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Monday September 16. 2013 vol. cxxxvii no. 67

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Announcement

Interested in joining us? The Daily Princetonian is having open houses today, tomorrow and Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the newsroom at 48 University Place. We’ll see you there!

In Opinion Prianka Misra shares her summer at home, and Adam Mastroianni illustrates the perils of a cappella.

Today on Campus 4 p.m.: Open houses for students interested in joining student groups. Frist Campus Center and Campus Club.

The Archives

Sept. 16, 1991 Vice President Wright responds to questions on a campus-wide ban on beer kegs introduced by President Shapiro.

PRINCETON By the Numbers

1 Number of Princeton presidents not to have a Ph.D. since Francis Patton in 1902.

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News & Notes

BEYOND THE BUBBLE

N.J. Senate candidate stops on Nassau St.

{ profile }

Success — and only success

Public image ranks low on the list of priorities for Christopher Eisgruber ’83, a man of few struggles, setbacks

By Anastasya LloydDamnjanovic news editor

Newark Mayor Cory Booker, the Democratic candidate in the Oct. 16 special election for the New Jersey Senate seat formerly held by Frank Lautenberg, made a campaign stop with Rep. Rush Holt in Princeton on Saturday afternoon. Booker spent approximately two hours in Princeton meeting residents and students on Nassau Street, chatting with locals at Small World Coffee, speaking in a small gathering with some members of the Princeton Community Democratic Organization, and visiting the Pins and Needles store on Chambers Street. Booker was recognized by most passersby, who stopped to shake his hand, have a short conversation, and take pictures. To the few who did not immediately recognize Booker, Holt introduced him as “the next senator.” Booker is currently polling with 64 percent of the vote, while Republican candidate Steve Lonegan follows with 29 percent, according to a Rutgers-Eagleton poll taken between Sept. 3 and Sept. 9. Holt, who ran against Booker in the Aug. Democratic priSee ELECTION page 2

JOSEPH LASETER :: SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

By Teddy Schleifer senior writer

“T

here are all sorts of politicians who have colorful personal lives. I don’t.” Christopher Eisgruber ’83 graduated at the top of the world’s best universities and climbed to the top of his favorite one. He is, by all accounts, a familyfirst husband and father, a role model even for his friends, a brilliant thinker, a dry wit and a kind soul. A former boss of his once wondered jokingly if he was so perfect that he was a fraud. Eisgruber, when asked about his life struggles, mentioned receiving a C in freshman year physics. On Sunday, Christopher Eisgruber will

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under scrutiny for signals about the values and temperament of the 20th University president. But a reconstruction of the 51-year-old’s life, based on interviews with 20 of his friends and colleagues, reveals a man who has had success — and only success — in nearly every aspect of his life and impressed nearly everyone he has met. He has encountered little ill will, setback or struggle. Eisgruber’s story is so straightforward that it will be difficult to make his image exciting to the University community, higher education communications experts said. Randell Kennedy of Academy Communications said academics like Eisgruber are sometimes reluctant to share their nonSee EISGRUBER page 4

BEYOND THE BUBBLE

Q&A: Mayor Cory Booker By Hannah Schoen staff writer

Newark Mayor Cory Booker, a Democrat, is running against Republican candidate Steve Lonegan to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by the late Senator Frank Lautenberg in June. The two candidates will face off in a special election scheduled for Oct. 16. After a meet-

and-greet in Princeton on Saturday, Booker spoke briefly to The Daily Princetonian about his prospective agenda as a senator and his position on the Syria crisis. The Daily Princetonian: If you’re elected to the Senate, what are going to be the first things on your agenda? Cory Booker: Well, the first

Former U. Provost Sheldon Hackney dies

former university Provost and University of Pennsylvania President Sheldon Hackney, 79, died Sept. 12 of Lou Gehrig’s disease at his home in Massachusetts, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Born in Birmingham, Ala., in 1933, Hackney graduated with a B.A. in history from Vanderbilt and a Ph.D in American history from Yale. He arrived at Princeton in 1965 as a history lecturer before taking the post of provost in 1972. He resigned after three years to become the president of Tulane University in New Orleans, La., where he served for five years before accepting the presidency at Penn. At the University, Hackney helped create the African American Studies program and taught Upward Bound, a program for disadvantaged students. Hackney served as Penn’s president from 1981-93 before continuing to teach history until he retired in 2010. He specialized in the post-Civil War history of the American South. In 1993, President Bill Clinton appointed him the chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, a post he held until 1997. President Amy Gutmann, who also served as provost at Princeton, called Hackney one of the “most beloved presidents” in Penn’s history.

be installed as president in a ceremony focused on him. For the past 12 years, Shirley Tilghman talked frequently about her biography: the University’s first female president, and a woman who raised two children on her own. A scientist who had conducted groundbreaking research. A public service advocate who herself had volunteered two years teaching chemistry in Sierra Leone. Her personal story made her elevation to the presidency historic, and she talked about her experiences extensively in Nassau Hall. As Eisgruber spends the upcoming school year meeting with students, faculty, alumni and staff, he will likely be asked about his path to the presidency, like Tilghman was. His biography will come

LILIA XIE :: ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Newark Mayor Cory Booker greets children during his stop in Princeton to campaign for his bid for a seat in the U.S. Senate.

thing on my agenda is to find out where the Senate lavatory is, and [laughs] my way around. No, in all seriousness, look: We’re still dealing with the ravages of this economy, and while the economy’s doing pretty good, real wages are declining or stagnating, declining in New Jersey. We have a lot of places where there’s concentrated poverty, from Cumberland County to Patterson, Passaic, and so I just really want to deal with sort of the economic fairness and justice issues, at a time where, as a United States government, we’re stopping investing in those things, and [I want to] ultimately produce long-term growth. So I’ll be focusing on a lot of the economic issues and economic fairness issues. DP: What’s your position on Syria? CB: Well, you know, I’m hopeful right now that there will be a diplomatic solution for this crisis. I’ve always been skeptical about the use of military force, and very concerned about that. That’s why I’m happy about this current bit of hope, but obviously when you’re dealing with the Russians and the Syrians, you have to do everything you can to verify and substantiate and make sure that we’re actually achieving our goals of getting chemical weapons out of the hands of the Syrians.

COURTESY OF THE MISS AMERICA ORGANIZATION

Student Cara McCollum represented the state of New Jersey.

McCollum eliminated from Miss America competition By Angela Wang staff writer

Cara McCollum, who competed as Miss New Jersey, was eliminated from the Miss America national competition on Sunday night when the top 15 semifinalists were revealed at the beginning of the evening’s programming. An English major formerly a member of the Class of 2014, McCollum is currently taking a year of leave from the University to fulfill her duties as Miss New

Jersey. McCollum could not be reached for comment. Nina Davuluri, who competed as Miss New York, was named Miss America. The Miss America 2014 pageant was held in Atlantic City, N.J., for the first time since 2005. Fifty-three representatives from the U.S. states and territories competed for the grand prize. The preliminary competitions, See PAGEANT page 2

ACADEMICS

New ENV course discusses climate change, extreme weather By Austin Lee staff writer

While the University campus was shielded from the worst effects of Hurricane Sandy last fall, the other home of Katie Goepel ’15 was not as fortunate. The extensive damage to her family’s beach house on the Jer-

sey Shore prompted Goepel to register this semester for ENV 343: Climate Change and Extreme Weather in the Garden State, a new course that situates Sandy in the wider context of climate change in New Jersey. “I think [the course] is really applicable to students here,”

Goepel said. “People seem to be very interested in the class and the environment, especially in something that happened so recently and could happen again.” The course’s purpose is to examine potential links between climate change and extreme weather, according to course in-

structor and ecology and evolutionary biology lecturer Eileen Zerba. “I think that’s really important in terms of teaching the students that because, obviously, given the current events, extreme weather holds the potential to change our lives in even a moment,” Zerba

explained. Princeton’s relative proximity to the Jersey Shore allows students access to a convenient real-world example of the devastation extreme weather change can cause. The class will visit two areas affected last year by Hurricane Sandy and will work See SHORE page 2

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Rep. Holt introduces Newark mayor Class examines lessons ELECTION from Hurricane Sandy Continued from page 1

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mary for the seat, has since endorsed Booker and pledged to help him win the general election, according to a Holt campaign press release. Avery Stewart ’16, a Booker supporter from Conn., attended the event, shaking Booker’s hand and taking a photo with him. Stewart was also signing people up to register to vote in New Jersey. She is planning to change her registration to New Jersey, and she would like to see more students do the same.

“I just think, as a university, we could definitely use some more civic engagement. It would be great to see a lot more students voting locally,” Stewart said. College Democrats supports Booker’s candidacy and plans to campaign on his behalf, Will Mantell ’14, the president of College Democrats, explained. “It’s sort of a no-brainer, especially when you look at his competitor. Ultimately, he is espousing the policies that we believe in—versus Steve Lonegan, who is an ultraconservative candidate who, you know, has basically approached the race with this

sort of ‘cut, cut, cut’ mentality that is paralyzing the Congress right now.” The student group plans to participate in phonebanking and door-to-door canvassing for Booker, as well as for N.J. gubernatorial candidate Barbara Buono, Mantell explained. It will also participate in a non-partisan voter registration drive with College Republicans and P-Votes. “Hopefully, we’re going to get a lot of people registered, and sort of just based on the numbers of the Princeton campus, hopefully a lot of those folks are going to end up voting for Booker and Buono,” he said.

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on developing strategies for preventing and countering the impact of extreme weather on communities, Zerba explained. “[The students] are going to go and survey the damage there and look at rebuilding strategies.” Zerba said. “Their project is to really research that, in light of future sea level change and come up with ideas about green infrastructure strategies, the things in the natural environment that can lower impact of future storms.” The course will consist of lectures, interactive discussion sessions and student projects in which students will study weather phenomena by looking at past storm data and design countermeasures for extreme weather, Zerba said. The two locations that students will be visiting are Union Beach, one of the areas hard-hit by Hurricane Sandy last fall,

and Sea Bright, an area located between the bay and the ocean where storm water affected many of the freshwater bodies in the area, Zerba explained. The trips are part of the University’s Community Based Learning Initiative, which aims to link students’ academic work with communities near the University. Through these trips and other projects, students will tackle the work of developing and designing countermeasures for extreme weather. Given last year’s storm, Goepel said she felt the course is extremely applicable to students. She explained that she feels the overall format and projects of the course are very distinctive and interesting. The course currently has 10 students enrolled, according to the Registrar’s Course Offerings page. “People seem to be very interested in the class and the environment, especially in something that happened so recently and could happen again,” she said.

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: The Daily Princetonian is published daily except Saturday and Sunday from September through May and three times a week during January and May by The Daily Princetonian Publishing Company, Inc., 48 University Place, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Mailing address: P.O. Box 469, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Subscription rates: Mailed in the United States $175.00 per year, $90.00 per semester. Office hours: Sunday through Friday, 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Telephones: Business: 609-375-8553; News and Editorial: 609-258-3632. For tips, email news@dailyprincetonian.com. Reproduction of any material in this newspaper without expressed permission of The Daily Princetonian Publishing Company, Inc., is strictly prohibited. Copyright 2013, The Daily Princetonian Publishing Company, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Princetonian, P.O. Box 469, Princeton, N.J. 08542.

T HE DA ILY

Someone take your ‘Prince’? Get your fix online.

www.dailyprincetonian.com LILIA XIE :: ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Rep. Rush Holt and New Jersey senatorial candidate and Newark Mayor Cory Booker walk along Nassau Street Saturday as Holt introduces Booker to local residents of Princeton.

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Miss New Jersey did not make top 15 PAGEANT Continued from page 1

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which took place throughout the week, consisted of the following categories: talent, interview, evening wear and swimsuit. The evening wear competition also featured an onstage question. The final night’s programming, which aired on ABC Sunday evening, also featured competitions in talent, evening wear and swimsuit, as well as the “Peer Respect and Leadership” and “Top Five Knowledge and Understanding” categories. This year’s judges include Miss America 2005, Amar’e Stoudemire from the New York Knicks, Lance Bass of ‘N Sync and actress Carla Hall from the television show “The Chew.” Another component of the Miss America pageant is the platform, a social issue of importance to the contestant. The winner embarks on a year-long national speaking tour to promote her platform. She, as well as the four runners-up, are also awarded with academic scholarships. McCollum grew up in Arkansas but moved to New Jersey and changed her residency after starting school at Princeton. She began competing last year and was crowned Miss New Jersey this June. McCollum played the piano for the talent portion of the competition and promote reading as her platform. She started a non-profit organization called the Birthday Book Project in high school, which sends books to underprivileged, elementary-aged children on their birthdays. On campus, McCollum is involved with Princeton Alumni Weekly, the Nassau Literary Review, Kappa Alpha Theta and Fashion Speaks.

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LAWNPARTIES

SEAN PAN :: STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

JOSEPH LASETER :: SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Princeton eating clubs opened their doors for fall Lawnparties. USG headliners T-Pain and Chiddy Bang performed at Quadrangle Club, while the other 10 eating clubs hosted their own musical acts, including American Authors at Charter Club and Aaron Carter at Tower Club. The semiannual event was sponsored by the USG and the Alcohol Initiative Fund. Logistical support was provided by the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students.

LILIA XIE :: ASSOCIATE PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

MERRILL FABRY :: PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

MERRILL FABRY :: PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

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Former provost repeatedly described as ‘brilliant,’ ‘sounds like Superman’ EISGRUBER Continued from page 1

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academic background with others. Because the University’s external face matters, he said, that could hurt Eisgruber. Eisgruber’s narrative may be hidden by his desire for privacy. Eisgruber said he is not interested in cultivating this image, and that he firmly believes that some elements of his biography and backstory are off-limits. He declined a request by The Daily Princetonian to shadow him for parts of the summer, citing a busy summer schedule; he also declined a subsequent request for a series of three interviews, instead agreeing to a single, hourlong interview scheduled for more than three months after the initial request was sent. His office also said he had no events over the summer that the ‘Prince’ could attend and that he would not answer additional questions before or after the single interview. Eisgruber’s wife, Lori Martin, who is a partner at the corporate law firm WilmerHale in New York, as well as his recently appointed top deputy University Provost David Lee GS ’99, declined to comment. “I think there are some aspects of my life that are boring, and I’m delighted about that,” Eisgruber said. “The fact that there’s a ‘Prince’ reporter who seems to have spent his summer talking to my childhood friends is astonishing to me, because I don’t think it’s very interesting,” he said. ***** Corvallis, Ore.: population 55,000, home of Oregon State University and a Hewlett-Packard campus, a city with some of the most patents per capita in the country and once home to Ludwig and Eva Eisgruber. The Eisgrubers, immigrants

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from Germany, were educated at Purdue in West Lafayette, Ind., where Princeton’s current president was born along with three younger sisters. But in seventh grade, Eisgruber left the gold-and-black walls in his room when his parents took faculty positions at Oregon State. Corvallis was a “quiet place” and the siblings lived a “peaceful childhood,” full of the “normal things,” Ingrid Repins, Eisgruber’s younger sister, said.

‘Chris is an order of magnitude more talented intellectually than the ordinary most-talented Princeton student.’ Jeffrey Tulis Princeton professor

“You can ride your bike to everywhere you want to go,” Repins said of her hometown. “You couldn’t really go any place without running into someone you knew or knew your parents.” The Eisgrubers were well known in the college town, she said. Their father was chair of the university’s agricultural economics department and their mother — who, unusually for a woman at the time, had a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering — stayed at home to raise the children for most of their childhoods. “She probably told us five times a day that you will never find a job unless you study science or engineering,” Repins said.

The parents, who are now both deceased, left an imprint on Eisgruber, who took AP Physics in high school and majored in physics at Princeton. His siblings studied it as well. Raised during the Great Depression, Eisgruber’s parents were eager to teach their children the value of money and had their son deliver newspapers after school. “That kind of idea, that we as kids should learn the value of money, that nothing is guaranteed and nothing is given to you, that really shaped our psyche growing up,” his sister said. Eisgruber’s mother also helped shepherd her son and his friends to various local chess tournaments in junior high school. In high school, his five-member team began to compete for state titles. Senior year, with Eisgruber as captain, it was time to make a bid for national glory, he said. In preparation, Eisgruber said he practiced his “end game,” the stage of the game where few pieces are left on the board and where he thought he struggled, for three hours a day during his senior year. “By the standards of the state of Oregon, I was a pretty serious, competitive player,” Eisgruber said in an interview. “For me, that was part of being on a team together with a group of other people who were also friends and competitors.” The chess team cleaned parking lots and parked cars to fundraise for a trip out to the 1979 national championship in Philadelphia, though much of the funding came from their own pockets, said Arnold Larson, a childhood friend and a member of the team. That spring, surprising nearly everyone, the team Eisgruber captained eked out a victory by half a point. ***** Three decades later, Eisgru-

ber would learn that what he thought was his heritage was a lie In a saga first reported by the Israeli newspaper Haaretz this summer, Eisgruber said he grew up believing his mother, born Eva Kalisch, left Berlin at age eight after her father made statements that offended the Nazis. The family fled to France and then arrived in the United States in May 1940. At Purdue in the 1950’s, Kalisch met Ludwig Eisgruber, a German exchange student, who she married in 1960. Kalisch died in 2003 without telling her children the truth — her family didn’t flee the Nazis because of a political disagreement; they had fled Germany because they were Jewish. Kalisch and her parents went to great efforts to shield Eisgruber and his sisters from the truth. Kalisch told her children she was raised Protestant and converted to Catholicism

‘He had a scientific demeanor and approach.’ richard klingler, Fellow Rhodes Scholar

before marrying. Her husband, she told Eisgruber’s relatives, was an anti-Semite involved in Hitler Youth. The paper also reported that Kalisch told her Jewish relatives that she wanted no further contact with them. The family named their eldest son after the Christian messiah, and the children were raised Catholic. When Eisgruber asked his mother or grandmother about their history, they would deflect the question and instruct Eisgruber not to intrusively ask about their hard times during the war. The deception was only discovered five years after his mother died. In 2008, Eisgruber’s only child, Danny, then a fourth grader, was tasked with a class project to learn more about their ancestors that may have landed at Ellis Island. Using online archives, Danny and his father discovered the manifest for the ship that brought the Kalischs to America. Next to his mother’s and grandparents’ names: “Hebrew.” “We thought: ‘Oh, that must be a mistake,’ ” Repins told the ‘Prince’ about their initial reaction. “When I first discovered this, there was certainly a sense of shock, I would say. Certainly a sense of being misled, a sense of loss as well,” Eisgruber said to the ‘Prince.’ He wasn’t angry though. Eisgruber said he understood his grandparents’ and mother’s decision to lie as a desire to assimilate in America. “It was very important to my family that we be thought of American. There’s a certain sense of which — being an immigrant, of being an insider and outsider at the same time — is also something that’s very much a part of the Jewish experience,” Eisgruber explained. “Understanding that this loss and rediscovery of family can be understood through that lens has helped complete my understanding of myself and help complete my understanding of what my family’s experience was.” He did say, however, that he wished he had discovered the truth when his grandmother or mother, an only child, were alive. “If I had a chance to talk to my mother or, especially, I would say, my grandmother about this, I think I could have known them in a way that even now is self-evidently impossible for me to know,” he said. Since Eisgruber unearthed his true history, he and his family have begun to connect

with long-lost relatives in Israel. Eisgruber and his sisters, who do not identify as Jewish as he now does, gave the relatives part of the sum the Eisgruber family was able to recover in a Holocaust Claims Resolution Tribunal in 2009. Eisgruber has since traveled to Israel twice, including a trip with his frequent co-author, University of Texas Law professor Lawrence Sager, last year. He also organized a family reunion at his home in Princeton about three years ago, his sister said. “All in all, it’s been a very positive experience getting to know your family,” she said. “It did leave us with some questions that we can’t answer.” ***** Eisgruber did not know his true heritage as he calmly dazzled others. At Princeton, Oxford — where he was as a Rhodes Scholar — and the University of Chicago Law School, Eisgruber blew away the faculty and peers he interacted with. Friends and professors said repeatedly that Eisgruber was not just smart — all students at those schools were smart, they conceded — but rather brilliant. “Chris is an order of magnitude more talented intellectually than the ordinary mosttalented Princeton student — and we all felt that,” said Jeffrey Tulis, who taught politics and advised Eisgruber at Princeton. “I’ve never had an undergraduate student even come close to the talent he showed.” Eisgruber majored in physics but was always attracted to its philosophical underpinnings; he particularly admired Princeton theoretical physicist John Wheeler, Tulis said, because Wheeler approached physics questions as questions of philosophy. Toward the middle of his college career, Eisgruber took more and more politics courses. By the end, he had effectively double-majored in physics and politics, and his 100-page physics thesis, “The Global Implications of Local Violations of the Energy Conditions,” cited Immanuel Kant in its references. After Princeton he went on to Oxford, where he spent two years seriously studying constitutionalism. Dissatisfied with the tutorial system, friends said, Eisgruber organized his own discussion group on constitutional philosophy. “He had a scientific demeanor and approach,” Richard Klingler, a Rhodes Scholar at the same time as Eisgruber, said. “He had a touching and inspiring belief if you discuss things you’ll get closer to an answer or to an understanding.” At the University of Chicago, his academic achievements continued — number one in his class; editor-in-chief of the Law Review; a potential clerk sought after by the nation’s top judges. Judge Patrick Higginbotham, of the U.S. Court of Appeals’ Fifth Circuit, hired Eisgruber straight out of law school as one of his three clerks for the 1988-89 judicial year. “This guy’s either brilliant or a fraud,” Higginbotham said he thought when reading Eisgruber’s resume. There was more of the same at his second clerkship with Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. “He’s brilliant,” Marina Hsieh, who clerked for Stevens alongside Eisgruber, said. Nearly everyone interviewed referenced Eisgruber’s intelligence as his most salient characteristic. His intelligence helped him move up the ranks unencumbered. Five years after clerking for Stevens, and before his 34th birthday, Eisgruber was a full tenured professor at NYU teaching constitutional law. Five years after that, he was back at Princeton. And five years after that, he was second-in-command to Shirley Tilghman, and the favorite to replace her. Eisgruber did say however

that his educational and professional life involved struggles, pointing in particular to a difficult freshman year physics course in which he received a C. “One of the things that helps you as a teacher is to understand what it is to be in a classroom and be struggling,” Eisgruber said. “There are a lot of faculty colleagues who have never been in a situation in a classroom where they found themselves struggling.” After graduating from U. Chicago Law School at the top of his class and clerking twice on the nation’s highest courts, Eisgruber also said he faced difficulty landing a job on a law school’s faculty. Eisgruber was offered two jobs — at the University of Texas and NYU, choosing the latter even though it was an opening in contract law rather than constitutional law. NYU President John Sexton, who as dean of NYU Law School hired Eisgruber in 1990, said Stevens had identified Eisgruber as the most promising clerk from the court in the past couple of years. Sexton said the law school in turn had identified Eisgruber as the top entering law professor. “He sounds like Superman,” Higginbotham noted. **** He’s not only brilliant, though. Christopher Eisgruber is extremely decent, people say. When David Frederick, his friend from Oxford, had his 50th birthday party, Eisgruber brought him a bottle of wine from 1983 — the year they became friends. While Ph.D student Mariah Zeisberg GS ’06 was worried about her non-academic background affecting her thesis performance, Eisgruber displayed surprising warmth that she said wasn’t common in academia. Christopher Eisgruber is open-minded and analytical, people say. When Hyam Kramer ’83 ended a debate with Eisgruber on good terms, Kramer said he left it wishing all the world’s debates ended similarly. Academic mentors and colleagues repeatedly noted how he disliked dogmatism and how

‘One of the things that helps you as a teacher is to understand what it is to be in a classroom and be struggling.’ Christopher Eisgruber ’83 even-handed Eisgruber could be in comprehending a topic: Eisgruber did not support or oppose eating clubs, Tulis, his Princeton professor, said. “The question for him was, ‘What kind of eating club could be good?’ ” Tulis said. Christopher Eisgruber has a dry, smart sense of humor, people say. When Gregory Mark, a fellow editor on Law Review, got drunk on wine at a U. Chicago professor’s wine tasting, Eisgruber looked over and quipped: “I think the neoclassical economists are wrong. There is such a thing as a utility monster.” But many of these same friends and mentors could not name a single weakness that they thought might humanize him. Chris Eisgruber is not the kind of guy who has foibles, they said. “Chris Eisgruber is a mensch,” Sortirios Barber, a constitutional law professor at Notre Dame, said. “I don’t know of anyone who has ever had a negative impression of Chris is any context.” “It’s hard for me to see anything ill about him, because really there was nothing ill about him,” Kramer, his college roommate, said. See EISGRUBER page 5

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U. president cited Kant in physics department thesis EISGRUBER

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“That’s the problem with this guy. He’s a rebuke to all of us who suffer original sin,” Sexton, NYU’s president, said. Eisgruber, when asked in the interview to point out a few weaknesses, originally questioned the validity of the question and declined to comment. “I’m not going to answer that particular application essay,” he said. When asked again, Eisgruber later said he often is too dismissive toward criticism and that he sometimes doesn’t open himself to points of view from people he disagrees with. “There’s something to what they’re saying, even if there’s a whole lot of chaff amidst the wheat,” Eisgruber said. Similarly, Eisgruber said he could be too combative toward other scholars; he said he now understands the best response to scholarship is not to criticize it, but to ask the question that highlights the viewpoint’s insight. It’s clear when Eisgruber sees little merit in opposing positions, multiple individuals close to the new University president said, noting that he “doesn’t suffer fools gladly.” Roger Crew ’83, a friend of Eisgruber’s beginning in freshman year, said the two frequently sparred in political debates and as a result, were sometimes at each other’s throats. “He was relentlessly polite, but he was relentlessly polite while he was shredding your argument to pieces,” he said. “He wasn’t shy about ripping into people if your position lacked merit.” In law school, Eisgruber was

seldom intimidated by faculty, said Erin Enright ’82, who worked with Eisgruber on the law review. He would stand his ground and press professors; this aggression made him disliked by some of his professors, Enright said. At Oxford, Eisgruber was amused by the pretentiousness of the school and its “buffoons,” said Frederick, his Oxford friend.

‘I don’t know of anyone who has ever had a negative impression of Chris in any context.’ Sortirios Barber, Notre Dame professor

“People that act in foolish ways are not going to make it very far with him,” Frederick said. “You better be prepared when you go in and talk to him.” His Supreme Court colleague Hsieh noted that, “he never minced words about anything.” She explained, however, that this harshness was not because he wasn’t kind — which he was — but more because he has high expectations. For the most part, Eisgruber acknowledges that he may have been too biting with people in his past, but he has changed. “If we’re talking about my senior year exchanges with my

roommates, I think it’s a pretty accurate characterization,” Eisgruber said. “I think that one of the things I’ve done over the 30 years that have intervened since then is developed more of an appreciation for the circumstances where I just have to hold my piece.” Eisgruber noted that he has been able to achieve some consensus on divisive issues already as provost. People close to him also said Eisgruber, the man with a wiry frame, glasses and a tendency to animate when discussing his academic work, was kind of shy and bookish. “This is a guy who was on the chess team, not the football team,” Repins, his sister, said. At Elm Club, Eisgruber was known as fairly serious and though he had friends, he wasn’t well-known around the club, according to Sarah Macaluso ’83, a friend of Eisgruber at the time. More than one friend from Elm at his 30th Reunion pulled Macaluso aside and whispered something that she said surprised her. “Did we know Chris?” they said. Eisgruber was in the club during junior year but dropped Elm and became an independent in Spelman during senior year. Friends at Princeton said he was well-liked, even if not well-known. “Even just getting to know him, I thought I had him pegged: focused guy, looks nerdy, spends a lot of the time in the library,” Kramer said. “At first meeting, I wasn’t expecting someone I would find fascinating and challenging and engaging.” But he did. Eisgruber said he enjoyed public speaking occasions and did not say whether he considered himself extraverted.

“I guess you could talk to our psychology department about whether or not that’s a metric,” he said. **** During the interview, Eisgruber was reluctant to discuss his personal attributes. What’s important, he says, is not his past but the University’s future; attempts to ask about him as a person was at times met with defensiveness. In the interview, Eisgruber said he planned to open himself up to the student body to a similar extent that Tilghman did. “I’ve been happy to talk to people about aspects of my career that I think are directly relevant to what it is that I’m doing at Princeton,” he said. “I don’t think that every aspect of my personal life is relevant, but nor did Shirley.” The University leader said his biography is relevant, but trivia — such as the fact that he cooks and is the primary caregiver in their two-career household — is “quite irrelevant.” “I think people are interested in lots of things about other people,” Eisgruber said. “That’s why we have gossip magazines and why some journalists write for them, but that doesn’t mean that it’s relevant to how people do their jobs.” He eschewed the notion that he should be building a presidential “image” and declined to comment on how he thinks the University community will generally perceive him. “Different people will use different words to describe other people, and a lot of that will be dependent on their perspective and what aspects of the person they’re interested in,” he noted.

JAZZFEAST

MONICA CHON :: PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

While University students enjoyed Lawnparties along Prospect Avenue, local residents attended the Palmer Square JazzFeast, listening to the Princeton University Jazztet, among other musical groups.

ACA - AWESOME

REBECCA TERRETT :: STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Campus a cappella groups showed off their talents at an open house to attract freshmen to audition.

9.16NewsForLuc.indd 5

9/16/13 12:24 AM


Today I lived

L

ast Sunday, I arrived at Princeton Junction around 9:30 at night. On the New York platform I recognized someone: a recent alumnus standing with a distinguished-looking couple, whom I took to be his parents. We began to talk, pleasantly. It emerged that my student’s mother had also been my student: the sort of thing that gladdens an old professor’s heart. Suddenly life sped up. A large man had been walking up and down, speaking and gesturing oddly. It seemed he needed help — but as so often happens, no one knew what to do. Without warning he jumped off the platform, lay down between the east- and westbound tracks and began to yell. Smart phones lit up as people finally called the local police. But before they could arrive, the New York train approached the station. Though safe where he was, the large man made a dash for the platform. He missed, and fell under the train — five or six feet from where we stood, stunned. We thought we had seen a death. But we hadn’t. The train stopped. The man, now underneath one of the cars, began to yell and throw stones from the roadbed. Conductors shouted, police scratched their heads, passengers looked as bewildered as I felt. Then my friend’s father said something wise: “Taxi.” We suited our action to his word, crossed under the tracks and let someone drive us back to the city. I haven’t been able to find out how events unfolded after we left, and keep thinking about that man in his strange agony, his world in pieces. So much for Princeton, the land of bucolic peace.

The story seems all the more strange for its contrast with the way I’m living now. This year, as fall nears, I’m not in Princeton but in New York, as a fellow of the Cullman Center of the New York Public Library. In this tiny, implausible paradise on earth, writers and scholars are paid to spend a year working in glassed-in cubicles around an elegantly furnished central space. Benign supervisors provide all the coffee and water that anyone could want and avert their eyes from our eccentric behavior. Best of all: they pay us. To sit in a library and read. Dracula is running the blood bank. The future of the New York Public Library — or at least of its Stephen A. Schwarzman Building — has been fiercely debated for the last few years. The library’s trustees and managers plan to transform it by adding a large modern circulating collection and public working space — in the vast dark spaces once filled with the main collections of books, which they have sent to off-site storage. Many scholars and writers have objected (I have myself) to all or part of this ambitious plan, which involves removing the stacks that support the magnificent Rose Reading Room on the third floor. Demands and compromises have been made, lawsuits have been filed and no one knows what the future holds. For the moment, though, the library is still what it always was: a palace for New York’s people, where anyone who lives in the city can sign up for a library card and see rare books and prints. Readers of every imaginable age and kind work with laptops; a few even read books. Tourists crowd the corridors. The library’s collection is still magnificent: a mass of books in every known language and from every known period. Heaps of them have already been delivered to me and my colleagues in the Cullman Center offices. One of the Renaissance scholars whose lives and works I study, Isaac Casaubon, visited the Bodleian Library in 1613. He found it tremendously exciting. The library didn’t allow books to circulate, so all the serious scholars in Oxford worked there, and it was easy to meet them. The stock of new books was unlike anything he had ever seen. A young Jew helped him read the Talmud, the great codification of Jewish law and ritual. He exulted in his diary: “Hodie vixi” — “Today I lived.” Casaubon took care to qualify his exuberance by writing “today.” A refugee from religious wars on the Continent, he knew that life, even the life of scholars who pore over great books stored behind stone walls, was precarious. It still is. Walk west past the Schwarzman Building and enter pretty Bryant Park behind it, and you’ll encounter plenty of homeless people and troubled wanderers. Stay in your office in the Cullman Center, and you’ll find yourself reading about the seismic changes that are shaking universities and the terrible and wonderful things that are happening in them. How to live and work, in the Center and in the world, at the same time, and how to do things that are of value in their very different terms — that’s the problem I’ll be grappling with this year. Anthony Grafton is the Henry Putnam University Professor of History. He can be reached at grafton@princeton.edu.

9.16 opinion.upstairs.indd 2

Opinion

Monday september 16, 2013

page 6

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Join the Editorial Board

ver the past semester, the unsigned editorials featured on this page have discussed issues such as the nascent Eisgruber presidency, Lawnparties as a benefit concert and University insurance coverage of sex-reassignment surgery. The Daily Princetonian Editorial Board, a group of 13 undergraduates, was collectively responsible for writing these pieces. The members of the Board are not the editors of the various sections of the ‘Prince.’ Instead, they constitute an independent group of undergraduate students who are charged with determining the position of the newspaper as a whole. Today, instead of taking a stance on an issue, we would like to explain the editorial process and invite interested freshmen, sophomores and juniors to apply to join the Board. The Board is the independent body responsible for determining the position of the ‘Prince’ on a range of matters that affect Princeton, its campus community and our generation. We meet twice a week to discuss campus issues, solicit input from potential stakeholders and ultimately determine the stance the ‘Prince’ will take on the issue at hand. We work closely with other sections of the newspaper to gather information about editorial topics, but we deliberate behind closed doors and independently determine our own positions to preserve

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vol. cxxxvii

that, in our opinion, are best for the community as a whole. For us, its members, the Board is one of the defining activities of our time at Princeton. From the (relative) comfort of our fourth-floor conference room, we engage in challenging, passionate and intellectually stimulating debates that lead us to examine and confront the full range of issues that affect our lives at Princeton. It is especially exciting when our suggestions make a lasting contribution to broader campus discussions about an issue or when the University adopts them, such as the computer science department’s decision to keep the pass/D/fail option available for COS 126 and the Honor Committee’s decision to modify its punishment for students who take extra time on tests. Our aim is to inspire discussion and, ultimately, action. But this is impossible without students with unique perspectives — independent thinkers who are eager to debate and willing to engage with issues important to Princeton. We value writing ability, creativity and strength of thought much more than journalistic experience. If you are interested in joining us, we encourage you to fill out our application at dailyprincetonian.com/join/opinion by midnight on Thursday, Sept. 26. Applicants will be interviewed shortly thereafter. We look forward to meeting you!

The freshman farewell

Adam mastroianni ’14 ..................................

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editor-in-chief

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managing editor Emily Tseng ’14 news editors Patience Haggin ’14 Anastasya Lloyd-Damnjanovic ’14 opinion editor Sarah Schwartz ’15 sports editor Stephen Wood ’15 street editor Abigail Williams ’14 photography editors Monica Chon ’15 Merrill Fabry ’14 copy editors Andrea Beale ’14 Erica Sollazzo ’14 design editor Helen Yao ’15 web editors Sarah Cen ’16 Adrian De Smul ’14 multimedia editor Christine Wang ’14 prox editor Daniel Santoro ’14 intersections editor Amy Garland ’14 associate news editor Catherine Ku ’14 associate news editor for enterprise Marcelo Rochabrun ’15 associate opinion editors Richard Daker ’15 Tehila Wenger ‘15 associate sports editors Damir Golac ‘15 Victoria Majchrzak ’15 associate street editors Urvija Banerji ’15 Catherine Bauman ’15 associate photography editors Conor Dube ’15 Lilia Xie ’14 associate copy editors Dana Bernstein ’15 Jennifer Cho ’15 associate design editor Allison Metts ’15 associate multimedia editor Rishi Kaneriya ’16 editorial board chair Ethan Jamnik ’15

NIGHT STAFF 9.15.13 news Night Chief: Catherine Duazo ’14 Paul Phillips ’16 copy Regina Wang ’14 Andrew Sartorius ’13 design Kat Gao ’15 Christine Kyauk ’16 Jessie Liu ’16 Helen Yao ’15

Here’s to coming home Prianka Misra columnist

I

woke up to the wails of power tools. Some days, their agonizing, heart-rattling whirring would crescendo, as if the drills were threatening to burst through my wall, through my headboard, into my head. It was like waking up in the dentist’s office, amplified, up close, and in your face — six days a week. It was on these days that I bitterly thought to myself, “Welcome home. After finishing my first year at Princeton, I was looking forward to going home — sort of. A few months of struggling to find an interesting internship, the stress of finals and nostalgia for my hometown all made me eager to savor the sights and sounds that had accompanied my childhood and teen years. My pre-Princeton self was reignited. I was ready to meet up with old friends, eat my mother’s Indian cooking and drive my car on freeways that meandered through hills turned golden by sun-scorched grass. But almost as soon as I came home, these romantic snapshots lost their vibrant colors, dulling in my mind. It didn’t help that

my parents had commenced a massive renovation endeavor while I was gone. The construction had rearranged our lives, leaving my home in a much less welcoming state than I had expected. But my disappointment wasn’t confined to my house. In general, the familiar suburban environment that I was just looking forward to became tarnished and demeaned. My twisting roads paled in comparison to pictures of Princetonian globetrekkers who were thrilled to be standing in front of the Taj Mahal, the Christ the Redeemer Statue in Rio and the U.S. Capitol. My internship struggles had already quelled my enthusiasm for my own summer prospects; now, seeing these images only exacerbated my emotions and made me feel trapped by the town that had raised me. I was kicking myself for not having gotten my act together sooner. Dreams of traveling across the world whisked me from a state of gratitude to one of indifference, until my numbness drowned the beauty of my surroundings. The bougainvilleas I saw on the way to my job were of no value to me, their ruby petals fluttering away on trellises that I ignored. The glassy San Francisco skyscrapers reflected sunshine throughout the city streets, while I squinted on and kept walking. I did not even fully acknowledge my fortune in landing a job that essentially paid me to watch and review documentaries, with a boss who was one of the most

accommodating and easy-going women I’ve ever met. While my tasks were challenging and rewarding at times, I was stuck in a competitive funk, wrongly convinced that I had been outshone by others. I couldn’t focus on what I had because I was convinced that a prestigious D.C. internship or international volunteer experience was better than what I was doing. There is a pressure around Princeton students to always find something better, cooler, more exotic, more honorable to do when it comes to summer vacation. But my sense of competition was limited to Princeton students — my high school friends, who go to colleges across the nation (including other Ivies), were all perfectly fine being back home, working at my high school as camp counselors, swim coaches and retail cashiers. I wondered if my friends experienced the same peer pressure to find something extraordinary to do over the summer. It’s possible that they felt exactly the same way. Around the beginning of August, I began to understand that I had wished my beautiful, exciting summer away. I discovered that it’s okay to just go back home and explore the jungle that you never realized was really just your backyard. After all, it’s called a vacation for a reason. I may sound idealistic — and I’m certainly not advocating watching cat videos and scraping through every vaguely interesting Buzzfeed

article — but sometimes, you learn how to appreciate home just by coming back there. Some will say that it’s simply not practical to come home every summer, because post-college life requires us to learn from our free time, to make connections in far-off cities, to do the things we wouldn’t do in high school. And I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with doing something new. But this pursuit of exotic summer activities shouldn’t cloud our view of what is old and familiar to us. I realized during these months that home should not be seen as a step down. This summer, I watched and wrote reviews of countless documentaries that changed my life. I picked up the ukulele, went horseback riding, saw dolphins in the Pacific Ocean. I went to two concerts, the San Francisco Gay Pride Parade (two days after DOMA and Proposition 8 were overturned), and a thing called the Bubbleverse that I still can’t quite make sense of. I went skydiving. I met my neighbor’s grandson for the first time, and learned how to make him laugh. Home has its charms. I think that if we listen closely, even the jackhammers and drills can lull us to sleep — especially if it’s in your own bed. Prianka Misra is a sophomore from Castro Valley, Calif. She can be reached at pmisra@princeton.edu.

9/15/13 11:23 PM


The Daily Princetonian

Monday September 16, 2013

page 7

Rookie Windsor’s goal Tigers outlast Spartans before falling to Nittany Lions lifts Princeton in shutout F. HOCKEY Continued from page 8

M. SOCCER Continued from page 8

.............

were able to score goals off of penalty kicks, which Porter said is rare. “We’ve made progress for sure from the first game to the second game,” Sanner

said. “At the beginning of the season we’re just trying to keep moving forward and progressing.” After their first win of 2013, the Tigers will go for their first road win of the season Wednesday when they face Loyola in Baltimore.

Nelson shines as Tigers dominate Invitational M. W-POLO Continued from page 8

.............

two assists from Nelson and four steals from junior attacker Sam Butler. Gow added 12 blocks and a steal. The sweep at home put the

Tigers in the best possible position as they head into a stretch of 10 straight away games. Princeton will travel to Maryland to face Johns Hopkins and No. 18 Navy and then visit George Washington before playing seven games in California.

.............

10 seconds left in regulation. The stunning equalizer sent the game into a 15-minute overtime period. Princeton continued to hold the edge after a close call stemming from a Michigan State transition. Three shot attempts from the Tigers resulted in Benvenuti finding the back of the cage on a pass from Cesan. The goal was Benvenuti’s third of the year. “I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me!’ “ Benvenuti said of the Spartan’s tying goal. “I was just focused on the game almost being over, and I was relieved that we had won. And all of a sudden they scored a goal. I guess it kind of served me right for

not staying focused. But I had a lot of confidence in our overtime team.” Reinprecht explained that the squad expected to face a competitive Spartan team. “I knew that Michigan State was going to come out hard and come out with a good game plan,” she said. “And I think the longer we let them hang in it, the more energy they were able to gain.” The disparity in shots and penalty corners of the previous match against Fairfield (22 to 6 and 9 to 2) was echoed against the Spartans. The Tigers outshot the Spartans 19 to 5 with a 13 to 0 penalty corner advantage. Benvenuti highlighted her team’s clutch overtime performance, but pointed to room for improved execution.

“We were able to regroup really quickly and come together in a situation we don’t really practice that much,”

“I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me!’” Teresa Benvenuti

she noted. “But we’re still trying to figure where we expect each other to be on the field. Having freshmen play such a large role, we’re not quite used to them yet. And on attack penalty corners, we didn’t convert as many as we

would have liked to. But we’ll just look to clean up the details.” Penn State took advantage of the early-season kinks in Princeton’s game last season, taking the Tigers to overtime before ultimately losing, but Princeton did lose a game before beginning the streak which saw it win the 2012 national championship - the Tigers fell to Syracuse at home just under a year ago. Princeton will face the Orange, currently ranked sixth in the nation, in Syracuse on Sept. 22 and will next face a ranked opponent when it travels to UConn on the 29th. Next weekend will see the Tigers begin to defend their Ivy title and seek a repeat national championship as they face off against Dartmouth in Hanover on Saturday.

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SportsUSPTAIRS.indd 7

9/15/13 11:15 PM


Sports

Monday September 16, 2013

page 8

{ www.dailyprincetonian.com } M E N ’ S W AT E R P O L O

FIELD HOCKEY

Tigers beat Santa Clara en route to sweep

Penn State snaps Princeton’s 17game win streak

By Saahil Madge

By Andrew Steele

staff writer

staff writer

The No. 15 men’s water polo team opened its season strong this weekend, with four victories in four games to win the Princeton Invitational Tournament. The team’s first game was Friday evening against nowNo. 18 Santa Clara, which the Tigers eked out, 9-7. The next game was an exhibition against Penn, which Princeton won 12-9, and Saturday evening the Tigers defeated rival Harvard by a large margin, 14-7. On Sunday, Princeton completed the sweep, downing Iona 11-6. The Santa Clara (2-2) contest provided ESPNU viewers with plenty of excitement. Santa Clara scored within the first 40 seconds, but Princeton (4-0) scored two goals in the next minute. By the end of the first period, the score was tied at 3-3. The Broncos took a 5-3 lead in the second period, but the Tigers equalized it at 5-5 by the end of the first half. The tying goal was scored by freshman utility Jovan Jeremic. Santa Clara charged ahead in the third period, which ended with the Broncos ahead 7-6 despite a phenomenal no-look goal from sophomore center Tommy Nelson. In the fourth, Princeton scored two goals within a minute and 10 seconds to permanently take the lead, and scored another one later to secure the victory 9-7. Sophomore goalie Alex Gow kept the Tigers af loat with nine saves, while Nelson led the team with three goals. Against Penn, the Tigers again gave up a very early goal. The Quakers kept pace with the Tigers and the second quarter ended 5-5, but Princeton took a 9-7 lead in the third period and never let go. The Tigers pushed their lead to 12-7 in the fourth period, and though Penn scored two goals at the end, the Tigers held on 12-9. The Crimson never really threatened the Tigers, as Princeton led 4-3 by the end of the first half and never looked back. In the second period, Princeton scored another four goals and held Harvard to two. The Tigers did even better in the third period, scoring four again and letting in only one from Harvard. In the fourth, the Tigers scored two and Harvard one, for a final score of 14-7. Junior attacker Drew Hoffenberg contributed five goals as Princeton showcased its offensive prowess, while Jeremic, freshman utility Curtis Fink, sophomore utility Jamie Kuprenas and junior center Kayj Shannon scored two goals. Senior Ben Dearborn made 12 saves in goal. The Tigers rode that momentum into the next day’s match with Iona — this time, it was Shannon who scored five times, helped out by two goals, two steals and

After an unprecedented winning streak which saw the field hockey team win its first-ever national c h a m p i o n s h ip, MICHIGAN ST. 1 the No. 3 Tigers (3PRINCETON 2 1) finally gave in Sunday when No. PENN STATE 4 13 Penn State bestPRINCETON 3 ed them 4-3 on the strength of two early goals. “Penn State is always a great matchup for us for us. They’re a very skilled and athletic team. I’m expecting a very high-paced game,” senior midfielder Julia Reinprecht said before the game. Reinprecht got what she was expecting, as the Nittany Lions (3-3) hit the ground running, getting two shots past junior goalkeeper Christina Maida in the the first 15 minutes. Reinprecht’s goal got the Tigers on the board, but Penn State answered back with alacrity, increasing its lead to 4-1 in the first five minutes of the second half.

See M. W-POLO page 7

From that point on, the Tigers played catch-up. Freshman midfielder Teresa Benvenuti assisted sophomore striker Maddie Copeland, who narrowed the deficit to 4-2, and a short time later senior midfielder/ striker Michelle Cesan fed junior striker Allison Evans on a penalty corner, making it a one-point contest. Goalkeeper Kylie Licata and her defense held on, however, as Licata notched seven saves on the day and the Nittany Lions held on to upset the Tigers on their home turf. The loss, Princeton’s first in 17 games, came as a surprise Sunday after Princeton took down Michigan State Friday. In that game, the Tigers came out on top despite a late goal from the Spartans which sent the game into overtime. With the clock reading 7:53 in the first period Friday, Cesan converted a pass from senior back Amanda Bird’s penalty corner. Yet, despite the huge disparity in shots and penalty corners, the State fans were rewarded for their trek with a Spartan goal with See F. HOCKEY page 7

ERIC SHI :: SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Junior striker Allison Evans had a goal and an assist as Princeton fell to No. 13 Penn State.

MEN’S SOCCER

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Tigers earn first victory

After shutouts, defense falters against Rutgers

By Anna Mazarakis staff writer

The men’s soccer team finished the weekend on a high note, beating Seton Hall on Sunday after a tough loss on Friday evening to Rutgers. “Our guys are eager to get their first win,” head coach Jim Barlow ’91 said before the win. “We know they’re putting an awful lot into it, we’ve gotten better and we’ve put some good stretches of soccer on the field.” “They’re big, strong, they have two very good outside wingers, they’re very creative,” sophomore forward Thomas Sanner said of Seton Hall (2-2-2). “We’ve been able to play against Seton Hall pretty consistently, so it’s usually a team that we can take care of as long as we’re playing well.” Sanner and the Tigers (1-2)

did just that in their home opener, knocking off the Pirates on the strength of freshman midfielder Bryan Windsor’s first career goal, the only score of the match. After two tough losses, both of which saw the Tigers let up three goals, senior goalkeeper Seth MacMillan — who had four saves on the day — and his defense held on to earn the win. “This year so far we’ve been frustrated that we’ve given up goals that we think were preventable,” Barlow said. “The big focus in our discussions and our preparation has been trying to get things secure defensively.” That preparation paid off Sunday and looked to have done the same early in Friday’s game against Rutgers (3-2-1), which started off strong for the Tigers with a goal from Sanner in the first

seven minutes. The Scarlet Knights tied the game up 10 minutes later and added two more goals to the scoreboard by the end of the first half. “We had a big talk about how we wanted to come out and control the tempo, and for the first 15 minutes we really did come out, we controlled it, we dominated,” junior forward Cameron Porter said. “Unfortunately, probably about five to 10 minutes after that [goal] we lost the tempo of the game, they started pushing on our end.” Princeton tried to make up the score differential in the second half, but fell short. Porter found the back of the net at the 81-minute mark, but the game ended with a 3-2 loss for the Orange and Black. Both Sanner and Porter See M. SOCCER page 7

MONICA CHON :: PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Junior Cameron Porter had a goal as the Tigers lost to Rutgers 3-2 Friday night in Piscataway.

By Mark Stein staff writer

Junior goalkeeper Darcy Hargadon tallied a seasonhigh three saves, including two important snags late in double overtime, allowing the women’s soccer team to earn a 0-0 draw against Seton Hall on Friday night in South Orange, N.J. The saves, during the 104th and 107th minutes, stymied a flurry of Pirate (1-5-2 overall, 0-0 Big East) activity near the Tiger net during which Princeton (2-1-1) conceded three shots and two fouls in a dangerous span closing the game’s final overtime period. “Darcy has stepped up and done an admirable job in goal for us,” head coach Julie Shackford said. The 0-0 draw on Friday night extended the Princeton defense’s shutout streak to all three of its games this season. In their seasonopening home stand last weekend, the Tigers shut out Richmond 2-0 and blanked Army 3-0. “It is still very early, but I think all the players are committed to the overall concept of team defending,” Shackford said. “The team is determined as a group to limit scoring chances.” Though they were unable to convert any goals in the matchup, the Tigers did produce several scoring chances. Led offensively by freshman forward Tyler Lussi, who recorded five shots and three on target, Princeton tallied 15 shots and five corner kicks in the matchup. Lussi, who had scored three goals in her first two games this season, was attempting to become the first player in Princeton women’s soccer history to score in each of her first three games.

“Tyler is a true competitor and a player who leaves it all on the field. She creates many chances for herself simply by disrupting the backs, intercepting balls and has an incredible amount of energy,” Shackford said. “She is very driven, and once she completely adjusts to the college game, she will have even more opportunities to create and score goals.” Following the draw with Seton Hall, the Tigers turned their attention to their Sunday afternoon road matchup against Rutgers. Princeton came into the game with a 10-14-3 all-time record against the Scarlet Knights, having dropped its last two matchups, both 2-0, in 2009 and 2010. “The game with Rutgers is always a good fight,” Shackford said before the game. “We will need to be better with our possession and not let their forwards have space to turn and create.” Unfortunately for Princeton, the Scarlet Knights(7-2-1, 0-0 American Athletic Conference) created plenty of scoring opportunities and capitalized five times, routing the Tigers 5-1. Rutgers outshot the Tigers 24-15, as the Scarlet Knights’ Stefanie Scholz netted three goals to stop Hargadon — who had eight saves — from recording her fourth-straight shutout. Junior midfielder Lauren Lazo, who is tied with Lussi for the team lead with three goals this season, recorded Princeton’s only score, which came unassisted 54 minutes into the game. The Tigers will be back in action Tuesday night at Saint Joseph’s in Philadelphia before returning to Roberts Stadium Satuday to face William & Mary.

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9/15/13 11:15 PM


Today I lived

L

ast Sunday, I arrived at Princeton Junction around 9:30 at night. On the New York platform I recognized someone: a recent alumnus standing with a distinguished-looking couple, whom I took to be his parents. We began to talk, pleasantly. It emerged that my student’s mother had also been my student: the sort of thing that gladdens an old professor’s heart. Suddenly life sped up. A large man had been walking up and down, speaking and gesturing oddly. It seemed he needed help — but as so often happens, no one knew what to do. Without warning he jumped off the platform, lay down between the east- and westbound tracks and began to yell. Smart phones lit up as people finally called the local police. But before they could arrive, the New York train approached the station. Though safe where he was, the large man made a dash for the platform. He missed, and fell under the train — five or six feet from where we stood, stunned. We thought we had seen a death. But we hadn’t. The train stopped. The man, now underneath one of the cars, began to yell and throw stones from the roadbed. Conductors shouted, police scratched their heads, passengers looked as bewildered as I felt. Then my friend’s father said something wise: “Taxi.” We suited our action to his word, crossed under the tracks and let someone drive us back to the city. I haven’t been able to find out how events unfolded after we left, and keep thinking about that man in his strange agony, his world in pieces. So much for Princeton, the land of bucolic peace.

The story seems all the more strange for its contrast with the way I’m living now. This year, as fall nears, I’m not in Princeton but in New York, as a fellow of the Cullman Center of the New York Public Library. In this tiny, implausible paradise on earth, writers and scholars are paid to spend a year working in glassed-in cubicles around an elegantly furnished central space. Benign supervisors provide all the coffee and water that anyone could want and avert their eyes from our eccentric behavior. Best of all: they pay us. To sit in a library and read. Dracula is running the blood bank. The future of the New York Public Library — or at least of its Stephen A. Schwarzman Building — has been fiercely debated for the last few years. The library’s trustees and managers plan to transform it by adding a large modern circulating collection and public working space — in the vast dark spaces once filled with the main collections of books, which they have sent to off-site storage. Many scholars and writers have objected (I have myself) to all or part of this ambitious plan, which involves removing the stacks that support the magnificent Rose Reading Room on the third floor. Demands and compromises have been made, lawsuits have been filed and no one knows what the future holds. For the moment, though, the library is still what it always was: a palace for New York’s people, where anyone who lives in the city can sign up for a library card and see rare books and prints. Readers of every imaginable age and kind work with laptops; a few even read books. Tourists crowd the corridors. The library’s collection is still magnificent: a mass of books in every known language and from every known period. Heaps of them have already been delivered to me and my colleagues in the Cullman Center offices. One of the Renaissance scholars whose lives and works I study, Isaac Casaubon, visited the Bodleian Library in 1613. He found it tremendously exciting. The library didn’t allow books to circulate, so all the serious scholars in Oxford worked there, and it was easy to meet them. The stock of new books was unlike anything he had ever seen. A young Jew helped him read the Talmud, the great codification of Jewish law and ritual. He exulted in his diary: “Hodie vixi” — “Today I lived.” Casaubon took care to qualify his exuberance by writing “today.” A refugee from religious wars on the Continent, he knew that life, even the life of scholars who pore over great books stored behind stone walls, was precarious. It still is. Walk west past the Schwarzman Building and enter pretty Bryant Park behind it, and you’ll encounter plenty of homeless people and troubled wanderers. Stay in your office in the Cullman Center, and you’ll find yourself reading about the seismic changes that are shaking universities and the terrible and wonderful things that are happening in them. How to live and work, in the Center and in the world, at the same time, and how to do things that are of value in their very different terms — that’s the problem I’ll be grappling with this year. Anthony Grafton is the Henry Putnam University Professor of History. He can be reached at grafton@princeton.edu.

9.16 opinion.upstairs.indd 2

Opinion

Monday september 16, 2013

page 6

{ www.dailyprincetonian.com } EDITORIAL ...............................

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Join the Editorial Board

ver the past semester, the unsigned editorials featured on this page have discussed issues such as the nascent Eisgruber presidency, Lawnparties as a benefit concert and University insurance coverage of sex-reassignment surgery. The Daily Princetonian Editorial Board, a group of 13 undergraduates, was collectively responsible for writing these pieces. The members of the Board are not the editors of the various sections of the ‘Prince.’ Instead, they constitute an independent group of undergraduate students who are charged with determining the position of the newspaper as a whole. Today, instead of taking a stance on an issue, we would like to explain the editorial process and invite interested freshmen, sophomores and juniors to apply to join the Board. The Board is the independent body responsible for determining the position of the ‘Prince’ on a range of matters that affect Princeton, its campus community and our generation. We meet twice a week to discuss campus issues, solicit input from potential stakeholders and ultimately determine the stance the ‘Prince’ will take on the issue at hand. We work closely with other sections of the newspaper to gather information about editorial topics, but we deliberate behind closed doors and independently determine our own positions to preserve

objectivity. The Board answers only to its chair, Ethan Jamnik ’15; the executive editor for opinion, Sarah Schwartz ’15; and the editor-in-chief, Luc Cohen ’14. While the Board strives for unanimity, editorial positions are determined by majority vote and members take turns writing editorials. The majority opinion is signed collectively by the Editorial Board rather than the individuals who concurred with the position of the majority. The minority can also publish a dissent that will bear the names of the individuals dissenting when it is particularly passionate about the issue. All majority opinions are the collective product of the Board and constitute an independent voice separate from other sections of the ‘Prince.’ Crucial to our mission is the ability to incorporate a variety of diverse perspectives into the editorials we produce. Current Board members come from across the globe and represent a wide variety of majors, political philosophies and academic and extracurricular interests. What unites us is an engagement in campus life and a commitment to investigating and discussing issues that pertain to the University community. We are committed to bringing compelling arguments and perspectives to this page, criticizing and praising in equal measure. We try to recommend specific policies or actions for the University

vol. cxxxvii

that, in our opinion, are best for the community as a whole. For us, its members, the Board is one of the defining activities of our time at Princeton. From the (relative) comfort of our fourth-floor conference room, we engage in challenging, passionate and intellectually stimulating debates that lead us to examine and confront the full range of issues that affect our lives at Princeton. It is especially exciting when our suggestions make a lasting contribution to broader campus discussions about an issue or when the University adopts them, such as the computer science department’s decision to keep the pass/D/fail option available for COS 126 and the Honor Committee’s decision to modify its punishment for students who take extra time on tests. Our aim is to inspire discussion and, ultimately, action. But this is impossible without students with unique perspectives — independent thinkers who are eager to debate and willing to engage with issues important to Princeton. We value writing ability, creativity and strength of thought much more than journalistic experience. If you are interested in joining us, we encourage you to fill out our application at dailyprincetonian.com/join/opinion by midnight on Thursday, Sept. 26. Applicants will be interviewed shortly thereafter. We look forward to meeting you!

The freshman farewell

Adam mastroianni ’14 ..................................

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editor-in-chief

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managing editor Emily Tseng ’14 news editors Patience Haggin ’14 Anastasya Lloyd-Damnjanovic ’14 opinion editor Sarah Schwartz ’15 sports editor Stephen Wood ’15 street editor Abigail Williams ’14 photography editors Monica Chon ’15 Merrill Fabry ’14 copy editors Andrea Beale ’14 Erica Sollazzo ’14 design editor Helen Yao ’15 web editors Sarah Cen ’16 Adrian De Smul ’14 multimedia editor Christine Wang ’14 prox editor Daniel Santoro ’14 intersections editor Amy Garland ’14 associate news editor Catherine Ku ’14 associate news editor for enterprise Marcelo Rochabrun ’15 associate opinion editors Richard Daker ’15 Tehila Wenger ‘15 associate sports editors Damir Golac ‘15 Victoria Majchrzak ’15 associate street editors Urvija Banerji ’15 Catherine Bauman ’15 associate photography editors Conor Dube ’15 Lilia Xie ’14 associate copy editors Dana Bernstein ’15 Jennifer Cho ’15 associate design editor Allison Metts ’15 associate multimedia editor Rishi Kaneriya ’16 editorial board chair Ethan Jamnik ’15

NIGHT STAFF 9.15.13 news Night Chief: Catherine Duazo ’14 Paul Phillips ’16 copy Regina Wang ’14 Andrew Sartorius ’13 design Kat Gao ’15 Christine Kyauk ’16 Jessie Liu ’16 Helen Yao ’15

Here’s to coming home Prianka Misra columnist

I

woke up to the wails of power tools. Some days, their agonizing, heart-rattling whirring would crescendo, as if the drills were threatening to burst through my wall, through my headboard, into my head. It was like waking up in the dentist’s office, amplified, up close, and in your face — six days a week. It was on these days that I bitterly thought to myself, “Welcome home. After finishing my first year at Princeton, I was looking forward to going home — sort of. A few months of struggling to find an interesting internship, the stress of finals and nostalgia for my hometown all made me eager to savor the sights and sounds that had accompanied my childhood and teen years. My pre-Princeton self was reignited. I was ready to meet up with old friends, eat my mother’s Indian cooking and drive my car on freeways that meandered through hills turned golden by sun-scorched grass. But almost as soon as I came home, these romantic snapshots lost their vibrant colors, dulling in my mind. It didn’t help that

my parents had commenced a massive renovation endeavor while I was gone. The construction had rearranged our lives, leaving my home in a much less welcoming state than I had expected. But my disappointment wasn’t confined to my house. In general, the familiar suburban environment that I was just looking forward to became tarnished and demeaned. My twisting roads paled in comparison to pictures of Princetonian globetrekkers who were thrilled to be standing in front of the Taj Mahal, the Christ the Redeemer Statue in Rio and the U.S. Capitol. My internship struggles had already quelled my enthusiasm for my own summer prospects; now, seeing these images only exacerbated my emotions and made me feel trapped by the town that had raised me. I was kicking myself for not having gotten my act together sooner. Dreams of traveling across the world whisked me from a state of gratitude to one of indifference, until my numbness drowned the beauty of my surroundings. The bougainvilleas I saw on the way to my job were of no value to me, their ruby petals fluttering away on trellises that I ignored. The glassy San Francisco skyscrapers reflected sunshine throughout the city streets, while I squinted on and kept walking. I did not even fully acknowledge my fortune in landing a job that essentially paid me to watch and review documentaries, with a boss who was one of the most

accommodating and easy-going women I’ve ever met. While my tasks were challenging and rewarding at times, I was stuck in a competitive funk, wrongly convinced that I had been outshone by others. I couldn’t focus on what I had because I was convinced that a prestigious D.C. internship or international volunteer experience was better than what I was doing. There is a pressure around Princeton students to always find something better, cooler, more exotic, more honorable to do when it comes to summer vacation. But my sense of competition was limited to Princeton students — my high school friends, who go to colleges across the nation (including other Ivies), were all perfectly fine being back home, working at my high school as camp counselors, swim coaches and retail cashiers. I wondered if my friends experienced the same peer pressure to find something extraordinary to do over the summer. It’s possible that they felt exactly the same way. Around the beginning of August, I began to understand that I had wished my beautiful, exciting summer away. I discovered that it’s okay to just go back home and explore the jungle that you never realized was really just your backyard. After all, it’s called a vacation for a reason. I may sound idealistic — and I’m certainly not advocating watching cat videos and scraping through every vaguely interesting Buzzfeed

article — but sometimes, you learn how to appreciate home just by coming back there. Some will say that it’s simply not practical to come home every summer, because post-college life requires us to learn from our free time, to make connections in far-off cities, to do the things we wouldn’t do in high school. And I’m not suggesting that there’s anything wrong with doing something new. But this pursuit of exotic summer activities shouldn’t cloud our view of what is old and familiar to us. I realized during these months that home should not be seen as a step down. This summer, I watched and wrote reviews of countless documentaries that changed my life. I picked up the ukulele, went horseback riding, saw dolphins in the Pacific Ocean. I went to two concerts, the San Francisco Gay Pride Parade (two days after DOMA and Proposition 8 were overturned), and a thing called the Bubbleverse that I still can’t quite make sense of. I went skydiving. I met my neighbor’s grandson for the first time, and learned how to make him laugh. Home has its charms. I think that if we listen closely, even the jackhammers and drills can lull us to sleep — especially if it’s in your own bed. Prianka Misra is a sophomore from Castro Valley, Calif. She can be reached at pmisra@princeton.edu.

9/15/13 11:23 PM


The Daily Princetonian

Monday September 16, 2013

page 7

Rookie Windsor’s goal Tigers outlast Spartans before falling to Nittany Lions lifts Princeton in shutout F. HOCKEY Continued from page 8

M. SOCCER Continued from page 8

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were able to score goals off of penalty kicks, which Porter said is rare. “We’ve made progress for sure from the first game to the second game,” Sanner

said. “At the beginning of the season we’re just trying to keep moving forward and progressing.” After their first win of 2013, the Tigers will go for their first road win of the season Wednesday when they face Loyola in Baltimore.

Nelson shines as Tigers dominate Invitational M. W-POLO Continued from page 8

.............

two assists from Nelson and four steals from junior attacker Sam Butler. Gow added 12 blocks and a steal. The sweep at home put the

Tigers in the best possible position as they head into a stretch of 10 straight away games. Princeton will travel to Maryland to face Johns Hopkins and No. 18 Navy and then visit George Washington before playing seven games in California.

.............

10 seconds left in regulation. The stunning equalizer sent the game into a 15-minute overtime period. Princeton continued to hold the edge after a close call stemming from a Michigan State transition. Three shot attempts from the Tigers resulted in Benvenuti finding the back of the cage on a pass from Cesan. The goal was Benvenuti’s third of the year. “I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me!’ “ Benvenuti said of the Spartan’s tying goal. “I was just focused on the game almost being over, and I was relieved that we had won. And all of a sudden they scored a goal. I guess it kind of served me right for

not staying focused. But I had a lot of confidence in our overtime team.” Reinprecht explained that the squad expected to face a competitive Spartan team. “I knew that Michigan State was going to come out hard and come out with a good game plan,” she said. “And I think the longer we let them hang in it, the more energy they were able to gain.” The disparity in shots and penalty corners of the previous match against Fairfield (22 to 6 and 9 to 2) was echoed against the Spartans. The Tigers outshot the Spartans 19 to 5 with a 13 to 0 penalty corner advantage. Benvenuti highlighted her team’s clutch overtime performance, but pointed to room for improved execution.

“We were able to regroup really quickly and come together in a situation we don’t really practice that much,”

“I thought, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me!’” Teresa Benvenuti

she noted. “But we’re still trying to figure where we expect each other to be on the field. Having freshmen play such a large role, we’re not quite used to them yet. And on attack penalty corners, we didn’t convert as many as we

would have liked to. But we’ll just look to clean up the details.” Penn State took advantage of the early-season kinks in Princeton’s game last season, taking the Tigers to overtime before ultimately losing, but Princeton did lose a game before beginning the streak which saw it win the 2012 national championship - the Tigers fell to Syracuse at home just under a year ago. Princeton will face the Orange, currently ranked sixth in the nation, in Syracuse on Sept. 22 and will next face a ranked opponent when it travels to UConn on the 29th. Next weekend will see the Tigers begin to defend their Ivy title and seek a repeat national championship as they face off against Dartmouth in Hanover on Saturday.

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9/15/13 11:15 PM


Sports

Monday September 16, 2013

page 8

{ www.dailyprincetonian.com } M E N ’ S W AT E R P O L O

FIELD HOCKEY

Tigers beat Santa Clara en route to sweep

Penn State snaps Princeton’s 17game win streak

By Saahil Madge

By Andrew Steele

staff writer

staff writer

The No. 15 men’s water polo team opened its season strong this weekend, with four victories in four games to win the Princeton Invitational Tournament. The team’s first game was Friday evening against nowNo. 18 Santa Clara, which the Tigers eked out, 9-7. The next game was an exhibition against Penn, which Princeton won 12-9, and Saturday evening the Tigers defeated rival Harvard by a large margin, 14-7. On Sunday, Princeton completed the sweep, downing Iona 11-6. The Santa Clara (2-2) contest provided ESPNU viewers with plenty of excitement. Santa Clara scored within the first 40 seconds, but Princeton (4-0) scored two goals in the next minute. By the end of the first period, the score was tied at 3-3. The Broncos took a 5-3 lead in the second period, but the Tigers equalized it at 5-5 by the end of the first half. The tying goal was scored by freshman utility Jovan Jeremic. Santa Clara charged ahead in the third period, which ended with the Broncos ahead 7-6 despite a phenomenal no-look goal from sophomore center Tommy Nelson. In the fourth, Princeton scored two goals within a minute and 10 seconds to permanently take the lead, and scored another one later to secure the victory 9-7. Sophomore goalie Alex Gow kept the Tigers af loat with nine saves, while Nelson led the team with three goals. Against Penn, the Tigers again gave up a very early goal. The Quakers kept pace with the Tigers and the second quarter ended 5-5, but Princeton took a 9-7 lead in the third period and never let go. The Tigers pushed their lead to 12-7 in the fourth period, and though Penn scored two goals at the end, the Tigers held on 12-9. The Crimson never really threatened the Tigers, as Princeton led 4-3 by the end of the first half and never looked back. In the second period, Princeton scored another four goals and held Harvard to two. The Tigers did even better in the third period, scoring four again and letting in only one from Harvard. In the fourth, the Tigers scored two and Harvard one, for a final score of 14-7. Junior attacker Drew Hoffenberg contributed five goals as Princeton showcased its offensive prowess, while Jeremic, freshman utility Curtis Fink, sophomore utility Jamie Kuprenas and junior center Kayj Shannon scored two goals. Senior Ben Dearborn made 12 saves in goal. The Tigers rode that momentum into the next day’s match with Iona — this time, it was Shannon who scored five times, helped out by two goals, two steals and

After an unprecedented winning streak which saw the field hockey team win its first-ever national c h a m p i o n s h ip, MICHIGAN ST. 1 the No. 3 Tigers (3PRINCETON 2 1) finally gave in Sunday when No. PENN STATE 4 13 Penn State bestPRINCETON 3 ed them 4-3 on the strength of two early goals. “Penn State is always a great matchup for us for us. They’re a very skilled and athletic team. I’m expecting a very high-paced game,” senior midfielder Julia Reinprecht said before the game. Reinprecht got what she was expecting, as the Nittany Lions (3-3) hit the ground running, getting two shots past junior goalkeeper Christina Maida in the the first 15 minutes. Reinprecht’s goal got the Tigers on the board, but Penn State answered back with alacrity, increasing its lead to 4-1 in the first five minutes of the second half.

See M. W-POLO page 7

From that point on, the Tigers played catch-up. Freshman midfielder Teresa Benvenuti assisted sophomore striker Maddie Copeland, who narrowed the deficit to 4-2, and a short time later senior midfielder/ striker Michelle Cesan fed junior striker Allison Evans on a penalty corner, making it a one-point contest. Goalkeeper Kylie Licata and her defense held on, however, as Licata notched seven saves on the day and the Nittany Lions held on to upset the Tigers on their home turf. The loss, Princeton’s first in 17 games, came as a surprise Sunday after Princeton took down Michigan State Friday. In that game, the Tigers came out on top despite a late goal from the Spartans which sent the game into overtime. With the clock reading 7:53 in the first period Friday, Cesan converted a pass from senior back Amanda Bird’s penalty corner. Yet, despite the huge disparity in shots and penalty corners, the State fans were rewarded for their trek with a Spartan goal with See F. HOCKEY page 7

ERIC SHI :: SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Junior striker Allison Evans had a goal and an assist as Princeton fell to No. 13 Penn State.

MEN’S SOCCER

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Tigers earn first victory

After shutouts, defense falters against Rutgers

By Anna Mazarakis staff writer

The men’s soccer team finished the weekend on a high note, beating Seton Hall on Sunday after a tough loss on Friday evening to Rutgers. “Our guys are eager to get their first win,” head coach Jim Barlow ’91 said before the win. “We know they’re putting an awful lot into it, we’ve gotten better and we’ve put some good stretches of soccer on the field.” “They’re big, strong, they have two very good outside wingers, they’re very creative,” sophomore forward Thomas Sanner said of Seton Hall (2-2-2). “We’ve been able to play against Seton Hall pretty consistently, so it’s usually a team that we can take care of as long as we’re playing well.” Sanner and the Tigers (1-2)

did just that in their home opener, knocking off the Pirates on the strength of freshman midfielder Bryan Windsor’s first career goal, the only score of the match. After two tough losses, both of which saw the Tigers let up three goals, senior goalkeeper Seth MacMillan — who had four saves on the day — and his defense held on to earn the win. “This year so far we’ve been frustrated that we’ve given up goals that we think were preventable,” Barlow said. “The big focus in our discussions and our preparation has been trying to get things secure defensively.” That preparation paid off Sunday and looked to have done the same early in Friday’s game against Rutgers (3-2-1), which started off strong for the Tigers with a goal from Sanner in the first

seven minutes. The Scarlet Knights tied the game up 10 minutes later and added two more goals to the scoreboard by the end of the first half. “We had a big talk about how we wanted to come out and control the tempo, and for the first 15 minutes we really did come out, we controlled it, we dominated,” junior forward Cameron Porter said. “Unfortunately, probably about five to 10 minutes after that [goal] we lost the tempo of the game, they started pushing on our end.” Princeton tried to make up the score differential in the second half, but fell short. Porter found the back of the net at the 81-minute mark, but the game ended with a 3-2 loss for the Orange and Black. Both Sanner and Porter See M. SOCCER page 7

MONICA CHON :: PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Junior Cameron Porter had a goal as the Tigers lost to Rutgers 3-2 Friday night in Piscataway.

By Mark Stein staff writer

Junior goalkeeper Darcy Hargadon tallied a seasonhigh three saves, including two important snags late in double overtime, allowing the women’s soccer team to earn a 0-0 draw against Seton Hall on Friday night in South Orange, N.J. The saves, during the 104th and 107th minutes, stymied a flurry of Pirate (1-5-2 overall, 0-0 Big East) activity near the Tiger net during which Princeton (2-1-1) conceded three shots and two fouls in a dangerous span closing the game’s final overtime period. “Darcy has stepped up and done an admirable job in goal for us,” head coach Julie Shackford said. The 0-0 draw on Friday night extended the Princeton defense’s shutout streak to all three of its games this season. In their seasonopening home stand last weekend, the Tigers shut out Richmond 2-0 and blanked Army 3-0. “It is still very early, but I think all the players are committed to the overall concept of team defending,” Shackford said. “The team is determined as a group to limit scoring chances.” Though they were unable to convert any goals in the matchup, the Tigers did produce several scoring chances. Led offensively by freshman forward Tyler Lussi, who recorded five shots and three on target, Princeton tallied 15 shots and five corner kicks in the matchup. Lussi, who had scored three goals in her first two games this season, was attempting to become the first player in Princeton women’s soccer history to score in each of her first three games.

“Tyler is a true competitor and a player who leaves it all on the field. She creates many chances for herself simply by disrupting the backs, intercepting balls and has an incredible amount of energy,” Shackford said. “She is very driven, and once she completely adjusts to the college game, she will have even more opportunities to create and score goals.” Following the draw with Seton Hall, the Tigers turned their attention to their Sunday afternoon road matchup against Rutgers. Princeton came into the game with a 10-14-3 all-time record against the Scarlet Knights, having dropped its last two matchups, both 2-0, in 2009 and 2010. “The game with Rutgers is always a good fight,” Shackford said before the game. “We will need to be better with our possession and not let their forwards have space to turn and create.” Unfortunately for Princeton, the Scarlet Knights(7-2-1, 0-0 American Athletic Conference) created plenty of scoring opportunities and capitalized five times, routing the Tigers 5-1. Rutgers outshot the Tigers 24-15, as the Scarlet Knights’ Stefanie Scholz netted three goals to stop Hargadon — who had eight saves — from recording her fourth-straight shutout. Junior midfielder Lauren Lazo, who is tied with Lussi for the team lead with three goals this season, recorded Princeton’s only score, which came unassisted 54 minutes into the game. The Tigers will be back in action Tuesday night at Saint Joseph’s in Philadelphia before returning to Roberts Stadium Satuday to face William & Mary.

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