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THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII NO. 15

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

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GRADUATION ISSUE

20 21 p.3

2021 President’s Engagement and Innovation Prize winners

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Daily Pennsylvanian senior columns

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Penn to award seven honorary degrees

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Through the years with the Class of 2021

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The best of graduating athletes

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2 NEWS

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

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THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

NEWS 3

Gutmann announces President’s Engagement and Innovation Prize winners The prize winners will recieve $100,000 to design and implement community-based projects MARY TUYETNHI TRAN & SEJAL SANGANI Staff Reporter, Contributing Reporter

Penn President Amy Gutmann announced the winners of the annual President’s Engagement Prize and President’s Innovation Prize, providing funding to five student teams for a diverse set of projects. The prizes are awarded annually to graduating seniors to encourage them to design engagement projects that will make a positive difference in the world in their first year after college. The winning teams will each receive $100,000 to implement their projects and $50,000 stipends for living expenses for each member. The Engagement Prize, which is given to projects that tackle community-based issues, was awarded to three teams comprising seven members of the Class of 2021. College seniors Christina Miranda and Amanda Moreno received the Engagement Prize for their project Be Body Positive Philly, which will serve as a preventative intervention against eating disorders for Philadelphia high school students. The project plans to use body-positivity workshops and near-peer mentorship to lower the rate of eating disorders, particularly within marginalized communities. “The general misconception is that eating disorders only afflict young, white, affluent women, when in reality we see that eating disorders really affect marginalized communities the most,” Moreno said. A Black teenager is 50% more likely to suffer from bulimia than a white teenager, Moreno and Miranda explained. Penn undergraduates will work with Philadelphia high schoolers as near peers — individuals who are old enough to be a mentor but young enough to still be relatable. After learning that eating disorders can begin as early as kindergarten, Miranda and Moreno decided to focus their project on high school students. The team has already piloted the program virtually this spring. The pilot was successful, and many of the students are looking forward to working with Miranda and Moreno in person this fall, the pair said. “While efforts on college campuses are great, eating disorders often start at a much younger age,” Miranda said. “Children as young as 8 years old are being diagnosed with eating disorders.” Moreno added that she and Miranda are looking for Penn students to join the project as near peers. College senior Martin Leet and Engineering senior Leah Voytovich were awarded the Engagement Prize for their project Maji. They plan to install a solar-powered water tank in Uganda’s Olua I refugee settlement and offer agricultural and

emergency first-aid response training to the refugees. Leet’s own experience as a refugee in the camp for almost 10 years inspired Maji, which means water in Swahili. Clean water accessibility is limited at Olua I

Project HOPE. Partnering with the Terrance Lewis Liberation Foundation, their initiative connects wrongfully convicted individuals with private attorneys looking to fulfill pro bono hours and implements a re-entry program for incarcerated individuals returning home.

Clockwise from top left: Christina Miranda, Amanda Moreno, Leah Voytovich, Martin Leet, Natalia Rommen, Carson Eckhard, Sarah Simon, Aris Saxena, Yiwen Li, and Anthony Scarpone-Lambert.

because supply delivery is unpredictable. Sometimes left without fresh water for a month, refugees extract water from the ground using lead pipes, introducing the possibility of lead poisoning. To prevent this, Maji’s tank will use PVC pipes to connect the water source to households and farms. The project’s first-aid medical training for refugees is being developed by Voytovich, who is a member of Penn’s Medical Emergency Response Team. Voytovich said that it is important for Penn students to recognize the privileges and resources available to them. “I don’t think most Penn students would ever think about how much water they have to drink, or to shower with or to even wash their hands, but there are people in the world right now that are literally rationing every single milliliter of water,” Voytovich said. “We have to be really grateful for what we have.” College seniors Carson Eckhard, Natalia Rommen, and Sarah Simon were recognized for

The students also lauded College of Liberal and Professional Studies senior and Daily Pennsylvanian opinion columnist Jessica Gooding — who will work as a paralegal for Project HOPE — for her contributions to the initiative. The team’s time at the Liberation Foundation led them to understand the challenge of hiring professionals to litigate wrongful conviction cases full time, Simon said. It was this realization that spearheaded Project HOPE. “We’re really excited to have Penn’s support and to be able to hopefully work more quickly and more efficiently on these cases,” Eckhard said. Project HOPE’s re-entry program brings together a cohort of experts to speak to incarcerated individuals about subjects including financial literacy and job search. It will also provide re-entry packages consisting of basic items such as a SEPTA card and laptop. The team developed the program in conjunction with an individual who is currently incarcerated. “For [Project HOPE] to reduce cycles of

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recidivism, to ensure that returning citizens can integrate into society more successfully, we all need to be doing our part,” Rommen said. Three seniors across two teams were awarded the Innovation Prize, which recognizes commercial ventures that aim to make a social impact. Wharton senior Aris Saxena and College and Wharton senior Yiwen Li were awarded the Innovation Prize for their project Mobility, a software designed to empower health care workers through an online system that allows primary care providers to bring their services directly to patients in underserved areas. Saxena and Li first had the idea for the software as sophomores, after they spent a summer together in South Africa, where they learned that health clinics in certain communities had difficulties treating patients who could not physically reach the medical care facilities they needed. Mobility manages the workflow of on-site health care workers and functions as a dashboard for providers to view patients’ information and schedule appointments and services, Saxena said. Li said that the funding will go towards finding and hiring new software development talent for the team as part-time or full-time employees. He added that Mobility plans to expand its offerings from just South Africa to other underserved communities, including in the United States. “South Africa is purely the springboard for the company, and we have a lot of ambitious goals,” Li said. Nursing senior Anthony Scarpone-Lambert was awarded the Innovation Prize for his project Lumify Care, making him the first Nursing student to receive the prize. Lumify Care sells a wearable LED light, called the uNight Light, that nurses can attach to their scrubs to illuminate their workspace without disturbing a patient’s sleep. The uNight Light is intended to serve as an alternative to turning on bright overhead lights or using phone flashlights, pen lights, and other wearable lights that are not made for clinical settings, and could pose a risk of infection. Scarpone-Lambert said that the funding will go towards marketing and product development in order to reach more nurses and other health care workers around the world. He added that he hopes to grow the Lumify Care team. “It’s really a dream come true,” Scarpone-Lambert said. “Especially to be the first Penn Nursing student to ever win the President’s Innovation Prize, it’s exciting to be bringing more nursing representation into the entrepreneurial spaces on campus.”

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of $150.00 or more. Offer valid while supplies last. No promotional code needed online. Certain product *FREE Kendra Scott gift promotion offer applies to Select Colleges and Select Ring Styles purchase only on orders of $150.00 or more. Offer valid while supplies last. No promotional code needed online. Certain product ed in combination with other discount, ortopromotion. Terms of offer are subject toorchange. exclusions mayany apply. Promotion cannot beoffer applied previous purchases and cannot be redeemed for cash, used in combination with any other discount, offer or promotion. Terms of offer are subject to change. Other restrictions may apply.


4 OPINION

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

OPINION Learning about compassion and the truth through the DP

THURSDAY MAY 13, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII, NO. 15 137th Year of Publication DANE GREISIGER President

Senior Column | How college journalism helped me become a better person

ASHLEY AHN Executive Editor HADRIANA LOWENKRON DP Editor-in-Chief ISABEL LIANG Design Editor CONOR MURRAY News Editor PIA SINGH News Editor HANNAH GROSS Assignments Editor BRITTANY DARROW Copy Editor KYLIE COOPER Photo Editor ALFREDO PRATICÒ Opinion Editor SUNNY JANG Audience Engagement Editor BRANDON PRIDE Sports Editor

PHOTO FROM ISABELLA SIMONETTI

B

LOCHLAHN MARCH Sports Editor

Leaving behind the DP’s ‘Only Section That Matters’

SOPHIE HUANG Video Editor QIANA ARTIS Podcast Editor ALESSANDRA PINTADOURBANC Business Manager JASPER HUANG Analytics Manager GREG FERREY Marketing Manager

ERIC HOANG Consulting Manager

I ALANA KELLY DP Design Editor ALICE HEYEH 34st Design Editor QUINN ROBINSON Deputy Design Editor AVA CRUZ Design Associate NATHAN ADLER Design Associate ALICE CHOI Design Associate REBEKAH LEE Design Associate MAX MESTER News Photo Editor ANA GLASSMAN Opinion Photo Editor SAMANTHA TURNER Sports Photo Editor NICKY BELGRAD Associate Sports Editor AGATHA ADVINCULA Deputy Opinion Editor VARUN SARASWATHULA Deputy Opinion Editor VALERIE WANG Deputy Opinion Editor SOPHIE NADEL Copy Associate JORDAN WACHSMAN Copy Associate TIFFANY PARK Copy Associate

ANA GLASSMAN

t’s not Thanksgiving for another six months, but I have a lot to be grateful for as I get ready to graduate from Penn. So instead of using this space to try to impart some random lesson on younger students at this school that no one will listen to anyway, here’s a sappy, non-exhaustive list of The Daily Pennsylvanian Sports things that I’m thankful for as my four years here come to a close. 1. Staff meetings: These Tuesday night get-togethers have been a staple of DPOSTM — that’s the “DP’s Only Section That Matters” for the uninformed — for as long as I’ve been in the department. We were understandably concerned about what would happen to the meetings after we could no longer hold them in person, but the Zoom versions held up remarkably well, all because of our great reporters. I couldn’t have chosen a better group of people to do icebreakers and Kahoots with. 2. Basketball games at the Palestra: There weren’t any of these this year, and it took away one of the best parts of being a sports fan and reporter at Penn. Watching a game at the Cathedral is maybe the most underrated and underappreciated experience students here can have, and I’m really happy I took advantage of those opportunities. Whether it was with other DPOSTMites in the student section or on press row, the Palestra never disappointed. 3. DPOSTM road trips: Another relic of the pre-COVID-19 world that should (hopefully) return soon, these trips allowed me to feel most like a professional sports reporter. I also was able to explore many of the inferior Ivy League basketball gyms and freeze my toes off at Harvard during a November football game. 4. Print nights in the office: Print nights probably represented the DP at its most collaborative, with editors, associates, and reporters from every department working together to put

together a product that we could all be proud of. They also allowed for some great bonding within DPOSTM through intense PIG games and debates about sports. 5. The Kamin Cup: I took part in this historic annual event three times, and all were great experiences (all were also wins for DPOSTM). However, the most enjoyable one for me came after we had to improvise this year, moving the event to May and switching it from football to kickball. The sunburns that came after weren’t fun, but the afternoon itself definitely was. 6. The future of DPOSTM: I was a bit worried about what aour fall recruiting would look like in a virtual environment, but it ended up far exceeding anyone’s expectations. We ended up with a great group of enthusiastic rookies who rose to the occasion in an extremely difficult year and will help make up the foundation of the department for the next few years. Along with DPOSTM’s terrific group of current editors and other returning veterans, the section is in a very good place moving forward. 7. The friends I’ve made and people I’ve met: DPOSTM introduced me to a phenomenal community of people who were passionate about sports, but more importantly, were kind and great to be around. I’ve made some of my closest friends through this department, and no story I ever wrote or edited matters as much as that. MICHAEL LANDAU is a graduating Wharton senior from Scarsdale, N.Y. studying finance. He served as a senior Sports editor on The Daily Pennsylvanian’s 136th Board of Editors and Managers. Previously he was a Sports editor, associate, and reporter.

MAAYAN WALDMAN Copy Associate

The silver linings from this past year Senior Column | Appreciating our resilience in overcoming the challenges of 2020 and 2021

A

few weeks ago, I was recruited by a friend to help film a video for his class. The topic? Positive takeaways from the past year. On first thought, finding those positive takeaways might not be that easy. We’re 14 months into a pandemic, we’ve had to deal with online classes and periods of social isolation, and my fellow seniors and I have had to adapt to a rocky final year at Penn. But behind all the negatives, there are silver linings. Each of these statements can be thought of either as an obstacle in our path or what we’ve surpassed to get to where we are today. When our world changed forever in March of last year, nobody expected to still be bearing the brunt of pandemic fatigue. But here we are, chugging along, as unstoppable as ever. Maybe it’s because I was raised to always

ANA GLASSMAN

look at the glass half-full, or maybe it’s because I tend to appreciate what I have rather than what I don’t. But what we had is a year no other senior class in history has had before. Take my time at The Daily Pennsylvanian as an example. I came into 2020 anxious but energized to co-lead the Sports Department during a year of so much possibility. Our men’s and women’s basketball teams were challenging for Ivy League titles, the lacrosse teams had their eyes on national title runs, and our talented football team would wrap up the year in style. But all that came screeching to a halt just two months into my term. In a matter of weeks, sports were canceled with no set return date. We lost our avenue of coverage, and it felt like the hope and vision I had spent years building

that I was often blind to the other side, what the administrators I was frustrated with were dealing with, or what my peers had on their plates outside of their interactions with the DP. As I became a leader at the DP, I encountered reporters who were emotionally distraught from sources who had yelled at them and called them names, or columnists who experienced severe backlash from articles they had written. In these moments, I was able to see the value of kindness and compassion, which everyone deserves in their most vulnerable moments. The DP has been the most formative experience of my time at Penn. It has guided my career ambitions and made me into a strong journalist. Yet, as I leave Penn, the most valuable lessons I have learned from the DP are not about reporting. Penn students are ambitious and often so preoccupied with worries about school and searching for internships and jobs that we forget about the importance of treating one another with respect. I am happy with my academic and career-oriented accomplishments at Penn, but I am most proud of the ways in which I have learned to critically engage with the community around me while acting with integrity and compassion towards others. ISABELLA SIMONETTI is a graduating College senior from New York City studying English. She served as the president of The Daily Pennsylvanian on the 136th Board of Editors and Managers. Previously, she was the Opinion editor on the 135th Board, an Opinion columnist, and reporter for 34th Street Magazine.

DP Design: My burden, passion, home Senior Column | Our lives changed in an instant, but the DP was always there

Senior Column | Seven things I’m grateful for as I graduate

EMILY CHEN Product Lab Manager

THIS ISSUE

viewed and interacted with the University. A College senior died by suicide during my first week of classes, and I quickly learned about the mental health crisis on Penn’s campus. Blaze Bernstein, a College sophomore, was murdered over winter break, and a fellow first-year student died in a plane crash. I was left to process these tragic events while I was also a member of an organization, the DP, that was responsible for respectfully cataloging them. This made things very consuming and distressing. At the time, I was not one of the people involved in that reporting. Still, I saw the importance of the work my peers were doing, and vowed to commit myself to the same meaningful work. Even when they made mistakes, I admired how the editors and reporters at the DP corrected them swiftly, and made

eyond the initial shock of adjusting to college, my first year at Penn was particularly heartbreaking. I came to Penn, overwhelmed by the reality of being a college student, a responsibility that I thought I was prepared for. This was something that I frequently discussed in my column for The Daily Pennsylvanian, which, at the time, felt like one of the only spaces where my voice was heard. I was away from home for the first time, without any friends, in a new city, taking challenging courses, and navigating a new environment. The DP felt like the closest thing to home, and it was where I learned the importance of having sympathy and empathy towards others. But numerous tragedies that occurred during my first year at Penn shaped how I

note to be better next time. They also offered the DP office as a space for staffers to come and process everything that was going on on campus. I knew then that I wanted to help tell the most important stories, both tragic and triumphant, at Penn. Since then, I have found that the most beautiful thing, in my opinion, about good journalism is how it listens to and uplifts as many perspectives as possible. Reporting is an art that celebrates the nuance of the truth. I spent a lot of my time at Penn chasing different stories that seemed the most pressing. I learned an unfathomable amount about journalism, and decided to pursue it after graduation. But the most important lesson I learned was to value and be respectful to the people around me: my editor who became one of my best friends during my first year, the columnists I worked with and eventually mentored, the reporters who stayed in the office until three or four in the morning. All of us cared about thoughtfully reporting everything that happened at Penn, and spent most of our time doing it. Of course, it was easy for us to grow frustrated with one another, since we spent so much time together doing urgent work. And we often did. More than that, members of the Penn community sometimes grew upset with us — often rightfully so — when we made mistakes, which presented its own challenges. It was easy to have tunnel vision working at the DP. No matter how mad we were at each other, or what angry email had floated into our inboxes, we were responsible for publishing the next print edition, updating the latest stories online, and keeping the entire operation going. But the worst consequences of that was

I

PHOTO FROM GILLIAN DIEBOLD

f COVID-19 taught us anything, it’s that things change in an instant. In the fall of 2019, I ran for The Daily Pennsylvanian’s 136th Board of Editors and Managers, feeling ready to give my all to the company and neatly wrap up my last year at the DP. It didn’t work out — and to those familiar with the situation, that could not be more of an understatement. But this isn’t really a story about that at all. It’s about change, for better or worse. Something unique about The Daily Pennsylvanian is working with, leading, and electing your peers. Getting a phone call at 4:30 a.m. telling you that you just weren’t good enough is never an easy thing. I thought I lost a lot of friends seemingly overnight and definitely felt alienated from everything and everyone. I thought elections had changed everything, and that now, I was a junior with one-and-a-half years left and needed to somehow find a new group at Penn. I never got very far into that exploration, as we soon got sent back to our childhood bedrooms for what turned out to be the rest of my college career. Time has given me the space to realize most of that loss was in my head, that those friends I lost are still here more than ever. I didn’t really find myself until I had to at Penn, and I don’t think there was ever one instance where I really did, just a series of happy mistakes that ended up taking me four years. I didn’t find myself at the DP, really, until I thought I was no longer welcome.

was crashing down around me. We may have been down, but we were certainly not out. In true DPOSTM fashion, the department kicked back into high gear in the summer and fall, doubling our staff and finding a way to publish impactful stories that still grabbed readers’ attention. Don’t even get me started on the people. To my fellow DPOSTMites, thank you for coming through when Landau and I needed you. When everything fell apart last spring, I had no clue how we would pick up the pieces and continue as a functioning department. But, despite the challenges of remote writing, interviewing, and editing, I’m so proud of how we were able to recover as one big team. To my fellow members of the 135th and 136th Boards, we finally made it. It wasn’t always easy, it wasn’t always pretty, and it wasn’t always smooth, but at the end of the day, we came together because we cared about each other. And although the work was timeconsuming, there’s something special about seeing the final print product that made the struggle all worth it. The DP was where I met some of my closest friends, both in and out of sports, as we bonded over late-night pizza, awards show watch parties, and balancing our rigorous academics with our full-time editing schedule, even over Zoom. But if there’s anything the last year taught me, it’s that flexibility is crucial in any team operation. You never know what curveballs life will throw your way, not the least being an ongoing worldwide disaster, but it’s how you react and respond that matters.

Having time to take a step back from the night-to-night grind of production in the Design Department helped me reflect on how important those specific connections are to me. Despite all the higher-level drama, Design stayed constant. Despite the pandemic, Design stayed constant. Design at the DP has given me more than I could ever give it, even in just two years as editor. It’s given me some of my best friends, my weirdest friends, a disgusting couch, and more late nights than any college kid should endure. I’m grateful someone allowed me into the department even though I had never used a design program before. It is my greatest pride and joy to see and feel the friendships formed in the chaos of the 135th Board continue, and I am so happy to have been a part of that. In the fall of 2019, I thought my DP career was over. Then, I thought I might never get back to Penn to see my friends because of the pandemic. Things change in an instant, but what matters most to me now are the memories and friendships made in Design, in Street, and at 2 a.m. on a production night. GILLIAN DIEBOLD is a graduating College senior studying communications and political science from Haverford, Pa. She served as senior Design editor on the 135th Board of Editors and Managers and previously held positions as Design editor on the 134th Board and 34th Street Magazine’s Audience Engagement director. DPOSTM came back stronger than ever, including our most recent Kamin Cup victory — our fourth in a row — in a fierce kickball game against the rest of the company. However, sometimes the beauty in how life unfolds can only be seen by looking back. When I arrived back home last March, I was surprised to learn my grandma would be staying with us for a while. Grandma’s habit of watching religious programs at full volume and sharing the same funny stories from her long life certainly made the months in quarantine memorable for my parents, my sisters, and myself. But only after she passed away last month could I truly appreciate the extra time we got to spend together. I’ll always be grateful for those valuable moments I never would have had in a normal year. When you think about the last year, you might be overwhelmed by the mass of difficulties jumping out at first. But when you look for things to celebrate — learning something new, spending more time with your loved ones, finishing your exams — you’ll find there are more gems than you thought. WILL DiGRANDE iis a graduating College senior from Warren, N.J. studying political science. He served as a Sports editor on The Daily Pennsylvanian’s 135th and 136th Board of Editors and Managers and was previously a Sports associate editor and Sports reporter.


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

It’s not about us Senior Column | The DP became me. It was a choice.

ANA GLASSMAN

T

he lights went out at 4015 Walnut a little way into Sunday production on April 7, 2019. In case a billion other senior columns don’t end up telling you this, our office doesn’t have windows — but to be fair, it was past sunset anyway. The bulbs flickered a few times, on, off, on …? No, off, and then they stayed off. I was a Design editor at the time: Sports and Opinion My pupils expanded in the sudden dark, and I could see that almost nobody had moved. Gillian Diebold was sitting next to me in another desk chair, cross-legged, her phone screen dusting her face with blue light. And then Jess Tan returned from the Morgue with a family-size bag of barbecue Lays. That was good; I like snacks. I chewed the chips

slowly, now horizontal on the Design couch. I could see Annabelle Williams’ tall silhouette move behind the Design computers, past Sarah Fortinsky’s office, past the Audience Engagement office, melting into the hallway like a shadow. The power was back on by 10:30 p.m., so the blackout was more of a hoot than an emergency. Real emergency hit later. We’re still in it, but I have little left to say about leading Street during the pandemic. There is a different point to make. I am a part of The Daily Pennsylvanian’s history, which is wonderful. I am proud to have led Street and I am grateful for being given the opportunity to do so. It taught me more than I thought I could ever learn. These sentiments are rooted in

Why I got off the Penn waitlist Senior Column | Finding my way to the DP family

I

ANA GLASSMAN

’m sitting in The Daily Pennsylvanian’s office alone right now. The walls are covered in yellowed newspapers, a whiteboard where we sign our names in green ink over and over again, and streamers from birthday celebrations passed. Actually, much of the past year has been me sitting alone somewhere. Whether it was on my 21st birthday Zoom call, virtual classes and meetings, or bingeing “The Queen’s Gambit” over and over again during quarantine — I was alone for most of my senior year. Sitting alone forced me to think a lot. I thought about the memories I cherished in college, that I prayed would come back come springtime. I thought about how lonely I felt in the beginning of my first year here, and how it compares nothing to COVID-19 life. But I thought mostly about my time at the DP and how I got here. I got off of the Penn waitlist on May 8, 2017. I was committed to another school, but it just didn’t feel right. Penn was not on my radar. I never even visited before attending.

But my English teacher told me he really saw me going there, and soon after he told me this, a direct flight to Philadelphia from my hometown was added to our local airport’s roster. The night of May 7, I scrolled on my phone at pictures of Penn’s campus. Realizing it probably would make me more upset about my waitlist status, I closed my phone and went to sleep. Somehow — maybe it was divine intervention, or maybe it was meant to be this way all along — I got into Penn the next day. I have never in my life cried tears from happiness, but that day I really did. Knowing that I was so close to not coming here made me cherish the experience more. Once I arrived it took a year of joining and quitting clubs to really find a “group” I fit in with. My friend Michael Warren said he was part of the photo department of the DP, and that I should try it out since I loved photography. Honestly, I only joined to beef up my resume, and anticipated keeping my status at the DP as a very low commitment.

OPINION 5

the camaraderie and relationships fostered by our common goal, connections I will treasure long past the day when I realize I’ve forgotten the front door code and can’t remember the name of the fish in the Stroffice anymore. But I will remain a part of DP history, which is problematic. When the DP first ensnares you, you feel chosen. It is a privilege to work nine-hour shifts after a full day of classes, assignments, part-time jobs, and other clubs. My seven-semester stint set no working hours and paid me in Zesto’s and experience. Only a few of us remain in the office once the files for tomorrow’s issue go out to the printer — DP gremlins, I think, was our pre-pandemic term. I wore dark under-eye circles like medals of honor to my courses the next day, even though I had to consciously stop myself from keeping my eyes shut too long when I blinked. I want to lie and say that I am too soft, and that was why I couldn’t stand the heat of what, by definition, was a mere extracurricular. In truth, the DP became me, and it became all of us. That is not something we should be proud of. It was a choice. I didn’t make it alone. But it’s not supposed to be about us. The DP is no tautology. We don’t exist for our own sake, to elect another board, to start again, to preserve the environment that made us leaders. That’s a self-serving attitude. Not everyone takes the same path. The sample size of students left standing, who hold elections and write these senior columns, is skewed. It’s not about us. Our massive and relatively prestigious platform

should faithfully provide relevant and factual information to a community that is exponentially larger than any DP board. If we want to use this platform correctly, if we really want to commit to inclusive coverage and fair journalism practices, we can’t cling to the unsustainable simply because it was there when we arrived. I can see progress happening now, from the sort of distance that a graduating senior has, and I have full faith in the 137th Board, and the 138th, and the 139th, and the rest, to see this project through — because the 134th Board had faith in me, and the 135th, and the 136th. This is a beautiful thing about the DP: Trust and accountability are institutionalized. There are so many other beautiful things — I wish I could list them, but I respect the sanctity of an inch count. “Power outage on Walnut Street hits approx. 1,000 students and locals Sunday evening.” Manlu Liu ended up with the article byline, and a bunch of us, sequestered in our second-story cave, shared it on Facebook. Sage Levine’s caption was my favorite: “The DP dies in darkness.” I loved the reference. But the DP did not really die in darkness. (How could a dead newspaper write an article about its own demise?) Lights go off in the office — no matter. We are journalists with an internet connection; we must write about what happens. And our stories are never about us.

Fast forward three years and I have been News photo editor, Editorial Board chair, and summer Opinion editor for the DP. It is hard to summarize these three positions in a short column. In the multimedia section (where I sit currently), Sage Levine and Sukhmani Kaur sat across from me every day. We blasted pop music while editing photos and video footage. It was also here where I started to livestream all celebrity award shows (and highly disturb print production nights), and a crowd slowly formed where I began to make friends. Across from me is the Red Room, home of the Copy Department (which I was a member of for one whole day), where Katie Steele, Sam Mitchell, and I most notably wrote and edited the editorial endorsing Bernie Sanders for the 2020 presidential democratic candidate. The next day, Max Cohen told me Sen. Sanders reposted it on social media, and we spent the night celebrating. Next to Copy is the Blue Room, home of News. Conversations strategizing photo essays morphed into talking about classes, life, and Shawn Mendes. Max, Maddie Ngo, Deena Elul, Manlu Liu, and Giovanna Paz all let me sit in and have fun while they edited their reporters’ stories. This is also the infamous locale where “Mariarmy” was born. I was talking to Gio about how funny it is that celebrities’ fandom names sound so aggressive — Selenators, Arianators, Shawn Mendes Army. I joked, “imagine there being a Maria army … a mariarmy!” The joke turned into a Slack channel for anyone to join to talk about fun, trivial matters in the office. Yes, I realize how odd it is to name a Slack channel or group after yourself, but somehow the joke morphed into a real, tightknit community. During quarantine, we had a Mariarmy secret santa exchange across the world, and at the most recent Kamin Cup, we fought to defeat DPOSTM (and of course, failed). Most visibly across from me is the Sports office. My status as a DPOSTMite who has never actually written a sports article began with homework help from Will

DiGrande. But in November of 2019, I dealt with the loss of my grandfather, somebody I was extremely close to. I never experienced such a close death, let alone by myself at college hundreds of miles away from home. On my flight back, the only thing that sounded comforting, the only thing I wanted, was just to be with my friends in sports. The moment I entered the office, Will ran up to me and gave me a big hug. Down the main hall of the DP office is the Opinion Office where Isabella Simonetti and Julia Schorr, or “JJ,” unknowingly convinced me to stop being a vegetarian of five years due to their tempting Terakawa orders. It was in this office that Julia, Isabella, Sam, and Dalton DeStefano made a video called “What we love about Maria” also after my grandfather died. They sent it to me, and needless to say, I was wrong for assuming I would be dealing with this loss without the support of family. So, when I sit in the office alone right now, somehow it is the least lonely I could possibly ever feel. And when I am forced to recall memories over the past four years, and think of how I got here today, I realize why I was meant to get off the Penn waitlist. I was meant to be at the DP. I was meant to meet my family here. Now that I have, I can only hold immense gratitude and joy that we get to move through the world — post-DP, post-Penn, and hopefully post-COVID-19 — together. Thank you all for being my family.

TAMSYN BRANN is a graduating College senior studying science, technology, and society from Hartsdale, N.Y. She served as 34th Street’s editor-in-chief on the 136th Board of Editors and Managers and as a Design editor on the 135th Board.

MARIA MURAD is a College senior from Hazard, Ky. studying cultural/linguistic anthropology, ancient history, and cinema and media studies. She served as the News photo editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian on the 135th Board of Editors and Managers, Editorial Board chair for the spring 2020 semester, summer 2020 Opinion editor, a photographer, and a videographer.

My DP cords are closest to my heart

Forget majoring in journalism — join your college paper

Senior Column | How I found a community and a place to advocate for important causes

T

PHOTO FROM JESSICA GOODING

he first time I met with my mentor, The Daily Pennsylvanian alumnus Mike Madden of The Washington Post last summer, admittedly, I was nervous. I was aware that I was different than most of the other interns: I was the only Opinion columnist participating in the DP’s summer internship program, I was balancing full-time work, adjusting to being home constantly, and trying to entertain my two-year-old twins during each hour of the sun. Initially, I thought Mike would be living an entirely different life. However, after we met, I realized, along with a love for writing, we had much in common: He was also balancing work, life with a family, and the pandemic. Mike helped guide my writing and gave me insightful advice on how to balance my expectations. He shared his post-Penn experience with me. His perspective gave me a taste of what life after Penn might look like and what it meant to be an alumni member of the DP. Ultimately, having Mike as my mentor will be one of the highlights of my DP and Penn experience. Growing up in northeast Philadelphia, attending an institution like Penn was simply not on my radar. When I got here, after transferring from the Community College of Philadelphia, I didn’t quite know how to fit in. When I wasn’t in class, I’d spend time walking around campus, tasting different foods and coffees, while trying to build a routine. I’d sit on the grass surrounding College Green, slowly taking in the subtle beauty and culture. Everything I noticed was distinctive and different from any other part of the city that I was familiar with. From listening to the chords and melodies of the piano being openly played in Van Pelt on spring afternoons to meeting up with friends to pick up warm macadamia nut cookies in the basement of Houston Hall during winter finals, eventually I began to feel at home. By my second semester, I started applying to spaces that I wanted to be a part of. When I first found out that I had been selected to write for the DP, I was quite surprised. Sharing my voice with the Penn community was exciting and important, but I didn’t know exactly how to jump in. The first time I stopped by the office on 40th Street, to my delight, fitting in came naturally. Everyone was hilarious and bright. I loved hearing about the long-held traditions, such as the DP’s yearly Thanksgiving get-together and the endless accomplishments of the impressive alumni network. I fed off of the uniquely positive and welcoming atmosphere. The

more I wrote, the more my voice grew. Column after column, week after week, I poured passion into each topic. The editors provided me with clarity and insight. Through countless emails regarding my columns, I have connected with people from hundreds of miles away from Philadelphia and Penn. There have been moments of triumph, like when Penn announced the George Whitefield statue would be removed after I penned “Take the George Whitefield statue” and when Penn reversed its decision to bring everyone back to campus, during a peak moment in the COVID-19 pandemic, after I shared my thoughts about that decision being wrong. There have been moments of pride, like when The Philadelphia Inquirer’s Will Bunch featured me in an article and when the History Department highlighted a column I wrote about the American flag on its website and included it in its monthly newsletter. I was also granted the space to be an advocate for parents at Penn. Lastly, there have been moments of vulnerability, such as when I shared my thoughts regarding microaggressions within the Penn community and how my experience as a former School District of Philadelphia student shaped my thoughts about the necessity of PILOTS. To the highest degree, Penn is a place of abundant opportunity; the possibilities are truly endless. I have accomplished much more than I originally set my eyes on. My writing for the DP has been a huge component of that. My DP experience has encouraged me to expand my agency and provided me with tools to own my activism. What I learned throughout my Penn adventure will accompany me everywhere I go. When I reflect on my undergraduate years, these experiences will shine brightly. I grew in this space through sharing my thoughts and experiences. I’ve made lifelong friends. I’m thankful for every single person who took the time to hear my voice. I’m even more thankful for every person who took the time to listen. This journey will remain tucked away in my heart, forever timeless and invaluable. JESSICA GOODING s a graduating College senior studying history and English from Philadelphia. She has been an Opinion columnist since 2019.

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ANA GLASSMAN

hroughout my years at Penn, conversations with nonPenn students usually followed a familiar formula. When talking about my interests, I would express my desire to enter the field of journalism. The person would understandably ask if I was majoring in journalism. “No,” I would reply. “Penn doesn’t actually have a journalism major.” Their face would contort in confusion. “It’s OK,” I’d respond with a smile. “The Daily Pennsylvanian is my journalism major.” For some time, I recall that answer serving as a crutch — a way to justify my existence at a school that didn’t have an entire academic apparatus dedicated to the craft of journalism. But now, I can look back with supreme confidence and acknowledge that it was true. Although my bachelor’s degree in political science will claim otherwise, the DP was my major, minor, and electives at Penn all rolled into one. And I would not have had it any other way. In the proud tradition of following advice from DP seniors, I have some unsolicited advice for anyone reading this column: Join your college paper! If you’re reading this and think it’s too late — think again (OK, maybe not if you’re a graduating senior or one of my family members). From a general assignments reporter who seldom entered the office, to a beat reporter who showed up twice a week for brutal, but rewarding, editing sessions, to a News editor who was there daily with my Blue Room family, to my tenure as DP editor-in-chief when 4015 Walnut became my second home — all of it was a wild ride that made me who I am today. The experience was intoxicating. There is something indescribable about being in a windowless office for hours, subsisting only on pizza and lukewarm water, only to send the paper to the printer at 2am. There is something beautiful about bringing together the paper’s best minds to land upon the perfect headline for the front page. At a college paper, and at the DP in particular, you can possess the most influence of anyone your age. You can set the school’s agenda. Your work will be seen by tens of thousands. You can hold an administration accountable. And you will make a family in the process. We had a lot of fun at this place. But we also made tough decisions in hard circumstances. We covered Donald Trump to the point where “1968 Wharton graduate” will forever be seared in my mind. We reported when the tragedies of suicide hit our campus. I interviewed congresspeople and former national security advisers. We dug deep into Penn’s problematic history with medical experimentation on disenfranchised individuals. And we produced content when the world stopped.

Senior Column | My time at the DP gave me the best memories and reporting experience I could hope for

Everyone should be a part of an experience like this. There is a place for everyone at the DP. Take the leap of faith — you won’t regret it. I feel compelled to offer my advice here because I’ve been fortunate enough to benefit from some priceless pieces of wisdom from fellow journalists. When taking my first journalism elective my sophomore year of high school, reporter Nathan Guttman of Moment Magazine urged the class not to study journalism in college. The best practice, he said, was to work in the field as a reporter, not in a classroom. The next piece of advice came from Stefan Fatsis, a legendary DP alum. When I worked under him before my first year at Penn, he extolled the virtues of the DP to me. Stefan was an editor in the ‘80s and he even took a semester off school to fully dedicate himself to the newspaper. Once at the DP, I received priceless morsels from my higher-ups. I remember former executive editor Dan Spinelli taking the time out of his day to message me, a lowly GA reporter, feedback on my article during my shift in November 2017. I remember a spring 2018 phone call with former news editor Sarah Fortinsky that sold me on being a summer news editor, which paved my way to eventually serve as the DP’s editor-in-chief. That same semester, former DP President David Akst convinced me to accept a position at The Philadelphia Inquirer, even though it wasn’t in my preferred city. It ended up being one of the best internships I ever did. Thank you to Kelly Heinzerling, who edited my beat stories and refined my reporting to great ends. Thank you to Maddie Ngo, Gio Paz, Manlu Liu, and Deena Elul, whose company in the Blue Room kept me going. Thank you to Sarah, whose tenacious drive for perfection drove me to be my best. Thank you to Julie Coleman, Conor Murray, and Ashley Ahn, who showed that a three-person Blue Room could do it all. Thanks to Maria Murad and the Mariarmy for injecting levity into a tough work environment. Thank you to Danny Chiarodit, Michael Landau, and Will DiGrande, who welcomed a non-DPOSTMite into the sports room. And thank you to Georgia Ray, for making my term as editor-in-chief a little extra special and showing that Design and News made a great combination.

MAX COHEN is a graduating College senior studying political science from Chevy Chase, Md. He was The Daily Pennsylvanian’s editorin-chief on the 136th Board of Editors and Managers and previously served as a News editor and politics beat reporter.


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Love your neighbors, and strangers too

My luckiest four years

Senior Column | How I came to understand love and justice at Penn

Senior Column | How luck transformed my time at Penn

ANA GLASSMAN

A

OPINION 7

t the heart of Penn’s campus, distanced from the array of academic buildings, sits a statue reading the most valuable lesson Penn can impart on its students: love. Last year, as I contemplated the meaning of the pandemic at its peak, I picked up “Man’s Search for Meaning,” by Viktor Frankl. In the book, Frankl, a psychiatrist and holocaust survivor, spends a considerable amount of time discussing love and its role in giving life purpose. At the pit of suffering, Frankl realized a core tenet, that “the salvation of man is through love and in love.” He conveys that through love, we forget ourselves, finding meaning through giving ourselves to another cause. Frankl’s belief about giving love reminds me of my favorite quote by Dr. Cornel West, “justice is what love looks like in public.” To me, both Frankl and West highlight the power of love in community — love that goes beyond us as individuals, and transcends to people we have never known. Over the years, these words have been a guiding light, and a reminder of why I care deeply about justice. I joined The Daily Pennsylvanian because writing about social issues is my way of loving in public. My years at the DP and Penn coincided with Trump’s presidency, national anti-gun violence protests, social uprisings for racial justice, and a global pandemic. Through these difficult years, it felt as though the never-ending news cycle of injustice and heartache left me more disillusioned than hopeful. Through writing, I rediscovered a sense of purpose beyond this feeling of powerlessness. When I started as a news reporter my first year, I never expected that learning about journalism and storytelling at the DP would teach me about justice. But at its best, that is exactly what journalism works towards when it amplifies the stories around us. Focusing my columns on issues local to Penn and Philadelphia helped me find a role within this complex community. Like many students, I was introduced to the astonishing wealth of resources at Penn at the same time I was exposed to the inequity they made apparent. Many of my columns have attempted to communicate this conflict, and the internal dilemma it poses to us as students. Why do Penn students have access to resources that aren’t accessible to the public education system blocks away? Why is our family’s income a greater predictor of our success than our work? If love and community are so central to Penn, so much so the LOVE statue sits at the center of campus, why doesn’t Penn’s love extend beyond its perimeter? The way things are now, is justice even possible?

I don’t have all these answers. But at my core, I believe the answer to justice connects to love, as Dr. Cornel West said. There is a laundry list of arbitrary circumstances that got me to Penn — from big things like the timing of my family’s immigration or the zip code I grew up in, to seemingly small things, like rides home after high school extracurriculars, or older siblings that helped with financial aid forms. These circumstances, and the opportunities they unlocked for me, remind me of the power of love and community — and the resources they provide. It wasn’t long after I arrived at Penn that I realized I did not deserve to be here, and that no one really did. Like me, we all had a series of fateful circumstances open doors and opportunities for us. Dominoes of small chances, like being born in the right place or receiving mentorship at the right time, fell on top of each other and gave us access to this education. While the arbitrariness of our place here is scary, it’s also hopeful. Knowing that none of us truly deserve to be here, opens us up to believing that everyone, with access to the right resources, would thrive here too. After we graduate, it’s up to us whether we reproduce a network of elitism and insulate these resources we had access to, or whether we choose to share them. As DP alumnus, William Snow, said best in his own senior column, “Penn seems to take our wealthiest and most privileged and give them the tools to go into the world and create the next generation of wealthiest and most privileged.” With our choices, we have the power to change this cycle. Graduation speeches are often filled with the flattering but trite remark that we are the “leaders of tomorrow.” If we wish to live up to this standard, we cannot forget to intertwine justice and love in whatever we do. After we graduate, we will make choices that indirectly or directly affect our communities, and determine whether we uplift or undermine the stories around us. These decisions, of where we want to work, who we want to open doors for, and how we give back, have the power to set off dominoes of opportunities for others. So, the question is, are we brave enough to love in public? UROOBA ABID is a College senior studying international relations from Long Island, N.Y. She has served as an Opinion columnist since 2019 and was previously an admissions and financial aid beat and first-generation, low-income beat reporter in 2018.

I

n the four years before I stepped foot onto campus, only one word kept me motivated: more. Suspended in the halls of a suburban public high school, my parents repudiated my sexuality, I had few friends whom I let into my life, and I was driven purely by the notion that if I worked hard enough, I would earn the life I fantasized about in films and novels. I wanted to freely love another man without judgment, I wanted friends who I could express my deepest feelings to, I wanted to bask in the glory of my success and renounce those who never recognized my merit. In many ways, I thought my struggles were incomparable. I thought I deserved more — that somehow I, through adversity, could will my dreams into reality. But in the past four years, what I’ve come to realize is that so much of what life has afforded me has been pure dumb luck; that luck is what led to the gratuitous love of others. It was luck that brought Miss Arlene into my life. More than a security guard, she was the reason Harrison College House became home. I knew that after a day of class, I would enter the lobby and hear her voice behind an open copy of The Daily Pennsylvanian asking, “Hey Benjamin, how you doing today?” She remembered my birthdays, giving me cash to buy myself a good meal, and handed me snacks whenever she had one for herself. She was the first person to notice my name on the DP masthead, under the title of executive editor, telling everyone in the lobby and any subsequent person who would listen how proud of me she was. After moving out more than a year ago, I haven’t seen her since due to tightened restrictions on the dorms, but I hope she sees these words and knows that she is appreciated; I hope she still continues to sing and dance while on the job, bringing a smile to everyone she meets. It was luck that allowed me into so many different communities at Penn. Some friends came and went, but none I regret letting into my life. While COVID-19 brought tragedy beyond comprehension, it also brought a unique opportunity to spend time together without outside distractions. The past year has been the most fulfilling I’ve had, and I owe it all to the friends who accepted me into their circle without hesitation. I had little to offer and everything to gain, and I hope I can someday return even a portion of the love given to me. It was luck that introduced me to the DP and

ANA GLASSMAN

the mentors that believed in me. I will be forever grateful that, in the dull hours we spent holed up in our windowless home, some saw a spark in me. Though I wasn’t a writer nor a particularly good journalist, I aimed higher because I knew I had the faith of those I most respected. To Rebecca, Sarah, and countless others: It is because of your patience, steadfast conviction, and wisdom that inspired me to be better. More than anything, I was lucky to have the 136th Board, a stellar staff who worked under unimaginably strenuous circumstances. I feel honored that you let me be your leader. It was luck that introduced me to my first love. While it wasn’t perfect, it taught me that I was worthy, and proved I could survive heartbreak. It was luck that I was born into a family that, despite not understanding my identity at first, came to love me for who I am. My parents, both born in rural China where the concept of homosexuality is unacknowledged and scorned, forced themselves to reconcile their traditional values with a son who openly identified as gay. Though their relationship with my sexuality was difficult at first, they are now the ones donning rainbow flag face masks and defending me to their conservative Christian friends. To be fully accepted by my parents is a reality I didn’t dare dream of four years ago — a reality many never actualize. If there’s anything the past four years have taught me, it is that I have been at the mercy of luck my entire life. I used to think that I, alone, had the power to steer my life, but without that myopic view, I see more and more how I am a beneficiary of good fortune. But for many, good fortune is inherently fleeting. While so much of our lives are dictated by chance, what we can control is how we treat others. So many times, I didn’t deserve the love that came my way, but through others’ empathy and ability to see the best in me, my life was changed. BEN ZHAO is a graduating Wharton senior studying finance and marketing from Northbrook, Ill. He served as The Daily Pennsylvanian’s executive editor on the 136th Board of Editors and Managers. Previously, he was Design editor and digital director on the 135th Board.

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NEWS 9

Penn to honor seven individuals with honorary degrees

Deputy Provost Beth Winkelstein will serve as interim provost beginning July 1

Recipients include the U.S. Treasury Secretary and outgoing chair of the Board of Trustees

JONAH CHARLTON Senior Reporter

Provost Wendell Pritchett to take leave of absence through fall 2021 semester

DELANEY PARKS Staff Reporter

Penn will honor seven individuals with honorary degrees, celebrating their accomplishments in fields ranging from public policy to arts and entertainment. This year’s cohort of recipients includes Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frances Arnold, award-winning poet Joy Harjo, composer John Williams, and public policy analyst David Miliband. Two Penn affiliates will also receive honorary degrees — outgoing Chair of the Board of Trustees David Cohen and cultural advocate Elizabeth Alexander, who earned her Ph.D. in English at Penn. Elizabeth Alexander Alexander, who graduated from Penn in 1992, will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree. She is the president of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the largest funder of arts, culture, and humanities in higher education. In her role, Alexander has helped reorient the foundation to focus on distributing grants through a social justice lens, prioritizing proposals that will create a more just society. Alexander is a pivotal figure in Black poetry, as well as a major voice in Black literary criticism. Her accomplishments include writing and reciting her poem “Praise Song for the Day” at former President Barack Obama’s inauguration, as well as chairing the African American Studies Department at Yale University. Frances Arnold Arnold, the Linus Pauling professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Biochemistry at the California Institute of Technology, will receive an honorary doctor of sciences degree. She won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2018 for engineering new directed enzyme evolution methods to create efficient and sustainable ways to produce chemicals. She is the co-inventor of more than 60 United States patents and has co-founded three biotechnology companies. President Joe Biden named Arnold the co-chair of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology in January 2021. “We have to reestablish the importance of science in policymaking, in decision making across the government,” she said in a statement. “We need to reestablish the trust of the American people in science.” David Cohen Cohen, a 1981 Penn Law graduate, will receive an honorary doctor of laws degree. He has served as the chair of the Board of Trustees since 2009, after he was first elected a University trustee in 2001. Cohen is a senior advisor of the Comcast Corporation, a telecommunication and media organization that is home to NBCUniversal. He previously served as the senior executive vice president and chief diversity officer. From 1992 to 1997, Cohen also served as chief of staff to former Philadelphia Mayor Edward Rendell, who now teaches at Penn.

Joy Harjo Harjo, the first Native American to be appointed U.S. Poet Laureate, will receive an honorary doctor of humane letters degree. She is an internationally acclaimed poet, writer, performer, and musician of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation, having authored nine books of poetry and a memoir. Her poetry is often autobiographical, incorporates Indigenous storytelling and mythology, and is informed by feminism and social justice. Harjo also performs both solo and with a band, and has produced six original music albums. Her memoirs include the award-winning “Crazy Brave” and “Poet Warrior: A Call for Love and Justice.” David Miliband Miliband, the president and CEO of the International Rescue Committee, will receive an honorary doctor of laws degree. The IRC responds to humanitarian crises and helps people whose lives have been impacted by conflict and disaster to survive, recover, and regain control of their livelihoods. Miliband has organized the agency’s relief and development operations, refugee resettlement and assistance efforts, and advocacy efforts in Washington, D.C. Miliband previously served as secretary of state for foreign and commonwealth affairs in the United Kingdom, advocating for human rights abroad. He has recently spoken out against the Biden Administration’s decision to maintain the Trump-era refugee admissions cap of 15,000 and called on the new administration to reverse it. John Williams Williams, a film and concert stage composer, will receive an honorary doctor of music degree. He has composed the music and served as music director for films including “Jaws,” “Jurassic Park,” “Indiana Jones,” and “Saving Private Ryan.” He also composed the scores for all of the “Star Wars” movies and the first three “Harry Potter” movies. Williams also contributed music to many Olympic Games, Obama’s first inaugural ceremony, and NBC Sunday Night Football. He has received the most Oscar nominations of any living person, with 52 nominations and five wins. Williams formerly served as the music director of the Boston Pops Orchestra and is currently its laureate conductor. Janet Yellen Yellen, the 78th secretary of the treasury, will receive an honorary doctor of laws degree. She is the first woman to hold the position, and she formerly served as the first woman chair of the Federal Reserve Board from 2014 to 2018. She has served as a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, an assistant professor of economics at Harvard University, and a lecturer at the London School of Economics. The primary focus of her scholarship is the causes, mechanisms, and implications of unemployment.

Congrat s, Senio rs! Clas s

Penn President Amy Gutmann announced in an email to the Penn community Tuesday morning that Penn Provost Wendell Pritchett will take a medical leave of absence from the University through the end of the fall 2021 semester. Gutmann wrote that Pritchett has been dealing with “some health issues that, while not life-threatening, require greater attention over the coming months.” Deputy Provost Beth Winkelstein will serve as interim provost beginning July 1, the email read. “[Wendell] is an exceptional leader who is universally recognized for his scholarship, teaching, compassion, and commitment to academic excellence and civic engagement,” Gutmann wrote. “He is also a cherished friend to so many of us here at Penn. We all want Wendell to take the time necessary to tend to his health, and this leave of absence will allow him to do just that.” The Provost’s Office oversees all departments pertaining to University life including teaching, learning, and research across the University, along with student life. Winkelstein wrote in an email to The Daily Pennsylvanian that she is honored to have been called on by

Gutmann and Pritchett to take on the interim provost position. “Penn has been a central part of my life since I was a student here, and I am committed to helping our community to thrive in the important months ahead,” Winkelstein wrote. “I look forward to working with our amazing students, faculty, and staff as we continue to resume our lives on campus this summer and fall.” Pritchett appointed Winkelstein as deputy provost in June 2020 after she previously served as vice provost for education for five years. Winkelstein graduated from Penn with a degree in bioengineering and earned her Ph.D. in bioengineering at Duke University. She has taught in the School of Engineering and Applied Science since 2002. “Wendell and I and everyone who has worked with Beth have great confidence in her ability to step in and lead the Provost’s Office while Wendell is on leave,” Gutmann wrote. “Beth is an exceptional University citizen, who is involved in all aspects of our academic, research and student-centered programming.” Pritchett was named provost in April 2017 after serving as a professor at Penn Law School since 2002.

Philanthropist Lorene Powell Jobs to deliver commencement address

Powell Jobs is known for her efforts to forward environmental justice and immigration reform TORI SOUSA Staff Reporter

Meet Laurene Powell Jobs, the philanthropist who will deliver Penn’s 2021 commencement speech at graduation on May 17. Powell Jobs, the 95th-richest person in the world and widow of the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, is known for her work to fund efforts on environmental justice, immigration reform, education, and a number of other issues. 1. She graduated from Penn in 1985. Powell Jobs earned a B.A. in political science from the College and a B.S. in economics from the Wharton School. During her time at Penn, she founded Special Deliveries, a student-run cake and care package delivery service within Penn Student Agencies. She also worked at PSA, waited tables at Smokey Joe’s, and studied abroad in Paris. Powell Jobs also served on the National Advisory Board of the Netter Center for Community Partnerships. Following her graduation from Penn, she worked at Goldman Sachs before earning her MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. 2. Powell Jobs is not interested in “legacy wealth building.” Powell Jobs, whose net worth is estimated at $19.3 billion, said she does not plan to pass her massive wealth onto her children. Instead, she told The New York Times she has dedicated her life to determining the best way to effectively distribute her wealth to uplift individuals and communities. “It’s not right for individuals to accumulate a massive amount of wealth that’s equivalent to millions and millions of other people combined,” she told the Times. “There’s

nothing fair about that.” She added that her husband was also uninterested in legacy wealth building. 3. Her commitment to promoting equity in education began many decades ago. Powell Jobs founded College Track, a nonprofit that works to equip first-generation, low-income students with resources to earn a bachelor’s degree, in 1997. She still serves as the board chair, working to close the achievement gap among students of color in education. She is also co-founder of the XQ Institute, which aims to create more equitable high schools and teach students to be civically engaged, critical readers, generous collaborators, and lifelong learners. 4. She is working to fund aid efforts for a number of social welfare issues. Powell Jobs founded the Emerson Collective, an organization that aims to create a more just country through impact investing, philanthropy, and advocacy. The organization focuses on creating systemic change in education, the environment, immigration, and cancer research and treatment. Powell Jobs is also an advocate for Dreamers, people who came to the United States as children and do not have citizenship. She has worked on reforming legislation for Dreamers, purchasing television ads that opposed Trump’s commitment to ending the program that has allowed Dreamers to remain in the country.

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Graduating 6B leaders reflect on their legacy, accomplishments, and future plans The 6B is a coalition of Penn’s main minority student groups on campus SHEILA HODGES Staff Reporter

Graduating leaders of the 6B — a coalition of Penn’s main minority student groups including the Penn Association for Gender Equity, UMOJA, Lambda Alliance, Latinx Coalition, United Minorities Council, and Asian Pacific Student Coalition — expressed excitement about their future as they reflected on their impactful time at Penn. Penn Association for Gender Equity Angela Yang, College senior and former chair of PAGE, a student association on campus that aims to promote gender equity and social justice, said the organization opened her eyes to how gender equity is intertwined with other issues such as racism and capitalism, which she said fueled her pursuit of public policy after Penn. Yang is now headed to New York after accepting a position in the Urban Fellows Program, a nine-month fellowship which places recent graduates into Mayoral offices and city agencies to engage in opportunities focused on urban issues and public policy. During her time as chair, Yang helped advocate for new policies and events on campus such as adding anti-bias training into the bylaws of Penn’s fraternities and helping develop PAGE’s first preorientation program, PennGenEq. She added that she is not only proud of the work PAGE is doing, but also how progressive and inclusive the organization has become. Yang hopes people remember her as an individual who positively shaped those around her. “I hope I’ve touched those around me and have helped them think about things in a deeper or unique way,” Yang said. “I also hope I’ve brought something into their life that only I could have brought.” UMOJA Hailing from South Jersey, College senior and former UMOJA co-chair Derek Nuamah said one of the biggest goals he helped accomplish was securing $150,000 from the Student Activities Council Reserve Fund for UMOJA. In August 2020, Penn Student Government pledged to donate $250,000 to Black student groups on campus — UMOJA, Makuu: The Black Cultural Center, and the Center for Africana Studies. Due to the large sum, UMOJA was also able to donate to some of its own constituent groups. Nuamah added that UMOJA has allowed him to build valuable relationships with his fellow board members, as well as with Makuu Director Brian Peterson and Associate Director Daina Troy, both people whom he considers mentors. He also credited the organization for piquing his interests in public policy and public health fields, which he plans to pursue after graduation. “UMOJA has opened my eyes to the way that institutions of power really operate and has given me insight into resistance, solidarity, and planning for the future,” Nuamah said.

He hopes his legacy at Penn is one of following the momentum of the Black Lives Matter Movement and challenging the University in order to help Black people everywhere — at Penn, in Philadelphia, and beyond. College senior and former co-chair of UMOJA Martha Gakunju said UMOJA has inspired her own personal growth and enlightenment about how institutions like Penn function, and how they impact their students. “It’s been a really great organization for teaching me advocacy skills and how to also be an effective leader, how to speak up for myself, how to listen, how to present the needs of others, and how to pass the microphone,” Gakunju said. Like Naumah, Gakunju is most proud of the funding they were able to secure for UMOJA from the Undergraduate Assembly. Now, Gakunju, a Kenya native who grew up in Ohio, hopes to do advocacy work for youth in Kenya. “Working with UMOJA and working with people has definitely greatly benefited me and equipped me with the skills to do that type of work,” Gakunju said. As she graduates, Gakunju said she hopes she brightened the days of those around her while at Penn, adding that she will miss having her friends close by and being with people who could relate to her life experiences. She said she will miss the sense of community she has found at Penn, since she had met many people whom she feels she shared life experiences with. Gakunju added that unlike her experiences in high school, she appreciates how the Black community is seen as diverse and not monolithic. Lambda Alliance College senior and former Lambda Alliance chair Bryce Nguyen, who is from Orlando, Fla., will be working in health care in New York after graduation and is excited to evoke change in the industry. Still, he said he will miss the proximity of having his friends at Penn, and his involvement with Lambda Alliance. Although COVID-19 prevented him from accomplishing many of his goals for the organization, Nguyen said one goal he was able to accomplish was creating a peer mentorship program for queer first years. “I really wanted to make sure that all the queer [first years] felt like they were going to transition well into the community, and so I wanted to make sure that there was some sort of precedent that they had a place at the gay community at Penn,” Nguyen said. Reflecting on his legacy at Penn, Nguyen hopes to be remembered as someone who continued the momentum of making meaningful change for marginalized communities on campus. Latinx Coalition College senior and former chair of the Latinx

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Coalition Frances Paulino said her time with the Coalition reignited her passion for advocacy and ensuring the rights of marginalized communities. The organization also taught her how to interact with historically white institutions, which she said will benefit her in her quest to become a public interest attorney for marginalized communities. “I think being in the 6B and the chair of the Latinx Coalition, you meet a lot of people who are passionate about supporting marginalized communities and giving back to the communities they came from, and I feel like that passion drives me forward, and on top of that, they are all incredible people to be around,” Paulino said. In addition to working to establish more cultural centers on campus, Paulino, who is from Miami, hopes that her legacy includes her work in the fall of 2019 to transition Grupo Quisqueyano, a former Dominican Student Association, to a Dominican and Haitian Student Association under the leadership of assistant professor of Africana Studies Grace Sanders. “I feel like a lot of my legacy and my board’s legacy that participated in making that transition lies there and in trying to repair some of the difficult relationships that Dominican vocations have on the islands and even the diaspora,” Paulino said. United Minorities Council After serving as the UMC chair for three semesters due to the pandemic, College senior Brooke Price said her time with the group helped prepare her for her career aspirations, teaching her how to take initiative and accomplish various goals as well as how to represent herself clearly and concisely. Price said she has followed in the steps of previous UMC chairs in pushing for more space for

cultural centers on campus, adding that she feels proud of how she helped the organization stay afloat during remote operation. “We were still able to put on a few events, particularly our celebration of cultures, where we had UMC alumni come back to talk about their experiences as people of color in business and health care,” Price said. As she begins her career in New York, Price said she will miss her friends and the beauty of campus, especially during the spring. She also hopes that she has contributed to the lives of others during her time at Penn. “I hope that I’ve been able to positively impact all the underclassmen I’ve met over the past four years and help them avoid mistakes or figure things out a little bit faster than I did,” Price said. Asian Pacific Student Coalition After learning more about the Asian American and Pacific Islander community and the diversity of perspectives through her time at APSC, College senior and former APSC chair Sarah Kim said she is now inspired to use film to share more Asian perspectives. Kim said she plans to go to film school on the West Coast, in New York, or abroad. As she leaves Penn, Kim said she will miss her friends and the free food she obtained on campus pre-COVID-19 the most. She also hopes to be remembered for helping members of the AAPI community at Penn. “I hope I was able to open up conversations for people to have, especially in the AAPI community, and after doing a mental health event, I also hope I helped destigmatize mental health,” Kim said. “I just hope that people felt that they were welcomed and had a home in the AAPI community.”

CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Application was made to the Department of State of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, at Harrisburg, PA, on May 6, 2021 by a foreign corporation formed under the laws of the State of Delaware, where its principal office is located at 251 Little Falls Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 19808 for a Certificate of Authority to do business in Pennsylvania under the provisions of the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law of 1988. The character and nature of the business is a 501c3 empowering young people in Philadelphia as changemakers in their community through restorative justice. The proposed registered office in Pennsylvania is: 2212 Delancey Place Unit 2R, Philadelphia, PA 19103.


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BY STAFF REPORTERS KOMAL PATEL & SHIRALI SHAH SENIOR REPORTERS ELIZABETH MEISENZAHL & JONAH CHARLTON

2020-2021 2017-2018 POLITICS In February 2018, The Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement officially opened, nearly a year after President Joe Biden was named as a Benjamin Franklin presidential practice professor.

STUDENT LIFE Penn First Plus announced plans in May to open an office to better support first-generation, low-income students. The office launched as a place for FGLI students to form a community after an increased number of first-generation students enrolled as part of the Class of 2022. After the death by suicide of seven students in 2017, Penn administrators and student leaders committed to strengthening mental health resources on campus. The University held a “Campus Conversation” to discuss resilience in times of tragedy, while Penn’s chapter of the nationwide nonprofit organization Project Let’s Erase the Stigma encouraged dialogues around mental health.

CONTROVERSIES In August 2017, Penn Law professor Amy Wax coauthored a now-infamous op-ed in The Philadelphia Inquirer, arguing that white Anglo-Protestant culture is superior to non-white cultures. The controversial piece sparked outrage across campus, and Wax was ultimately barred from teaching a mandatory first-year law course. In February, Penn removed former Penn Trustee Steve Wynn’s name from the common area outside Houston Hall after multiple reports of sexual misconduct. The area was renamed Penn Commons. In April, multiple students accused then-Psychology professor Robert Kurzban of sexual misconduct. Kurzban allegedly had romantic relationships with undergraduate students he directly oversaw, violating University policy that prohibits sexual relationships between faculty and students for whom they have a "supervisory academic responsibility." Following University investigations, Kurzban resigned in July. In March, University policy was modified to prohibit all sexual relationships between current undergraduates and faculty, beyond just the period of the teacher-student relationship.

SPORTS On Feb. 4, the Philadelphia Eagles won their first Super Bowl title, winning 41-33 against the New England Patriots. Following the victory, Penn students who had gathered on and off campus to watch the game rushed to the streets to celebrate with other fans. Penn football wide receiver Justin Watson was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the fifth round of the NFL draft as the 144th overall pick. Watson was the first Penn player to be drafted since 2002, when former Penn football offensive lineman Jeff Hatch was drafted.

2018-2019 POLITICS Penn students turned out in record-breaking numbers for the 2018 midterm elections. On Nov. 6, 2018, a total of 2,762 ballots were cast on campus, more than double the count from the 2014 midterms, and more than the number from any midterm election in the previous 12 years. Incumbent Gov. Tom Wolf (D-Pa.) and incumbent Sen. Bob Casey (DPa.) won by large margins among Penn voters. In February 2019, former Penn Law professor and United States Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) officially announced her candidacy for the 2020 presidential race. In April 2019, former Penn Presidential Professor of Practice Joe Biden (D-Del.) followed suit. The former Penn professors joined a crowded Democratic field that included figures such as U.S. Sens. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.).

HOUSING In September 2018, Penn announced that all sophomores would be required to live in oncampus housing beginning with the Class of 2024. The decision was part of an initiative to create a "Second-Year Experience Program" for sophomore students. Former Undergraduate Assembly President and College 2019 graduate Michael Krone told The Daily Pennsylvanian that Greek leaders from the Panhellenic Council and Interfraternity Council met with administrators prior to the announcement to discuss the implications the decision would have on Greek life at Penn. Greek life leaders voiced opposition to the new policy, noting that chapter houses are mostly filled by sophomores and that unfilled rooms would likely increase dues. On Dec. 3, 2018, Penn broke ground on the construction of its recordbreaking $163 million dorm, New College House West, on the corner of 40th and Walnut streets. NCHW is set to open on time in fall 2021.

ADMISSIONS SCANDAL Former Penn men’s basketball coach Jerome Allen pleaded guilty in October 2018 to accepting $74,000 in bribes in exchange for the recruitment of a player. In March 2019, Allen testified in a federal trial that Penn parent and Miami businessman Philip Esformes paid him to facilitate his son’s recruitment in 2015. Esformes was indicted for allegedly defrauding the federal government of $1 billion in a Medicaid money laundering scheme. Days after Allen's testimony, court documents unsealed by the United States Department of Justice charged 50 people for partaking in a bribery scam to get prospective students into elite schools. The crimes included bribing college officials to falsify identities of students as recruited athletes and cheating on entrance exams. Although Penn was not one of the universities named in the national admissions scandal, former Dean of Admissions Eric Furda told the DP that Penn would consider revising their recruitment and admissions processes. On April 5, Esformes was found guilty on 20 charges, including bribery, in Miami federal court, and later sentenced to 20 years in prison. Allen was sentenced to four years of probation, 600 hours of community service, and a fine of $202,000 on July 1. The next day, Penn Athletics removed Allen from its Hall of Fame.

2019-2020 CAMPUS Penn renamed several campus buildings. Previously known as New College House, Lauder College House was renamed in September following a contribution from Wharton graduates and frequent University donors Ronald and William Lauder. The University faced backlash from Penn Law students in November after its announcement that the University of Pennsylvania Law School would be renamed the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School following a $125 million donation. Hundreds of students and alumni signed a petition calling for the shortened name to remain Penn Law instead of Carey Law, arguing that the prestige of the Penn Law name is important to their careers. The University kept the full title as The University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, but changed the shortened name back to Penn Law

POLITICS Penn students took an active role campaigning ahead of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary. Two student groups, Penn for Bernie and Penn for Biden, traveled to New Hampshire in February ahead of the first-in-the-nation primary to canvas for their respective candidates. Several candidates in the primary had notable connections to Penn. Biden became the nominee after Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) dropped out in April. Warren, who dropped out of the race in March, taught at Penn Law from 1987 to 1995. After Biden secured the nomination in the spring of 2020, the general election featured two candidates with ties to Penn, as he would face off against, and ultimately defeat, 1968 Wharton graduate and then-incumbent President Donald Trump.

COVID-19 In March of 2020, Penn evacuated campus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The University extended spring break for one week and nearly all students were required to leave campus and complete coursework online. Many students struggled to adapt to the new learning environment, particularly international students with time zone differences and others without access to reliable WiFi. The COVID-19 pandemic also led Penn to cancel or modify second-semester traditions. Commencement for the Class of 2020 was held virtually with the promise of a future in-person ceremony. Hey Day, when juniors are officially pronounced seniors, was also held virtually for the Class of 2021. In early March, Penn canceled Quaker Days for admitted students to visit campus. The Penn Relays were also canceled for the first time since 1895.

COVID-19 After initially planning to reopen campus in the fall, Penn reversed its plan and closed on-campus housing following a nationwide spike in cases just weeks before students were scheduled to move in. Many students — including many members of the Class of 2021 — still returned to the Philadelphia area in off-campus housing, prompting the University to offer weekly COVID-19 testing in Houston Hall to all students living near campus. The University-wide case count reached a semester high largely due to three individual households in late October when 3.3% of undergraduates tested positive and a total of 107 Penn community members contracted COVID-19. In the spring, Penn reopened on-campus housing to an overwhelmingly successful degree, with a semester positivity rate of 0.61%. While the University avoided a large COVID-19 outbreak on campus, it saw a spike in cases in early February, when the undergraduate positivity rate reached 4.72%. Since then, Penn's COVID-19 positivity rate decreased for seven straight weeks to a semester low of 0.09% in the last week of the semester. On April 14, Penn administered the first COVID-19 vaccines at its on-campus vaccination site, a monumental step towards the University's reopening. Penn began vaccinating students five days later to widespread praise. Ahead of the University's planned in-person fall 2021 semester, Penn announced it will require all students to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

POLITICS Despite COVID-19 related guidelines and campus being closed, Penn community members turned out in droves to vote in the historic 2020 presidential election, which featured two candidates with strong ties to the University. A total of 689 ballots, not including dropped-off mail-in ballots, were cast in person on Election Day, according to election judges at the three campus polling sites. Eighty-three percent of ballots were cast for Biden. Penn President Amy Gutmann and her husband were two of the 503 voters at Houston Hall on Tuesday. Before she voted, she spoke with the DP about the importance of voting, particularly in the current political and social climate. "Every election is incredibly important, but this election, given the pandemic, given the fight against racism, given that Philadelphia is the birthplace of freedom and justice, all of our students, members of the Penn community, and everyone across America should be voting in this election," Gutmann said.

ADMISSIONS Penn accepted 5.68% of applicants to the Class of 2025, a record low and a significant decrease from last year's 8.07%. This year marked Penn's largest application pool in history, with 56,333 applicants — a 34% increase from last year. The University also experienced a shakeup at the top of the Admissions Office for the first time in 12 years, as Furda announced he would leave the Admissions Office at the end of 2020. Vice Dean and Director of Admissions John McLaughlin assumed the role of interim dean of admissions and will serve in that capacity until July 1. Whitney Soule, the current senior vice president and dean of admissions and financial aid at Bowdoin College, will take over the position on July 1 and serve as the University's next vice provost and dean of admissions. The Penn Admissions Office and the student-led Kite and Key Society debuted live, student-led, virtual tours. The live virtual tour was the first of its kind in the Ivy League and has continued to run throughout the 2020-2021 academic year.

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also became the Ivy League Champion in the 400 free relay during his sophomore year, which was Penn’s first-ever win in the event. Lee’s junior year only saw more accolades and success, as he qualified in five different events for the Ivy League Championships, finishing fourth in one and fifth in two others. Wrestling During his time with Penn wrestling, Jon Errico was a valuable component of the program. In his freshman year, he led his class with 14 wins. He then followed that up by achieving fourth place at Keystone Classic in 2018. Before he could continue his burgeoning sophomore year success, he suffered a season-ending injury, forcing him to miss the remainder of the year. He finished with a 4-4 record. The last time Errico saw action was in the 2019-20 season, where he posted an 11-8 record and secured pins in duals against Duke and Long Island University. Although the 2020-21 Penn wrestling season was canceled, Errico was named as one of the three team captains. Fencing Going 115-65 in her career as a Quaker, Miranda Gieg shined brightly for Penn women’s fencing. In her sophomore season, she helped the Red and Blue to a top-three finish at the Ivy League championships and earned a second team All-Ivy nod for her performance overall on the season. During her junior year, Gieg again garnered a second team All-Ivy nod and netted the best winning percentage of her career at 67.2%. On the men’s side, Michael Li earned an AllAmerica mention in each of the three years he was able to compete for Penn. He entered the program as it was at a high point and only furthered its forward momentum. In his freshman year, he helped the Quakers to their thirdstraight Ivy League title and aided the team in finishing eighth at the NCAA championships.

For his performance in both his sophomore and junior years, Li earned second team All-America each season, and he finished his Penn career with a cumulative record of 142-80.

FALL Soccer After a bumpy start to his Penn career, Joey Bhangdia became a crucial part of his program’s success. He didn’t play at all during his freshman year due to injury. As he began his time as a Quaker his sophomore season, Bhangdia scored a goal just 69 seconds into his first collegiate appearance in Penn’s season opener against Monmouth. His junior season was the real highlight of his career, though, as he led Penn in goals (6), points (12), shots (30), and match-winners (3). He was awarded first team All-Ivy and was also named a Philadelphia Soccer Six All-Star. Beginning her Penn career off the bench, Chase Geffert had a lot to prove, but did so in resounding fashion, proving her worth as an excellent defender. After she was substituted in, she started in the final 13 matches of the season and was named an honorable mention All-Ivy, the fourth freshman to be named All-Ivy under head coach Nicole Van Dyke. In her sophomore season, Geffert was a mainstay on the pitch, leading the team with 1,420 total minutes played, and in both her junior and senior seasons, she was named a team captain. Field Hockey Playing in each of the 51 total games she had the opportunity to compete in over her career, Erin Kelly left an indelible imprint on Penn field hockey. After a freshman season in which she only took four total shots, her sophomore campaign involved her starting all 17 games in midfield, tying for second on the team with eight points, and being named an honorable mention All-Ivy. To finish out her playing time with the program,

CHASE SUTTON, VARUN SUDUNAGUNTA, SON NGUYEN

Unlike the winter and spring seasons, fall teams have only missed one season due to COVID-19 cancellations.

Kelly led the Quakers with six assists during her junior year. Football Linebacker Brian O’Neill has been a consistent player for the Red and Blue ever since his freshman year. His first season was marked by him appearing in all 10 games, recording 26 tackles and three pass breakups in the process. In his sophomore season, he grew his role substantially, as he was able to start all 10 games and achieve the third-most tackles on the team with 57, as well as the second-most tackles for loss with 9.0. O’Neill’s best season, though, was his third and final, when he was a junior. He was awarded second team All-Ivy and had the fifth-most tackles for loss, as well as the second-most

interceptions in the Ivy League. Sprint Football In both of the seasons that Aaron Johnson competed for the Quakers, his impact was felt in a significant way on the program. As a sophomore, he appeared in all six of Penn’s games and was made a team captain. In his role as defensive back, he netted 27 total tackles, including an impressive eight in one game against Army. Additionally, he was tied for third on the team with two sacks. In his junior year, Johnson led the team with two forced fumbles and 38 solo tackles, with nine of those coming in just one game contest against Navy. For his performances, he was awarded first team All-CSFL.

15 questions with... Will DiGrande, a former DP senior Sports editor

BRANDON PRIDE Senior Sports Editor

Current Sports Editor Brandon Pride sat down with one of his predecessors, “Big Will” DiGrande, and asked him 15 questions about his time at The Daily Pennsylvanian, his time at Penn, and life overall. Here’s what the senior had to say. 1. Introduce yourself. Hi, everyone. My name is Will DiGrande. I’m a senior studying political science from Warren, N.J. I joined the DP my freshman fall, and I became a sports editor my sophomore spring. I was an editor for two years, and now I’m enjoying my last semester of college. 2. How did you first decide to get involved in DP Sports?

I was a sports writer for my high school’s newspaper. And I knew that coming to Penn, I wanted to continue some of my extracurriculars from high school. So after reading a few of the first editions of the DP my freshman fall, I was like, ‘Wow, this seems really cool, and I definitely wanted to get involved with it.’ Once I got involved, I really couldn’t get out of it. I love meeting the players and coaches and being a part of the department that made it so welcoming to be there. 3. You’re a big Kansas sports fan who’s from New Jersey. How did that happen? I don’t even know how it happened. It’s funny because my dad is a huge Michigan fan. So we kind of have a thing going in our family where we’re all fans of schools from across the country. And I guess when I was younger, I just really liked the logo, like the Jayhawk. I think that was also when their basketball team was doing really well, so I’ve just been following them ever since. And even though their football team isn’t the best, I still try to follow them as much as I can. 4. Can you talk about what the roles and responsi-

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018PHOTO FROM WILL DIGRANDE For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 Former Sports Editor and senior WillFor DiGrande’s memories Release favorite Thursday, May 13, from 2021his time with the DP are road trips to

games and sitting on press row with other editors and reporters.

NEWYORKTIMESCROSSWORDPUZZLE Edited by Will Shortz

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

bilities are of being a senior sports editor? Yeah, there are so many things. So basically, we just have to make sure that all the sports content that we publish — either in print or online — comes out wellwritten, well-edited, well-formatted, and all that. But in reality, it’s also managing a staff of 30-plus writers, and making sure that everyone’s happy and we have a good community going, that the culture is welcoming and positive. And it’s also managing relationships with other departments and other editors, too. So you have to make sure that people think that you’re approachable, people can trust you. 5. What is your favorite class at Penn? I took Swedish for two years, my freshman and sophomore years, and I always say that’s my favorite class because we just had a really tight-knit group. We were the same class for almost two years basically, so we got to know each other pretty well. And we all came into the class just wanting to learn the language, so it was a very low-stakes environment. I felt like I could just share whatever I wanted to without a lot of judgment. And we took really cool field trips too, we went to IKEA and a Swedish museum in South Philly. We had little parties in class where our professor would bring in baked goods from her house, so all that was a really fun experience. And I recommend taking a fun language for anyone who wants to have a chance like that. 6. If you were a baseball player, what would your walk-up song be? I feel like it would change literally every single week. But let’s say “Levitating” by Dua Lipa. 7. What is the biggest positive that you took away from the pandemic? I think I was really worried about how we, as a sports department, would work during COVID-19, just because sports were canceled and we didn’t know what we were going to do for such a long time. But I’m really happy that [fellow Senior Sports Editor Michael] Landau and I were able to adapt really well and still have a lot of coverage throughout the summer and even in the fall, too. I’m just happy that we were able to overcome this difficulty in our biggest activity at Penn, and that we were able to still make it a good experience for the people in the department and for us as well. 8. If you were hosting a new talk show, who would be your first guest? I don’t even know. There are so many people out there to interview, maybe a sports star, so I’m gonna go with Tim Tebow. 9. You’re known as the DP’s wrestling guru. What sparked your interest there? Back in high school, I was my high school wrestling team’s manager, because my best friend was our star wrestler on the team and they needed someone to help film their meets so they could see the highlights online. So it’s really funny, and it was a pretty big learning curve because I had never done any filming like that before. At first, I was working with literal discs and I had to put them into the camera. But after a while, we had it all digitized, where I was able to just put the flash drive into my computer. And that was a really fun experience. I got to travel with them, be on the bus, and hang out

with the team — and they all knew me and we had a good vibe going. So I was the I was manager for three years. At the end, they gave me awards and it was super, super cool to be involved with that, even though I wasn’t actually an athlete. 10. Speaking of being an athlete, what was it like to go up against a DI college fencer? That was so much fun. I’m really glad that I had that experience, especially because it wasn’t something that I had been preparing for. I was asked to do the video at the last minute. I had never fenced before, I’d never even held a sabre. But Miranda was super chill. She knew that I had zero experience, and she might have let me get a point or two but I remember I did score, so I was very happy with that. And then the whole team that edited it made it look really nice and maybe better than I did in real life. So I was really happy for that. 11. What is the most underrated restaurant on or around campus? Yiro Yiro right across from Acme. They have great gyros and it’s close to the DP office, so it’s very convenient for late nights. 12. What’s your favorite memory from being a part of the DP? Any of our road trips I think were so much fun, whether it was big group trips, like my freshman fall we went to Columbia, or just any road trips to cover games, it made me feel so official. I went to a few on my own, but any ones that I did with photographers or other editors, it made you feel like sitting on press row, you felt so just like, ‘Wow, I’m so accomplished, I’m sitting here with real reporters,’ and then getting to talk to the coaches afterwards. I’d say that’s my top experience. 13. What is your favorite story that you’ve worked on at the DP? I think this was my freshman year, I wrote a story about [an athlete] on the gymnastics team who was injured and then moved into a student coaching role. And I didn’t know it at the time, but she was actually from the town next over to me back in New Jersey. So I reached out to her after the story and I was like, ‘Wow, I had no idea we were so close.’ As someone who’s overcome some physical limitations in my life as well, it was a really positive connection that she and I had, even though we never actually got to meet in person, but I thought that it was a cool connection that I had to the story. 14. Do you have any plans for after graduation? I’m looking to get into political research, so I’ve been applying to a bunch of jobs recently. Nothing is set in stone just yet, but fingers crossed that something will fall into place very soon. 15. How do you want to be remembered within DPOSTM [The DP’s Only Section That Matters]? I think about this one kind of often because I want to, you know, have that legacy. But at the same time, I don’t want to pressure people into thinking of me after I’ve graduated. But I want to be remembered as someone who’s always positive and who tried to spread good energy throughout our meetings. Just someone who was dedicated to the department and was always a friendly face whenever someone needed to see it.

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2 1 3 6 7 8 3 5 8 4 1 8 7 3 4 2 5 6 8 4 7 6 8 5 3 1 9 3 4

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SPORTS | In his second year as an editor, DiGrande co-led the Sports Department through a tumultuous 2020

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THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

SPORTS 15

15 questions with... Michael Landau, a former DP senior Sports editor SPORTS | Landau, an avid golf fan, has supported Jordan Spieth through many ups and downs BRANDON PRIDE Senior Sports Editor

Current sports editor Brandon Pride sat down with one of his predecessors, Michael “Landau” Landau, and asked him 15 questions about his time at The Daily Pennsylvanian, his time at Penn, and life overall. Here’s what the senior had to say. 1. Introduce yourself. My name is Michael Landau, I’m a senior in Wharton. I’m from Scarsdale, N.Y., and I’ve been in DP Sports for three and a half years now. I was a Sports editor for a year, senior Sports editor for another year, and a sports reporter and associate before that. 2. How did you decide to join DP sports? I was looking for something else to do on campus and involve myself with. And I signed up for sports largely because I was interested in sports and wanted to see what sports reporting was like, but I also really liked the community when I came to the first few meetings and I liked the people. So that is really what encouraged me to stay. 3. So you’re known as the big golf fan within the DPOSTM [The DP’s Only Section That Matters]. So how did you become such a golf person, and why do you like it so much? I think when I was younger, I was sort of introduced [to] the game, it just, like, ended up on the TV in my house, my dad watched it a bit. And over the summer, it was sort of something that I ended up starting to play. And it was just, I really enjoyed it. And I want[ed] to play more or watch more. And I just got more and more interested in it over time, just, like, the strategy element

of the game. And I just think it’s a super unique sport. So yeah, that’s why I love it. 4. What was your favorite part about being a sports editor? I mean, being able to lead the community that DPOSTM is is a really unique experience. I think that’s what stood out to me the most throughout the time I was an editor there. It’s just a really unique and great group of people, and being able to lead it is a tremendous privilege. That’s why I really wanted to do it in the first place and why I wanted to do it for such a large part of my time at Penn. 5. What’s your favorite story you’ve written? I think the recap story I wrote for Penn versus Villanova my junior year was probably my favorite one. Not necessarily because of the story itself, but because of the atmosphere around it. Getting to cover a game at Villanova made me sort of feel like a professional sports reporter, and I was able to be in the press conference with Jay Wright, and it just made me feel very close to sort of the heart of college sports and college basketball, which I’m a big fan of. 6. Who’s been your favorite Penn athlete to cover in your time here? AJ Brodeur, I mean, men’s basketball is my favorite sport to cover, and he was definitely the best player throughout my time at Penn and one of the best men’s basketball players ever. So he made the team much more interesting to cover and to watch. 7. What is at the top of your bucket list? I think being able to, one, be able to travel, but also being able to play golf at lots of places around the world. There probably are a lot of golf courses on my bucket list both in and outside the United States. That’s probably its own bucket list. That’s probably one of the biggest things on there. 8. What is the most underrated restaurant on or around campus?

PHOTO FROM MICHAEL LANDAU

Former DP Senior Sports Editor Michael Landau’s favorite story he has written was Penn vs Villanova during his junior year.

TacoTaco, it’s up at 44th Street. So I think that’s why it’s so underrated and people don’t talk about it as much. I hadn’t gone there until this fall, but it’s really good. Probably the best tacos on campus. I think so. That’s pretty underrated. 9. What is your hot take of the day? A very hot take is that Kyle Shanahan is a pretty overrated NFL coach who doesn’t treat his players the way he should and doesn’t talk about his players the way he should. I think, you know, the team has a pretty good roster, and I think any coach [could] do what he’s doing, and, just, I think they’re making a mess of what’s a great team. 10. What is the most overrated movie in your

opinion? Probably “Saving Private Ryan.” Like, a lot of people think that’s, like, one of the best movies of all time. And maybe it’s just because I don’t love war movies, but I remember watching that and just being like, ‘I do not get why people love this movie so much.’ I just did not like it. I found it really boring. 11. What is your biggest regret from your time at Penn? Probably not joining DPOSTM sooner. I missed a semester, my freshman fall, so yeah, having that back and being here longer would have been nice. 12. Who’s your favorite golfer and why? Jordan Spieth. He was really good, well, he started playing really well at [the] age when I was really getting interested in golf, which I think helped. And I just really like his playing style, it’s a lot of fun to watch. And, you know, there’s a little bit of excitement coming every round around [when] you watch him play. 13. Historically speaking, what has been your most accurate hot take? For the March Madness Tournament this year, I said Oregon State over Tennessee in the first round was not only the biggest upset lock of the year, but also maybe the biggest 12 over 5 seed lock in history. And I obviously ended up being right there, so yeah. 14. How do you want to be remembered within DPOSTM? Just as a good leader and someone who was able to connect with as many people in [the] department as I could. And try to do my best to carry on the legacy that the people before me have made for the DPOSTM because we’re a department that has a really long and pretty storied history within the DP. So just being able to carry that on, I guess. 15. Do you have any plans for after graduation? Yeah, I’m working in investment banking in New York. So I’m looking forward to that.

15 questions with... Danny Chiarodit, a former DP Sports editor SPORTS | Chiarodit, who spent all of 2019 as a Sports editor, has served as a Sports associate this semester BRANDON PRIDE Senior Sports Editor

Current Sports Editor Brandon Pride sat down with one of his predecessors, Danny Chiarodit, and asked him 15 questions about his time at The Daily Pennsylvanian, his experience at Penn, and life overall. Here’s what the senior had to say. 1. Introduce yourself. I’m Danny Chiarodit. I’m from Los Angeles, I’m majoring in psychology, and I’m a senior. I was a sports editor for one year, and I’ve also been a reporter and an associate. 2. How did you decide to join the DP’s Only Section That Matters? It’s a funny story, because when we were freshmen in the Quad, my roommate at the time, Sam Mitchell — this is early on first semester — was leaving for a meeting. And at the time, I didn’t really have much going on — I didn’t join that many clubs. And he was like, ‘Hey, I’m going to this sports writing meeting for the DP.’ And I was like, ‘I don’t even know what the DP is.’ And he’s like, ‘It’s the school newspaper.’ So I just decided to join him and just check it out because I played sports in high school. I knew I wasn’t going to be playing sports here, but I thought it could be a fun way to get involved with Penn sports, so I just went to the meeting. The first meeting was good, but I actually wasn’t even sure that I was going to come back. And then the next week, I was like 50-50 on even going. I actually remember this really vividly. I remember 10 minutes until I had to leave the meeting, I was like, ‘Oh, I’m not gonna go, I’m just gonna find something else to do with my time.’ And then for some reason, I don’t even know what made me change my mind in those 10 minutes, but I decided to go. And that second meeting was kind of like, ‘Yeah, I really feel like there’s a real community here.’ 3. What’s your favorite memory from DPOSTM? I actually have to still say that football game my fresh-

man year, when we went to Columbia. It’s hard to have hard for everyone. So she and I got really close because one favorite memory, but that really does stand out. Be- I was at home more than I had ever been these last four cause I was a freshman, it was the first time that I had years. She and I were already so close, but we kind of done any sort of social event with any of the others as established an even deeper bond and love. opposed to DPOSTMites. And that was really fun game. 13. You did a half of a semester in Australia. What 4. What’s your favorite story you’ve written here? was the best part of that? So, it was before the Eagles-Pats Super Bowl, and it It wasn’t even half a semester, which is the hilarious was the story where I just talked to a few different Pats thing. I was there for like a total of six weeks. But I think fans on campus. I talked to a couple professors, one of the best thing about that was just how casual everything which was Jamie-Lee Josselyn, and I actually ended was. I really felt that it was different from Penn in that up being a teaching assistant for her class after I took I was actually able to enjoy Melbourne and Australia it, so we actually stayed in touch. Partly because of that without having to think too much about other obligastory, that’s how I met her, and she’s a huge Pats fan. tions like school. And it was just great because I wrote that story about all 14. How do you want to be remembered within these diehard Pats fans, and then they obviously lost. We DPOSTM? should have done a follow-up, but that’s OK. PIG champion. No, no. I want to be remembered as 5. What is your favorite memory as a high school base- someone who people wanted to be around. And someball player? one who made people feel positive [and] feel good while My sophomore year we won the CIF championship, they were in the office. And I hope that I contributed which is pretty much like our sectional championship. That was really cool because that was an actual Cinderella run. There were 32 teams, and I think we were ranked like No. 18 or something. We just ran the table and won the whole thing. That was really fun because we got to play for the championship game in a college stadium, and that doesn’t sound like it’s that big of a deal, but we were a really small school, and it was the first time that our school had ever won a baseball chamThe New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation pionship. So that was a great memory. 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 6. 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to creating a fun environment in the office, and a space where people could come and relax and hang out and not have to think about school or anything else going on in their lives. 15. What are your plans for after graduation? I’m going on a road trip with my mom all the way back to L.A. Then later, Landau, Will, and we are going on a Vegas/Yosemite/Bay Area/Pacific Northwest trip. And then after that, what I’m doing right now and what I’ll be doing partly through the end of the summer is working for the National Stuttering Association on their marketing team. My role in that is just spreading the word about speech impediments and giving people an understanding of what stuttering is, because it’s kind of a misunderstood thing. A lot of people who stutter don’t know that they can find help or find a community with other people who stutter, so that’s what I’m going to be doing in the summer. In the long term, I’m going to be applying to graduate school in psychology.

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Former DP Sports Editor Danny Chiarodit pictured by the basketball hoop in the DPOSTM office after winning his second PIG Tournament championship.

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THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 VOL. CXXXVII NO. 15

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THE BEST OF GRADUATING ATHLETES SPORTS | The Quakers will say goodbye to some key players from every team MATTHEW FRANK Sports Associate

While it didn’t end as abruptly as last year’s season, this year’s athletics season was marred by cancellations and a lack of play. For many of Penn’s graduating seniors, this meant that they had no traditional senior night. In honor of these soon-to-be graduates, here’s a look at some of the seniors that impacted their respective programs the most.

SPRING Lacrosse Hailing from a lacrosse family, Zoe Belodeau became a superstar player for Penn women’s lacrosse. In her freshman season, Belodeau set the Penn rookie records for points in a season (80), goals in a season (45), and assists in a season (35), earning her a first team All-Ivy nod. She followed that up with another first team AllIvy selection her sophomore year, and it seemed as if she’d follow suit once again before her junior year got canceled. Prior to the cancellation of his senior season, Adam Goldner was looking to graduate in 2020. Instead, he stayed another year, and he will graduate in 2021 as one of Penn men’s lacrosse’s most legendary players. In his junior year, Goldner broke the Penn record for single-season goals (56) and came third all-time in single-season points (63). For his performance, he was awarded second team All-Ivy and was selected to the Ivy League Tournament All-Tournament Team. Golf Mitchell Cornell improved his stroke average each year he was at Penn and made a name for himself as an elite talent in the process. In his freshman year, Cornell started off hot, finishing tied for 10th at the Ivy League Championship, which helped him earn a second team All-Ivy nod. His sophomore year only produced more upward momentum, as he was deemed first team All-Ivy and ended up finishing tied for third at the Ivy League Championship. Like Cornell, Rina Jung started off strong and only continued to get better each successive season. During her first season, Jung shot a team-low 77.2 stroke average, which she then followed up in her sophomore season by shooting an even lower average and earning fifth at the Ivy League Championship. For her success, she was named a first team AllIvy selection her sophomore year. Tennis After coming out of high school ranked No. 1 in the USA by United States Tennis Association in two different divisions, Noah Makarome only continued to excel for Penn. In his freshman year, he led all freshmen on the team with 16 wins in the spring, which helped the team earn 15 victories, their most since 2006. He followed that up with a sophomore season in which he was one of six Quakers to post doubledigit wins in singles in the spring, which aided Penn in garnering a No. 23 ranking by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association. Hailing from Croatia, Marija Curnic proved that she could hang with the best of them during her time with Penn. She earned winning records in both singles and doubles play her freshman year, ending the year on a six-match singles winning streak after beating six different Ivy League opponents. In her sophomore season, she finished the year 23-9 in doubles, which helped her be named a first

CHASE SUTTON, VARUN SUDUNAGUNTA, ARI STONBERG, IZZY CRAWFORD-ENG, SAMANTHA TURNER, AMY GUO (GOLF PHOTO FROM RINA JUNG)

In honor of these soon-to-be graduates, we take a look at the achievements of some of the seniors from spring sports that impacted their respective programs the most.

team All-Ivy doubles player. Curnic continued to thrive into her junior year, as she finished 20-6 playing No.1 doubles with Iuliia Bryzgalova. Rowing During her time with Penn women’s rowing, Maggie Osumi was a vital part of the team’s success. In her sophomore season, she was the five seat for Penn’s Varsity Eight in the Murphy Cup, and helped lead the team to multiple victories. That same year, she was named as a Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association All-America Honorable Mention. Ed Barry helped Penn men’s lightweight rowing to a number of victories during his time with the program, earning some individual accolades in the process. His sophomore year seemed to be his best, as he was named first team All-Ivy and was a part of a team that was named Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges Lightweight Crew of the Year. He followed that up in his junior year by being deemed Academic All-Ivy as well as helping the team to first place in Lightweight Eights at Princeton Chase. After being a part of numerous successful Varsity Eight squads for Penn men’s heavyweight rowing, David Theiss was named team commodore his junior year. Before that, in his sophomore season, he helped lead the team to a victory against Columbia and was previously named Intercollegiate Rowing Association All-Academic. Squash Julia Buchholz started out her Penn career undefeated and continued her success both academically and athletically. In her freshman year, she won her first seven matches, which included wins over No. 5 seed Stanford and No. 6 seed Yale. Similarly, she began her sophomore season with a five-match winning streak. Between those wins and her later wins, Buchholz helped the Quakers to an appearance in the Howe Cup. Her junior year was also a fruitful one, as she competed in all 16 varsity matches, going 13-6 overall across individual and team play. During that same season, she earned Academic All-Ivy and was named a College Squash Association Scholar-Athlete, Philadelphia Inquirer Academic All-Area, and the Jacobs Award Winner. During his time with Penn men’s squash, Andrew Douglas established himself as arguably one of the best players in the Ivy League.

ILANA WURMAN, SON NGUYEN, TAMARA WURMAN, DOMINIC LIM, SAMANTHA TURNER (WRESTLING PHOTO FROM JON ERRICO)

While it didn’t end as abruptly as last year’s season did, this year’s winter sports season was marred by cancellations and a lack of competition. SEND STORY IDEAS TO DPSPORTS@THEDP.COM

In his first year, he played the entire season at the team’s No. 1 slot, going 14-4 during team events. In the process, he became just the second freshman in Penn men’s squash history to be named first team All-American and first team All-Ivy. In his sophomore year, the program soared to heights that the team had never reached before. Douglas was a major part in an effort that brought Penn to its first ever No. 1 in the CSA rankings as well as a third-place finish at the Potter Cup — what was then its best finish in program history. He finished off the season ranked No. 3 in the CSA individual rankings and was awarded first team All-American as well as first team All-Ivy and Academic All-Ivy. After a summer in which he helped the United States win the XVIII Pan American Games threeman team title in Lima, Peru, Douglas was named team co-captain for his junior year. The following season was even more successful, as Douglas earned honors on the first team All-America and first team All-Ivy squads. He was also named Philadelphia Inquirer Academic Men’s At-Large Co-Performer of the Year. Track and Field/Cross Country Marvin Morgan has seen his name go down in the Penn record books in several different categories. In his sophomore season, Morgan helped Penn capture its first 60-meter title at the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships since 2000, finishing with a time of 6.78. He won a number of other races, and in doing so, was named first team All-Ivy twice, with one nod coming for his indoor 60m performance and one coming for his outdoor 100m performance. Morgan also holds the program record for the indoor 60m with a time of 6.75, as well as third alltime finish in the indoor 200m (21.46) and fifth alltime finish in the outdoor 100m (10.42). Throughout her time with the Red and Blue, Uchechi Nwogwugwu made a name for herself by winning races and setting records left and right. In 2019, she was a part of teams that won the Penn Relays Championship of America as well as the Ivy League Outdoor Heps Team Championship. During the same year, she also earned three separate first team All-Ivy nods. In total, Nwogwugwu garnered nine total All-Ivy nods during her time as a Quaker. In both the indoor (53.21) and outdoor (52.27) 400m, the Lansdale, Pa. native holds the record for Penn. Additionally, she holds the second all-time mark in three other events, as well as third, fifth, and ninth all-time marks in others. Softball Outfielder Kayla Ketring began her time as a Quaker in a leading role and only progressed to assume more of that type of a role as her career moved forward. In her 14 appearances as a freshman, Ketring led the team with a .417 batting average as well as a perfect 1.000 field percentage. As a sophomore, she was named first team All-Ivy after ranking second in the Ivy League in overall batting average (.413) and leading her team in the category. Her batting average that year also ranks as the fifth-highest in a single season in program history. After being named team co-captain her junior year, Ketring was tied for second among Ivy League players in runs scored (10), keeping up a high-level batting average (.351) in the process. Baseball Similar to his softball counterpart, second baseman and outfielder Eduardo Malinowski started his Penn career off with a bang and only built upon his momentum from there. In his freshman season, Malinowski was named a 2018 Collegiate Baseball Freshman All-American, as well as Ivy League and Big 5 Rookie of the Year. This surprised few, given that he batted a team-best .347 at the plate. Despite missing about a quarter of the season due to injury, the Spring, Texas native was awarded an All-Ivy Honorable Mention his sophomore year, due

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in part to his again stellar batting average (.354). His season was marked by an individual performance against Lafayette, in which he went 5-for-6 with four runs scored. Although his junior year was cut short, Malinowski managed to lead the Ivy League and rank sixth in the nation with a .471 batting average over the course of eight games.

WINTER Basketball Eddie Scott, a 6-foot-6 guard for Penn men’s basketball, left a significant mark on the program during his time with the team. During his freshman year, Scott played in just nine games due to injury, but had a breakout performance in a quadruple-overtime game at Monmouth in which he went for 21 points and 13 rebounds. In his junior year, Scott made 11 starts and averaged 4.8 points and 3.2 rebounds per game while also earning 22 total assists and nine steals on the season. Although the 2020-21 season was canceled, the Bowie, Md. native was named a team captain. A superstar for Penn women’s basketball in every sense of the word, center Eleah Parker was a dominant force during her time with the Quakers. She hit the ground running, as she helped the team earn a Big 5 championship in her freshman year, earning an Ivy League Rookie of the Year award by a unanimous vote in the process as well as Big 5 Rookie of the Year and second team All-Ivy. Parker’s sophomore season was somehow even more impressive than her first. She was named Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year for her play on that side of the ball as well as Big 5 Player of the Year and first team All-Ivy. In doing so, she led the Red and Blue to an Ivy League regular season title. In her junior season, Parker again won Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year and was yet again awarded first team All-Ivy. After not being able to play her senior year with Penn, Parker will finish her college basketball career with the University of Virginia this upcoming season. Volleyball Throughout all of her time with Penn volleyball, outfielder Parker Jones was a cornerstone of the program. Her freshman year was arguably her best, as she led the Ivy League in total kills (319), started every match and played in every set, and was awarded second team All-Ivy. She continued this momentum into her sophomore year, finishing with over 200 kills for a second straight season. Additionally, she was named an honorable mention for the All-Ivy teams. Jones served as co-captain and team captain in her junior and senior years respectively. In her junior season, Jones led the Red and Blue in both kills (224) and points (245.5), and unfortunately, her senior season was canceled like many others. Swimming and Diving During her time with Penn women’s swimming and diving, Anderson Myers was a steady competitor in the Ivy League and set program records in the process. In her first two years, Myers was an honorable mention for CSCAA Scholar All-America and qualified for 11 Ivy League Championships qualifiers at the same time. Her junior year was marked by a win in the 100meter fly at the Miami Invitational as well as an Ivy Championships in which she set the 200 fly program record with a 1:58.19 swim. Just like his female counterpart, Sean Lee of Penn men’s swimming and diving set the school record in the 200 fly with a time of 1:45.20. Aside from his record-breaking 200 fly time, Lee

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GRADUATION GOODBYES 17

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Shahbano Abbas

Congratulations, Bano! We are so proud of you – always knew you would shine. Onwards and Upwards! Love from, Khala, Noorie, Abaji, TT & Abba!

Letter from the Senior Class President

Ricardo Adrogué

Eight years ago, I was seated at a Penn graduation ceremony, celebrating my brother’s commencement. The lights were dimmed in Irvine Auditorium, the graduates and professors processed onto the stage, and hundreds of family, friends and underclassmen were seated in the audience. This year will surely look different. We will not be in Irvine, but in our bedrooms, we will not be wearing graduation gowns, but instead probably wearing PJ bottoms, and the audience will be tuning in from all over the world. This past year, we experienced loss on a personal, communal, and global scale. We grieved over the continued injustices in our country, the loss of loved ones to COVID-19, and the separation from our families. We experienced the daily struggles of operating Zoom meetings, the discomfort of converting our bedrooms into office spaces, and having calls interrupted by our family or pets. As seniors, we have mourned the loss of many lasts, our Hey Day on College Green, and commencement surrounded by family. At some point, finding the silver linings became exhausting, even Professor Angela Duckworth would agree that we’ve exercised enough grit to last us a lifetime. Our class chose to respond to the devastation by being more empathetic, innovative, giving, forgiving, and resilient. This response is what makes this class, the class of 2021, so special. We aren’t historic by being the first class in a centennial to live through a pandemic, and we aren’t legendary for being the first to create a tradition uniquely for sophomores with U-Night, nor are we the best for being the first to live in the renovated Hill College House. We are unique for how we’ve shown up. I’m talking about senior leaders like my roommate who created a grassroots political organization and contributed to the largest voter turnout in U.S history. The seniors in the performing arts who led virtual rehearsals and ensured the continuity of their groups. Athletes who continued to train tirelessly and broke school records when they finally had permission to race. And faith leaders who organized events for Ramahdan, Rosh Hashanah, and Easter, and fostered community despite restrictions. This is resilience. Grit. It’s about pushing the boundaries and continuously getting up, trying again and training harder despite the world telling you not to. That’s what this year has been all about.

Congratulations, Ricardo! We are so proud of you y te queremos un montonazo. Love, Papá, Mamá y Nico

Zak Ahmad

Beyond resilience, this class is also selfless. Leadership is often a thankless job, but during COVID that became an even more prominent reality. No one saw the hundreds of event proposals or ideas that were rejected before the final product. No one saw the behind the scenes of testing Zoom to ensure that rehearsals run properly. No one knows how many times we had to emotionally stay strong for our communities despite being so tired inside. Leadership is often thankless work, but this year, seniors didn’t even get the classic validation they usually do: standing on stage for the final curtain call, engaging with students at events, or standing at a podium to receive a medal. Every senior is a leader in some capacity, formally or informally, within Penn or beyond, and each of us not only adapted to the challenges, but surpassed them. In a year when the expectation was for us to merely survive, we did so much more than that. I’m forever grateful to have led such a gritty and selfless class. I’ve learned so much from each of you over the last four years. Of course at our high points, but so much more during the low ones. Our true character has shown this year in how we responded and rose to the occasion despite how difficult it was on certain days, weeks, and even months. I’d be remiss if I did not recognize the very people who gave and instilled these traits in us: our families, professors, and mentors are what got us here today, and I want to take a moment to thank you all, being in those roles are the most thankless, and just as much as today is a celebration of us, it is of you too. Thank you for teaching us how to lead, and for continuously guiding us when we lost direction. Congratulations ‘21! I am looking forward to hugging you or greeting you with an elbow bump the next time we meet. I love you all. Lizzie Youshaei President, Class Board 2021

Letter from the President

Congratulations on your graduation, Zak! We’re all so proud of you. Enjoy a well deserved summer of fun! Much love, Ma, Pa & Zarah. xx

Becca Avigad

To the Caring and Gifted Class of 2021: When I visited your College Houses on move-in day of your first year on campus, I knew I was meeting some of the most talented and capable-and I also hoped compassionate and caring-students in the world. I was thrilled to welcome you to campus and eager to see what you would achieve during your years at Penn. What nobody could have foreseen was how profoundly you would be challenged in your time here. Challenged you were to the nth degree, and in so many ways you developed and demonstrated your own resilience, your empathy, and your life-sustaining capacity to both care for and lean on others. Out of the unforeseen difficulties that life presented you, your life-long friends, and classmates, you found the most wide-ranging opportunities for profound intellectual and emotional growth and-while doing so-you also contributed to a most caring community. You have come through all this amazingly. In every way, you have exceeded our very highest expectations and made new benchmarks of your own. Penn has been your second home, both in-person and remotely, and in making it so, you have enhanced and strengthened our University community. Now, in this springtime of hope, guarded optimism, and new awakenings, you must confront the special challenge of saying goodbye as you prepare to move on to the next exciting stage of your lives. Despite the hardships and losses that we have endured as a community, country, and world, we still have so much for which to be grateful. As you pack and get ready to depart, I hope you will set aside time to express your thanks and affection to your friends and faculty and staff mentors. They have helped you see the world more broadly, deeply, and in entirely new ways. They have helped you better know yourself. Let them know just how much they have meant to you. The connections you’ve made at Penn and the lessons you’ve learned during your time here will only grow in importance in the years ahead.

CONGRATULATIONS, BECCA! “Intelligence plus character—that is the goal of true education.” — Martin Luther King Jr. You’ve got both in spades! With love, Mom, Dad, Jordana & Ariella

Ariel Azria

It has been my privilege and pleasure to get to know you, this amazing Class that has so wonderfully exemplified the spirit of questing, of caring, and of giving that for generations has defined the Penn way. I am proud that you will soon count yourselves among our distinguished alumni. Nothing gives me greater hope for the future than knowing a new generation of Penn graduates is on its way to tackle our world’s toughest challenges. Remember us always, visit us often, and do good work!

Congratulations, Ariel! We are so proud of you & wish you every success in life! Love you Sunshine Girl!


18 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Sophie Bass

Ethan Boyer

No doubt, YOU ROCKED IT ETHAN!! We are so proud of you. Congratulations.

SOPHIE, CONGRATULATIONS! WE LOVE YOU! XOXOXO

With Love, Mom, Dad, Zayde, Bubbe, Nana, Pop-Pop & Birdie

MacKenn Bross

Congratulations, Mac! We are so proud of you & love you so much! Mom & Dad

Congratulations, Olivia! You did it! We are so very proud of you! We love you, Mom & Dad

With love and pride, Mom & Dad

Danny Chiarodit

It’s been a joy to watch you grow and achieve so much. We feel so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Andy

Congratulations!! We are extremely proud of you. We love you so much! Mom & Dad

First, a soothing word: ETERNAL pride for grasping the ephemeral happy ending while waiting for the light to change! Is it OK if we cry? Mom, Dad & Geoff

We’re so proud of you!!! Wish you all the best in the journey of life. Love, Mammy & Daddy

Maxwell Cohen

Julie Coleman

Dearest Maxie,

Congratulations, Julie!

Celebrating you and your weird and wonderful journey! We are so proud of you!

Well done! Daddy would be so proud. Much love and success always.

Love, Mom, Dad, Eliza & the Lion Family

Love Mom & Laura

Alexander Cook

Mitchell James Cornell

Congratulations, Mitchell!

So very proud of you! Now...“Go forth and set the world on fire” – St. Ignatius of Loyola

From nursery school through your graduation from UPenn, you’ve made us as proud as we can be.

Love, Mom, Dad & Rainbow

We love you! Love, Mom, Dad & Matthew

Julia Cozine

Congratulations Julia Cozine & the Class of 2021.

Love, Mom, Dad & Mac

Go out there and make the world a better place!!

We are beyond proud of you! Cheers to what comes next!

Love You! Mom, Dad, Jake & Sofie

Love you, Mom, Dad, Mia & Willie

Congratulations Alex & Penn Class of 2021! The best days are ahead! Love, Mom, Dad, Sunny & Pippy

Mom, Dad, Jordyn & Eric

Juliana Tsz Yan Choi

Congratulations on this achievement. Brighter milestoness ahead! Love, Daddy

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” – Ralph Emerson Lots of love, Mama, Baba & Rohan

Congratulations, Archit!

You’ve given us every reason to be proud. Wishing you only the best on everything you hope for.

You did it! We are very proud of you! Best wishes and love. We love you!

Love you always, Daddy, Mommy & Joaquin

Love, Didi, Mom & Dad.

William Di Grande

Will,

You did it! We are extremely proud of you. Wishing you success and happiness. God always bless you!

You’ve always been a sports enthusiast. Through your words, Penn readers could feel your passion. We’re so proud! HEINZ Love, Mom, Dad, Caroline & Lizzy

Mamá

Jennifer Cullen

We are so proud of you, Jennifer. Now go take on the world! Love, Mom, Dad, Katie & Colin

Sabrina de Brito

Go take on the world!! We will always be right here behind you. We’re so proud of you! All our love, Mom, Kira, Wyatt, Shane(y) & Scout(er)

Archit Dhar

Congratulations, Justine!

Congratulations, Sebitas!

Oh, the places you’ll go! We are so proud of you, Nico. Make this world a better place!

Saachi Datta

Justine de Jesus

Alexis Sebastian Contreras

Love, Mom, Grandparents, Uncles, Aunts, Cousins & all your family

Hell yeah Ava!

Drew Dannenbaum

From your first day of school to your last day of school, we are always proud of you! Love you!

Nicolas Corona

Ava Cruz

We are so proud of your accomplishments these four years and can’t wait to see what history you will make.

Alexander Chen

GRADUATION GOODBYES 19

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Congratulations, Alex!

Anna Farrell Callahan

Juliana Tsz Yan Choi

Congratulations, Juliana!!!

Danny,

TAMSYN,

Anne Chen

Congratulations, Anne!

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Tamsyn Brann

Olivia Bruyn

Emma Jane Carlson

You have exceeded our biggest dreams for you!

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Eliana Doft

Gillian Diebold

We are so proud that you are really a Penn graduate now and not just wearing the sweatshirt! Congratulations! Love, Mom & Dad

Deena Elul

Dear Eliana,

Congratulations on your graduation, Deena!

You continue to amaze us! We are so proud of you and all of your accomplishments.

We are very proud of you! Wishing you happiness and fulfillment in everything you do.

Love, Mom & Dad

With all our love, Mum, Dad, Noam & Daniel


20 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Jake Flancer

Congratulations, Jake! You were always destined for Wharton, huge accomplishment! Wherever your next destiny lies, we’re sure it’ll be great. We love you, Mom, Dad & Matt

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Esther Fleischer

Congratulations, Liss!

All our love, Mom & Jay

We love you so much and more, Mom & Dad

We couldn’t be prouder! Keep being you and there’s no doubt all your dreams will come true!

Owen Ford

I love you to the moon and back! Mom

Congratulations, Owen!

Congratulations, Benjamin Geist!

We are so proud of you. You are the best son in the whole wide world!!!

Looks like you were an engineer from the start. Excited for what the future holds for you.

We are so proud of you today and every day. Here’s to your exciting future ahead!

With love always, Mummy & Dad

Love, Mom

Love always, Mom & Dad.

Stacy Claire Gerchick

Katie Heist

Congratulations, Katie! We are so proud of all you have done so far. Good luck and much happiness ahead! We love you so much! Mom & Dad

Kassidy Houston

Benjamin Geist

Congratulations, Ryan!

Nicholas Genovese

“This is the day Your life will surely change This is the day When things fall into place” – The The

Words cannot express the pride and joy we feel for you, Kass! We can’t wait to see what’s next! Congratulations! Love, Mom, Dad, Kami, Kalani, Kyra & Kai

Emily Izmirian

Emily Gliklich

So proud of our Superwoman! Love you, Mom & Dad

Congratulations, Emily!

Congratulations!

We are very proud of you! Looking forward to your next adventure!

We are so proud of you! We wish you health, happiness and success in all of your endeavors!

We are so proud of you. Wishing you a lifetime of happiness and continued success. We love you!

The world awaits and we are eager to see you leave your mark! Go Quakers!

We are so very proud of you and can’t wait to see what your amazingly bright future holds!

Love you always, Mom, Dad & Zandra

We love you! Mommy, Daddy & Brooke

With love, Mommy, Daddy, Jenny, Ben, Brady & Billy

Love, Mom & Dad

Love, Mom, Dad, Sam & Biscuit

Congratulations, Sammy! We are extraordinarily proud of you. Keep chasing your dreams – you will reach them, without question! All our love, Mom, Dad, Gus & Charlie

Lily Haber

Way to go goose! You did it! We’re so proud of you. Do you remember any of it??? Love you always, Mom & Dad

Congratulations, Alice! We are so very proud of you! Love from, Mom, Dad, Tommy & Lily

Carmina Hachenburg

Mina, you did it! We are so proud of you and wish you a bright future! Te queremos mucho, Mama, Daddy & Tavo

Evan Jiang

WAY TO GO JUSTIN!

Congratulations!

We are SO proud of all that you have accomplished. Your future is incredibly bright...JG 2052!

We are proud of you! You are talented, kind, believe in yourself, aim high to face the life test.

All our love, Mom & Dad

Love, Mom, Dad & Ruiji

Cole Hancock

All our love, Phoebe, Talia, Mom & Dad

Luke Hrushanyk

Congratulations, Luke! We are beyond proud! Wishing you continued success!

Alexandra Jackman

Dear Emily,

Justin Greenman

You’ve always been preparing for a bright future. We couldn’t be more proud. Congratulations, Little Boy!

With all our love, Mom, Dad & Elena

Congratulations!

Alice Goulding

Avery Hoffman

Paige Howard

Congratulations, Nick!

Samuel Gordon

GRADUATION GOODBYES 21

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Luisa Healey

Alissa Fogelson

We send our love, pride and joy and wish you fair seas as you embark on new adventures and accomplishments.

Ryan Foo

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Annie Jardine

Way to go Annie! You make us proud every day. Love, Mom, Dad, Thomas, Hayden & Sophie

Sydney Judge

Dear Sydney, From your very first day of school to now, you’ve made us proud every step of the way! Congratulations on your Graduation! Love, Mom, Dad & Jack

Julia Klayman

Lindsay Krott

Sarah Khan

Congratulations, Sarah! You did it! So proud of you! Wishing you all the best! Love, Mom & Dad

Isabella Kynci

Congratulations, Cole!

Congratulations, Julia!

Congratulations, Lindsay!

Dear Isabella,

We are excited to see what you will accomplish in the other “City by the Bay”!

So proud of you! LOVE your style!! Keep being sparkly you! We can’t wait to see what’s next!

We are so proud of all you have accomplished over the past 4 years!

Congratulations on your incredible achievement. We are beyond proud of you!!

Love, Mom, Dad & Ginny

xoxo, Mom, Dad, Noah & Nana

Love, Mom & Dad

With love, Dad, Mom & Adriana


22 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Michael Landau

Congratulations, Michael! Keep following your dreams. We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Andrew

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Hannah Lazar

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Angela Lin

Jacob Nibauer

Adrian Ogunfowora

Congratulations, Angie!

Congratulations, Jake!

Toni,

Congratulations!!!

We are so proud of your accomplishments and excited for all the adventures that lie ahead!

You did it! We are so very proud of you! Wishing you great success! We love you!

We are so proud of you and all of your accomplishments. We love you.

We are so proud of you! We wish you all the best in the next phase of your life.

We are so proud of you!! We love you with all our hearts!!

Love, Mom, Day, Amanda, Teddy, Twiggy & Grandpa Karl

Love, Mom & Dad

Love, THE FAMILY

Love, Mom & Dad

All our love, Mom, Dad, Ryan, Frankie & Beanz

Rachel Madhogarhia

Jack McCaghren

Samuel Orloff

Dear Jackie,

Congratulations, Rachel!

Jack,

Congratulations, Sam!

Congratulations, you made it! Take your time celebrating and enjoying the moment.

We are incredibly proud of our graduate: embrace the future, dream big, work hard, follow your heart.

From Memphis to Penn and beyond – Congratulations! We are so proud of you!

You did it! We are so proud of you and all of your accomplishments.

Love, Mom & Dad

Love you forever, Mom, Dad, Rhea & Rohan

Love, Mom, Dad, Mary Jane & Joey

Love Dad, Mom, Dani & Noah

Evan McClelland

Caitlin McNamara

Jake Mengarelli

Paige Orner

Congratulations, Paige. From then until now, you have always made us proud. Wishing you much success and happiness ahead. All our love, Mom & Dad

Kelsey Padilla

Corey Parker

Caitlin,

CONGRATULATIONS, JAKE!!

Congratulations, Kelsey!

Corey,

Cheers to you, and your amazing fortitude. Not even a global pandemic could stop you!

We are so proud of all you accomplished at Penn. Congratulations on PBK! Your future is bright!

We are soo proud of you! We can’t wait to see what you do next. We love you!

We are so very proud of all you’ve achieved! You are an amazing young woman!

Congratulations! You make me proud and I wish you success as you start the next chapter of your life.

Love, Mom, Dad, Charlie, Edison & Muffin

We love you! Mom, Dad, Ellie, Lindsay & Ryan

Love, Mom, Dad, Alex & Annie

Love and blessings, Daddy, Mom & Michael

Love Always, Mom (your fellow UPenn/Wharton alumni)

We are so proud of you. Love, Mom & Dad

Jess Mixon

Jake Milner

Miriam Minsk

Remember: “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

Congratulations, Miriam!

All our love, Mom, Dad & Callie

Love, Mom, Dad, Shira & Oren

Grace Anne Mock

We are so proud of you.

Tyler Moorehead

Isabella Perez

We are so proud of you darling! Soar and be happy with your incredible future. We love you so! Love, Momma, Dad, Tory, Julia & Gma

Ellie Rampulla

We are so proud of how far you have come! Your exceptional fashion sense started early! We love our Jecca!

It’s been a wonderful journey Grace and we are so proud of you! Congratulations graduate and onto your next adventure!

We are so proud of you, Tyler!

Congratulations, Ellie!

Love, Mom, Dad, Will & Maddie

Love and happiness for you, Mom & Dad

You have absolutely nailed college and we can’t wait to see what’s next!

We are so proud of you for what you have accomplished over the past four years.

We love you so much! Mom & Dad

We love you so much, LLKK! Mom & Dad

Margarita Ortiz

Congratulations, Margarita! We are so proud of all of your accomplishments and “Advancing” to graduate school! Love, Mom, Dad, David & Nicholas

Corey Parker

Congratulations!

Congratulations, Evan!

Congratulations, Mark!

Jessica Olarsch

Congratulations on your graduation!!

Jacqueline Lou

Mark Michna

GRADUATION GOODBYES 23

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Alexa Pisciotti

Congratulations to our beautiful, brilliant baby! We are so proud of you, Alexa! Love, Mom, Dad & Katie

Ishaan Rao

Congratulations, Ishaan! We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Ameya

You are the captain of your ship, charting a course that will surely bring you success in the future. I am very proud of you! Much Love, Nana

Daniel Planta

We are proud beyond words, love you more than words could describe, and are so excited for your future! Love from, Mom, Dad, Casey, Colin, Piper & Pepper

Niels Rasmussen

Congratulations, Niels! Wishing you all the happiness and success going forward. We are so very proud of you! Love from, Hannah, Mom & Dad


24 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Lauren Reiss

Congratulations, Lauren! We’re so proud of you!! Always keep smiling!!! We love you!!!! Love, Mom, Dad, Juliette, Mariel, Robbie, Evan & Max

Cameron Rhind

Dear Cameron, Congratulations on this outstanding achievement. Wharton 2021. We are so proud of all that you have accomplished. Love, Mom, Dad & Tyler

Kristen Rusas

We are so proud of you and what you have accomplished! You are amazing!

We love you so much! Keep on smiling and bringing your sunshine to the world!

We love you. Love, Dad, Mom, Marky & Lauren :)

Love, Mommy, Daddy & Mathias

Jack Schaible

Dear Allie,

Proud of you, love you lots, Mom & Dad

All our love, M,D,S,T,W & E

We hope you continue to find joy and amazement in all that life has to offer you.

Sarah Simon

We love you so much, Mom, Dad & Shannon

Lauren Snyder

Lauren, We are very proud of your accomplishments at Penn Nursing. Your hard work is inspiring. Congratulations on your graduation! Love, Mom, Dad, Cameron, CA Thompsons & AZ Snyders

Be fearless! Love, Mom & Dad

Congratulations on your incredible accomplishments at Penn and your successful graduation. We are all very proud of you! Love, Dad

Love, Mom & Dad

Helen Shaves

Congratulations, Helen! We have proudly watched you grow into a fine young lady with exceptional personal qualities and future possibilities. Love always, Mommy & Daddy

Congratulations, Cate! You have always made us proud! Lots of love, Mom & Dad

We are crazy proud! XOXO With love, Dad, Mom, Lily & Billy

We’re so proud of you and so excited for what comes next! You’ll continue to do wonderful things! Love, Mom, Scott, Fana, Pandora, Jake, Stef, Grandma, Steve, Jack & Kira!

Harry,

Love & magic from every Sterling, Tandy & Howard

Elsie loves you most.

What an incredible accomplishment! We are so proud of you!

Ever since you were a baby, you have always made us proud.

Love, Mom & Dad

Love, Mom, Dad, Richa & the whole family

Stefan Valeriev Tzvetanov

We are so proud of you. Be bold, go ahead and all your dreams will come true! Mum, Dad, Lenko, Mulu & Valerko

Emilie Veilleux

Love! Mom, Dad & Leah

Congratulations! You’ve worked so hard and achieved so much. We are very proud of you! Love, Mom & Dad

Dear Ally, Congratulations on your graduation! Enjoy your accomplishments and always remember how much I love you! Love, Mom

Evan Viroslav

Congratulations, Evan!

We are so proud of all that you have accomplished, from the first day of first grade!

We’re very proud of you and are so excited for you to start your next adventure!

We love you, Dad, Mom, Nathan & Catie

Love, Mom, Dad, Hannah & Liv

Joelle Walker

Congratulations, Joelle! We are so proud of your diligence, intellect, and just being an overall sweet person! The future awaits! Love you! Momica, Lee, Marilyn, Babs, Michael, Sam, Fiona & Maddie

Nicole Windreich

Dear Nik,

Alexandra Turco

Hurrah, Emilie!

Reese Vogel

From your first day of school to the last, what an amazing journey (and you haven’t changed a bit).

You are our treasure. We are proud of you today and every day!

Anshul Tripathi

Congratulations, Anshul!

Congratulations, Stefi!

Harrison Tandy

It’s been a bizarre, wonderful, educational, traditionimpacted, COVID-impacted, magical series of seasons at Penn. Ut postero valebat!

Congratulations, Paul!

Declan Stecher

Declan!

Harrison Tandy

Paul Taylor

Cate Simons

Nina Stavropoulos

Congratulations on your graduation, Nina!

What an incredible achievement! May your passion and drive always guide you. Continue to follow your dreams. We love you, Mom & Dad

We are extremely proud of you and your achievements. We wish your great future and happiness. Happy Graduation.

Isabella Simonetti

Dear Isabella,

Congratulations, Kamryn!

GRADUATION GOODBYES 25

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

Kamryn Stecyk

Risa Sato

Allie Shapiro

CONGRATULATIONS on your many achievements at Penn. May your future be filled with health, friendship and success.

You did it! We are so proud of you! Chase your dreams!

Cheers to your graduation, our lovely sons!

Congratulations, Risa!

Dear Eliana,

THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Seth & Caleb Rogers

Eliana Salmon

Congratulations, Kristen!

Congratulations, Sarah!

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Isabella Yu

Jacob Wee

Congratulations, Jacob! SUMMA CUM LAUDE! WOO-HOO! Take a bow for a job well done. We are so proud of you! Love, Daddy,Mommy, Kait & John Jr.

Benjamin S. Zhao

Isa,

Congratulations, Ben!

Congratulations on reaching this milestone. We are very proud and excited to support you on your next adventure.

We’re so proud you’ve graduated - true independence! We believe more success and happiness are coming your way!

We love you, Mom & Dad

So much LOVE, Mom, Dad, Jason, Callie & Tato


26 SENIOR SHOUTOUTS

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Senior Shoutouts to my fiancé: i hate penn but i love you <3 Seniors of Sigma Kappa, Congratulations on your graduation! Thank you for being amazing role models and friends! SKL, Your Sisters

Congrats bestie, I can’t wait to take over the world with you with our Ivy League degrees <3 Love you!

Emily Xu, A recent addition! I can see you are very sweet and down to earth! Kisses, Sarah

Joseph, You are a true bestie and a formidable Mario Kart opponent. I love you! Cindy

To Millie, Christina, and Francine: Thank you for being the best friends I could ask for. ILY! Love, Soph

Max, Congratulations! I’m so proud of you, I love you, and I miss you already All My Love, Sara Elizabeth Kim, You rock! Thanks for the wonderful times we spent together. You really stuck out with me. Love, Sarah

Bonjour et félicitations, bestie! Love you and so proud of you for making it to graduation!

Dear bestie and roomie, ily and am so proud of us for graduating from Wharton. Cheers to the future!

Ivy Liu, Thanks for the wonderful memories we’ve spent with each other! Excited to see where life takes us! <3

Meri slaaaayyyyyy!!! Congratulations! We are going to miss you so much. Love Michael & Ani

Jayden Lee, you are such a joyful addition to an overall dynamic. You have such wonderful humor and happiness.

Hey horse-girl, so proud of you for finishing undergrad as a junior and snatching a masters too <3 Love you!

happy graduation, kelsey so lucky we had time at penn together, proud of everything you’ve done & everything you are!! -deb

Cindy, Thanks for being the best college roomie of all time! Can’t wait to see the amazing things you do.

THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

GRADUATION GOODBYES 27

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THE HUNTSMAN PROGRAM IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES & BUSINESS

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2021 COMMUNICATION MAJOR GRADUATES!

THE HUNTSMAN CLASS OF 2021!

Carlos Arias Vivas

Caitlin E. McNamara

Jaden Baum

Riley Murphy

Connor Hughes Oxendine Beard

Shalom C. Obiago

Abigail Rose Bosco

Caroline Mahar O’Neil

Vanessa Renée Bowers

Margaret Osumi

Winston Britton Jr.

Alessandra Pacheco

Anna Farrell Callahan

Hannah Paquet

Sharon Ying Man Chan

Lauren Payton

Jean Chapiro

Jessica Penn

Justin Matthew Cohen

Maria José Perilla

Nikaela Comizio

Anna Francesca Polise

Victoria Kane Dailey

Brooke Price

Tyler Zenobia Daniels

Erin Quinn

Gillian Diebold

Isabella Maxine Reynolds

Alida DiGiovanni

Sophia Rodney

C.F. Danny Fariello

Natalia Christine Rommen

Esther Fleischer

Gabriella Marie Rothbart

Danielle Gin

Yeunsu Ryu

Andrea Heyward

Dora Maria Saldaña Perez

Paige Howard

C O N G R AT U L AT E S

Balladares

Alexander Jacobson

Jackson Ames Satz

Parker Jones

Edward Scott II

Sydney Judge

Chase Philip Serota

Sky Karasik

Ayaka Shimada

Jeannette Kean

Jarrod Simmons

Kayla Ann Ketring

Emily Solomon

Adam Martin Louis Kimmel

Khristina Tiara Spence

Aleksei Kuryla

Raven Oluwatoyin Sulaimon

Sia-Linda Mabeh Lebbie

Chase Sutton

Naomi Levi

Fisher Taylor

Hannah Lottenberg

Hector Ignacio Velez

Helen Ly

Eliana Hannah Waxman

Flavia Madriz Peters

Emily Shu-Yun Yao

Austin Maguire

Tiffany Ji Won Yoon

Farah Abdelrahim Ryan Abdullah Zan Ahmed Frida Aloo Tay lor Atkins Raj Bagaria Kimaya Basu Becca Bean Carlo Chiesa Shak Davidson Emily Despinoy Gabe DiClaudio Madii Edgar Isabella Edmonds Ian Fitzgerald

Scott Marceca

Alfredo Garcia Sanchez Allison Gorokhovsky Sebi Gray Júlia Gros Mariana Guimarães Cole Hancock Couloir Hanson Connor Har t Soyoung Jeon Daniel Leva Kevin Liman Lucas Lipper t Ben Lu Dario Madyoon Melissa Marketos

Lani Matsumiya Victoria Mayer Brielle McDonald Henrique Mulinari Gus Owen Tommy Pollack Eve Robinson Alejandro Romero Grace Seeley Ashley Shah Rober t Sim Iman Tajadod Kosara Tsoneva Joshita Varshney Ho Fung Dexter Wan

Sphinx

Senior Society

EST. 1900

Honors Sphinx Class of 2021 THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS* OF THE SPHINX SENIOR SOCIETY, PENN’S OLDEST SENIOR HONOR AND LEADERSHIP SOCIETY, CONGRATULATES THE 30 MEMBERS OF THE SPHINX CLASS OF 2021 ON THEIR GRADUATION AND WISHES THEM ALL GOOD HEALTH, HAPPINESS AND SUCCESS: Karen Herrera** C’21, W’21 Chief

SHOUTOUT TO eddy yu, eric wang

Adrian “Ace” Evans Angela Yang Bryce Nguyen Camilo Duran** Carson Eckhard** Charles Curtis-Thomas Connor Beard** Danielle Miles-Langaigne Erin O’Malley

Hannah Paquet**, C’21, Pharisee Frances Paulino** Justine de Jesus Kaiyla Banks Kaliya Greenidge Kelsey Majam Madison Pettaway Manya Johnston-Ramirez Melissa Tanaka Mercedes Owens**

C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21

C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 C’21 SEAS’21 C’21

Cassandra Jobman**, C’21, Scribe Michiyah Collins** C’21 Nicholas Carrion Gomez SEAS’21 Quinlyn Spellmeyer C’21 Sarah Kim C’21 Sarah Simon C’21 Sciaska Ulysse C’21 Sheila Gaur SEAS’21, W’21 Trapetas McGill C’21 Victoria Gonzalez Saldana C’21 **2021 Senior Class Academic, Honor & Leadership Award Winner

Anannya, Catherine, Diane, Joy, Minakshi, Varun and Vraj, congrats on befriending awesome Chen. Amiya, Congratulations on graduating (a year early)! I’m so proud and can’t wait to continue our journey in London! Ishaan

Dear Joe, Happy graduation and may the light of your glory never go dim. Love you - S Aditya, Ishaan, Ravi, Shabaig: Thanks for everything over the past few years, love you guys! Will miss you so much.

Oh Yeabe, I’ll miss seeing you and your new fits every day. Your new friends will be lucky. Love you! CerinnI love you more than words! Thanks for always dancing with me <3 xoxo julia

Congratulations, Yash!! So proud of you and always rooting for you! Love you, Devishi

Anne, Still can’t believe someone gave you a job offer...Penn was better with you:) Congrats for Penn and beyond! Vraj

Joseph, I can’t believe our daily Mario Kart girl boss sessions are coming to an end. I’ll miss you bestie.

Congratulations to the BMES Class of ‘21 Amy, Rachel, Nikhil, Sofia, Nick and Andreana!

*Officers: Gregory S. Suss, Esq., PhD., C’75, President; Elizabeth Katz Miller, W’87, Vice President; Louis “Tripp” Hornick Ill, C’02, Treasurer; Kiera Reilly C’93, Secretary; Stephen H. Klitzman, Esq., C’66, President Emeritus; Siani Woods, C’20, Chief Emeritus. Alumni Members: Joshua Chilcote, C’ 15, LPS’ 16; John Fiorillo, Esq., W’86; Jeffrey Hack, W’87; Urja Mittal, C’14, W’14; Scott Romeika, C’94; David Scollan, C’17;Jay Shah, C’19

Adrian “Ace” Evans IV

Angela Yang

Bryce Nguyen

Camilo Duran

Carson Eckhard

Cassandra Jobman, Scribe

Charles Curtis-Thomas

Connor Beard

Sphinx Outdoors, Masked Initiation Fall 2020 in Penn Park Danielle Miles-Langaigne

Erin O‘Malley

Frances Paulino

Hannah Paquet, Pharisee

Justine de Jesus

Kaiyla Banks

Kaliya Greenidge

Karen Herrera, Chief

Kelsey Majam

Madison Pettaway

Manya Johnston-Ramirez

Melissa Tanaka

Mercedes Owens

Michiyah Collins

Nicholas Carrion Gomez

Quinlyn Spellmeyer

Sarah Kim

Sarah Simon

Sciaska Ulysse

Sheila Gaur

Trapetas McGill

Victoria Gonzalez Saldana

Sphinx Class of 2021 at www.sphinxseniorsociety.com


28 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

The Department of Romance Languages Congratulates the

2021 Hispanic Studies Graduates Majors AMELIA GALBRAITH SARAH GARCIA AGUSTIN GUERRERO-FLORES ANA HALLMAN EMMA HARRIS

DANIEL LEVA THOMAS MAGGIOLA CARA MAHONEY EMMA SWEENEY MATTHEW TOMASELLI

Minors ZAN AHMED KATHERINE ALL CARLOS ARIAS VIVAS MICHAEL AUBLE REBECCA ANNE BEAN ELIZABETH BENHAM MADELEINE BLAKE EMMA BOEY ANEEKA BRITTO OLIVIA BRUYN JULIA BUCHHOLZ KACIE BURTON MARGAUX CARRE MELISSA CORTES CALAIS CRONIN KAHLEETAH DIRKS JULIANNA EMANUEL ALEXANDER ESCOBAR MICHAELE FREEMAN CASSIDY GALLAGHER SAMUEL GOIDELL FELIPE GOMEZ MARIANA GUIMARAES JACQUELINE HAHN CONNOR HART RYAN HOOD CERINN HWANG

RACHEL JOHANNESEN MIMI LAZEROWITZ SIA-LINDA LEBBIE JIECONG LU MARY MACVITTIE MADISON PAIGE MCCARTHY JESSICA MIXON LAURA OSPINA COREY PARKER HETA PATEL ISABELLA PEREZ LUCY POPKO JULIETTE POZZUOLI PAULINA RUTA STEPHANIE SARABIA JACKSON SATZ BRADLEY SAUNDERS GRACE SEELEY JANVI SHUKLA ROBERT SIM MADELEINE SMITH RACHEL STEINIG SHREYA SUBRAMANIAN WILNAPHEKIE TALOUTE WENFEI WANG MARISA WONG

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

French and Francophone Studies Congratulates the 2021 Graduates

THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

The Department of Romance Languages Congratulates the

2020 & 2021 Italian Studies Graduates

Félicitations!

Congratulazioni!

Majors

Majors

NANA-KONADU ATTAKORA SOPHIE JAY SOYOUNG JEON

Minors FARAH ABDELRAHIM CARLOS ARIAS VIVAS TAYLOR ATKINS THOMAS AUSLANDER REBECCA AVIGAD BIRSU BAC JAYME BANKS MATTHEW BERGMANN TAMSYN BRANN ANIKA BULL JOAO CAMPOS DO VALE DOURADO MAUDE CERUSO ALEXIS CONTRERAS SHEKINAH DAVIDSON SARA DAVIS ARABANG DINGALO DORINA DOMI ISABELLA EDMONDS MEGAN EVERTS WANQI FANG CHRISTOPHER FLETCHER ALFREDO GARCIA SANCHEZ NAKEEYA GARLAND SEBASTIEN GRAY JULIA GROS MADELEINE GRUNDE-MCLAUGHLIN MERRY GU WALLIS HESS ELLIE HOFFMAN YOO JIN JANG DANA JONES

JASMINE JOSEPH ERIN KELLY JULIA KLAYMAN DARIA KULAKOVA DANA LANE TYLER LAWSON AMANDA LEWIS KEVIN LIMAN JACQUELINE LOU ANDREA MAKAMBA ALESSIA MCGOWAN CAITLIN MCNAMARA AMANDA MORENO KRISTINA MULLEN PAOLO NASR ZITA NDEMANU MARIA JOSE NEGRON-REICHARD NELSON NGOUENET DANA NOVIKOV NUPUR OZA PIRIL OZILHAN AMANDA PAREDES-BARBEITO SAMANTHA PECAN JIMENA RODRIGUEZ-BENITO NATALIE SADJO MARY SHINNERS EUGENIE ST JOHN SUTTON MARION STANDEFER IMAN TAJADOD JOHN WILLIS

Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures To all our students, We wish you...

KERRY O’NEIL ISABELLA TAGLIAFERRI MAXIMILIAN WOLMAN

PAULINA PEDAS ANNA SCHWARTZ

Minors CARMINA HACHENBURG LUKE HRUSHANYK ALEXANDER LEE

PIETRO MAISANO AUGUSTUS OWEN SOFIA RABATE

GIORGIO ROSCINI BRANDON TEXEIRA JONAS VALLONE

Certificates ALESSIA MCGOWAN STEPHANIE URENA

EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CONGRATULATES OUR 2021 GRADUATING SENIORS! Majors

Minors

Kenneth Cho (EASC) Daniel Cooper (EASC) Thomas Digiovanni (EASC) Devon Dorch (ENVS) Robert Henry Fetell (EASC) Olivia Fielding (EASC) Matthew Fouts (EASC) Anna Hardie (EASC) Elyse Kochman (ENVS) Ryan Kim (ENVS) Paul Lin (EASC) Su Ly (EASC) Sabine Nix (EASC) Zoe Osborne (EASC) Alex Pearlstein (EASC/ENVS) Anna Polise (ENVS) Alexander Schoeny (EASC) Sophie Spalding (EASC) Tyler Vandergriff (EASC) Jeremy Wyman (EASC) Nicholas Zhu (ENVS) Natalie Zucca (EASC)

Pascal Calvin Michel Aubert Margaret Badding Georgeanne Dinan Meghan Doody Marlena Guttman Uriel Habie Anna Hardie Erin Kelly Elyse Kochman Avni Limdi Alison Millman Caroline Murphy Flavia Olivera Marilyn Pease Gregory Preiser Georgia Ray Varun Sudunagunta Melissa Tanaka Lucia Vita Shoshana Wintman

Congratulations to the Class of 2021 You are always welcome back at Penn! As a Penn graduate, you have instant access to academic programs and courses that can advance your personal and professional goals. We invite you to consider one of our many innovative professional master’s degrees. You can also work directly with an advisor to design your own career-enhancing post-baccalaureate program.

President Amy Gutmann and Provost Wendell Pritchett congratulate this year’s Penn recipients of major national and international fellowships!

GRADUATION GOODBYES 29

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

With flexible class schedules and diverse academic offerings, there are more ways than ever to pursue your passion at Penn. We look forward to seeing you back in class!

We offer programs in: Applied Geosciences Applied Positive Psychology Behavioral and Decision Sciences Chemical Sciences Classical Studies Environmental Studies Liberal Arts Non-Traditional Graduate Studies Organizational Dynamics Post-Baccalaureate Studies Pre-Health Public Administration

To learn more, visit

www.upenn.edu/lpsforalumni


30 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Congratulations Class of 2021!

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

CINEMA & MEDIA STUDIES

GRADUATION GOODBYES 31

congratulates its

2021 MAjorS AND MINorS MAjorS

Juliann Barbella Whitney Barrett Matthew Bergmann Jean Chapiro Jennifer Chen Julie Coleman Nikaela Comizio Lily Haber Adrian Wei Xi Choi Hong

The Netter Center wishes to recognize the many graduating student leaders who have worked with partners on campus and in the community to make positive social change. Special thanks to the Class of 2021 Netter Center Student Advisory Board Members: Ania Alberski Annah Chollet Eddy Yu Evelyn Fabian Jordyn Wilson Margaret Tebbe Marion Standefer Saachi Datta Victoria Wu

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Veronica Bristol Kacie Burton Octaviano Cesar Noga Even Rachelle Frederic Anna Glickman Sarah Goldfarb

Luke Hrushanyk Sung Min (Dennis) Kim Sungjoon (Kevin) Kim Hannah Lazar Ryan Murray Shinyoung (Hailey) Noh Kelsey Padilla Hannah Paquet

MINorS

Sofia Janak Sydney Judge Zovinar Khrimian Anthony Lagana Aubrey Luk Isami Mccowan Sydney Miller Benjamin Mowatt

Lauren Payton Lauren Reiss Spencer Rosen Sydney Schwartz Amanda Simpson Erico Solis Declan Stecher Xitong (Nava) Wang Yuxi (Rick) Wei Maria Murad Campbell Parker Joshua Rosenberg Laiqa Shariff Daniel Shifren Ijulu Wonodi Linda Zou

THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT

CONGRATULATES OUR GRADUATING

MUSIC MAJORS AND MINORS

Congratulations to our 2020 Graduating Seniors! Kacie Burton Summer Intern

Coby Louis Haynes Student Exhibition Program

Maria Kiamesso DaSilva Summer Intern Near East Section Volunteer Student Exhibition Program

Maria Murad Penn Museum Fellow

Regina Fairbanks Clio Society Penn Museum Fellow Minor in Archaeological Science Jessica Greenup Student Exhibition Program

Aria Sophie Spaulding Summer Intern Penn Museum Fellow Minor in Archaeological Science

Wishing you great success as you embark on the next chapter of your careers.

Bhatia Tathagat Summer Intern

Please stay in touch!

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2021 from the CIS Department AASHISH JAIN ABHAI SHUKLA ADAM H ELDEFRAWY ADAM MICHAEL CANARICK ADEL WU AKIRA S TAKABAYASHI ALEX E ERINGIS ALEX M XU ALEXANDER KEMPF ALICE S BIAN ALICIA LU ALIZA N GINDI ALLISON G SMITH ALLISON H ZHANG AMIT R LOHE AMY YEUNG ANDREW O ADALLAH ANGELA XI ANJALI MAHESHWARI ANNAJUNE K GHRIST ANNE CHEN ANSHUL TRIPATHI ANTHONY J KUPECZ ANUSHRUT SHAH ARJUN S GURU ARUN K KIRUBARAJAN ARUNA J PRASAD ASHISH K BHAT AYUSH PARIKH BENJAMIN K HOOVER BENJAMIN R ROBINOV BO YANG HUANG BRIAN L HANDEN CAROLINE E MURPHY CAROLINE J EVANS CATHERINE D WANG CATHERINE XU CHAIM J FISHMAN CHLOE E PREZELSKI CHRISTOPHER Y FU CHUNXI LIU DAGMAWI DEREJE DAKSH CHHOKRA DANIEL SSEMANDA DANIEL STEKOL DAVID J HEFFERNAN DAVIS BURKE HAUPT DENIZ ENFIYECI DESIREE F PENARANDA DHRUV IYER

DHRUV KARTHIK DINESH JAGAI DIVYA R BADE DUNG P NGUYEN EBTIHAL A JASIM EDMUND CAI EFE AYHAN ELIAS M KALISH EMMIE DONG ERIC LIU ERIC Z WANG ERIC ZHANG ERICA HILLARY WINSTON EUGENE S ENCLONA EVA S KILLENBERG FATIH O OZER FELIX Y CUI FRANKIE WANG GABRIELLE S WEISS GRACE J CHONG GRANT D BREWSTER HALIL CAN MEMOGLU HANNAH Y PAN HANYU SUN HARONI M AMARE HELEN D QI HENRIQUE MARTINS DOS SANTOS HENRY E ZHANG HIYORI C YOSHIDA HO-WA-JONATHAN MAK HYACINTHE UWIZERA IRENE Y ZHANG ISAAC J SCHROF ISHAAN D RAO IVAN A ESMERAL PARRA JACK G ROSEMAN JACK R MCKNIGHT JACOB B GLENN JACQUELINE M LOU JAI KRISHNA H ASHAR JAI THIRANI JAKE O LEM JAMES HU JANINE H LIU JASMINE T LEE JASON P WANG JASON R CHEN JAY M MUDHOLKAR JAYDEN LEE

JEFFREY LIU JELANI N HUTCHINSBELGRAVE JENNIFER E YEN JERRY Z LU JESSE H WU JESSE M BLATT JESSE W XU JIAHUI LI JIECONG LU JILLIAN R PESCE JIMMY NI JINA LO JOAN SHAHO JOAO LEITE JOHN C FLAHIVE JOHN C SARIHAN JOHN L GOETTLE JOHN P MANTHORP JONAH F SCHIMPF JONAH H MILLER JONATHAN BRIAN LEE JONATHAN H ASHTON JOSE A MENDEZ MENDEZ JOSEPH N LAFORGIA JULES PIERCE JULIE L CHEN KAMY HUO KARMAN S CHEEMA KATHERINE R HYLAND KATIE Y YANG KAUNG KHANT KENNY T HOANG KENTO SUGAMA KEVIN AGOLLI KIERAN M HALLORAN KONGKRIT JUNGSANGUAN PORNSUK KUMAR V LADHA LEAH M VOYTOVICH LIAM A HOSEY LIANA PATEL LISA LIU LUKE A SILVESTRI MACKENN A BROSS MADISON D JONES MAGHNUS H MARENECK MARCOS D CARBALLAL MARK S CHOI MATTHEW M MILLER

MAX HENRY GOLDMAN MAXWELL H DENG MAXWELL J ROLING MAY XIAO MAYLAT D KASSA MERI KAVTELISHVILI MICHAEL G ABELAR MICHAEL Z SONG MOHAMED K ALY MOKSH JAWA MUKUND T VENKATESWARAN NABEEL A FAROOQUI NATHAN G TITUS NATHAN I NG NATHAN J RUSH NAYEONG KIM NEEL N SHROFF NEIL S SHWEKY NICHOLAS A YOUSSEF NICHOLAS C GOMEZ NICHOLAS P NG NICOLAS A TAPIERO NIELS K RASMUSSEN NIKHIL KOKRA NINA Y CHUNG OLIVER C FERRY OLIVIA R O’DWYER PEDRO H SACRAMENTO DE OLIVEIRA PETER H CHOU PHILLIP V SAJAEV PRIYANSH SHARMA QINGRONG JI RAFAL PROMOWICZ RAJVI N GEMAWAT RESHU C LIANG RILEY T CHEESEMAN ROHAN BENDRE RONGZI SUN RYAN J TELESCA RYAN M GUAN RYAN Z SHARAFUDDIN SAMUEL C HARTMAN SAMUEL G XU SAMUEL I PFROMMER SAMUEL J OSHAY SANJANA S RAO SARAH W RAINES SARANYA SAMPATH SEAN E WAXMAN-LENZ

SELINA S NIE SHANTANU PURI SHEILA GAUR SHREYAS S SONBARSE SHRIYA K IYER SIDDHARTH JAISWAL SKYLER R RANKIN SOHAM R DHARMADHIKARY SPENCER M WEBSTER-BASS STEFANO J YUSHINSKI STEVEN L SHAPIRO STEVEN MALDONADO SUSAN X XIE SYDNEY A MILLER TATIANA TSYGANKOVA TEA A TRAN THOMAS WANG TIANQI SUN TIANZHENG WANG TIFFANY ANAYA TIFFANY K TSANG UMANG V SOMANI VARUN RAMAKRISHNAN VATSAL JAIN VERONICA M BRISTOL VICTORIA BARTH VRAJ R SHROFF WEI ZOU WEICHEN ZHENG WEIYU DU WILLIAM C MORGUS XUFEI HUANG YANFEI LI YASH KILLA YE DONG YINUO XU YITING HUA YIYANG ZHANG YOUNGHU PARK YRVINE D THELUSMA YUFEI XIA YUXIN LIAO ZETONG JIA ZHILEI ZHENG ZHIXIN ZHANG ZULFIQAR A SOOMRO


32 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

FriarsSenior Senior Society Friars Society Class of 2021 2021 Graduates

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Congratulations To the man behind the camera and behind most of the DP’s photos.

Louis Galarowicz Cristin Pogorevici Best of luck with your future plans. Come back and visit the Pink Moksh Jawa Rakesh Ravi Palace whenever you’re in Philly. Anthony Scarpone-Lambert Sydney Lewis Sahitya Mandalapu Tommy Seaman Anthony Scarpone-Lambert Moksh Jawa Darrian McAfee Katie Shia Tommy Seaman Lewis DannySydney Mendelsohn Dan Smith Harsh Meswani Raven Sulaimon Katie Shia Sahitya Mandalapu Tiphani Swaby Kushal Modi Dan Smith Darrian Selina Nie McAfee Kyle Whiting Derek Nuamah Lizzie Youshaei Raven Sulaimon Danny Mendelsohn Uche Nwogwugwu Shaina Zafar Harsh Meswani Mic Zammuto Tiphani Swaby Eleah Parker Henry Platt Modi Ben Zhao Kyle Whiting Kushal

Urooba Abid Erin Bailey Zoe Belodeau Yash Bhargava Urooba Abid Greer Bizzell-Hatcher Erin Bailey Reagan Bracknell Julie Chen Zoe Belodeau Elijah Conniff Yash Bhargava Mitchell Cornell Archit Dhar Greer Bizzell-Hatcher Camille Dickson Reagan Bracknell Andrew Douglas Martha Gakunju Julie Chen

Selina Nie Elijah Conniff Derek Nuamah MItchell Conniff Uche Nwogwugwu Archit Dhar Eleah Parker Camille Dickson Henry Platt Andrew Douglas Cristin Pogorevici Louis Galarowicz The Department of Philosophy Rakesh Ravi Martha Gakunju

Here’s a toast to you!

Lizzie Youshaei Shaina Zafar Mic Zammuto Ben Zhao

congratulates our

CONGRATULATIONS Majors 2021 Graduating Seniors

ANDREA BARRERAS AUGUSTINE BENJAMIN SAMUEL BORISLOW CHRISTOPHER DENQ JONATHAN DIAMOND-REIVICH DAVID EHRENREICH* JULIA ESHAGHPOUR YEABESIERA FEKADE LOUIS GALAROWICZ SAMUEL GORDON SYDNEY GWYNN

MOMENA HAIDER TENGQIN HAN KIRA HOROWITZ* TAT HANG HUNG CHUKWUDI IKPEAZU ZETONG JIA DANIELLE KNASTER MADELINE LU* AUGUST MATTEIS JACKSON MAXWELL HANNA MUSHAKEVICH

UYEN NGUYEN RILEY O’BRIEN CALEB OH GEORGIA RAY TALIA SAEID SAKSHI SEHGAL SHIRA SILVER ARUNDHATI SINGH* NATHAN TITUS PEI HSUAN TSENG * XITONG WANG

minors EDWARD BARRY SARAH BRUNSBERG CALEB CHEN LULA S CHOU JOSEPH DOAN*

PABLO ESPINOSA ARGAIZ DAVID FERNANDEZ CHAIM FISHMAN MEGHANA IYER RINA JUNG

RACHEL MADHOGARHIA TARA MCCAFFREY SHANA VAID CASEY WILBANKS *Fall 2020 Graduate

Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Congratulates the Class of 2021! Ph.D. Ikenna Achilihu Dayo Adetu Faisal Yousef Alsalloum Hassan Alyagoob Akshay Ananthakrishnan Mari Andersen Claudio Angrigiani Adrian Armendariz Kohki Asai Joseph Auckley Victor Azumah Kelly Babitz Dharma Babu Rossiny Beaucejour Javier Becerra John Berg Julia Bougard David Bunn Armando Cabrera Ruijie Cao Paul Castellana Wujoon Cha Chun Chang Kevin Chazotte Briana Cieniewicz Cristian Constantin Shuvrangsu Das Shivam Dehinwal Boyu Deng William Deo Anastasia Dombrowski

Xingyu Du Simona Dwass Jorge Echeverria Mason Elms Mohamed Elshabrawishy Sommer Farber Seth Fein Connor Fenn Jake Floyd Matthew Fohner Owen Ford Christopher Fox Kevin Galloway Samuel Garr Nicholas Genovese Nicholas Garza Alice Gilmore Miriam Glickman Paedyn Gomes Zoe Granato Yuchen Guo Zachary Hahn Mohamed Shahul Hameed Siyao Hu Terry Huang Weihao Huang Elizabeth Hunter Aviva Hurvitz Gokulanand Iyer Andreana Izotov

MSE

IPD

Akshil Amit Jhaveri Chenxi Ji Zhuheng Jiang Maria Jimenez Kathie Jin Tom Jose Ryan Jurewicz Isaac Kalapos Ethan Kellough Maura Kelly Noah Kamerling Leora Korn Saurabh Kumthekar Zachary Lane Jack Lanzi Mona Lee Kevin Leeb David Levine Guojin Li Yupeng Li Jieyu Liu Jihang Liu Sixuan Liu Aoyi Luo Madison Magee Armando Marquez Roselyn Matlou Jessica McWilliams Arnesh Mishra Tamir Mizrahi Allen Moak

GRADUATION GOODBYES 33

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

BSE Nelson Ngouenet Anthony Nguyen Chenze Ning Alan Nunez Paul Owens George Neehar Pandya Justine Paolini Nicholas Parkes Abhishek Patil Ryan Patrick Toni-Ann Peck Sophie Perez Pratik Ponnarassery George Arthur Popov Tony Qiu Rakesh Ravi Joshua Ren Alexis Robles Neil Rodrigues Jared Rogers Seth Rogers Alexander Roth Mustafa Shabazz Dingyi Shen Zhifei Shen Jillian Stahl Abigail Stein Lucille Stinn Lilian Stoesser Zhiqiang Su Yao Sun

Andrew Sweigard Yewen Tang Ilana Teicher Wei-Ju Tseng Huen Yee Tso Christopher Valencia Vashist Valsaraj Vasileios Vasilopoulos Sai Vetcha Andres Voyer Chuqiao Wan Muxuan Wang Yuwei Wang Tianshi Wang Xinyue Wei Michael Whitzer Yihang Xu Geli Yang Shuohuang Yang Woohyeok Yang Mallika Yedla Guner Yenal Fan Yi Shiping Yi Eric Young Patrick Zerbe Chris Zhang Shuhan Zhang Ranny Zhao Yuqi Zhao

Wharton Ambassadors would like to thank our seniors for their service. Congratulations! Austin Zhu, Co-President Wharton Ambassadors would like thank our Nithya Kasi,to Co-President seniors for their Adam Weiss service. Congratulations! Hersh Solanki Austin Zhu, Co-President Co-President Lucy Pless, Jillian Li NithyaYang, Kasi, Co-President Hanna Co-President Peter Hissey Adam Revi Weiss Aloni Peter Ojo Hana HershCharnley Solanki Sabrina Sidhu Jordan JillianCohen Li Michelle Mato Shivani Komma Peter Hissey Lucy Pless Peter Shabbir Ojo Uswah Cristina SabrinaPogorevici YasminSidhu Mulla Haley Tille Shivani Komma Uswah Shabbir Yasmin Mulla

PENN ENGLISH CELEBRATES THE CLASS OF 2021! We honor your accomplishments: the literary and cultural worlds you have explored, the insights you have shared, and the pages and pages you have composed. And you completed all of this within little boxes of rooms and zooms! We are proud of our illustrious majors, and we send off the heroic class of 2021 to a brightening future. A toast to you!


34 GRADUATION GOODBYES

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2021 · GRADUATION ISSUE

GRADUATION GOODBYES 35

Congratulations!

Congratulations!

Congratulations!

CLASS CLASS OF 2021 OF 20 CLASS OF 2021 M MINORS Congratulations! LATIN AMERICAN ANDAMERICAN AND MINORS LATIN Javier Leo LATIN AMERICAN AND LATINX STUDIES Ca LATINX STUDIES LATINX STUDIES MAJORS &CLASS MINORS! OF 2021 Sil MAJORS &&MINORS! MAJORS MINORS!

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GRADUATING SCHOLARS!

Javier Leonardo Aguilar Espinosa

Ja ie r a Le Carlos Aria s vV iv s onardo Aguilar E Carlos Arias Viva

Silvia Ayala Torres Daisy Angeles

Joseph Wharton Scholars Abenezer Mechale Anannya Shandilya Angela Schmitt Angelica Viscito Corey Parker Dante Benitez Deniz Yilmaz

Dhruv Iyer Emily Cheng Emma Lu Eve Robinson Gabriel Lozano Harrison Ndife Irene Wang

MINORS

LATIN AMERICAN AND Timothy Cobb MAJORS LATINX STUDIES MAJORSJ a v i e r A r m a n d o C u a d r a s Silvia Ayala Torres MAJORS & MINORS!Silvia Ayala Torres A l e x a n d e r E s c o b a r

Natalia Joseph Richard Kaser Sardar Asfandyar Cheema Saxon Bryant Shreya Subramanian Stephanie Xie Victoria Mayer

MAJORS Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña

Javier Armando Cuad Silvia Ayala Torres

To the 2021 Graduating Seniors of Wharton STEP

SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION & EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM

Christopher Hernandez Karlin Isnady Lobo Itzol Anna Jellinek Antonio Jimenez Dariush Keyhani Jordan King Melisa Lee Erin Lomboy Gabriel Lozano Nyeem Maloney Carlos Martinez Kristen McLaughlin Abenezer Mechale Jose Mendoza Noreen Mohsin Adrian Ogunfowora Catherine Parr

Hardi Patel Caleb Pennington Thandiwe Persaud Cristina Pogorevici Alexia Poscente Ryan Pruitt Gerald Rehill Anannya Shandilya Oyinkansola Sofela Malcom Summers Stephanie Tian Angelica Viscito Wenfei Wang Yuluan Wang Irene Wang Tiffany Wong Arturo Wuest

The Wharton Undergraduate Division salutes you and says Well Done!

Alexander Escoba

Daisy Angeles Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña Nicholas Gomez aov ezr Nicholas J G mie Emma Boey Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Silvia Ayala Torres Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena A g u s t í n G u e r r e r o -AFgl o rt eí s us n Guerrero-Flo MAJORS Ale Thomas Maggiola Thomas Maggiola T i m o t h y C o b b Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña Ryan Hood Ryan Hood Kiley Marron J a v i e r A r m a n d o C u a d r a s KileyAyala Marron Silvia Torres N Claire Kercheval-Ro C axi a re Ke err c hc eovb aa lA lle nd Es r Roig Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Evangelina Padilla Gonzalez CLASS OF 2 Evangelina Padilla Gonzalez Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña

Congratulations!

Congratulations! Congratulations! Congratulations

Class of 2021

V a l e n t i n aA Lo ad gs u sa t ahlo eln ao m Lo NV ic atsi n G esza d a

Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Thomas Maggiola Jose Mendoza CLASS OF 2021 Agustín G rre od -F oa res Jo su ee M ern olz Thomas Maggiola CLASS OF 2021 LATIN AMERICAN ANDL o g a n NJaanv iteari sL e Kiley Marron Ryan Hood Logan Nantais MINORS Kiley Marron LATINX STUDIES L u i s G . O r t i zCJ ulaarCie Claire Kercheval-Roig MINORS LATIN AMERICAN AND is JGonzalez a v i e r L e o n a r dPadilla o Aguilar E sL pu in o sG a. Ortiz Juarez Evangelina Gonzalez Evangelina Padilla S Margarita Raquel O

MAJORS & MINORS!

LATIN AMERICAN AND LATINX STUDIES LATINX STUDIES MAJORS & MINORS! MAJORS & MINORS!

Saihyun Kim Shaheel Mitra Sinan Onukar Stephanie Tian Yelin Hu Yilin Ma Yixi Wang Zhangyi Fan Zhun Yan Chang

Timothy Cobb

Carlos Arias Vivas

Stay in touch with MAJORS The Weekly Roundup

Valentina Losada Javier Leonardo Aguilar Espinosa Va C a r l o s A r i a s V i v aM s argarita Raquel Ortiz Antonia Piedrahita Jose Mendoza Carlos Arias Vivas Silvia Ayala Torres Antonia Piedrahita J Enrique Henry Sherwood C Logan Nantais Silvia Ayala Torres Daisy Angeles Enrique Henry Sherwood Caballero Rachel Steinig Luis G. Ortiz Juarez L Daisy Angeles Emma Boey Javie R a c h e l S t e iM n ii g chael Alexander Wil Margarita Raquel Ortiz Emma Boey Timothy Cobb LuA is M i c h a e l A l e x a n d e r W i l lA ia sndru Zanca l em xa Antonia Piedrahita Timothy Cobb Javier Armando Cuadras E m i l y ZM i s l ia s rg ru ZdaC nc E n r i q u e H eA n rl e y x Sa hn ed rw oo aa ballero Javier Armando Cuadras Agu Alexander Escobar

MAJORS

Silvia Ayala Torres Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Silvia Ayala Torres Silvia Ayala Torres Thomas Maggiola Victoria Gonzalez Saldaña ml i S l yt eZi n i si g lis R a cE he Alexander Escobar Subscribe to The Weekly RoundupVictoria to getGonzalez the week’s Nicholas Gomez Saldaña Kiley Marron Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Michael Alexander Williams Nicholas Gomez Agustín Guerrero-Flores top stories from the The DP. Stories are meticulously Adriana Gonzalez-Camarena Evangelina Padilla Gonzalez E n r i q u e Thomas Maggiola

MAJORS

Thomas Maggiola curated for parents and alumni delivered directly to Kiley Marron Kiley Marron Evangelina Padilla Gonzalez your inbox.

Agustín Guerrero-Flores

Evangelina Padilla Gonzalez

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Ryan Hood

Ryan Hood

Alexandru Zanca

Claire Kercheval-Roig

Emily Zislis

Claire Kercheval-Roig Valentina Losada Valentina Losada Jose Mendoza Logan Nantais

A

Rachel Steinig Michael Alexander Williams Michael Alexander Williams Alexandru Zanca

Salutes its graduating seniors

Emily Zislis

Emily Zislis

Katelyn Heist Gordon Ho Will Hooper Lucia Hornbacher Kira Horowitz Luke Hrushanyk Yue Huang Madison Jaffe Sarah Jaffe Aashna Jain Sofia Janak Ebtihal Jasim Moksh Jawa Melannie Jay Cassandra Jobman Parker Jones Natalia Joseph Sydney Judge Nour Elyakine Kaddeche Nancy Kang Avni Kataria Jenny Kean Riley Kennedy Claire Kercheval-Roig Nabil Khan Sarah Khan Zovinar Khrimian Liz Kim Sarah Kim Julia Klayman Maryanne Koussa Alex Kuang Jahnik Kurukulasuriya Anthony Lagana Andrew Lam Michael Landau Hannah Lazar Sia-Linda Lebbie Enwook Lee Joel Lee Mona Lee Jake Lem Elizabeth Lemieux Crystal Leung Jake Levitz Zizhao Li Reshu Catherine Liang Dominic Lim Avni Limdi

Angela Lin Diane Lin Amy Liu Bingqing Liu Jeffrey Liu Pearl Liu Zinan Liu Calista Lopez Jacqueline Lou Anna Lisa Lowenstein Fred (Zhouzheyuan) Lu Kai Lu Louise Lu Vincent Lugrine Helen Ly Natalie MacKinnon Victoria Mai Minakshi Mangal Siyuan Mao Francesca Marini Evan McClelland Isami McCowan Caitlin McNamara Audrey McQuietor Mehr Mehta Riley Merkel Alex Miao Harold Milton-Gorvie Miriam Minsk Sam Mitchell Jess Mixon Shreya Mondal Tyler Moorehead Simmi Mourya Maria Murad Bryce Nguyen Shinyoung (Hailey) Noh Dana Novikov Sabrina Ochoa Tsemone Ogbemi Jessi Olarsch Anna Orosz Margarita Ortiz Noa Ortiz-Langleben Mercedes Owens Kelsey Padilla Rachel Pak Minsuh Park Seung Won (Sue) Park

R

Luis G. Ortiz Juarez

Enrique Henry Sherwood Caballero Rachel Steinig

Ava Cruz Jennifer Cullen Lucy Curtis Sophia Dai Will Danon Courtney Daub Sabrina de Brito Jonathan Diamond-Reivich Gillian Diebold Will DiGrande Eliana Doft Francine Dong Keely Douglas Alec Druggan Sophia DuRose Adam Eldefrawy Deena Elul Maria Escudero Zhangyi (David) Fan Katie Farrell Veronica Fenton Olivia Fielding Adam First Paige Fishman Taré Floyd William Gallagher Anurudh Ganesan Ben Geist Tamara Gelband Rajvi Gemawat Emily Gliklich Hoyt Gong Jessica Gooding Samuel Gordon Evelyn Gotlieb Alice Goulding Julia Gros Merry Gu Yoni Gutenmacher Lily Haber Carmina Hachenburg Chae Hahn Ana Hallman Naati Hamda Max Han Emma Harris Sam Hartman Luisa Healey Tashweena Heeramun

V

M ar A l

Logan Nantais

Antonia Piedrahita Enrique Henry Sherwood Caballero

Bano Abbas Urooba Abid Ana Acevedo Brady Africk Ania Alberski Joseph Arias Carlos Arias Vivas Efe Ayhan Margaret Badding Hyejun Bae Juliann Barbella Vicky Barth Nikita Bastin Kimaya Basu Evan Batov Leah Baxter Reese Berman Sanaea Bhagwagar Emma Boey Kaitlyn Boyle Tamsyn Brann Nicole Browne Tyira Bunche Courtney Butterworth Anna Callahan Sami Canaan Rebekah Canty Lucy Cao Danielle Capriglione Margaux Carre Jean Chapiro Sam Chechik Karman Cheema Anne Chen Delia Chen Sally Chen Danny Chiarodit Juliana Choi Ty Ciatto Max Cohen Pauline Colas Julie Coleman Emily Condon Alex Cook Daniel Cooper Nicolas Corona Alexa Cotler Calais Cronin Kevin Crouch

Cla

He

Lu

Margarita Raquel Ortiz Antonia Piedrahita

Alexandru Zanca

An

Michae

Jose Mendoza

Luis G. Ortiz Juarez Margarita Raquel Ortiz

Congratulations!

Narimene Amami Geras Artis Similoluwa Ayinde Sydney Bell Kusiima Boswell Saxon Bryant Haley Carbajal Timothy Chung Ayibaitariworio Clement Elijah Conniff Alexis Contreras Maribel Davila Jaia Gillette Colette Gordon Bryson Hamrick Brianna Hatfield Jadyn Henderson

D

Emma Boey Javier Leonardo Aguilar Espinosa

Isabel Romeu Jackfille Pierre Jordan Cohen Maggie Browdy Mikayla Angel Min Joo Kim Mohnish Sabhani

Frida Aloo Grace Patrice Hoyt Gong James Flynn Jamie Wang Jiwhan Moon Maher Abdel Samad Monica Volodarsky Paulina Ruta

Daisy Angeles

Emma Boey

Wharton Research Scholars Antonio Canales Aris Saxena Beau Staso Beverlye Gedeon Brandon Nguyen Canyon Kornicker Ciana Curran Colette Gordon David Alanis Garza

Silvia Ayala Torre

Jonathan Patterson Lauren Payton Lucy Popko Sarah Poss Vasudha Rajgarhia Ellie Rampulla Ishaan Rao Sanjana Rao Georgia Ray Lauren Reiss Caroline Riise Nicole Rocha Sophie Rodney Natalia Rommen Emma Ronzetti Zack Rovner Carolyn (Carly) Ryan Abrar salhoba Saranya Sampath Sam Sanders Devishi Sarda Jackson Satz Eva Schottenstein Sophia Schulz-Rusnacko Jordan Seibel Lexie Shah Allie Shapiro Helen Shaves Mira Shetty Katie Shia Vraj Shroff Alana Shukovsky Isabella Simonetti Amanpreet Singh Claire Sliney Abdul Sohu Isaac Spear Nina Stavropoulos Katie Steele Varun Sudunagunta Raven Sulaimon Can Sun Crystal Sun Jacquelyn Sussman Chase Sutton Spencer Swanson Mateen Tabatabaei Karthik Tadepalli Jierong Tan

Stephen Tannenbaum Biruktawit Tibebe Anshul Tripathi Fiona Tsai Tiffany Tsang Ishaan Tugnait Stefan Tzvetanov Kat Ulich Mia Van der Meer Tyler Vandergriff Eliud Vargas Evan Viroslav Riley Wagner Christian walton Xinyi Wan Catherine Wang Michael Warren Santini (Yang) Wei Yuhao Wei Jonah Weinbaum Ana West Kyle Whiting Michael Williams Shoshana Wintman Daniel Wittmer Arianne Wong Ethan Wu Tianyi Wu Sophie Xi Feiwen Xiao Erica Xin Alex Xu Emily Xu Fengming Xu Samuel Xu Yana Yadav Kristen Yeh Carrie Yin Howard Yin Zachary Zamore Kevin Zeno Eric Zhang Jinghan Zhang Margaret Zhang Ben Zhao Edward Zhao Rougang Zhao Li Zhihui

Enrique H

Micha

A


36 GRADUATION GOODBYES

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congratulations to the graduating staff of the College Houses. Best of luck, and thank you for your hard work!

W.E.B. Du Bois Ja'Nya Banks Joanna Ferguson Serrano Legrand Fisher Hassenfeld Imran Idzqandar Charles Curtis-Thomas Ginneh Dickenson Marion Standefer LaTisha Thompson Jessica Valdes Theodore Yuan Gregory Farzana Khan Karen Nershi Harnwell Divyansh Agarwal Sardar Asfandyar Cheema Jennifer Chou Katie Hancin Suchait Kahlon Sirus J. Libeiro Stephanie Mark Rita Semaan Anthony Wagner Harrison Jesan Atahural Dakota Becker Fadi Farsakh Gaurav Gupta Shivali Govani Edmund Gyasi Dariush Keyhani Fernando Nombera Whitney Orji Lauren Payton Edward Quaye Thomas Seaman Hill Jada Edwards Gabrielle Lipson Timothy Roche Sasmita Rout Kendall Smith

Kings Court English Juliana Choi Mark Lovett Kanika Nadkarni Rongzi Sun Lauder Javier Becerra Erin Feeney Ejirooghene Ojeni Anthony Scarpone-Lambert Matthew Yu Riepe Kathlyn Drewicz Bruce Eskesen Zoe Osborne Rodin Kaiyla Banks Ben Brikman K Burns Mariama Diallo Sharon George Jelani Hutchins-Belgrave Matthew Katz Grace Nguyen Derek Nuamah Haley Pilgrim Joana Shehu Stouffer Jennifer Delgado Tahira Islam Sunpin Li Penny Luan Paola Perez Varun Perla Wichinpong Sinchaisri Ware Jay Falk Fawad Syed Diamond Walker

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Le,

Yr Coe e XOXO

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