Get tickets at the Irish Classical’s box office at 625 Main Street, call 853-4282, or visit irishclassicaltheatre.com. WAY BACK WHEN: AN EVENING OF ONE-ACTS:

By local playwrights Rebecca Ritchie and Grant Golden. Through February 24 at New Phoenix Theatre in the Park, 95 Johnson Park, 853-1334, newphoenixtheatre.org.

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9


ART REVIEW

FIVE SHOWS AT CEPA BY JACK FORAN

TWO GROUP SHOWS, THREE INDIVIDUALS: ORIN LANGELLE, NATALIE DIIENNO, AND TARA JAIN THE EXHIBITS CUP runneth over right now at CEPA. Five

shows currently going, including the annual members’ show, and feature shows of the work of Orin Langelle and Natalie DiIenno, in consequence of their having won top prizes in the members’ show last year. Langelle is a documentarian of protest and resistance topics and tactics, ranging from the three guys buried up to their necks in the middle of a mud road into the Shawnee, Illinois, National Forest in an effort to halt logging operations there (two of them up to up their necks but with an arm each free to be able to raise a fist of defiance to the government and business interests cabal behind the no doubt not otherwise well-publicized commercial activities in the forest preserve, while to be fair to the third guy—the one with no arm showing—he may be a dummy), to marchers protesting the likely do-nothing real agenda—as in fact ultimate outcome—of the UN Climate Conference in Durban, South Africa, in 2011. The conference ended with “an agreement to arrange another agreement.” Lots of photos of cops in force, forcefully subduing participants—marchers, usually, it looks like—in one resistance action or another. And of matters and situations that cry out for protest and resistance,

Through the Blue Hour by Natalie DiIenno.

but tucked away in remote areas of the globe, may have gone unnoticed and undocumented except for Langelle’s photos. Such as the series on the concentration camp where Ayoreo indigenous people of the Chaco forest region in Paraguay were interned to allow and facilitate the continuing destruction of their woodlands native habitat to create or expand cattle ranchlands. Prior to the creation of the concentration camp, the Ayoreo people were shot and killed on sight by cattle industry operatives, sometimes from a timber small tower erected apparently just for that purpose. One of the photos in the Chaco forest series is of the killing tower. Generous explanatory captions with the Langelle photos. None at all with DiIenno’s works, which could be described as “obscure” in two senses of the word, the root sense of “dark,” and more common extended sense of “hard to decipher, hard to understand.” Each piece consists of two visual layers, a background photograph of human body parts—as much as decipherable amid the predominant darkness, verging on blackness—overlain by imagery on glass mounted at a small gap distance from the background photo, of body parts again, but inner body parts, by and large, bony structures. What look like x-ray views. Or maybe medical illustrations, outline drawings from textbooks. In one case, clearly an image of a spinal column. Some other cases, hard to say for sure what. Art about doubling, somehow. In an artist’s statement, DiIenno talks about doubling relating to notions of the uncanny, and refers to Freud’s concept of the uncanny, which DiIenno explains as “a contradictory mixing of something that is recognizable yet unknown.”

CEPA Gallery Members Exhibit winner by teaching artist Aitina Fareed Cooke.

IN GALLERIES NOW = ART OPENING

Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700, albrightknox. org): We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965–85, on view Feb 17-May 27. Opening reception Fri Feb 16 7-9pm. Matisse and the Art of Jazz, on view through Jun 17. Window to Wall: Art from Architecture, on view through Mar 18. Picturing Niagara, paintings by Stephen Hannock, on view through Mar 25. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) until 10pm. Amber M Dixon Dixon Gallery at the Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680, buffaloartstechcenter.org): Mon-Fri 10am-3pm. Anna Kaplan Contemporary (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, annakaplancontemporary.art): Susan Reedy: Urban Passage, on view through Mar 17. Artist’s talk Sat Feb 17, 2pm. Sat 12-4 or by appointment. Art 247 (247 Market Street, Lockport, NY 14094, theart247.com): Black White & One Color, photography exhibition. On view Feb 17-Mar 18. Opening reception Sat, Feb 17, 1-4pm. Wed-Sun, 10am-5pm. Art Dialogue Gallery (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo,

Some excellent photos and photo-related works in the members’ show, by the likes of Patrick Simmons (a forms and colors contrasts and comparisons study in a semi-trucks and trailers parking area

NY 14209 wnyag.com): Donald J. Siuta, Photographs, Feb 2 through Mar 16. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716885-2251, wnyag.com): 22nd Annual Juried Members Exhibition, opening Fri Feb 16, 7:309pm. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Argus Gallery (1896 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207) By appointment only. Betty’s Restaurant (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 362-0633, bettysbuffalo.com): New work by the artists of Autism Services, on view through Mar 18. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, NY 14222, thebenjamangallery.com): Works from the collection. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm. BOX Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203): Every day 4-10pm. Buffalo Arts Studio (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2495 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 8334450, buffaloartsstudio.org): George Afedzi Hughes, The Politics of Identity. On view through Mar 3. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Buffalo & Erie County Central Library (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900, buffalolib.org): Buffalo Never Fails: The Queen City & WWI,100th Anniversary of America’s Entry into

10 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

adjacent to a nondescript warehouse-like building), Nicole Dilweg (the white horse in front of the wine and liquor store on Grant Street and a woman in a bikini, and apparent passersby attracted to the scene and wanting to get into the Lady Godiva picture, which they do, to the Lady Godiva’s great delight), Kate Stapleton Parzych (gnarly twists and tangles of tree limbs and twigs in sepia silhouette on delicate fibrous rice paper), William Vogel (a smallformat strip series of shots along Broadway—sparse schoolbus and auto traffic and occasional pedestrians—or maybe just waiting for a metro bus—on what looks like a dismal rainy morning), Kelly Walsh (a sun-splashed Puerto Rican street scene with shiny brick roadway and copious vegetation and colorful architecture), and Eric Jensen (mostly abstraction black, and in one corner, in signature fedora and fiddling, an askew image of musician and multifarious artist and educator, the late and much lamented Tony Conrad, currently undergoing apotheosis). While in another area, a group show of works of some “social justice allies” who participated in a recent CEPA photography course. Some on social justice themes, but some of the best work is on nature themes, by the likes of Veronica Moore and Zainab Saleh. And by Kristen Luppino-Gholston, including a butterfly and a flower, and a view looking upwards at a grain elevator complex, and a series on kids caught in moments of discovery. At least tangential P to social justice is Donna Edwards series about inner-city people involved in rural agricultural activities. And in the basement, brightly colorful photos of various subject matters in various locales from Buffalo to India, by student photographer Tara Jain, who states that “in photography I discover what I see in the world…the world around me inspires me…” All five shows continue through February 24.

WWI, on second floor. Building Buffalo: Buildings from Books, Books from Buildings: Grosvenor Rare Book Room, through Mar 21. Catalogue available for purchase. Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm.Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldpenney.org): The Flying Slatherpuss and Other Portals Into the World M. Henry Jones, on view through Feb 25; Charles E. Burchfled, The Ohio Years, through Mar 24; Milton Rogovin: A Trip to Chile, 50 Years After, on view through Mar 25; Angels and Demons, works on paper by David Schirm, on view through Mar 31; Images (of Us by Us) through Apr 1; Cargo, Way-Points, and Tales of the Erie Canal, through Jul 29; Divine Messengers, work by Craig LaRotonda, through Mar 25. Wright, Roycroft, Stickley and Roehlfs: Defining the Buffalo Arts and Crafts Aesthetic, through November 26. A Dream World of the Imagination, works by Charles Burchfield, through Nov 26; Under Cover: objects with lids from the permanent collection, through Apr 29. 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Caffeology Buffalo (23 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY, 14201): The Witch and Circumstance, works by Nikayla Brown. Canisius College Andrew L. Bouwhuis Library (Canisius College 2001 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14208, 888-8412, library.canisius.edu): Along

P

the Way, by Stacey Lechevet. On view through Feb 24. Carnegie Art Center (240 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, carnegieartcenter. org): Buffalo Society of Artists: Winter Exhibition. Thu 6-9pm & Sat 12-3pm. The Cass Project (500 Seneca Street, Buffalo, NY 14204, thecassproject.org): Notes on Simian Startchildren and Other Well-Meaning Creatures, new multi-media work by David Mitchell, on view through Feb 24. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm. Plus, special viewing hours for Lullaby for a Lost Horizon, a video & sound installation in the Boiler Room, Thursdays 12-9pm and Fri & Sat 125pm. Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Western New York Collects: Nancy Dwyer, on view through Feb 4. Mark Snyder: Muscle & Bone, on view through Jan 21. Dana Tyrell: Blue, on view through Jan 21. Painting Niagara, Thomas Kegler, on view through Jan 21. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 856-2717, cepagallery.org): Photos by Tara Jain; Through the Blue Hour, works by Natalie DiIenno; Visions, selection of photographs taken by emerging photographers from many of Buffalo’s social justice organizations; Portraits of Struggle, photos by Orin Langelle; CEPA Gallery Members Exhibition. All shows on view


GALLERIES ART through Feb 24. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm.

Fri 5:30am-6pm, Sat-Sun 8am-6pm.

Czurles-Nelson Gallery (Upton Hall, Buffalo State College, 1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222): Buffalo State Alumni Artists, Works from the Gerald Mead Collection. On view through Feb 15.

Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North St., Buffalo, NY 14201): The Young Abraham Lincoln, the drawings of Lloyd Ostendorf. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.

Dana Tillou Fine Arts (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285, danatilloufinearts. com): Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm. Daemen College, Tower Gallery of the Haberman Gacioch Art Center (Daeman College Center for Visual & Performing Arts, 4380 Main Street, Amherst, NY 14226, 839-8241): See and Be Seen, 49th Annual juried exhibition at Daemen College of high school juniors and seniors throughout WNY schools. On view through Feb 23. MonFri 9-5. El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 4644692, elmuseobuffalo.org): Wed-Sat 12-6pm. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Tue-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 11-4pm. GO ART! (201 East Main Street, Batavia, NY 14020): The Kite Boy, paintings by Alex Segovia. Exhibit in the Oliver’s Gallery in the Seymour Dining Room, on view through Apr 7. Reception Apr 15, 6-8 pm. Thu-Fri 11am-7pm, Sat 11am4pm, Second Sun 11am-2pm. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): Tony Conrad @ Hallwalls, on view through Mar 2. Tue-Fri 11am6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com): Recent work by Caroline Doherty & Gareth Lichty, on view through Mar 2. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays. Jewish Community Center of Greater Buffalo Bunis Family Art Gallery (2640 N Forest Road, Benderson Family Building, Amherst, NY 14068, 6884033, jccbuffalo.org): Teresa Alessandra on view through Feb 28. Mon-Thu 5:30am-10pm,

Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall) (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201): Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Main Street Gallery (515 Main St. Buffalo, NY 14203): Western NY-inspired watercolors by Mike Thompson. On view Feb 16-Feb 21. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts. com): Original Originals: Vintage Drawings by WNY Artists, on view through Feb 10. TueSat 9:30am-5:30pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 282-7530, thenacc. org): Artists of Color Exhibit in the Townsend Gallery on view Feb 10-Mar 18. Opening reception, Mar 10, 5-7pm. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Nichols School Gallery at the Glenn & Audrey Flickinger Performing Arts Center (1250 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14216, 332-6300, nicholsschool.org/ artshows?rc=0): Peanut Punch Leisure Lamps, artwork by Robert Lynch and Matthew SaGurney. On view through Mar 19. Mon-Fri 8am-4pm, Closed Sat & Sun. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Lenox Hotel, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-882-5777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com): Tue-Fri 10am–5pm. Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop (37 South Grove Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-652-3270, norbergsartandframe.com): Regional artists from the gallery collection. Tue-Sat 10am–5pm. Harold L. Olmsted Gallery, Springville Center for the Arts (37 N. Buffalo Street, Springville, NY 14141, 716-592-9038, SpringvilleArts.org): Joe Ward: Scenes, on view through Feb 24. Wed & Fri, 12-5pm. Thu 12-8pm, Sat 10-3pm. Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Ave-

nue, Buffalo, NY, parablesgalleryandgifts. com): The Heart, a group exhibit on view Feb 1-28. Reception Fri Feb 2, 7-9pm. Wed-Sat,125pm, Sun 1-5pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069 pausaarthouse.com): The Allegory of Color, show by Cassie Lipsitz. ThuSat by event. Pine Apple Company (224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648, squareup.com/store/ pine-apple-company) Wed & Thu 11am-6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 523-0068, project308gallery.com): Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Queen City Gallery (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod. com): Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, Chris McGee, Tim Raymond, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Liebel, Barbara Lynch Johnt, John Farallo, Thomas Busch, Michael Mulley. First Friday extended hours. Tue-Fri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Revolution Gallery (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, revolutionartgallery.com): Fathom, work by Tricia Butski, on view through Feb 17. Thu 12-6pm, Fri and Sat 12-8pm. River Gallery and Gifts (83 Webster Street, North Tonawanda, 14051, riverartgalleryandgifts. com): Wed-Fri 11am-4pm Sat 11am- 5pm.

videoactivist belit sağ, on view through Mar 23. Tue-Sat, 12pm-5pm. Stangler Fine Art (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129, stanglerart.com): Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Closed Sundays. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, starlightstudio. org): 3X3: Heather Swenson, Ricky Hogan, & David Feickert, on view through Feb 28. MonFri 9-4pm. Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, buffalosugarcity.org): 20th Century: Drawings by Curtis A. Guy. Open by event and Fri 5:30-7:30. UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754, ubartgalleries. org): Light, Line, Color and Space, new acquisitions from among hundreds of recently acquired gifts to the permanent collection. On view through Apr 15. Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Jouneys 1967-2017. Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, ubartgalleries.org): ​Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective, on view through May 26. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Unity Gallery (1243 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-882-0391) ImpactArtist’sMembers on view through Feb 28.

Ró Home Shop (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387, rohomeshop.com): Work by Catherine Willett. Tue-Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am4pm, closed Mondays.

Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833): Fine Arts Program Student Exhibit, Feb 5-16. Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 10am5pm.

Sisti Gallery (6535 Campbell Blvd., Pendleton, NY 14094, 465-9138): Honoring Watercolor, works by Rita Argen Auerbach and Charles E. Burchfield. Fri 6-9, Sat & Sun 11-2pm.

Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430, wnybookarts.org): Printed Lives, an exhibition by Bob Fleming. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.

Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Let Me Remember: first North American solo exhibition of artist and

To add your gallery’s information to the list, please contact us at info@dailypublic.com. P

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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12 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


LIZ BUKOWSKI was named one of the winners at CEPA Gallery’s annual members exhibition, on view through February 24, for this photograph. The artist’s prize is a solo show at the gallery next year. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR PUBLIC APPROVED

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 14 Sweetheart Skate 12pm Canalside, 44 Prime St. $25

[VALENTINE'S DAY] Reminder: Valentine’s Day is Wednesday, February 14. Don’t panic, just stay calm and follow our instuctions. Head down to Canalside, sign up for the Sweetheart Skate Package—$20 for admission, skate rentals, hot chocolate for two, chocolates from Park Edge Sweet shoppe, and a coupon to Fat Bob’s Smokehouse—and enjoy. You’ll thank us later. -TPS

Atomic 8pm Hallwalls, 341 Delaware Ave. $10-$15

[JAZZ] Five-piece Scandinavian jazz band Atomic makes closed-eye jazz music designed to transport you to another place in innerspace. Chaotic, unpredictable, and at times overwhelming, Atomic’s music, as the band likes to point out, is far from the romanticized piano jazz that the term “Scandanavian jazz” might evoke. There is plenty of beauty that emerges from the chaos, however, usually in the form of Fredrik Ljungkvist’s wandering clarinet solos or pianist Håvard Wiik’s calculated streamof-consciousness crescendos. The band, which hails from Norway and is led by double bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten, formed in 1999 and has since released a dozen records, and are prepping for the release of their next album, Six Easy Pieces, this month. Catch Atomic live at Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center on Valentine’s day, Wednesday, February 14. -CP

VARIOUS ARTISTS Public Entities compilation Recommended if you like: Fennesz, Tim Hecker, Oneohtrix Point Never A massive compilation of 78 tracks titled Public Entities was released by the Buffalo-based record label Value Exchange this week. The compilation album, which features almost as many original artists as there are tracks, is the 14th release by the record label in its first year of existence. Compiled by record label head Empathic Window, the compilation features mostly ambient and noise music tracks. Found sounds, static, eerie low-volume synthesizer tones, and highly warped samples permeate the record. The compilation oscillates in tone from David Lynchian levels of eeriness (“Supply Side Theology” by 80’s Horns) to austerity (“akrotiri” by Drake), hypnogogia, (“Bunny Habit” by Baby Daddy), maddening hyperpop (“Circles in the Parking Lot” by GMO Sharia Law), chaos (“Suicide Epiphany” by Cese & Desit), sublimity (“Sunrise on Day Three” by James Shain), absurdity (“Scuba” by Nuclear Starship), eroticism (“Sexfish2” by Seiei Jack), and vaguely meditative (“Padma” by Tavishi).

DJ HOLOGRAPHIC FRIDAY FEBRUARY 16 10PM / GYPSY PARLOR, 376 GRANT ST. / $5 [ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Maybe DJ Holographic’s biggest success so far is as a resident DJ for Bak

Dør, a queer afterhours party held in her hometown of Detroit that bills itself as a party for “misfits who don’t want to be classified.” These, in this writer’s humble opinion, are the best types of parties. As DJ, Holographic spins a jackin’ mix of house, deep house, techno, nu-disco, and funk with a focus on connecting the dots and paying respects to those who’ve come before her. Her skills and taste—which she says she developed while listening to her parents’ Chaka Khan records as a kid—have set her on a journey that has expanded worldwide. Since November she has played many of the world’s most sacred house and techno meccas including Detroit, Chicago, New York, and Berlin and this Friday, February 16 she’ll make her way to the Gypsy Parlor on Buffalo’s West Side for an all-nighter. The party is hosted by DJ Rufus Gibson, who’ll open with a set of deep house and techno. So if what you seek is to #getmessyanddanceallnight, then you’ve come to the right place. -CORY PERLA

PUBLIC APPROVED

Most tracks play more like mini vignettes than songs, and despite the dozens of artists featured, there’s an astounding sense of cohesion throughout created by a mixture of lo-fi sound qualities, ambient structures, and spacious sound design. Tracks range in length from 32 seconds to more than 36 minutes. With a total run time of over nine hours, it’s clearly not meant for listening to in one sitting (lest the listener experience some kind of Clockwork Orange-esque mindsoftening effect), but seems to exist rather as more of a time capsule or official document. Stream Public Entities for free on Bandcamp or buy the album for whatever price you choose to pay.

DO YOU MAKE MUSIC? HAVE A RECOMMENDATION? CONTACT CORY@DAILYPUBLIC.COM TO BE CONSIDERED IN OUR WEEKLY PUBLIC PICKS.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 15 Joe Louis Walker 6pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $15-$20

[BLUES] Joe Louis Walker is a blues music legend. The 68-year-old guitarist, singer, and producer has released dozens of records, dominating the 1990s blues scene. Since 1964, he’s worked with a slew of blues and rock icons including Bonnie Raitt, Buddy Guy, Tower of Power, and many others. In 2013, Walker was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame, and last year his latest record, Everybody Wants a Piece, was nominated for a Grammy for Best Co nte m p o ra r y Blues Album. Catch Joe Louis Walker at the Tralf Music Hall on Thursday, February 15. Support comes from Jeff Fetterman. -TPS

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 16 Sons of Apollo 7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $25

LOVE & SEX(BOT) SHOW SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17 7PM / SQUEAKY WHEEL, 617 MAIN STREET / $10 [PARTY] In tune with your Valentine’s most colorful desires, join Squeaky Wheel this Saturday,

[METAL] "Progressive metal supergroup" is not the kind of term that gets thrown around much in the year 2018, but that makes Sons of Apollo a rare breed. The band, formed last year, features Derek Sherinan and Mike Portnoy of iconic metal band Dream Theater, as well as Belly Sheehan of David Lee Roth fame, and Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, formerly of Guns N’ Roses. Last year, the supergroup released their debut record, Psychotic Sympony. Catch Sons of Apollo live at the Town Ballroom on Friday, February 16. -TPS

February 17 for the Love & Sex(bot) Show, Squeaky’s annual erotica-themed party, with plenty to feast the mind and eyes on. Dubbed a “fully-functional Valentine’s,” Squeaky has a lineup of films and installations with live and virtual performances by local and international artists including Bhakti Brown, Maya Ben David, Seoungho Cho, Yvette Granata, Faith Holland, Shawné Michaelain Holloway, Georges Jacotey, Lernert & Sander, and Margaret Rhee. Tickets are $10 each, but go with two friends for the threesome discount at $25, and come dressed as a “lovebot” for a chance at a prize. Yeah, it’s that kind of party. -AARON LOWINGER

14 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

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CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED

PRESENTS

PEACH PICKS

LIVEMUSICEVERYNIGHTFOROVER30YEARS! WEDNESDAY

FEB 14

AT PEACH: “Mushroom” is all of us. It is staring at your phone screen waiting for the “…” in a text bubble below that thing that you maybe shouldn’t have said. After hearing Paige Melin read this poem aloud at our First Friday reading at Allen Street Dress Shop, I couldn’t wait for its feature at Peach and yesterday, just in time for Valentine’s Day, it was posted. Although there is nothing like hearing Paige read it after several “rage poems,” as I think she called them, “mushroom” is a dreamlike and hopeful look into a stage in a relationship that most people have trouble putting into words. “We’re not/ at emoji level yet but/ I imagine your eyes/ when you’re reading my words/ & that/ seems close enough for now.”

9PM $5

elliot scozzaro

THURSDAY

FEB 15

9PM $5

FRIDAY

free happy hour w/jony james

FEB 16

6PM FREE

space junk cd release, vibe & direct 10PM $5

SATURDAY

FEB 17

ENTER THE HAGGIS SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17 [FOLK] As the focus continues shifting away from record profits to touring, pledges, and

subscriptions to keep musical artists above water, it’s intriguing to watch as they also find new deep in this regard: Beginning in 2011, they started using crowd-sourced funding to finance their albums, arguably a bit ahead of the curve, and have raised an impressive accumulated $150,000 for

Feel Free

subsequent releases, one of which included fans in the development of its content. While 2012’s

by Zadie Smith

The Modest Revolution pulled storylines from a specific edition of The Globe and Mail (issue

Penguin Press 2018 / essays

March 30, 2012), 2014’s Penny Black was made directly from fans’ story submissions. The latter

Zadie Smith is arguably my favorite living author, and when I opened her new book of essays to one titled “The House That Hova Built,” I knew that I wouldn’t be disappointed with her latest collection. Smith writes about a dinner with Jay-Z (the essay was initially published in the New York Times Magazine in 2012), and she intersperses her experience with Jay-Z’s lyrics and his thoughts on Obama’s presidency, the tragic death of Trayvon Martin, the future of hip hop, and being a new father without missing a beat. For those not interested in a meal between Zadie Smith and Jay-Z, the book is split into five parts: “In the World,” “In the Audience,” “In the Gallery,” “On the Bookshelf,” and “Feel Free.” When I say there is an essay for everyone, I mean it. In commentary ranging from politics to photos of Billie Holiday, to Geoff Dyer, joy, and Justin Bieber, Zadie Smith is an expert and will have you hanging on every last word.”

PEACHMGZN.COM

was also released under a different name—Jubilee Riots—and signified a shift in musical directions. Citing the name Enter the Haggis as having an association with a very specific neo-traditional

MONDAY

FEB 19

spirit. Now returning to Buffalo for a show at Iron Works as Enter the Haggis on Saturday, February 17, the band is fresh off their seventh tour of Ireland—literally, with fans. “We fill a tour bus or two with adventurous fans and travel around the country with them. It’s a great way to make sure you’re never playing to an empty room,” says singer/fiddle–player Brian Buchanan. “It’s funny watching the looks on the faces of locals who are seeing us for the first time,” Downie says.“They’ve probably never heard of us and there are 60 or 70 people hollering along with every word.” Enter the Haggis is currently touring behind a seven-song EP, Broken Arms, released in late 2016.-CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

Funktional Flow and After Funk

9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10

[JAM] A pair of quality local jam bands team up for what should be a fun and funky night this weekend. Catch Funktional Flow along with their friends After Funk this Friday, February 16 at Buffalo Iron Works. -TPS

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17 Buffalo String Works Benefit Concert 8pm 500 Seneca, $60

[BENEFIT CONCERT] In an era when funding for arts education is continually diminished, the value of an organization like Buffalo String Works can hardly be overstated: The grassroots, musician-led organization provides instrumental instruction to underserved students, particularly to refugee communities on Buffalo's West Side. There's a benefit concert this Saturday, February 17, to raise funds to support that mission at 500 Seneca Street, with performances by

free jazz happy hour w/ the duo+ 5:30PM FREE

WEDNESDAY

FEB 21

stevie ray vaughn tribute w/russ vesci and texas revolver 9PM $5

THURSDAY

FEB 22

sound (frontman Craig Downie is a skilled bagpipe player), they stated that Jubilee Riots, which refers to Toronto’s 1875 riots, better underscored their Canadian roots and adventuresome musical

mid-winter beach party w/the surfin cadavers, the freshwater four, the jagaloons 9PM $5

8PM / BUFFALO IRON WORKS, 49 ILLINOIS ST. / $12-$15

ways of keeping fans engaged. The once-Toronto-based quintet Enter the Haggis has dug

IN PRINT​:

the heartless showcase: the big beat edition

herbie hancock tribute night 9PM $5

FRIDAY

FEB 23

free happy hour w/the fibs 6PM FREE

yace booking presents:

seafox, feverbox, rust belt brigade 10PM $5

WEEKLY EVENTS David and Phillip Ying of the Ying Quartet, the BPO's Andrea Cone, Kyle Resnick of the National (that's right), and Buffalo String Works directors Virginia Barron and Yuki Numata Resnick. At $60 for an extraordinary cause, great music, and a reception replete with food and drink, it's a bargain. Find out more at buffalostringworks.org. -TPS

Mark Normand 7:30pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $24-$32

[COMEDY] Mark Normand looks like he just left a boring day job after drinking too much at lunch, but he’s actually a full-time comedian who has appeared on Inside Amy Schumer and every late night show you can think of. His latest standup special is Don’t Be Yourself—a hilarious series of self loathing rips that’ll keep you laughing for the entire 60 minutes. Normand comes to Buffalo’s Helium Comedy Club for five shows this Thursday, February 15 through Saturday, February 17. -CP

EVERY SUNDAY FREE

6PM. ANN PHILIPPONE

8PM . DR JAZZ & THE JAZZ BUGS

(EXCEPTFIRSTSUNDAYS IT’STHE JAZZ CACHE)

EVERY MONDAY FREE

8PM. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 9PM. OPEN MIC W. JOSH GAGE

EVERY TUESDAY 6PM. FREE HAPPY HOUR W/

THE STEAM DONKEYS 8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS $3

EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE

6PM. TYLER WESTCOTT & DR. JAZZ

EVERY THURSDAY FREE

5PM. BARTENDER BILL PLAYS THE ACCORDION

EVERY SATURDAY FREE

4:30-7:30PM. CELTIC SEISIUNS

248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 15


EVENTS CALENDAR

STAY IN THE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

PUBLIC APPROVED

Steak & Cake Records 7-Year Anniversary 6pm TBA, $5

[INDIE] Steak and Cake sounds…delish, right? Something meaty and flavorful with some fluffy sugar on the side? It seems like a hard-to-fuck-up recipe. But beyond dietary fantasies, the Steak and Cake moniker is a pro-local DIY music label founded right here in Buffalo seven years ago that's churned out over 125 releases in that span of time, including music from the now-defunct Brimstone Blondes, Slow Mutants, and Radarada's Little Cake among many others. The label’s 7th anniversary show, this Saturday, February 17 will feature a whole bunch of locally-loved bands including Welks Mice, Award Show, Medusa, NYBRKFST & Friends, Hop Hop, Derick Evans, and Curis Lovell. For location information, ask a band member. -CJT

THIS WEEK'S LGBT AGENDA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15

MONDAY FEBRUARY 19 BEYOND BOUNDARIES: I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO AT BURCHFIELD PENNEY ART CENTER 7-10pm, 1300 Elmwood Ave.

Anyone who's already seen it will tell you that Raoul Peck's 2017 film is one of the most important creative statements ever made about race in America. See the film at this screening and observe a panel discussion afterward. Written by James Baldwin, directed by Peck, narrated by Samuel L. Jackson.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16

WE WANTED A REVOLUTION: BLACK RADICAL WOMEN 1965-68 SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17 8PM / ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY, 1285 ELMWOOD AVE [ART OPENING] This Friday, February 16, the Albright-Knox Art Gallery opens an exhibit

that’s long overdue: We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85 comprises work by more than three dozen women of color in a broad array of media—film and video, photography, painting, sculpture, performance, printmaking—curated by the Albright-Knox in concert with the Brooklyn Museum. It is, according to the museum’s notes on the show, “the first exhibition to highlight the voices and experiences of women of color—distinct from the primarily white, middleclass mainstream feminist movement—in order to reorient conversations around race, feminism,

BUTCH QUEEN AT UNDERGROUND 10pm-3am, 274 Delaware Ave.

Check out this trash drag party where perfection is achieved in much different ways than on Drag Race. According the event planners: "Their fishnets are neon pink and no they did not stone those tights. They barely shaved their legs. They are a BUTCH QUEEN! Prob in drag for the first or eighth time. They don’t care if their lipstick gets smudged, because they didn’t just come here to dance…if you know what I mean. Come dance to the music you wish they played on the gay side of Allen." Cover is $5.

political action, art production, and art history in this significant historical period.” Friday’s opening

Weekend Mondays: The Get Money Squad, Truey V, TooSmoothJu 7pm The 9th Ward, 341 Delaware Ave $3

[PARTY] Babeville has launched a fun new weekly event dubbed Weekend Mondays. The series features small, intimate, shows— closer to parties—on select Monday nights. The next edition of the series will feature some great Buffalobased hip hop and indie acts include indie rock band The Get Money Squad, hip hop solo acts Truey V and Too$MoothJu, and DJ Jett. Check it out at Babeville’s 9th Ward this Monday, February 19. -TPS

runs 5-7pm for members; a free opening for the general public follows, 7-9pm. An artist’s talk with

Excision

Dindga McCannon, whose work is part of the exhibit (and on our cover), takes place at 7:15pm.

7pm Buffalo RiverWorks, 359 Ganson St. $30-$35

The show is up through May 27. -THE PUBLIC STAFF

PUBLIC APPROVED

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Excision brings beats so big that they require he tow a custom sound system along with him on tour. The 150,000-watt system will be set up at Buffalo Riverworks for the artist’s biggest local show to date, this Monday, February 19. The 31-year-old Canadian dubstep DJ and producer is making his way across the country on his Paradox tour and he’s bringing Liquid Stranger, Dion Timmer, and Monxx along with him. Prepare your ears for this one. -CP

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 20 Candy Ambulance 8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $5

BLACK PANTHER AT ELMWOOD REGAL CINEMAS 6-9pm, 2001 Elmwood Ave.

Marvel is releasing this groundbreaking futuristic film this Friday—see it in this organized group, which puts it in proper context: "Crossroads Collective and PANTHFRICA are uniting for a special screening of Black Panther and a just transition in Buffalo. Come imagine, experience, and be part of the movement towards a regenerative economy and a selfdetermined future. Introductory remarks by Push Buffalo's Director of Organizing John Washington II."

PHASE 1 PRESENTS DENISE RABE & LUIS FLORES SATURDAY FEBRUARY 17 10PM / LOCKHOUSE DISTILLERY, 41 COLUMBIA ST. / $19.50

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17

[TECHNO] The first party from a new contingent of Buffalo-based techno promoters dubbed Aural

DBGB MONTHLY DRAG BRUNCH

Shift is slated for this Saturday, February 17 at Lockhouse. The party—itself titled Phase

11am-4pm, 253 Allen St.

1—features the Berlin-based techno maven Denise Rabe in the top slot. A new release from Rabe

Our own Kelly Vasquez-Lord hosts this now monthly event: Doors are at 11am, with two shows at noon and 2pm, featuring Veronica Lace, Miss Deelicious, and Mercedes Sulay. Call 716-602-1374 for reservations! $24.99 per person and includes buffet and show. $35.99 per person and includes buffet, bottomless mimosas, and show.

[PUNK] Formed in 2014 with a "grunge influence," Candy Ambulance's new single "Spray"—also the title track of the trio's upcoming EP, out Friday, February 16—sounds unabashedly punk to us, and there's nothing wrong with that. At barely two minutes, the song packs a manic burst of chaotic energy that's hard to resist. Front gal Caitlin Baker sounds agitated and restless (but she hasn’t lost her sense of humor), while her bandmates churn out an impressive, tumultuous racket behind her. At Mohawk Place on Tuesday, February 20, they'll share the stage with local emo trio Passed Out and Nylon Otters (if you haven't checked out their awesomely sloppy single "Pollenblonde" you're cheating yourself)—all for a whopping $5. -CJT

came in December in the form of a track titled “First Impression” from her EP The Fox and the

Raven, the first release from the artist’s own label. The pulsating, punishing, textural techno track comes in hot with massive reverberated drums and restless hi hats that remind of works by Rrose, Vril, or Shifted. Expect that sort of relentless gray scale techno from the young producer’s DJ set. Rabe’s Buffalo date, sandwiched in between dates in Tijana, Mexico and Toronto, also features Guadalajara, Mexico’s Luis Flores, who’ll bring his own flavor of live, hypnotic underground techno. Opening sets come from Mary Yuzovskaya, who comes in from New York City by way

LOOPMAGAZINEBUFFALO.COM

of Russia, and Brooklyn’s Fadeface. Along with this international lineup, expect a custom drink menu. Grab tickets early or pay more at the door -CORY PERLA

16 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

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CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED

HUNDREDMILLIONTHOUSAND WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 21 8PM / MOHAWK PLACE, 47 E MOHAWK ST. / $5 [ELECTRONICA] And now, for something completely different…HundredMillionThousand is the musical project of Persian/Filipino experimental producer Noel Jon, based up in Edmonton, Alberta. Jon’s HMT debut, lp1, was self-released on vinyl and digital formats last year and has received some mind-blowing acclaim. Paste went as far as to call it, “A stand out record of the year; the album is like no other you will hear,” while Exclaim! said, “He marries Western and Iranian sounds in order to develop a varied sound that’s at once melodic, haunting, abrasive and ominous.” The album isn’t the whole picture, however, as Jon is equally concerned with post-production elements of design, and A/V presentation. Garnering comparisons to Massive Attack, Amon Tobin and even Portishead, HMT’s sound incorporates Persian instrumentation with aggressive downtempo percussion. In performance, HMT contextualizes his music with a visual narration of “Gordafarid”—a suppressed female storyteller in Iran—through audio/visual and laser elements. HMT will transform Mohawk Place on Wednesday, February 21 with support from local P dubstep maven Basha up first. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

National Geographic Live: Point of No Return 7pm Kleinhans Music Hall, 3 Symphony Circle $15 students, $35 general, $75 VIP

Named “one of the most adventurous women in the world of sports,” North Face athlete Hilaree O’Neill tells the story of her harrowing ascent to the summit of Hkakabo Razi, an unexplored mountain in Myanmar. Her presentation—the second in Kleinhans Music Hall's National Geographic Live series—will be accompanied by stunning photographs, plus clips from the documentary film about the climb, Down to Nothing. As the recipient of a National Geographic Explorers grant, O’Neill led a team of alpinists, photographers, and filmmakers to attempt a first ascent of Hkakabo Razi in northern Myanmar in 2014. The film about their adventure and well-publicized feuding won the Best Cinematography Award at the Telluride Mountainfilm festival in 2015. O’Neill attempted another Himalayan giant, Makalu, which was named by Outside as one of the “most badass adventures of 2015.” In 2017, she was named one of the 25 most adventurous women of the last 25 years by Men’s Journal. Catch O'Neill as she describes her remarkable story on Tuesday, February 20, at Kleinhans. And read more about it at dailypublic.com. -TPS

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 22 • 10PM

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 21 PVRIS 6:30pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $26.50

[POP] If you've ever been through Lowell, Massachusetts, it'd be pretty easy to say that it doesn’t seem like much is going on. A slow-to-gentrify, blue-collar, industrial town, it's hard to believe that Lowell has spawned PVRIS (formerly PARIS, but now changed because of some legal hoohah a few years back), which merges pop, punk, and electronica is a worldly way that eschews their hometown environs. Released late last summer, All We Know of Heaven, All We Need of Hell turned out to be one of the year's more hotly anticipated indie releases, and it delivers. By merging the unrelenting energy of the bands 2014 debut with a worldweary darkness, PVRIS sounds grown-up, sophisticated, and musically clever without becoming inaccessible or weighted down in gothic camp. Additionally, they haven't achieved this end by upping their pop ante, either—All We Know is plenty edgy. Hear how it translates live at Town Ballroom on Wednesday, February 21, with Detroit's Flint Eastwood in the opening slot and an early set from Sony-subsidiary-signed quartet, P Cherry Pools. -CJT

Thursdays with The Public at

HARDWARE

featuring DJs Bump & Touch Every last Thursday of the month.

Funk, Soul, Disco, Old School Hip Hop, • Boogie, Freestyle, O N R&B — Vinyl Only! • OVER

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245 Allen St. Buffalo • allenstreethardware.com DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 17


SPORTS SPOTLIGHT

MARV LEVY BY KIP DOYLE LOVE IS IN the air again between the Buffalo Bills and their fan base after a long awaited return to the playoffs. The Bills flirtation with postseason glory comes 17 years after their last playoff appearance and 23 years since coach Marv Levy led the Bills to the last of four Super Bowl appearances in 1994. Levy, 92, still has fond memories of the coaches and players he worked with during the Bills glory days, many of whom continue to stay in touch with the Hall of Fame coach online and at public appearances. Fans will have a chance to catch up with Levy and other Bills greats like Bruce Smith, Bill Polian, Shane Conlan and Fred Jackson at the Legends and Stars sports convention, which takes place Saturday and Sunday at Batavia Downs Gaming in Batavia. Levy is scheduled to sign autographs Saturday from 11am to noon. Calling from his home near Chicago, Levy spoke to The Public about the Bills renewed success, his first brush with a young Thurman Thomas and the once-in-a-lifetime piece of sports memorabilia he possessed, briefly, as a youth.

I’m sure you were excited to see the Bills finally get back into the playoffs. What was your reaction to that dramatic finish to the Bengals-Ravens game that clinched a wild card spot for the Bills?

I did get to see a clip of it, and whoever was showing the clip turned right away to show the Buffalo Bills locker room and the reaction of Bills players, and it was really inspiring to see. I was so gratified, again, because honestly, I’ve coached a lot of places—Buffalo Bills fans are terrific. They are deserving of a team that can keep on going up the ladder. Your Bills teams had a few late season wild card pushes. What is it like at that point in the season to not be entirely in control of your team’s fate and have to watch your future decided at another team’s hands?

Yeah, you’ve got to hope and you’ve got to pull for them. You don’t have any control over that one, but you put yourself in the position to profit if your team wins. It’s exciting and a little bit nail biting, too, I’m sure. As the league has grown, the number of Bills staff has increased substantially, especially when compared to your days as head coach. As we’ve seen, though, those larger staffs haven’t exactly resulted in more success, and I’ve talked to former players who think the staffs are overgrown. What do you think?

Maybe I sound like an old fogy when I say this—I think the size of the staffs are too big. Honestly, it blows my mind to have that big of a staff. I imagine that a team takes on a personality, especially through the front office and the coaching staff, and it is harder to solidify that personality when you’ve got 100 guys running around.

That’s very true, and it makes me think of a philosophy I had. We really kept it simple. You know, our playbook was only about 20 percent the size of every playbook in the league. Some coaches are enamored—more plays, more plays, more plays. But I wanted them to be the size where players could get repetitions, understand it and get the grasp to know which of the plays is applicable at that time. If a substitute goes in, he’ll have it mastered. How would you grade the job performance of head coach Sean McDermott and GM Brandon Beane? I don’t think anyone expected to be in the playoffs after one year.

I think they’ve done a wonderful job. I’ve gotten to know Sean a little bit, I really haven’t had a chance to meet Brandon yet, but I’m sure they are working together well. And it’s not just a great coach, it’s not just a great quarterback—it’s the total organization that wins. Working together is what really counts. And I’ve been impressed. [Former Bills safety and current broadcaster] Mark Kelso was a William & Mary alum; Sean McDermott is there and he’s a William & Mary alum. Mike Tomlin in Pittsburgh, a William & Mary alum, is doing a great job.

Way back in the 1960’s I was coaching there, and they were the greatest group of overachievers I’ve ever known. In my five years coaching football at William & Mary, every single player on our roster graduated, and that’s the type of guy that comes out of there. There were a lot of question marks on the roster going into this past season and still plenty coming out of it. I think it’s fair to say that McDermott’s Bills team played like overachievers.

That’s right, work ethic is so important. You know, it’s an old mantra of mine. People used to say, “Do you have the will to win?” And my response to that was, “Do you have the will to prepare?” Tell me that. If you don’t have the will to prepare, the hard daily work—you can talk all about it, [but] you don’t really have the will to win. But what I’m seeing, and I can’t say I have the real inside insight, but it’s very encouraging, very uplifting and I’m very gratified to see it.

LEGENDS AND STARS SATURDAY & SUNDAY FEBRUARY 17 & 18 • 10AM - 4PM $8 ADMISSION (FREE FOR KIDS UNDER 10) BATAVIA DOWNS GAMING, 8315 PARK ROAD, BATAVIA, NY TICKETS, SCHEDULES, AND AUTOGRAPH PRICING: LEGENDSANDSTARS.NET 18 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

These sports collectors shows, like the Legends and Stars event you will be part of in Batavia, are always filled with unique and pieces of memorabilia. Can you think of any bizarre or interesting items fans have asked you to sign?

No, I can’t say that I can think of anything specific. Personally, I never was a real memorabilia guy. When I was about a nine or 10-year-old kid, I had an uncle—and I’m going back a long way—he gave me a baseball. It was signed by Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and I went out and played ball with it and I have no idea where it is now. Oh, God. That would be worth many thousands of dollars today. You probably would have been able to retire on that ball. I hope you enjoyed it!

That’s right, I had fun with it! One of the fun things for you must be catching up with old players at these events. What is it like to see players that you coached as young men now all grown up with families and grandchildren?

They are moving into the age that I was when I came to the Bills as coach. It’s always great to catch up with them, I stay in touch with a lot of them. Occasionally, we get to reunite for something. I get to Buffalo two or three times a year for games, and email helps me stay in touch with a lot of them. We had the greatest group of guys. Bill Polian, Ralph Wilson and I determined that we would only bring in guys of high character onto our team. Some were extroverts, some were more laid back. And on rare occasion, we would make a mistake. But these were guys of high character, they showed up to work every day. Were they good citizens? Did they not blame their teammates? Those were the kinds of guys we had, and it all adds up to some pretty darn likable personalities, too. When we were getting ready to draft there early on, Elijah Pitts, our backfield coach was just pleading for us to draft Thurman Thomas. Thurman had had a very bad injury [in college] and was on a lot of people’s write off lists. And Elijah said, “Coach, you are going to love this guy! He can do it all, and he’s a guy of high character!” Well, when Thurman showed up for training camp, after about three weeks I said, “Elijah, did you say that P he has high character or that he is a character?” That’s Thurman. He was a prankster and stuff of that nature, but what a player, what a teammate, and how I treasure knowing that I can say that I coached Thurman Thomas. I’m sure a lot of people in the Buffalo area are wondering how you are enjoying your time in retirement in the Chicago area. What have you been doing to enjoy yourself and keep busy? First of all, yes, I moved back to Chicago, my original hometown. My wife is from here, our daughter, grandkids, all of our siblings are from here and tons of friends. I exercise at least for an hour a day, whether it’s a little trot in the park or weightlifting. I’ve been very busy with family, with speaking engagements, and I’ve written five books—everything from a memoir, to a novel, to a book of poetry, and now a children’s book, Go Cubs Go!, after the Cubs finally won a World Series after a 108-year drought. Legends and Stars takes place Saturday and Sunday at Batavia Downs Gaming. Other athletes scheduled to appear include Donovan McNabb, Derrick Coleman, Bernie Kosar and Dave Robinson. Ticketing, schedules and autograph pricing information are available at LegendsandStars.net. P


THE GRUMPY GHEY COMMENTARY

THE GRUMPY GHEY:

THE HOLIDAY PIE CAPER BY CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY BEEN A WHILE.

I’ve had a shitty few months and haven’t felt particularly inspired to write, so I took an unscheduled break. The smoke is finally beginning to clear, and looking up from my messy life, I can see that there’s been plenty to write about…maybe just not in the moment that it’s all been happening. Reflecting on the shit-show of the last few months, I can trace a clear pattern of acting out with food. But while it was happening—at least in the beginning—I was blind to the undertow. My cluelessness makes the matter more amusing. In retrospect, it’s clear that one thing that got me through the holidays this year was pie. It started the week before Thanksgiving. I had been gearing up to move apartments and tensions were mounting about money and logistics. And while running through Tops on Elmwood in the Target plaza—incidentally, where North Buffalo goes to die—I spotted a display for eight-inch pumpkin pies on sale. I think they were four bucks, something like that. So, I bought one. Now, I’ve been disarmingly honest in these pages about my vices of yore, so my inability to imbibe much of anything with moderation should come as no surprise. Some compulsions need speedy intervention. For example, excess spending will have me in ruins quickly and destroy a lot of hard work that’s gone into raising my credit score. But when it comes to food, I usually let a compulsion run its course. My experience has been that these torrid affairs with foods—usually one specific food at a time—come to a natural end in a few weeks. In the past, I’ve been strung out on bakery muffins, brownies, salami, various cheeses, fresh bread and butter, cookies, cookie butter, cheeseburgers, mayonnaise (in cahoots with tuna and cold cuts) anything maple flavored, and numerous varieties of ice cream. In between these seasons of indulgence, there are usually periods of “good” eating. But all good things eventually come to an end. A little history. My dad and I shared “a thing” for pumpkin pie. When I was a chubby pre-teen, we would gorge ourselves on Entenmann’s pumpkin pie which, in the 1980s, was a quality product. My mother would have trouble keeping up, making sure we had enough pie so that both of us could eat with abandon. If I went to bed before he did, I would often discover in the morning that he’d finished the pie behind my back. There was something competitive about it, and since I was never much for sports, I guess he took what he could get: The fey kid was useless with a football, but damn can he put away some pie. We were competitive about certain ice creams and Pepperidge Farm cookies as well. But the pie was an annual specialty, like the World Series. I don’t like other pies nearly as much. I’m also not one of these people mentally masturbating all year about the arrival of pumpkin spice season. Back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when seasonal beers were a novelty rather than the norm, I loved the Oktoberfest brews. And I did have an indulgent couple of months back during the 2011-12 holiday season when I soothed myself over a ridiculous breakup with copious amounts of pumpkin ice cream made by Blue Bell, a Texasbased creamery. It had candied pecans and praline swirls, and I recall wishing the container came with straps for my ears so I could just make a feedbag of it. Outside of these labformulated synthetic pumpkin simulations, however, I tend to favor the real thing. I got the pie from Tops home with a vat of French vanilla and it was gone the following evening. But the Tops pies are funky with that weird skin on top that often looks burned and oily. There’s something nasty about them. It was tasty enough, but not the full-on flavor distraction I’d hoped for. So, within 48 hours I graduated to a Wegmans pie. Now, that’s a pumpkin pie. When this flirtation with dietary disaster began, Wegmans was having a promo: 12-inch pumpkin pies for $7. But when I went into the store a day or two past Thanksgiving (for which I took myself out for Indian food and then enjoyed half a pie, lowering my unpleasantly bloated self into bed early due to the ensuing food coma), there were no pumpkin pies. Panic set in. Approaching the bakery counter, I said, “What’s the story with the pumpkin pie?” The woman looked at me and smiled. “I guess they’re all gone. You mean the 12-inch ones, Hon?”

“I dunno, the big seven dollar ones.” “Seven? No, those are nine.” “No, they’re definitely seven.” She went ahead and punched up a ticket on her bakery scale to see and it printed as nine. I was being made to feel like I’d imagined the whole thing. An addict knows how much the fix costs, lady. “We’ve got those little ones for now,” she said, pointing to this pathetic little bite-sized pie for six bucks. It couldn’t have been more than three inches. “That’s it on the pumpkin pie today?” I managed to catch the ear of a guy in full kitchen whites passing by. “Think so,” he said, smiling. I’m so glad everyone else was so fucking chipper. I had a fit. I marched out the door, slamming my little blue handcart into the stack in the entranceway. It seemed beyond comprehension to me: no pie at four in the afternoon on a day between Thanksgiving and Christmas? Unreal. I imagined a satisfying social media rant. As I started the car, a light bulb appeared above my head: I’ll drive to the Dick Road Wegmans. They will surely have a pie for me. And they did. Over the next two weeks or so, this sequence of events played out another three times. Each time, I drove myself to Dick Road for a pie, and each time my efforts were rewarded. Stopping at the Amherst store became a formality. I think I’d just grown fond of exasperatedly slamming my blue basket back into the stack as I exited. Obviously, this sugar compulsion had completely spiraled out of control. But I hadn’t really noticed until the fourth trip to Dick Road. Sitting in rush hour traffic on the 33, it suddenly occurred to me: I was a junkie all over again. But the thought of the delicious pie quickly shut down that realization— the density and serious flavor of the pumpkin (a vegetable, mind you!) tumbling on my taste buds and mixing with the frivolous, fluffy French vanilla. It became like porn, churning on repeat in my brain. I’d sometimes run into people I knew at the supermarket and would essentially watch them talk while daydreaming about the pie. After the fourth (and final) trip to Dick Road, I approached a different woman at the Amherst Street bakery counter. “What’s the story with the pumpkin pie?” I barked, as if she must know exactly what I’m referring to. She asked me to be more specific, so I explained that on four occasions recently I had to drive to Dick Road for a pumpkin pie and that it seemed the staff wasn’t putting out any pie for the later-day shopping crowd. Maybe I was breathing heavy and/or perspiring. She could tell I meant business. My approach had all the finesse of a bank stickup. Her expression shifted a bit. Was she going to call security? “I’ve been on vacation for the last two weeks,” she said, revealing that she was the department manager and noting that she intended to speak to her staff about pie coverage for late shoppers. But not to worry, she assured me: When and if I foundan empty spot where a pumpkin pie should be, all I had to do was ask and they would bring me one from out back that just might need to be heated up for a few minutes before eating. And so, between then and Christmas, I continued gorging myself on pie. For every two pies, another 1.5 quarts of French vanilla also went down. I felt sluggish and awful, but I was beyond giving a shit. My beard was a mess, I’d been wearing

the same industrial work pants for two weeks, and there was a French vanilla crust on my moustache. I was all out of fucks, except for the safe haven of pie and ice cream, which, by the way, I never ate before 9pm, thus ensuring a lousy night’s sleep due to the sugar surge. The eating of the pie was no more civilized than my appearance. I would soften the ice cream in the microwave, then eat a few spoonfuls out of the middle of the container, leaving a perfect sized ditch to fill with a slice of pie, which would then get devoured simultaneously. One night I stopped at Wegmans for a refill and they’d roped off the entire refrigeration section for maintenance. There was a solid barrier of shopping carts chained to one another walling off the ice cream. French vanilla was in a display case facing outward at the end of an aisle, however, and no sooner had I discovered this than I found myself planking a cart, making a painful impression against my weary stomach muscles, to open the case and get my hands on the ice cream. Onlookers were amused, but I was mortified. I had reached bottom. I started talking to people about my binge. I thought perhaps by telling on myself I could jumpstart my inner voice of reason. In the midst of all this, I somehow managed to finally move apartments. And I wondered if maybe changing the scene would halt the pattern. Nope, the new kitchen housed my pie habit just fine. I would emerge from a darkened bedroom, some murder porn streaming on Netflix, to shove pie down my gullet a few times a night, inevitably stubbing my toe on a moving box or a piece of furniture. I ended the pie binge on Christmas. It seemed a logical endcap since pumpkin season was coming to a close. And for nearly two weeks, I moved back into normal eating. I also got sick as a dog, which helped break the cycle. I missed pie, but I seemed to have reached a point of satiation (disgust?) where I was resigned to get back on track. As the second week in January began, however, I made the mistake of strolling down the bakery aisle. Lo and behold, pumpkin season wasn’t over. And so, there was a three-pie relapse—the darkness before the dawn. It felt so wrong: Pie had become vindictive during our two-week separation, and the sex just wasn’t quite as satisfying. I felt manipulated. Used. The second breakup needed to hold firm. Thankfully, it has. As I ready myself for a doctor’s checkup today, I realize I will soon know just how much weight I gained eating somewhere between 15 and 20 pies, plus the, say, eight or 10 containers of ice cream. I have a lot of digging out to do. Grocery shopping with a friend the other day, I said, “I’ll meet you over there, I just need to run back to the prepared foods area,” and he said he’d just tag along. “Unless you’re going to get something you’re P ashamed for me to see,” he joked. Nope, not anymore. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / FEBRUARY 14 - 20, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 19


FILM REVIEW like Turner’s parents really cover every inch of their houses in wallpaper? And is a “bacon butty with jammy sauce” actually something that people eat? The things you learn at the movies. *** To say that the French film Double Lover is based on a novel by Joyce Carol Oates would be to do you a disservice, even if it is true. The novel was called Lives of the Twins, and if you don’t remember it, that may be because Oates published it in 1987 under a pseudonym, as authors of high literary esteem sometimes do when they want to do something different than what their readers are used to expecting from them. I haven’t read the book, but I can’t imagine that anyone who comes to see this new film expecting something Oatesian will be anything less than horrified. The target audience is people who say to themselves, “Why doesn’t anyone ever make movies like Brian DePalma did in his heyday?” You folks are in for a treat.

Jamie Bell and Annette Benning in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool.

AFTER THE GLITTER FADES FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL, DOUBLE LOVER BY M. FAUST IT WAS A LONG, downward spiral for actress Gloria Grahame,

who was once a movie star. The blonde with the distinctive unhappy pout won an Oscar for her supporting role in The Bad and the Beautiful, but you’re more likely to remember her small turns in other films: as the local girl gone bad in It’s a Wonderful Life, a shocking encounter with a pot of boiling coffee in Fritz Lang’s The Big Heat, getting on the wrong side of Bogart in another noir masterpiece, In a Lonely Place, or atypically as Ado Annie, just a girl who can’t say no, in Oklahoma! Personal difficulties sidelined her after the mid-1950s, and when she died of cancer in 1981, a lot of people reading the news probably thought, “Gee, I hadn’t heard of her in years!”

But don’t expect Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool, about the final years of Grahame’s life, to wallow in personal tragedy. For one thing, it’s based on the memoir by her lover Peter Turner, an actor who was a hair more than half her age. They met when she was appearing in a Liverpool stage production of Rain (and it’s not hard to see that the role of Sadie Thompson would suit her to a T). Grahame is played by Annette Bening, Turner by Jamie Bell, and the two have enough chemistry to get you past any queasiness about the age difference.

AT THE MOVIES A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues

OPENING THIS WEEK BLACK PANTHER—This month’s Marvel comic book adaptation. Starring Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan. Lupita Nyong’o, Martin Freeman, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, and Andy Serkis. Directed by Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria DOUBLE LOVER—French adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates’s novel Lives of the Twins, about a woman who falls in love with her psychotherapist but later becomes obsessed with his twin brother. Starring Marine Vacth, Jérémie Renier, and Jacqueline Bisset. Directed by François Ozon (Swimming Pool). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst EARLY MAN—From Wallace and Grommit creator Nick Park, a new stop-motion animation feature about cave men. With the voices of Tom Hiddleston, Eddie Redmayne, Maisie Williams, Timothy Spall, Richard Ayoade, Miriam Margolyes, and Rob Brydon. Dipson Flix, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL—Annette Bening as Gloria Grahame, Oscar-winning actress of the 1950s during the last year of her life, as she faced cancer in the home of her younger lover’s family in Liverpool. Co-starring Jamie Bell, Julie Walters, Stephen Graham. and Vanessa Redgrave. Directed by Paul McGuigan (The Acid House). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Eastern Hills, North Park

An opening sequence which demonstrates that the French care naught for American standards, or at least not our movie rating systems, introduces us to Chloe (Marine Vacth), who is young and beset by stomach pains. Because her doctor can find no physical cause, she visits Paul ( Jérémie Renier), a psychotherapist. She discusses her troubles, they fall in love and move in together. When Paul tells her that he has a twin brother, Louis, whom he never sees, and who is also a psychotherapist, Chloe is intrigued and makes an appointment with him. Think this is going to go well? Guess again.

If anything, you may be reminded of a scandal that didn’t help the real Grahame’s career, one that linked her with the underaged son of her second husband, Nicolas Ray. (That son later became her fourth husband, a marriage that lasted 14 years, longer than her other three marriages combined.) That scandal is referred to but not dwelt on, which in Turner’s telling is how the woman he knew lived her life: with no regrets. Bening is the same age, give or take a year, as Grahame was at this point in her life, but she makes as much as she does of the role because it’s not tied to biography. She is carrying on, not afraid to go after what she wants, if unwilling to face reality head on. (She tells her doctor that she didn’t get the chemotherapy that might have saved her life because losing her hair would have kept her from getting parts.)

As directed by François Ozon, who rarely goes more than 18 months without at least one film in American theaters (his last was Frantz; you may also recall Swimming Pool and 8 Women), Double Lover starts out sedately enough, but don’t let that fool you. References to films like David Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Psycho (of course), and the Paul Schrader remake of Cat People (Vacth is the image of Nastassja Kinski), among other classics of unsettling cinema, should be warning enough. The fun of a movie like this, of course, is trying to second-guess it: We watch events unfold knowing that things aren’t the way they appear to be. But of course Ozon knows that we know that. And we know that he knows that we know that. But does he know that—well, you get the idea.

This isn’t to say that a biography covering Grahame’s post-star years wouldn’t be interesting, but for the most part that’s not what this movie is. Looking back on her relationship with her young lover from the vantage point of her final days, it’s a MayDecember romance that could as easily have been about fictional characters, in the kind of working-class British environment that I sometimes suspect only exists in the movies. Do people

If this all sounds familiar, you may (against all odds) remember Lies of the Twins, an adaptation of the Oates book that was made for the USA Network in the early 1990s, starring Isabella Rossellini and Aidan Quinn. Oates felt that the script changed too much from her book and refused to watch it. What P she thinks of this version, I’d love to know.

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA

CONTINUING

CASABLANCA (1941)—Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in what is by general consensus Hollywood’s greatest romance, if not the most popular Hollywood film period. Call it a miracle of studio craftsmanship, a whole that exceeds the sum of its parts, and an almost mythological example of why we love movies so much. Directed by Michael Curtiz (The Adventures of Robin Hood). With Paul Heinreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet, S. Z. Sakall, and Dooley Wilson. Wed, Fri, Sat 7:30pm. Screening Room THE FINAL YEAR—Acclaimed documentary about foreign policy problems during Barack Obama’s final year in office. Directed by Greg Barker (Manhunt: The Inside Story of the Hunt for Bin Laden). Sat-Sun 11:30am, Mon 11am. North Park THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC (France, 1928)— Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent epic (if that word applies to a film consisting almost entirely of close-ups) starring Maria Falconetti in one of only two feature films in which she appeared. Thu 9:30pm. North Park THE PRINCESS BRIDE (1987)—Rob Reiner’s fractured fairy tale, adapted by William Goldman from his own novel, with a cast of comedians poking fun at children’s fantasy stories. Starring Cary Elwes, Mandy Patinkin, Chris Sarandon, Christopher Guest, Wallace Shawn, André the Giant, Billy Crystal, Robin Wright Penn, Peter Falk, Peter Cook, Mel Smith, and Carol Kane. Wed 9:30pm. Screening Room RIGOLETTO—Giuseppe Verdi’s opera, based on a story by Victor Hugo, from London’s Royal Opera House. Sun 11am. Dipson Amherst SPECTRAL LANDSCAPES—Five short films by Laura Kraning, assistant professor in the Department of Media Study at University at Buffalo, including “Vineland” (2009), “Devil’s Gate” (2011), “Port Noir” (2014), “Irradiant Field” (2016), and “Meridian Plain” (2016). Thu 7:30pm. Hallwalls

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME—Scripted by James Ivory from André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same title, this Oscar nominated film by Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash) portrays a crucial affair between a young man in his twenties and a 17-year-old youth having his first physical homosexual experience. Set at an isolated villa in Northern Italy, it is a voluptuously appealing movie, its surface and compositions elegant and compelling, as well as a celebration of carnality. But it’s at least a bit anachronistic given the changes that have occurred in gays’ lives and opportunities since 1983 (when the story takes place). Starring Timothée Chalamet, Armie Hammer, Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, and Esther Garrel. —George Sax Dipson Amherst COCO—An aspiring young musician visits the Land of the Dead for guidance in this new Pixar animated film. AMC Maple Ridge, Four Seasons THE COMMUTER—The latest of Social Securityeligible Liam Neeson’s roles as a kick-ass action star (surely the most unexpected career shift since Leslie Nielsen turned to comedy) reunites him with director Jaume Collet-Serra, who has made better-than-average use of him in films like Unknown, Ride All Night, and Non-Stop. This time Neeson is a commuter whose bad day gets worse on the train ride home when he becomes tasked with a mystery to be solved before it reaches its destination. It’s not as well-tooled as Non-Stop, and if I hesitate to lay out the mechanism of the plot it’s partly because the way the film sets up its premise is better than the way it executes that premise. But as with most of these Neeson vehicles, you could do worse. With Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, Jonathan Banks, Sam Neill, and Elizabeth McGovern. —MF Four Seasons, Regal Quaker, Regal Walden Galleria DARKEST HOUR—Gary Oldman may not seem like a likely candidate to portray Winston Churchill, but beneath cosmetic padding and facial reconstruction he gives a bravura performance of the great man as he becomes prime minister

20 THE PUBLIC / FEBRUARY 14 -20, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

of England at one of the lowest points in that country’s history, in he early days of World War II. Churchill was one of the Western world’s greatest political actors, a man acutely aware of his effect on the public, and Oldman captures him as variously pugnacious, smugly self-possessed, rhetorically soaring, acerbic, and sometimes privately abashed. Joe Wright (Atonement) directs in his customary technically emphatic and sometimes gimmicky fashion. While there has been no lack of Churchills on screens small and large recently, this is likely to remain the one huge numbers of people remember. With Ben Mendelsohn, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Lily James. —GS Dipson McKinley (STARTS FRIDAY), Four Seasons, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit DEN OF THIEVES—“Thieves without fear. Cops without limits,” proclaims the exhausting trailer for this LA thriller in which I couldn’t tell who we’re supposed to be rooting for. Starring Gerard Butler, Pablo Schreiber, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Jordan Bridges, and Dawn Olivieri. Directed by Christian Gudegast. Dipson McKinley, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Walden Galleria THE 15:17 TO PARIS—If the term “nothingburger” hadn’t already been coined, Clint Eastwood’s newest film would surely have given rise to it. Give him credit for wanting to tell this true story, about the young Americans who stopped a terrorist on a train headed from Amsterdam to Paris, without any Hollywood frosting, going so far as using the actual guys to play themselves (as well as the Brit and the Frenchman who were also involved, but don’t get as much credit). But the incident only lasted a few minutes, and the remainder of the film, which ploddingly recounts the trio’s childhoods and their European vacation, has more filler than a vegetarian meatloaf. The script is by Dorothy Blyskal, whose only previous credits were as a production assistant on a handful of films including Eastwood’s Sully: I guess it pays not to mess up the boss’s cappuccino order. The non-amateur cast includes Jenna Fischer, Judy


IN THEATERS FILM Greer, Thomas Lennon, and Jaleel MOLLY’S GAME—Aaron Sorkin moves (OPENS FRIDAY), Four Seasons, White. -MF AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson from screenwriting to directing Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Regal Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara (from his own script) with this drama Transit, Regal Walden Galleria Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, based on the true story of Molly PHANTOM THREAD—Love it or hate Bloom, a former Olympic skier who it, another Paul Thomas Anderson Regal Walden Galleria AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) FIFTY SHADES FREED—Softcore B&D ran a high-stakes poker game for film, reuniting him with his There 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 sequel. It’s what America does for movie stars, business titans, and the Will Be Blood star Daniel Day-Lewis. Russian mob. Sorkin acquits himself amherst.dipsontheatres.com Set in London in the 1950s, the Valentine’s Day, I guess. Starring slight story charts the relationship Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, admirably, having clearly studied between a star dressmaker (Day– Eric Johnson, and Eloise Mumford. the Martin Scorsese playbook, but AURORA THEATRE his trademark rat-a-tat dialogue Lewis) and Alma (Vicky Krieps), the Directed by James Foley (At Close 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 never gets in the way of the star waitress who becomes his model Range). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson theauroratheatre.com Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara performance by Jessica Chastain, and mistress. The building where Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, who is mesmerizing despite make- he lives and works is his empire, EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) up that looks as if was designed with his sister (Lesley Manville) as Regal Walden Galleria 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall by someone who studied with the business partner and majordomo, a THE GREATEST SHOWMAN—Musical Ringling Brothers. In retrospect, Williamsville / 632-1080 nicely ordered life that doesn’t allow based on the life of circus magnate you may feel that there is both less easternhills.dipsontheatres.com for an outsider (not for nothing is P. T. Barnum. Starring Hugh and more to the real Bloom than is he named Woodcock). How Alma Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac revealed here, but the details of the FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) redresses this imbalance gives Efron. Directed by Michael Gracey. world of high-stakes poker and the 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix (ENDS sure pacing make the 140 minutes what narrative drive there is to a flix10.dipsontheatres.com THURSDAY), Regal Elmwood, Regal an easy ride. Co-starring Idris Elba, film that gives the impression it Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Kevin Costner, Michael Cera, and would rather have no plot at all to interfere with the director’s love of FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 Transit, Regal Walden Galleria Chris O’Dowd. —MF Dipson McKinley visual craft. (He serves as his own 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), (ENDS THURSDAY) HOSTILES—Scott Cooper (Black director of photography.) It’s lovely Niagara Falls / 297-1951 Mass) wrote and directed this MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS— to look at, and Anderson is capable fourseasonscinema.com lugubriously pretentious effort at a Having spent much of the last of immersing you in enough mood liberal condemnation of America’s decade playing the Swedish police to sustain two plus hours, though HALLWALLS reprehensible suppression of the inspector Kurt Wallander on British one wishes he didn’t insist on Indians. Christian Bale stars as a 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 TV, Kenneth Branagh turns to smothering everything with music. cavalry captain, guilty of his share hallwalls.org Belgium’s most famous detective, But what you come away with could of atrocities against the Indians, who Hercule Poirot, in a performance have been provided with much less is assigned (under protest) to escort that will remind no one of David effort. Co-starring Harriet Sansom HAMBURG PALACE a dying Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) Suchet. Even if you’ve never seen Harris, Camilla Rutherford, and 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 and his family through dangerous Sidney Lumet’s 1974 Oscar-winning Gina McKee. —MF Dipson Amherst, hamburgpalace.com territory in 1892. The tedious, adaptation of the Agatha Christie Dipson Eastern Hills uneven narrative is broken by novel, you’re likely already to POST—Steven Spielberg’s LOCKPORT PALACE bursts of brutality and interspersed know how it ends, but that’s not THE dramatization of the Washington 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 with stilted, inflated dialogue necessarily a drawback: it more even Post’s struggles to publish the toplockportpalacetheatre.org meant to convey lofty sentiments be more interesting watching the secret Pentagon Papers in 1971 may and conscience-awakening. With plot unfold if you know where it’s be of some value to casual historians, MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) Rosamund Pike and Rory Cochrane. going. Branagh (who also directed) but at heart it’s no more about Nixon —GS Dipson Flix (ENDS THURSDAY), puts an all-star cast through their 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 era politics than The Crucible was Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, amctheatres.com paces with the finest sets and about the Salem witch trials. Rushed Regal Quaker, Regal Transit costumes that money can buy, into production earlier this year, MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE— with camerawork as flamboyant as The Post is clearly about the need Reboot of the 1995 movie about a Poirot’s moustache (which in this 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall for a free press to stand up against incarnation is saying a lot). On board the lies that fuel Trumpism. It’s still board game that pulls its players Hamburg / 824-3479 into an all too real situation. Starring are Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, a canny piece of entertainment, mckinley.dipsontheatres.com Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, with Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep Derek Jacobi, and Michelle Pfeiffer. Black, Karen Gillan, and Bobby predictably appealing as Post NORTH PARK THEATRE Cannavale. Directed by Jake Kasdan —MF Dipson McKinley editor Ben Bradlee and publisher 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 (Sex Tape). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS—Three Katherine Graham. But as a cri de northparktheatre.org Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara programs of this year’s nominees coeur, it may only be preaching to Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, in the categories of Best Short the choir: those who need its lesson REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 Regal Walden Galleria Film—Animated, Live Action, and probably won’t get it, if they see it at 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 all. With Bob Odenkirk, Tracy Letts, Documentary. If you can only get to LADY BIRD—Greta Gerwig makes her regmovies.com debut as a writer-director in this one of them I recommend the Live Sarah Paulson, Bradley Whitford, winning comedy-drama inspired Action films, though if your goal is to Bruce Greenwood, Alison Brie, and REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 Michael Stuhlbarg. —MF AMC Maple by her own youth as a teenager sit in a warm, comfy theater for as 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls desperate to get away from a bland long as possible, the Documentary Ridge, Aurora, Dipson Amherst, 236–0146 suburb of Sacramento. Saoirse Ronan section runs three hours. –MF Dipson Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal regmovies.com stars as a senior at a Catholic high Eastern Hills school, an ordinary girl desperate PETER RABBIT—The storybook Walden Galleria to be extraordinary, though it’s hard character updated as a badass THE SHAPE OF WATER—Guillermo Del REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 to be special when the exact nature mofo. Apparently the Paddington Toro’s tribute to his favorite movie 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 of your specialness isn’t quite clear movies are not having the influence monster, the Creature From the Black regmovies.com to you. This generous and perceptive one might hope. Domhnall Gleeson Lagoon, is a sophisticated fable for movie covers a year in her life in is joined by the voices of James adults as well as a declaration that REGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 short, concise scenes. Laurie Metcalf Corden, Sia, Margot Robbie, and the Mexican director can make a Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 is excellent in a tailor-made role as Daisy Ridley. Directed by Will great film even within the Hollywood regmovies.com Lady Bird’s mother, a psychiatric Gluck (Annie). AMC Maple Ridge, studio system. His love for the gill nurse who can’t recognize the Dipson Flix, Hamburg Palace, Regal man drips from the screen, but he REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 nature of her passive-aggressive Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, has much more on his mind than One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga reactions to her frustrations with Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal making a creature feature. Sally 681-9414 / regmovies.com family and financial problems. Also Walden Galleria Hawkins stars as a mute woman, starring Tracey Letts. —MF North PADDINGTON 2 may look like a romantically repressed, who works Park, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal children’s movie, but kids are as a cleaning woman at a seaside RIVIERA THEATRE Quaker, Regal Transit 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda unlikely to enjoy these newest military installation. Here scientists are conducting experiments on an 692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org LOVING VINCENT—The biographical adventures of the “short but polite” elements of this story of a young talking bear as much as adults will. “amphibian man” captured in the postman investigating the life It takes an adult to truly appreciate Amazon. Because he cannot speak THE SCREENING ROOM of Vincent van Gogh as he tries Paddington’s good nature, so the two bond, and she determines in the Boulevard Mall, 880 Alberta Drive, to deliver a letter written before lacking everywhere you turn these to set him free in a plot that hews Amherst 837-0376 /screeningroom.net the painter’s suicide aren’t very days. And unlike animated movies closely to that of Splash, only with satisfying, but that doesn’t detract in which the name-value cast only far deeper rewards. Del Toro packs a SQUEAKY WHEEL lot into the two hour running time, from the film’s real appeal, the use provides voices, you get to enjoy 712 Main St., / 884-7172 including numerous valentines to of van Gogh’s paintings to produce Downton Abbey ’s such sights as VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> squeaky.org cinema itself. With Michael Shannon, an animated backdrop for the Earl of Grantham, Hugh Bonneville, Richard Jenkins, Octavia Spencer, actors. One hundred artists hand doing yoga splits, or Dr, Who (Peter SUNSET DRIVE-IN Michael Stuhlbarg, and Doug painted the backgrounds, settings, Capaldi) as a neighborhood crank, 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport Jones. —Gregory Lamberson Dipson and the costume details and hairdos or The IT Crowd’s Richard Ayoade as 735-7372 / sunset-drivein.com Eastern Hills (ENDS THURS), Dipson of the characters, all in van Gogh’s a forensic investigator. Best of all is unmistakably characteristic Hugh Grant as a villainous ham actor Flix, North Park (ENDS THURS), TJ’S THEATRE Expressionist style. The result is who gets to dress up in any number Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Walden Galleria 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 startling and compelling, a small of ridiculous costumes before newangolatheater.com VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM MORE Oscar FILM ending LISTINGS REVIEWS marvel of FOR effectiveness. the film & with a production >> STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI—Having nominee, Best Animated Film. number that only Mel Brooks has paid George Lucas $4 billion for Starring Douglas Booth, Josh ever matched. With Sally Hawkins, the Star Wars franchise, Disney sets TRANSIT DRIVE-IN Burdett, Holly Earl, and Chris Brendan Gleeson, Julie Walters, Jim about capitalizing on its investment 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport O’Dowd. Directed by Dorota Kobiel Broadbent, Tom Conti, and Joanna with what they project will be a 625-8535 / transitdrivein.com and Hugh Welchman. —GS North Lumley. Directed by Paul King yearly series of movies. Picking Park (ENDS THURSDAY) (The Mighty Boosh). —MF Aurora up where J. J. Abrams’s The Force

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Awakens left off, The Last Jedi finds Rey (Daisy Ridley) imploring Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill, giving the best performance of his career) to train her in the ways of the Force. Meanwhile his twin sister, General Leia (Carrie Fisher, in her final performance), desperately tries to save the Resistance fleet from encroaching enemies. There are space battles galore, featuring the most spectacular special effects yet, a large dose of welcome humor, and the passing of the torch from old characters to new ones. The central conflict between Rey and Darth Vader wannabe Kylo Ren has sufficient weight to hold writerdirector Rian Johnson’s pastiche of The Empire Strikes Back and The Return of the Jedi together, but this Disneyfied universe still doesn’t make much sense: Stay tuned for the next installment. —GL Four Seasons, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI—Frances McDormand stars as a mother whose grief at the rape and murder of her teenaged daughter turns to rage as a year goes by and the police have failed to turn up a culprit. So she hires the titular signs to accuse the local sheriff (Woody Harrelson) of dragging his feet. McDormand manages a remarkable portrayal even as the movie drives her character beyond the borders of implausibility. Writerdirector Martin McDonagh (In Bruges), whose working motto is “Guns. Explosions. Blood,” directs in a careful, conservative style and his cast performs impressively, but the behavioral extremes he imposes on his characters work against the redemptive theme he seems to desire. He’s tried too hard to juxtapose divergent moods, ranging from an adolescent-like mischievousness to domestic melodrama. With Kerry Condon, Sam Rockwell, Peter Dinklage, and Abbie Cornish. —GS Dipson Eastern Hills, Dipson Flix (T, North Park, Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria 12 STRONG—Or, how the US won the war in Afghanistan after the attacks on the World Trade Towers killed more than 10,000 Americans. (Never rely on movies to teach you history.) This Jerry Bruckheimer production is based on the true and undeniably inspiring story of the Special Forces team that was the first on the ground in Afghanistan, tasked with persuading a mountain warlord with joining forces to defeat the Taliban. The efforts of the dozen men—well, mostly untested but confident Captain Chris Hemsworth and wizened Warrant Officer Michael Shannon—to make common ground with desert warriors on horseback is engrossing, but too much of the film’s running time is given over to incomprehensible battles. And the fact that this early victory was followed by a quagmire that extends to this day is a dramatic inconvenience that the movie ignores. With Michael Peña, Navid Negahban, Rob Riggle, and William Fichtner, who hopefully does not plan to retain the bald look he sports here. Directed by Nicolai Fuglsig. —MF Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria WINCHESTER—Helen Mirren as the heir to the fortune built on the famous rifle, who constructs a mammoth San Francisco house to trap the ghosts of those killed by her ancestor’s creation. With Sarah Snook and Jason Clarke. Directed by Michael Spierig and Peter Spierig (Jigsaw). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix (ENDS THURSDAY), Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal P Walden Galleria

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CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AN AD EMAIL CLASSIFIEDS@DAILYPUBLIC.COM OR CALL (716)856.0737 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM/CLASSIFIEDS THE PUBLIC’S NOTICE The Public encourages you to use caution while participating in any transactions or acquiring services through our classified section of the newspaper. While we do approve the ads in this section, we do not guarantee the reliability of classified advertisers. If you have questions, email classifieds@dailypublic.com.

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NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: � PROOF (WITH CHANGES) Fresh-painted 1BR, OK carpets, applnces, mini-blinds, prkng, coin-op lndry, CALL FOR WORK: Parables Gallery sec sys. Water & elec inc. No pets, no Advertisers Signature and Gifts, 1027 Elmwood Ave., Bflo. smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175. “The Element of Texture,” March ____________________________1-31. All mediums welcome. Please ----------------------------------------------------send samples of your work to: Glenn Norwood Ave. ELMWOOD VILLAGE: CY Y17W46 Kroetsch gdkroetsch@roadrunner.com Date _______________________ 2 BR, study, porch, appliances, must --------------------------------------------------see. Issue: No pets/smoking. $1,350+util. ______________________ FESTIVAL SCHOOL OF BALLET rsteam@roadrunner.com or Classes for adults and children at all 716-886-5212. IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICHlevels. ARETry ONa class for free. 716-984-1586 ----------------------------------------------------THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE festivalschoolofballet.com. HELD RESPONSIBLE. THE AD LAFAYETTE, 3 bdm, 2 bath,PLEASE newly EXAMINE --------------------------------------------------renovated, w/d hook-ups, THOROUGHLY EVENsteps IF THEtoAD ISFREE A PICK-UP. YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS Elmwood $1195+, 984-7777, 812-4915 THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USEDTue FORand Thur 3:30-6pm. Open to writers between ages 12 and 18 at ----------------------------------------------------PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC. the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 BLACK ROCK Marion St. 1 bdrm, $650. Washington Street, 2nd floor, Buffalo Available on 7/1/17. Includes: cable, wifi, 14203. Light snack provided. laundry, parking. Month-to-month, no --------------------------------------------------smoking or pets. jph5469@gmail. SOUTH BUFFALO ART STUDIO offers --------------------------------------------------skills-based classes in drawing & ROOM FOR RENT $400 Per Mo. painting, private or group, Jerome Incl. util./kitchen privileges Mach (716) 830-6471 or jeromemach@ Commonwealth off Hertel, 390-7543. yahoo.com.-

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THE ARTS

ERWIN RAKOCZY

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MARKENZY JULIOUS CAESAR

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A LIMITED LIABILITY CORPORATION:

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Ashland Ave. 1 Bedroom, Carpeted Studio ,Utilities Included. 716-882-7297.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

process may be served. NYSS may

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PETER HUBBARD MAEVE K. MCDOUGALL ETHAN AXELROD ANJI MALHOTRA

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CROSSWORD BACK PAGE PHOTO BY TOM SICKLER

“EN VACATION” - THEY ALL COME UP SHORT.

ACROSS 1 1/1760th of a mile

53 Tiny mythical creatures on patrol?

28 Is totally up for nestling in bed?

5 Baseball Hall of Famer Ripken

59 2004 Jude Law drama

29 Golf prop

8 Came down softly?

61 “Music for Airports” composer

30 Get bigger

14 Margarine, colloquially

33 “Science Friday” airer

15 Brewhouse brew

62 “Come ___, we’re expecting you ...” (“The Love Boat” theme lyrics)

16 Party appetizer

63 Confident finish?

35 Really dislike

17 Poet/dramatist Hughes

64 Armitage who plays “Young Sheldon”

36 Equipment used at the Winter Olympics

65 Frosty maker

38 Viciousness

66 ___ ThÈrËse, Quebec

39 Sunup to sundown

67 Gambler’s numbers

42 Back muscle, for short

19 Quirky French title role of 2001 20 Furniture to display cheesy stuff? 22 ___ Soundsystem 23 Baled stuff

DOWN

34 Cocoa container

44 Actor Banderas

1 Part that’s egg-centric?

46 Shepherd’s pie bit

26 Attach, as a button

2 Jai ___ (fast-moving sport)

47 “Black Beauty” novelist Sewell

29 Pre-flight org.

3 Landlord’s check

48 Colorful parrot

31 Stewart who sang “Maggie May”

4 Competition for toys?

49 “___ right back!”

32 Till the soil

5 Comic strip character known for saying “Ack!”

50 Many residents of Erbil in Iraq

33 Hot off the presses

6 Tons

51 Limber

34 Changes gradually, graphically

7 “Girls” creator Dunham

54 Some baseball stats

8 Balancing device

55 “Gosh darn it!”

24 Symptom that might require eye drops

37 Kiwi’s much larger cousin 38 Go faster 40 Sturdy tree

9 Mention a connection, perhaps 10 “First of all...”

56 Name in spiral notebooks 57 Noddy creator Blyton

41 Dress shirt component

11 Body of water that’s surrounded?

58 Mumford & ___

43 Connectivity issue

12 Humongous movies

60 Melancholy

44 U.S. : counter(clockwise) :: U.K. : ___(clockwise)

13 “Dirty ___ Done Dirt Cheap” (AC/DC song)

45 “Captain Underpants” creator Pilkey

18 Read a QR code

46 Two-___ toilet paper

21 Underwire’s locale, maybe

47 Incas’ mountains

25 Neither companion

48 Goof

26 Built to ___

51 Teensy carpenter

27 “Sesame Street” character voiced by Ryan Dillon since 2013

52 European peak

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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