Issuu on Google+

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSIT Y OF PENNSYLVANIA

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

Penn price tag to rise above $60,000 3.9%

60000

increase from the 2013-2014 academic year

50000

40000

2010 - 2011 2011-2012

2012-2013

Breakdown of 2014-2015 tuition and fees

2013-2014 2014-2015

Academic Year

$5,492

$13,464

financial aid budget

additional fees

room and board

the largest allocation for financial-aid in the University’s history

SEE TUITION PAGE 5

BY JILL CASTELLANO Staff Writer

tuition

$196 million

Source: Office of University Communications

p

$30

WHY WE

BEYONCE

$5

CAN’T HAVE

per appear 0 0 an 0 ce 0,

p

er llion appearance i m

A look at SPEC’s budget COUNTDOWN TO

FLING 2014

41

BY KRISTEN GRABARZ Staff Writer There is a reason Beyonce is unlikely to ever headline Spring Fling. The Social Planning and Events Committee would have to spend more than 11 times its $175,000 Spring Fling grant to afford Queen Bey’s reported $2 million dollar fee. SPEC uses its entire $175,000 Spring Fling budget to pay for the concert artists, College senior and SPEC concerts co-director Ben Yang said. Expected ticket and floor ticket revenues of $230,900 pay for all other production costs, which vary widely depending on the genre and artist, said College

DAYS

APRIL 11-12

and Wharton senior Ethan Jones, who is co-chair of SPEC’s Concerts committee. At $2 million per appearance, according to the Huffington Post, L ad y Ga ga i s a l so out side of SPEC’s price range. Pitbull, who charges $300,000, is also not a fiscally plausible Fling headliner. All hope is not lost for pop culture enthusiasts. At around $50,000 per appearance, Fergie lies w ithin SPEC’s budget. Despite financial constraints, students do have a say in who SPEC picks. SPEC releases an annual survey seeking student input for headliner and opener suggestions. This year’s survey collected SEE BEYONCE PAGE 8

Drexel University to purchase University City High School Some were upset with the lack of transparency in selecting who would purchase the space BY CLAIRE COHEN Deputy News Editor University City High School, which enrolled 655 students last school year, closed last June along with 22 other Philadelphia schools. However, Drexel University plans to develop this currently unused space into a conglomerate of educational and commercial organizations. The School District of Philadel-

phia announced at a community meeting on Wednesday night that Drexel was the highest bidder in the competition to purchase UCHS, located at 36th and Filbert streets. The official announcement came after indications that Drexel was looking to purchase the space. “Drexel is absolutely delighted to be chosen as the finalist and is looking forward to the next step in the process,” Drexel Vice President of University Facilities Robert Francis said. Many of the meeting’s attendees, though, felt that the selection proSEE DREXEL PAGE 7

Editorial (215) 898-6585 • Business (215) 898-6581

$175,000 Spring Fling grant is used to pay for the artist

$230,900

revenue used to pay for all other concert costs including

Franklin Field rental, Advertising, Ticketing, Hospitality, Security, Production, Talent, Appearance costs from Huffington Post Housekeeping/Cleanup Graphic by Hailey Edelstein

ARTFULLY FASHIONED

Henry Lin/Staff Photographer

A new exhibition featuring more than 150 works from Korea opened yesterday at the Philadelphia Museum of Art amongst a monk performance and a fashion show yesterday.

Visit us online at theDP.com

The new dean of the Penn’s School of Nursing will be Antonia Villarruel, currently the associate dean for research and global affairs at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

ANTONIA VILLARRUEL The new dean of Penn’s School of Nursing

0 apepr earanc 0 0 e 0,

per d ore lion appeara m il nc e m

Alum to be new Nursing dean

Antonia Villarruel hopes to continue working with Latino communities as dean

$42,176

The University has authorized a

$2

The cost for a Penn undergraduate education will cross the $60,000 mark for the first time in the 20142015 academic school year. The University announced at Thursday’s Board of Trustees’ winter meeting that tuition and fees will increase by 3.9 percent to $61,132 from $58,812 for the next academic year. This marks the fifth year in a row that the University has raised the cost of a Penn education by 3.9 percent. The $61,132 figure includes tuition, fees and room and board. Undergraduate tuition will increase from $40,594 to $42,176, room and board

$61,132

$1-3 Ru

BY FOLA ONIFADE Staff Writer

The next academic year’s tuition and fees will amount to

70000

Undergraduate tuition

The announcement was made at yesterday’s Board of Trustees’ meeting

online at thedp.com

V i l l a r r u e l ’s a p p o i nt m e nt will go into effect July 1, 2014, Penn President Amy Gutmann and Provost Vincent Price announced in a press release on Thursday. She will replace current Nursing Dean Afaf Meleis, who was appointed in 2002. “Well I’m not always sure that being a dean was in my career trajectory, but when the opportunity came up it just seemed like I needed to check it out,” Villarruel, a 1982 Nursing graduate, said in an interview. Villarruel taught at the Nursing School between 1995 and 2000 and has written books with several other Penn faculty members. “I have fond memories of Penn both as a student and I had such an incredible experience there as a faculty, so I know what a great school Penn is,” she said. Villarruel has spent years building and maintaining a research program around interventions for Latino, Mexican and Puerto Rican populations, with a particular focus on reducing sexual risk among Latino adolescents. Villarruel is Mexican American herself. Her father was born in Mexico, and her mother was born in the United States. Her mother’s parents were also born in Mexico. Many administrators, faculty members and students have been looking to the current dean searches to include and promote diversity in the University administration. The administration came under fire in January 2013 following the selection of former Vice Provost for Research Steven Fluharty as the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. A group of Africana Studies faculty members criticized Gutmann in a strongly worded Daily Pennsylvanian guest column, arguing that “her commitment to diversity does not include her own administration,” citing that up to that point Gutmann had never appointed a person of color as a dean at Penn. Much of Villarruel’s past work has dealt with minorities and diversity. She served on an advisory council to the Secretary of Health and Human Services for minority health and was president of the National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nurse Associations. Villarruel hopes to continue her efforts in Latino communities as the new Nursing dean. “I still have an active grant that’s taking place in Puerto Rico right now. I’d like to be able to build on that,” she said. “I started those initial interventions when I was here at Penn as faculty, so it’s almost like full circle,” she added. Beyond her extensive work SEE NURSING PAGE 7

Send story ideas to newstip@theDP.com


NE WS

PAGE 2 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Penn firsts in Black history

Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander (1898 - 1989) Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander came from a family of firsts. Her father was the first black man to graduate from Penn Law and her uncle was the first black graduate of Penn’s Medical School. She received a bachelor’s degree in education in 1918, a master’s degree in economics in 1919 and a Ph.D. in economics in 1921. “My understanding is that [another woman] got her doctorate a week before Sadie or a few days before Sadie, so she was not the first [black woman] in the United States of America [to get her Ph.D.],” Mark Frazier Lloyd, Director of the University Archives, said. She was, however, the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. from Penn and the first black woman to earn a Ph.D. in economics in the country, he said. Several years later, she also became the first black woman to graduate from Penn Law and the first to practice law in Pennsylvania in 1927. In 2007, with a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Education and a contribution from Philadelphia law firm Duane Morris, Penn Law endowed “a professorship devoted to the study of civil rights and race relations” in Alexander’s name, according to a University of Pennsylvania Almanac publication in 2007. “With this chair, we are once again reminded that a good education should be available to everyone regardless of race or financial background,” Penn President Amy Gutmann said in the Almanac at the time. Dorothy Roberts is currently the Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights.

W.E.B. Du Bois spent a year as an "Assistant in Sociology” at Penn and Martin Luther King Jr. audited three classes here. But other black Penn alumni with slightly lesser known names have also accomplished noteworthy firsts and have been hugely influential in the local community. As Black History Month draws to a close, the DP looks back on Penn’s history of influential black alumni.

Willie Wilson Goode (1938 - )

Charlie Brady Hauser (1917 - 2007)

Willie Wilson Goode, who received his master’s degree from Wharton in 1968, was elected the first black mayor of Philadelphia in 1984. He first became well known in Philadelphia in 1969 when he became executive director of the Philadelphia Council for Community Advancement. Goode also worked as the Managing Director for the City of Philadelphia and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Education under President Clinton. He is an ordained Baptist Minister currently working as the director of the Amachi Program, “a national faith-based mentoring model for children of incarcerated parents.”

John Baxter Taylor (1882 - 1908)

Charlie Brady Hauser, who earned a master’s degree and a Doctor of Education degree from Penn, described himself as “strike two” in the civil rights activism that culminated with strike three from Rosa Parks in 1956 in a personal account written in 2006. On a 1947 trip from Winston-Salem, N.C. back to West Virginia State College, where he was teaching education courses, the bus driver asked him to move to the back of the Greyhound bus. “I knew I had the right to sit where I wanted to,” Hauser wrote in a 2006 article recalling the event. Hauser was arrested and eventually filed a lawsuit for false arrest. The judge ruled in his favor and the Atlantic Greyhound Corporation paid him $2,000 to settle. “I bought a car with the money and didn’t have to take the bus again!” Hauser remembered.

John Baxter Taylor was the first black athlete to win an Olympic gold medal and the second black athlete at Penn. He originally enrolled in the Wharton School in 1903, but withdrew and ended up graduating from the School of Veterinary Medicine in 1908. He was a member of Penn’s track team for five years, setting numerous interscholastic records. Taylor earned a gold medal in the 1908 Olympics in London on the 1600-meter relay team, and he died of pneumonia just a few months later. Following his death, an editorial in the Daily Pennsylvanian wrote, “We can pay him no higher tribute — John Baxter Taylor: Pennsylvania man, athlete and gentleman.”

Photos Courtesy of The University of Pennsylvania Graphic by Laura Anthony and Vivian Lee

Quizzo & live music. Come on by! 3131 Walnut Street 215-883-0965

Drink specials @ Quizzo with photo of this ad

Select appetizers $5 with photo of this ad

EGFR Radio

enhancement Prague Prevention

Histories battery

cancer Philadelphia Adoptability Foraging regulating Dominican Tailored Birthing No-Kill Cats

treatment Biopower Patterns Micropolitics chewing

Effect Dominant cell

Resistance

Urban

lithium Churning Nudges Ethiopian Self-care kinase Rescue Immigration Segregation Pelizaeus-Merzbacher

Research Kangaroo

Toward

Connexin47 Interventions Evaluation Point W03 Timers

ion

glioblastomas Monster Republic

Launch

Ice Europe

Residential

Grey Harm Medicaid inhibitors Spring

Digital

Sustainability

HealthDorms Policy Housing survival Herodotus Murmur giganteus SHP2 Romantic small Macropus mutations disease Public nanowires Organization

Do

Heart Failure Shower Reduction

lung

Penn Undergraduates

Free Promote Melodrama European

Invention Reproductive Development Reforming

Lens Effects

Come join us for the Erin Express on Saturday March 8th and March 15th

Summer GJA12

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

NEW DAILY HAPPY HOURS MONDAY - FRIDAY 5PM TO 7PM

Margarita

Taco

Welcome

MONDAYS TUESDAYS WEDNESDAYS Thirsty

THURSDAYS

5

Faculty

FRIDAYS

VISIT DISTRITORESTAURANT.COM TO VIEW OUR DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

during Penn Quaker Days (formerly Penn Previews)

presented by the Center for Undergraduate Research & Fellowships and College Houses & Academic Services

Taco TUESDAYS EVERY TUESDAY FROM 5PM TO 7PM POLLO CHICKEN ROPA VIEJA,

ATTENTION UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCHERS!

QUESO FRESCO, CREMA, RADISH

CARNITAS SMOKY BLACK BEANS, PINEAPPLE-HABANERO SALSA

We’re looking for undergrads interested in sharing their research with the University community–as well as with prospective Penn students– through a 12-minute formal conference paper or a 60-second lecture. Papers and lectures will be presented at the Quaker Days Research Conference on April 7, 2014.

HONGOS WILD MUSHROOMS,

TRUFFLED POTATO PURÉE, YUKON POTATO

GUACAMOLE

MASHED AVOCADO, JALAPEÑO, COTIJA CHEESE

To apply, visit www.upenn.edu/curf/pprc-app and submit your proposal online.

SALSA MEXICANA

TRADITIONAL MEXICAN SALSA

Proposals due Thursday, March 20.

3945 CHESTNUT STREET • PHILADELPHIA, PA 19104 • 215.222.1657

/Distrito.PHL

DISTRITORESTAURANT.COM

@DistritoPHL


NE WS

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 3

Trustees’ meeting: just the facts BY FOLA ONIFADE Staff Writer The Board of Trustees met on Thursday at the Inn at Penn for the winter full board meeting. The Daily Pennsylvanian took a look at the main points of the meeting. Ad Hoc Committee on Diversity/Academic Policy Committee: Several issues surrounding faculty recruitment were discussed. President Amy Gutmann and Vice Provost for Faculty Anita Allen stressed the importance of hiring faculty from within our own system, alluding to hiring students as future professors. Both Gutmann and Allen believed that hiring from within the University could address the issue of faculty diversity while retaining the stellar students as promising faculty members. As a regulated nursing program, there are rules that the School of Nursing must follow. By 2025, nurse anesthetists will not be certified without a doctoral degree. Dean of the Nursing School Afaf Meleis announced that the school would begin its transition from a master’s program to a doctorate program. The Doctorate in Nursing Program will be the first in Pennsylvania and the first among Ivy League institutions.

Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences Stephen Fluharty introduced a new initiative under the School of Liberal and Professional Studies for the development of a Master of Chemical Science Degree. As the demand for advanced science credentials increases, the program would serve those who are currently employed and seeking additional training. Creation of a master’s program would also help the University strengthen relations with chemical science companies such as Johnson & Johnson. Facilities and Campus Planning Committee The committee approved the creation of the Jordan Medical Education Center that is set to be completed by January 2015. The Center will be connected to the Smilow Center for Translational Research. The committee also discussed the South Bank Master Plan for the Pennovation Center. Development principles will focus on entrepreneurship, creation and innovation and fostering interdisciplinary collaborations and partnerships. As part of the developing the design for the center, there will be a particular effort to connect the Center to Penn, the Schuylkill River and the city of Philadelphia in general. “This

BE IN HAVANA BY GRADUATION Brunch ★ Lunch ★ Dinner ★ Latin Floorshows

is a place where we can do lots of things at a lower cost than we can do it on our main campus,” Gutmann said. Budget and Finance Committee Vice President of Budget and Management Analysis Bonnie Gibson gave an overview of the University’s finances to the committee. She noted that two-thirds of all students who received financial aid received grants of $35,000 or more, while onethird of aided students received grants of $50,000 or more. The tuition for the 2014-2015 academic year was announced to be $61,132, and Gibson point-

RIFF FOR CHARITY

ed out that Penn remained at a consistent average among its peer schools in tuition increase. Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli presented 10 resolutions for renovations to be included in the University budget. These included building renovations in SteinbergDietrich Hall, Huntsman Hall classrooms and group study rooms and continued renovation of Gregory College House. Carnaroli noted that final renovations of Gregory would complete the renovations for University residence halls past 38th Street.

Ruihong Liu/DP Staff Photographer

A cappella groups faced off last night at the Relay Riff-off at Castle. Penny Loafers and other groups compete. Proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society.

Staff writers Victoria Moffitt and Jill Golub contributed reporting.

OPEN 7 DAYS La Fontana Della Citta

A WEEK

215.875.9990

Experience a Touch of Italy At the Best BYOB In Philly!

2301 E Albert st. phila. 19125 penn.

Seats 150 People 5 Lunches, 7 Dinners, 7 days a week Excellent for Family and Group Meetings

www.cookandshaker.com

215-426-2665

Contact Management, they are happy to meet your needs!

Authentic Italian Cuisine at Reasonable Prices

COcktails & beer | appetizers | sandwiches | Entrées

15% off with Fixed Price Sunday-Thursday

20% discount w/ penncard!

1701 Spruce St. - Philadelphia, PA 19103 - www.lafontanadellacitta.com

Open 7 Days a Week FREE Delivery The most variety of Indian Cuisine on campus at

Sitar India Present your Student ID for

10% OFF!

CELEBRATE YOUR GRADUATION WITH CLASSIC & MODERN CUBAN CUISINE BY JAMES BEARD AWARD-WINNING

(215) 662-0818

www.CubaLibreRestaurant.com Old City | 10 S. 2nd Street | Philadelphia

Grace Church is a multi-ethnic community of rich and poor, undergrads and PhDs, blue-collars and no-collars, Americans and internationals, all united by the good message of Jesus.

Lunch and Dinner Buffet

CHEF GUILLERMO PERNOT

Special Graduation Packages Available Contact Hannah Yoffa, Sales Director for more information HYoffa@CubaLibreRestaurant.com | 215.627.0666

(corner of 36th and Haverford Ave)

60 South 38th Street

FREE with most of these insurances:

GLASSES or CONTACT LENSES

2 $ 79 2 $ 129

Co-pays may be applied • Now accepting Bravo Health

SPECIAL PRICES FOR PRADA PENN STUDENTS Lens Options per pair Pairs Eye Exam Standardof Polycarbonate................................$40 GUCCI SPECIAL PRICES FOR PENN STUDENTS Lens Options per pair Comprehensive Eye Exam......................... $42 Standard Plastic SPECIAL PRICES FOR PENN STUDENTS IAL PRICES FOR PENN STUDENTS Glasses Lens Options per pair Scratch Coating..................$15 Lens Options per pair Eye Exam Standard Polycarbonate................. Standard Contact Lens Fit & Follow-up.......$40 SPECIAL PRICES FOR PENN STUDENTS UV Treatment.................................................$15 Eye Exam Lens Options per pair Eye Exam......................... $42 ye Exam from RAY BAN Standard Polycarbonate................................$40 Standard Polycarbonate................................$40 Comprehensive Standard Plastic Scratch Coating... Eye Exam or Gradient Tint.....................................$15 Comprehensive Eye Frames Exam......................... $42 Polycarbonate................................$40 ehensive Eye Exam......................... $42 Standard Standard PlasticSolid Scratch Coating..................$15 Standard Plastic Scratch Coating..................$15

Standard Contact Lens Fit & Follow-up.......$40 Includes: UV price Treatment................................. Eye Exam......................... $42 40% offFit retail price Photochromic.........................20% off retail Standard Contact Lens & Follow-up.......$40 rd Contact Lens Fit &Comprehensive Follow-up.......$40 Standard Plastic Scratch Coating..................$15 Frames, VERSACE UV Treatment.................................................$15 UV Treatment.................................................$15 Frames Solid or Gradient Tint...................... Lenses, Standard ContactFrames Lens Fit & Follow-up.......$40 Standard Anti-Reflective Coating...................$45 LensesTint.....................................$15 per pair UV Treatment.................................................$15 and Complete Solid40% or Gradient Tint.....................................$15 ames Solid or Gradient off retail price Photochromic.........................20% Eye Exam and Service.... 20% off retail price Other Add-On Single Vision.................................................$40 Frames SolidACUVUE or Tint.....................................$15 40% off retail price Photochromic.........................20% off retail price f retail price Photochromic.........................20% offGradient retail price Standard Anti-Reflective Coating.... Cannot be combined with insurance Lenses per Bifocal...........................................................$60 Contact Photochromic.........................20% offpair retail Lenses price Standard Anti-Reflective Coating...................$45 Standard Anti-Reflective Coating...................$45 Lenses per pair nses per pair 40% off retail price Other Add-On and Service.... 20% Single Vision.................................................$40 Progressive...................................$120 Conventional.........................15% Anti-Reflective Coating...................$45 DOLCE Standard &20% GABBANA LensesSingle per Vision.................................................$40 pair Other Add-On and Service.... 20% off retail price off retail price OtherStandard Add-On and Service.... off retail price Vision.................................................$40 Bifocal...........................................................$60 Lenses Premium Lenses Progressive.............20% off and retail price Lenses Disposable..............................5% off retail Contact price Other Add-On Service.... 20% off retail price Single Vision.................................................$40 Boxes Bifocal...........................................................$60 Contact ..........................................................$60 Contact Standard Progressive...................................$120 Conventional.........................15% o KENNETH Bifocal...........................................................$60 Contact Lenses of Disposable Standard Progressive...................................$120 rd Progressive...................................$120 Conventional.........................15% off retail priceprice Conventional.........................15% offCOLE retail price Premium Progressive.............20% off retail Disposable..............................5% o ContactoffLenses Standard Progressive...................................$120 Conventional.........................15% retail price Premium off retail price m Progressive.............20% off retail price Progressive.............20% Disposable..............................5% off retail price Disposable..............................5% off retail price BAUSCH & LOMB Premium Progressive.............20% off retail price Disposable..............................5% off retail price from TOM FORD NOW OFFERING SUNGLASSES

Includes: Contact Lens Fitting, 2 Boxes of Contacts, Solution, Cannot be combined with insurance Eye Exam

• •

1325 Market Street ....................... 267.514.4393 3853 Aramingo Avenue .................. 215.288.3333 Dr. Jeffery Gold - Previously Sunrise Optical

4002 Chestnut Street ..................... 215.921.4871 1925 Chestnut Street ..................... 215.854.0441

• • • • • • •

City Workers SEPTA employees VBA NVA Blue Cross Blue Shield Americhoice F.O.P. Aetna

• • • • • • • •

March Vision Care United Healthcare Community Plan Davis Vision Keystone East Keystone Mercy Bravo Health Health Partners All University of Penn Workers


THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

PAGE 4 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

Opinion LETTER TO THE EDITOR

VOL. CXXX, NO. 29

The Independent Student Newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania

To the Editor:

130th Year of Publication

Michale Goldberger’s opinion piece in Thursday’s DP on the American Studies Association vote to boycott Israeli academic institutions calls upon the University to cancel its membership in the ASA. In fact, Penn does not have an institutional membership in the ASA, nor do any schools within Penn. Some individual faculty are members and travel to their conferences, as is their right. Department chairs may choose to fund their travel to these conferences, as they do for any academic activities, respecting faculty members’ academic freedom to take part in academic activities of their choosing. Paying for those individual activities does not imply institutional endorsement of the ASA. As Ms. Goldberger correctly noted, the University denounced the boycott when it was announced last December. President Amy Gutmann, as vice chair of the Association of American Universities, signed a statement issued by the AAU “strongly opposing a boycott of Israeli academic institutions” as a violation of “academic freedom.” The free exchange of ideas is the lifeblood of an academic institution, and efforts to restrict that are in direct opposition to the values that we at Penn hold most dear.

TAYLOR CULLIVER, Executive Editor AMANDA SUAREZ, Managing Editor JENNIFER YU, Opinion Editor LOIS LEE, Director of Online Projects FIONA GLISSON, Campus News Editor HARRY COOPERMAN, City News Editor JODY FREINKEL, General Assignments Editor WILLIAM MARBLE, Enterprise Editor GENESIS NUNEZ, Copy Editor MATT MANTICA, Copy Editor YOLANDA CHEN, News Photo Editor MICHELE OZER, Sports Photo Editor CONNIE KANG, Photo Manager

STEVEN TYDINGS, Senior Sports Editor RILEY STEELE, Sports Editor IAN WENIK, Sports Editor HAILEY EDELSTEIN, Creative Director ANALYN DELOS SANTOS, News Design Editor VIVIAN LEE, News Design Editor JENNY LU, Sports Design Editor JENNIFER KIM, Video Producer STEPHANIE PARK, Video Producer

GIANNI MASCIOLI, Business Manager CHANTAL GARCIA FISCHER, Credit Manager ERIC PARRISH, Marketing Manager

SELMA BELGHITI, Finance Manager KATHERINE CHANG, Advertising Manager

Sincerely, Stephen J. MacCarthy Vice President for University Communications

THIS ISSUE Paola Ruano, Associate Copy Editor Megan Mansmann, Assoicate Copy Editor Katarina Underwood, Associate Copy Editor Jennifer Kopp, Associate Copy Editor

Collin Henderson, Assoicate Sports Editor Eunice Lim, Associate Online Editor

The freshman porn star

THE SCREWTINIZER| What if it happened at Penn?

B

ack in January, a Duke f reshman named Thomas Bagley was huddled up in his dorm room, watching porn on his laptop, when he saw something that made him pause the scene. He squinted at the girl, and although she was sprawled naked across the screen, he was sure: It was a classmate of his, a fellow Duke freshman. What happened next can only be ex pla ined as the way i n for mat ion spreads in cyberspace. Her name was splashed across fraternity listser vs , online news sites and Collegiate ACB. Her friends and professors found out. She received 230 new friend requests in one weekend — most of which came from college men who professedly wanted to “bang the porn star.” Can you imagine this happening at Penn?

When I think about all the f lack this column gets for merely touching the subject of sex, it’s f r ightening to imagine how Penn would respond to a student involved in sex work. But here’s the rub: There are, undoubtedly, sex workers at Penn. And they deserve more respect than this girl at Duke is getting. In 2011, 34th Street published a feature about students involved in sex work, mentioning a College student who worked as a foot fetish model, another who worked i n a BDSM du ngeon a nd another who worked as an escort. Underpinning each was the the same motivation: economics. “Sex work is an economic issue, and so where there is economic need, it’s an activity that people will engage in to make money,” Samantha Majic, author of “Sex Work Politics,” explained. For college students fac-

ing steep tuition bills, this type of work is more pervasive than you might think. A 2010 study, “Participation in Sex Work: Students’ Views,” suggested that 16.5 percent of undergraduate students would consider working in the sex industry, with moneymaking as the overwhelming motivation. For t he Pen n st udent s who were profiled in 2011, this was very much the case. The foot model made $10,000 w ithin three months; the BDSM girl was making $500 per week. (One comment on the Street feature: “Ambitious Wharton students, take note.”) The Duke freshman has defended her work in pornography with similar motivations, noting that she’s used all of her porn profits to pay her tuition — which, like Penn’s, is nearly $60,000 per year. But what if she wasn’t us-

ing pornography as a means to an economic end? What if she wasn’t using the money for tuition? What if she was actually just enjoying sex work? There are plenty of feminist activists, politicians and porn haters who will argue that pornography is inherently disempowering and void of choices. But for the Duke freshman, the Penn students and others involved in sex work, these arguments come across as condescending. “I think that’s incredibly patronizing and stigmatizing — and actually objectifying — to say that she couldn’t possibly be doing this on her own volition,” Majic said of the Duke porn actress. The Duke freshman, who strongly identifies as a feminist a nd is pursuing her degree in gender studies, responded by asking: “If the patriarchy is about men making decisions for women and

taking away their agency, why do some feminists want to control other women’s decisions?” It’s a valid point. And if her critics are mostly concerned with the pornography industry, then maybe they should stop finger-wagging at the Duke freshman and shift their criticism toward Thomas Bagley, who discovered her work only through his loyal viewership of an expensive subscription-only porn site. “Just because pornography for the majority of us is associated with the shame of lonely Friday nights doesn’t mean it is a shameful industry,” said College sophomore Iris Zhang, who is vice chair of the Penn Consortium of Undergraduate Women. No matter how we feel about sex work, a student at a place like Duke or Penn shouldn’t be forced to defend her volition, whether the motivation is

ARIELLE PARDES economic or for enjoyment (or both). After all, we don’t attack the agency of students who work part-time jobs to support themselves financially or entrepreneurial students who work to get a head start on their careers. Whether our classmates are working as waitresses or porn stars, what’s the difference? ARIELLE PARDES is a College senior from San Diego. Email her at ariellepardes@gmail.com or follow her @pardesoteric. “The Screwtinizer” appears every Friday.

The right to be alone

LINES OF PERSPECTIVE | There’s something to be said about enjoying your own company

W

hen I appl ied for housing last year, I automatically opted for the single option. Like every new freshman, I wondered whether having a roommate would enable me to attain the social scene of Penn more easily, but I rapidly gave up on that moment of hesitation upon reassessing the fact that I like being on my own. I enjoy meeting people, discovering new surroundings and new personalities, but at the end of the day, I also enjoy my own company. People have the right to vote, to eat in public, to embrace, to marry, to make art, to observe art. I have the right to be alone. Our campus is so pulsating with thousands of wanderers that it is hard sometimes to not feel guilty about simply wanting a moment alone. The other day, a friend complained that people always saw me for dinner or coffee,

but I never made the time for him. After telling him I was always busy, he mentioned the notion of “double-booking” people and asked me if I did it too. When I replied that I never took on that notion because I would much prefer not seeing anyone, he simply said, jokingly, that I was the worst. It struck me that my preferences would cause such bad judgments of me. Edith Bouvier Beale and Edith Ewing Bouvier chose to take shelter in their Long Island summer estate Grey Ga r dens t o esc ape t hei r busy New York Cit y l i fe. They quick ly became the highly eccentric neighbors of the block, partly because of their reclusive nature. My behavior and that of others who choose one-on-one intimacy from time to time does not come as close to the craziness the Eddies were put through at the end of their lives.

Yet, their lifestyle proves that society considers chosen loneli ness outside of

‘‘

Our campus is so pulsating with thousands of wanderers that it is hard sometimes to not feel guilty about simply wanting a moment alone.”

the norm. The Eddies simply chose reclusiveness to avoid whatever unnecessary trouble, drama and boredom the city pressed upon them. For the society and the Penn

community, doing mundane things such as eating, going to the theater, walking or going to a museum or a coffee shop alone is mostly considered uncommon. Society makes it awkward. At Penn, we’re always rushing to make plans for lunch or dinner because no one wants to eat alone — not because we don’t want to be alone while eating, but because we know that the next time we tell people that we ate on our own, their first reaction will be to frown and then ask why. For me, getting out of Penn and walking to Clark Park or down to Center City alone does not make me a loner or an antisocial person. It just shows that I am a functional member of society who needs to do things on her own to keep everything else in her life normally balanced. Speaking about this to a friend the other day made me realize that my needs might

be due to the fact that I am an only child. I did not grow up amidst a huge family with vacations occupying all of our days or dinners every night. Sunday was our family day, but all the other days were spent separately. Then, of cou rse, goi ng to Chinatown or Reading Terminal Market on a solo trip makes me feel happier at times. It enables me to breathe, think of something else, walk aimlessly or so. Other friends feel the same way, perhaps because there is a common feeling on campus that people at Penn do not especially wander in the city that much. Not that many people would eat in Old City or in Fishtown on a Friday. Most of the restaurants around 40th Street will be occupied, and if some are adventurous, maybe Baltimore Avenue will be walked on. So next time none of your friends want to give up on laziness and comfort and

YOUR VOICE

CONTACT

HAVE YOUR OWN OPINION? Write us! The DP encourages guest submissions from the Penn community. Submissions can be up to 700 words long. The DP reserves the right to edit for accuracy, clarity, grammar and DP style. The DP does not guarantee publication of any submission. Send submissions to Opinion Editor Jennifer Yu at yu@ thedp.com or 4015 Walnut St.

By mail or in-person:

By phone:

4015 Walnut St. Philadelphia, PA 19104 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

News/Editorial: (215) 898-6585 Advertising: (215) 898-6581 Fax: (215) 898-2050

DIANE BAYEUX you need to walk out of University City to feel you’re part of the world, go on your own. Do not hesitate because of unfounded and unnecessary moments. You have the right to be alone. DIANE BAYEUX is a College freshman from Paris studying English. Email her at dbayeux@ sas.upenn.edu or follow her @dianebayeux

The DP wants to ensure that all content is accurate and to be transparent about any inaccuracies. If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of any content in the print or online editions, please email corrections@thedp.com.


NE WS

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 5

New LGBTQA group launches BY SEAN McAFEE Contributing Writer While the country’s courts and legislature continued to grapple with gay rights this week, a new LGBT group launched on campus. Out in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics held its kickoff event Thursday night in Skirkanich Hall. The national group seeks to increase the participation of sexual and gender minority identities in STEM-related fields. The event marked the return of an LGBTQA interest group for students in STEM fields after Penn’s chapter of Queer Undergraduates in Science and Technology closed after its members graduated in 2010. Engineering alum Matthew Feczko founded QUEST while he was an undergraduate student at Penn. He joined the national board of oSTEM as Vice President of Membership upon graduating in 2010.

“Seeing the organization start to re-flourish and re-grow is incredibly exciting,” Feczko said in an email. “Since 2010, we have grown to over 55 oSTEM chapters nation-wide.” The board currently consists of three graduate students. “The g roup needs undergraduate representation,” Engineering graduate student and oSTEM officer Marco Varela said. “It’s important for the sustainability of the group,” added Britt Binler, also an Engineering graduate student and oSTEM officer. Binler helped found the group after meeting with other queer Engineering students through Lambda Grads, an umbrella LGBT group for graduate students. “We saw that the [other graduate schools] had their own specific LGBT groups and we thought Engineering needed one,” she said. Binler, who had met Feczko while they were both undergraduates at Penn, reached out to him for assistance in setting up Penn’s chapter of oSTEM. The group hopes to support

Financial aid also makes historic jump

Delicious

HOT POT

to get you through a cold winter

TUITION from page 1

ASIA SUPERMARKET

more welcoming. Penn may be an exception in terms of work-place equality. It extends full health care benefits to same-sex couples as well as offering tax offsets to employees who cover their spouse with university insurance. Currently, Pennsylvania does not recognize same-sex marriage. “The institution is glad to see the group,” Carpick said in the opening of the kickoff event. “The climate isn’t always what you want. These groups are important for networking in a comfortable environment.” The group hopes to hear 34 what ST types of events students would like to see oSTEM sponsor.

Join Award-Winning Filmmaker Christopher Zelov (Class of ‘83) for a screening of his recent production at the Rotunda, Sunday March 2nd at 7PM. Local panel includes Dan Garofalo. See www.therotunda.org for more information.

FILM

DO YOU PAY PER VIEW?

T

hough we all know the Internet is for porn (thanks Avenue Q), the bedroom is no longer the only area being ceded to digital territory. For every girl with daddy’s AmEx, window browsing on Fifth Avenue has been replaced with online shopping. And FYEs everywhere have virtually been rendered useless (pun intended) with the existence of the multifarious iTunes store. Things are no different here at Penn, where the Rave gets nearly half the traffic for the midnight screenings of blockbuster hits like Twilight as Hulu does the day after the newest episode of 30 Rock airs. This makes sense. We Penn students are too busy procrastinating on Penn InTouch and designing funny lacrosse pinnies for the clubs we’re involved in to leave the comfort of our beds to

watch Hugo in theaters. And we fit this mold of overworked Ivy League students well, with only about 17% of Penn undergrads watching movies at the Rave every semester. But how about the other stereotype, the one that says all college students are poor? The free movement of information made possible by the interweb makes

you guess then that Penn students would prefer to get their RomCom fix online with free streaming websites like SideReel and Ch131 rather than pay for services provided by Netflix and Redbox? While 75% of us watch movies online, nearly 50% pay for it. I hear Horrible Bosses — a new release on iTunes — is hysterical, but is Whose recommendations do you take? it worth the 50 1.5 salads at 47.7% Other Sweetgreen 40% 40 A Friend it would Cinema Studies have cost if 30 Major 26.2% 25% 25% I had seen it Professor or TA 20 in theaters? Street Ramen noo10 *Students surveyed were allowed to choose more dles aren’t than one option. 0 that bad, I guess. entertainment accessible and The average Penn student inexpensive to anyone with an (who is anything but average, if AirPennNet account. Wouldn’t you ask Amy Gutmann) watch-

has everything you need.

143 North 11th St.

(215) 928-9888

Dine-In, Catering & Delivery Happy Hour: Mon-Fri 5-7 Lunch Special: Mon-Fri $8.95 Early Bird: Sun-Thur $10.95

Handmade, Super Premium Ice Cream // Vegan Ice Cream Shakes // Ice Cream Sandwiches // Weird // Yummy

PattayaRestaurant.com • 215.387.8533 4006 Chestnut Street • University City

8

CONTINUOUS CRAB LEGS

LATE NIGHT EVERY WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY

EVERY SUNDAY 3-9 PM

10PM - MIDNIGHT $3 YUENGLING DRAFT $3 FEATURED CALL SHOT* $4 WINE $5 FISHBOWL $1 BUCK-A-SHUCK

$19.95 ALL YOU CAN EAT

LATE NIGHT MENU

FEATURING WED: QUIZZO THURS-FRI: DJ SAT: DJ + KARAOKE

* LIKE US ON FACEBOOK TO SEE OUR FEATURED SHOT OF THE NIGHT

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ DOCMAGROGANSOYSTERHOUSEUNIVERSITYCITY

Phone: 215.382.3474

H

Film polled you to find out how you are getting your Sunday afternoon movie fixes. Here’s what we learned. BY ANTHONY KHAYKIN

34TH STREET Magazine December 1, 2011

will increase from $12,922 to $13,464, additional fees will increase to $5,492 from $5,296, the University announced. The University also authorized a $196 million financial aid budget for 2014-2015, the largest financial-aid allocation in the University’s history. Since President Amy Gutmann’s term began in 2004, Penn’s financial aid budget has grown by 148 percent. “One of Penn’s highest evergreen priorities has been to eliminate all financial barriers for young women and men with exceptional promise who attend the University of Pennsylvania,” Gutmann said. The University will also continue its all-grant, no-loan financial aid policy. The average grants for undergraduate students eligible for financial aid will be about $41,700 in the upcoming academic year. When compared with cost of attendance around the Ivies, Penn’s tuition announcement places the University somewhere in the middle of the spectrum. While Penn is just crossing the $60,000 mark in tuition and fees, the cost of attendance at Harvard, Columbia, Cornell and Dartmouth universities have already exceeded that. These schools have not yet released their budgets for the 2014-2015 academic year. Princeton University announced on Jan. 27 that its tuition and fees would increase by 4.1 percent to $55,400 in the upcoming year. Brown University increased its tuition and fees by 4 percent to $57,232 earlier this month in its budget for the 2014 fiscal year.

and cultivate diversity in engineering and science much like Society of Women Engineers or the National Society of Black Engineers. “The three main things for this group is to introduce members to the LGBTQA community, to cultivate leadership and to make it sustainable,” Binler said. “Allies are welcome too.” John Henry Towne Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineer ing and Applied Mechanics Robert Carpick is advising the group after previously counseling the defunct QUEST chapter. “oSTEM is the phoenix rising from the ashes of QUEST,” Carpick said. Carpick is an outspoken advocate of same-sex rights. He left University of WisconsinMadison in 2006 to work at Penn after Wisconsin denied to extend full health care benefits to his partner. “After six and one-half years of working very hard, I found it’s problematic to work in an environment where you are not treated equally,” Carpick said in an interview with the Associated Press. He found the environment at Penn to be

highbrow ego food & drink film feature music arts lowbrow

oSTEM looks to foster community for LGBT+ students in STEM fields

3432 Sansom St.

www.docmagrogans.com

Wh

3.1

2

es seve every s tic pro to watc than a tional of pop not in tions). ing sev less tha many paid se ing in bufferi immun and m ing to watchi on Me Not price t the big savings studen service movie tween depend Netflix Moral judge i

*A of 100 survey their fi


NE WS

PAGE 6 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

FEMINISTING Upgrade your ramen.

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Four things that you need to know about Penn Alexander BY CLAIRE COHEN Deputy News Editor

4040 Locust St. 215.243.9999 ramenbarphilly.com

We’ve moved! Springfield Beer Distributor

Now open at

22nd and Washington Avenue

Amiya Chopra/Staff Photographer

The Penn Women’s Center kicked off two days of events commemorating its 40th anniversary on Penn’s campus yesterday at Houston Hall. Self-described “feminist evangelist” Jessica Valenti gave the keynote speech on “Purity, Sexism and Activism.” Valenti, a contributor to The Nation and other reputable publications, founded blog Feministing.com. She has also authored four books. The Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies conference will continue with events today.

just 7 minutes from campus!

Today is the last day for parents to register their children in the enrollment lottery for the Penn Alexander School, located at 42nd and Spruce streets. The school is one of the top elementary schools in the city and places well-above the state average in standardized test scores. Nineteen percent of students at the school are children of Penn faculty members. But other than its reputation, why should you concern yourself with Penn Alexander?

We Deliver

34st.com

gives $1,330 per student each year (this translates to $700,000 per year) leases the building to PAS for $1

Penn Alexander had no serious incidents in 2011 - 2012 (Serious incidents include: assault, drugs, weapons, morals and theft)

Number of student suspensions in 2012 - 2013

1.

Penn gives a ton of money to Penn Alexander Penn is a generous supporter of this local school. The University currently gives Penn Alexander $1,330 per student, which translates to about $700,000 per year. It also leases property to the school for virtually no money at all, charging only $1 each year for rent. This partnership started in 1998, when Penn, the School District of Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers came together to found the academically excellent school in order to ease overcrowding in the district. The building, which houses students in kindergarten through eighth grade, opened its doors in 2001.

2. It’s a really, really ridiculously good school Phone: (215) 546-7301

Penn’s donations to Penn Alexander School

Parents are sometimes desperate to enroll their children in Penn Alexander, partly because the school places above the Philadelphia average in math and reading state exams given to third through eighth graders.

1

Penn Alexander

39

Henry C. Lea

Source: The School District of Philadelphia

The school has a 17:1 studentto-teacher ratio in kindergarten and a 23:1 ratio for all other grades. It is equipped with a well-staffed library, three computer labs, two gardens and full-time technology and arts specialists. The closest elementar y school to Penn Alexander is the Lea School, located at 47th and Locust streets, which has dramatically different test scores. Lea performed lower than the Philadelphia average in stateadministered exams in all categories except for sixth grade math and seventh grade math and reading. The school reported 39 suspensions during the 2012-2013 school year, while Penn Alexander reported only one suspension. Lea also reported six “serious” incidents last year, while Penn Alexander reported none.

3. Admission is competitive

Because Penn Alexander is such a prestigious school, there is a high demand for enrollment that typically exceeds the number of spots available. Parents who want to enroll their children at Penn Alexander must live inside an area called the “catchment zone” and must register for a lottery system, which ends today for the 2014-2015 school year. Names will be drawn on March 5, and families will be notified of the decisions by mail the week of March 10. The admissions process used to be different though. Last January, the system changed dramatically when Penn Alexander switched from a first-come, first-served basis to the current lottery process. In prior years, parents camped out for days outside of the school in order to secure spots for their children. Last year, the first year the lottery system was in place, 78 children were given spots in the kindergarten class and 10 families were placed on the waitlist.Ultimately, all the students on last year’s waitlist were granted admission to the school. Given that admissions has a rocky history at Penn Alexander, it’s clear that ...

4.

Penn Alexander is no stranger to controversy Beyond the possibility of enrollment qualms, Penn Alexander has been the subject of other local controversies. While students enrolled in Penn Alexander are required to live inside the catchment zone, the Philadelphia Daily News reported in January that 34 Penn Alexander students live outside the zone. Three of these out-of-zone students are the children of Kevin Johnson, who was considering a run in next year’s mayoral election when the article came out but announced his decision not to run earlier this month. The Daily News reported that Johnson, who was known for being an “outsider” candidate at the time, was close friends with former school superintendent Arlene Ackerman, who had the power to place students in Penn Alexander.


NE WS

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Plan for space is a mixed-use building DREXEL from page 1 cess was not transparent, and that the end result failed to benefit the West Philadelphia community. “There was zero community input of who the developer was going to be,” Powelton Village Civ ic A ssociation P resident M ichael Jones said. “This was simply irresponsible.” Jones added that members of the community were on edge during the selection process, though they were relieved that Drexel will develop the space, since the university was most upfront with its plans. In addition to UCHS, the 14acre cluster Drexel will purchase includes the Charles R. Drew Elementary School building on 37th and Warren streets and the Walnut Center on 37th and Walnut streets.

Four deans still need to be replaced

The school district will receive $35 million for the sale of both this cluster of buildings and four other neighborhood schools. It is unclear what Drexel will pay for the buildings it will purchase. However, it’s clear that Drexel plans to transform the space into a mixed-use building w ith residential, commercial and educational functions. Francis stressed that the space will not be converted into dormitories. “We’re talking about significantly improving what is currently vacant,” Francis said. “We see ourselves participating in the economic recovery of West Philadelphia.” While no plans have been finalized, Drexel may relocate the Samuel Powel Elementary School, currently at 36th Street and Powelton Av-

enue, to the UCHS site. The expansion would allow for the addition of fourth through eighth grades to the school, which currently only enrolls kindergarten through fourth grade students. “We’re delighted to pursue this dream,” Drexel Vice Provost of University and Community Partnerships Lucy Kerman said. “We’re really committed to supporting a school that has been so successful.” Despite Drexel’s promise to support Powel, many at the meeting expressed concern that the district’s sales weren’t doing enough to support the community. “Our high school is gone, our community is scattered — we’re looking for a way to help our kids,” a 1977 UCHS alumnus said. “I’m asking

you, Mr. Developer, what are your plans?” The audience particularly questioned how the school district can help students from the Mantua district. “If [Powel] is going to be the great school that it is going to be, I want to make sure it’s available to the Mantua community,” Mantua Civic Association member Vanessa Pembleton said. UCHS was one of the 23 Philadelphia schools to close in June 2013. Now that Drexel is the finalist to purchase the property, the university will begin examining the property and negotiating with the school district. Both parties hope to reach a settlement before the end of June. “We still have to move from finalist to owner,” Francis said.

PENN200

$200

!

You ShOUld

LIVE HeRE

Now Leasing for Fall 2014 2013! Spaces going fast!

w w w. r a d i a n a p a r t m e n t s . c o m Individual leases (per person) – w/ utilities included*

NURSING from page 1 with diversity and minority communities, Villarruel’s efforts to support nursing faculty research at the University of Michigan have led to a steady increase in funding from the National Institutes of Health, the press release said. “I would say probably the first challenge is looking at research funding and seeing what we can do to increase our success of the faculty,” Villarruel said. In March 2013, a federal government sequester cut the budget of the NIH by 5 percent, or $1.55 billion, in its fiscal year — though the NIH has recently received another billion-dollar grant. “One of the things that happened as a result of this is that people started saying, ‘We’re not going to be able to get any money — it’s not useful writing grants,’ and that’s just not true,” Villarruel said. “So we have to make sure that we continue to write good grants and that they’re competitive, in addition to looking to other funding strains.” Villarruel said that it’s “too soon to tell” what initiatives would be best to implement during her time at Penn. She said her strategy for her first year would begin with “really understand[ing] where Penn Nursing is with input from ... students, our board of overseers [and] faculty.” Provost Price described Villarruel as someone who “knows how to identify strategic priorities and then marshal the vision and resources to achieve them.” “The [Consultative] Committee was looking for people with a strong background in research, a passionate commitment to education, significant administrative experience and talent and an investment in work related to access and diversity,” Rebecca Bushnell, former School of Arts and Sciences dean and chair of the consultative committee for the selection of the new dean, said in an email. “Dr. Villarruel excels on all counts, and her deep experience with Penn is also a plus.” The announcement of the Nursing School’s new dean concludes the first of four dean searches at Penn this year. Consultative committees are also helping Gutmann and Price to conduct searches for new deans of the Graduate School of Education, the Wharton School and the School of Social Policy & Practice. The University will also need to replace Penn Law School Dean Michael Fitts, who will officially become president of Tulane University on July 1.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 7

Washer and dryer in every apartment Internet Cafe & Private study room Ground floor shopping & dining State-of-the art fitness center 2-story city-view clubroom with walkout terrace

40th & Walnut St.

*restrictions apply on electric usage.

215.222.4212

O P E N O 24 P HE ouN rs 24 Hou

OPEN 24 HOURS OPEN 24 HOURS 24 HOUR DELIVERY 24 HOUR DELIVERY

rs

20 South 36th St. 20 South 36th St. Philadelphia, PA 19104 Philadelphia, PA 19104

CALL 215-382-2199 OR CALL 215-382-2199 OR ORDER ONLINE AT WWW.AXISPIZZA.COM ORDER ONLINE AT WWW.AXISPIZZA.COM


NE WS

PAGE 8 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

Only 12 11 units left for next school year! Call us today.

We’d love to help you find a great place.

www.apartmentsatpenn.com

215.222.0222

At Penn, At Home.

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Obstacles for clinic serving immigrants

Penn volunteers at Puentes de Salud treat illegal Phila. residents BY CATHY HAN Contributing Writer Treating illegal immigrants involves more than just writing a prescription. Penn for Immigrant Rights and the Latino Pre-Medical Association co-hosted “Healthcare for the Undocumented,” a panel discussion on Thursday in Huntsman Hall. Immigration Action Week is a series of events around campus this week meant to bring attention to the policy and thought surrounding immigration. Puentes de Salud, a community health clinic serving the Latino immigrant population of South Philadelphia, was the focus of the discussion. Two former Penn students and current volunteers for Puentes de Salud participated on the panel. Carla Paredes, a 2010 Nursing graduate and an Intensive Care Unit nurse at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Elsa Treffeisen, a 2012 College and Engineering graduate and a student at Jefferson Medical School, shared their experiences of providing health care to undocumented immigrants. All volunteer The volunteer-run clinic generally serves 40 patients, two nights a week. Although it was founded in 2006, it did not provide any clinical services for three years in order to establish its place within the community. “Puentes de

Census information 2000: 6,200 Latinos // 2010: 13,000 Local leaders in community estimate 30-50K in Philadelphia up to 28% of Philadelphia's foreign-born population is estimated to be Latin American

Salud did not start with one doctor alone. It started in the community,” Paredes said. “It’s not just about giving [patients] a pill and sending them away. They need to be heard. They need to be counseled,” Paredes said. Education and outreach Puentes de Salud provides clinical services, educational programs, supports community outreach and participates in research. Other than community clinics like Puentes, the emergency room is the only place undocumented immigrants can be seen for medical care. “We educate the community to empower their own lives and take care of themselves,” Paredes said. “We treat what needs to be treated in addition to providing education for conditions that our patients are at high risk for such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia.” Paredes also said “language and literacy is one of the main challenges that Puentes faces.” All volunteers need to be fluent in Spanish and receive training on the unique cultural needs of the patient population. “If a patient believes in traditional remedies like slicing a tomato and putting it on their back to heal wounds, that is something we need to respect,” she

added. Politics by proxy The role of providers in addressing health care disparities is unclear. Paredes believes that “advocacy for clinicians means showing up and providing services.” She noted that the issue is politically divisive. “When you are funding a clinic like this, you are making a political stance,” she said. Treffeisen also emphasized that Puentes is about getting the word out about issues associated with immigrant health. “Increasing education in the community leads to healthier lifestyles,” she said. Treating body and mind Puentes de Salud is entirely a team effort. Instead of the traditional hierarchal structure in providing health care, there is a level field between all providers and volunteers. Paredes and Treffeisen also emphasized the need for providing culturally competent care and listening to the patient. Paredes explained that a psychosocial counselor is present at the clinic every night to “address what the majority of the patient population goes through with issues including anxiety and depression that can be associated with being undocumented immigrants.”

Fergie is more affordable

BEYONCE from page 1

Today’s Lesson: Take lots of study breaks and try out these great campus restaurants

Enjoy great dining right in your neighborhood!

34th & WALNUT/SANSOM STREETS: AUNTIE ANNE’S * BABY BLUES BBQ * CITTA PIZZA * DOC MAGROGAN‘S OYSTER HOUSE *DUNKIN’ DONUTS * MAD 4 MEX * MEDITERRANEAN CAFE * NEW DECK TAVERN * QUIZNOS SUBS * STARBUCKS * WHITE DOG CAFE 36th & WALNUT STREETS: COSI * PENN BOOKSTORE CAFE* PENNE RESTAURANT & WINE BAR * POD 36th & CHESTNUT STREETS: KIWI YOGURT * PIZZA RUSTICA 36th & LOCUST STREETS: TORTAS FRONTERAS 37th & SPRUCE STREETS: BEIJING RESTAURANT * GIA PRONTO * HUBBUB * SALADWORKS * WAWA 38th & WALNUT STREETS: BOBBY’S BURGER PALACE * CAPOGIRO * CITY TAP HOUSE * SWEETGREEN 40th STREET: BEN & JERRY’S * DISTRITO * FRESH GROCER * GREEK LADY * HARVEST SEASONAL GRILL & WINE BAR * HIP CITY VEG * METROPOLITAN BAKERY * QDOBA MEXICAN GRILL * SAXBY’S * SMOKEY JOE’S TAVERN

For a complete list of retailers, visit:

www.ucnet.com/universitysquare www.ucnet.com/universitysquare

over 500 responses within days. Jones said that the Concer ts Committee also utilizes Facebook analy tics as another data point to identify student interests in artists and bands. The Concerts Committee, which consists of over 30 u nder g r adu at e st udent s , begins brainstorming possible Fling per for mers months before the event , producing an extensive list of possible ar tists dur ing the summer before Fling, Jones said. The committee contacts artists’ agents one by one about eight months in advance of the concert to discuss preliminary quotes and availabilities. Throughout the fall semester, the Concerts committee deliberates performer options and seeks input from the student body to nar row dow n the list, Jones said. “ The process is always in f lux. A rtist availability and the price range they are quoting can change in an instant ... because of factors that are largely out of our control but necessitate us being very responsive and flexible,” Jones said. While contracts typically secure a performer, plans s o me t i me s d o not c o me to fruition. In 2013, a lastminute artist cancellation necessitated a last-minute booking of Girl Talk. “ L a s t y e a r, a n a r t i s t dropped out prior to the announcement which, while unfortunate, is a part of the concert production industry and was out of our direct control,” Jones wrote in an email. After an artist has been chosen, SPEC submits names to the University for conf i r mation. Once ga i ning approval, the committee begins working with the artists’ agents to negotiate a contract. They focus on the headliner first, and then move to openers.


SP OR TS

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 9

Red and Blue look to get ball Quakers get ready for second rolling in Lone Star state top-six matchup of young 2014 campaign THREE UP, THREE DOWN

BASEBALL | Quakers begin John Yurkow era with four games against Dallas Baptist

BY RILEY STEELE From The Daily Pennsylvanian’s sports blog, THE BUZZ No. 6 Denver 3-1 Saturday, 1 p.m. Franklin Field

For the second time in three games, Penn men’s lacrosse is preparing for a heavyweight fight against a highly ranked opponent. With No. 6 Denver (3-1) set to visit Franklin Field this weekend, the No. 20 Quakers will be forced to contain a high octane offense with plenty of talent. As the Red and Blue (1-1) get ready for Saturday’s game, we take a look at who’s up and who’s down heading into Penn’s matchup with the Pioneers. Three Up Penn’s defense: It’s hard to imagine any other team in the nation playing defense as well as the Quakers right now. In both games this season, Penn has shut down its opponents for extended periods, allowing its offense to go to work during those stretches. In their last game, the Red and Blue

Quakers will need to handle high intensity TRACK & FIELD from page 12 long- distance r unner Cleo Whiting , to perennial All-Ivy contenders like senior high jumper Maalik Reynolds . As one might expect, coach Steve Dolan has significantly different expectations for his athletes to match their wide variety of experience levels. “Some people are fighting to get into the f inals, and some people are trying to win Heps titles,” he said. But exper ience isn’t the only factor affecting the prog ram’s expectations of its athletes. The different event groups feature drastically different levels of competition within the Ivy League. For example, the Ivies feature one of the most competitive men’s onemile races in the country. “ You’r e pr o b ably goi ng to have to run under 4:05 to score,” high jump coach Joe Klim said. “It’s insane.” But rega rd less of t hese

shut down St. Joseph’s for over 37 minutes at one point, emphatically stifling the Hawks’ attack. More of the same will spell doom for the Pioneers on Saturday. Double the Feeney, Double the Fun: The Feeney twins have been lights out for Penn this season. Brian Feeney has been almost impenetrable in goal, having only allowed 13 goals in two games, including a mere four scores against St. Joes. In the midfield, Brian’s brother Danny scored six seconds into the game against the Hawks, helping spark Penn’s route of its cross-town rival. Jamie Faus: It’s been an eventful week for the Pioneers’ senior goalkeeper. Denver’s captain not only captured the MVP award in last weekend’s Frontier A irlines Face Off Classic, but was also named Big East Defensive Player of the Week for his efforts against Marist and Canisius in the tournament. Three Down Slow Starts: Other than Danny Feeney’s goal just six seconds into Penn’s matchup with St. Joes, the Quakers have had difficulty in the early phas-

es of their two games this season. Against Duke, the Red and Blue gave up four first quarter goals and couldn’t pull even after a sluggish beginning. Even Brian Feeney has struggled at the onset of both contests, allowing seven goals combined in the first period this year. Denver’s Defense: Though the Pioneers have played well in all four of their games this year, the team’s defense has some work to do as the season progresses. Denver has been outshot by 17 in 2014, with most of those shots coming against Faus and company in the second half. They haven’t fared much better early in games, having allowed 20 goals before halftime. Beating Duke: The Blue Devils have been the proverbial thorn in both Penn and Denver’s paws this season. The Pioneers and Quakers each dropped contests to the top-ranked team in the nation, albeit both in relatively close matchups. If the two teams could push the defending national champion to the brink, there’s no limit to the body blows the squads could trade this weekend.

var iables, Penn track and field is ultimately rebuilding. As such, Dolan has taken a pragmatic approach toward formulating his overall expectations for Heptagonals. “It’s going to probably take us some time to get up with the top teams in the league,” he said. “We’re more interested in how well we compete relative to where we are, and in which events some of our stars can show up.” Dolan may be approaching this weekend as he has every other weekend all year, but it would be naive to say that the Heptagonal Championships are just any other meet. For Penn freshmen, this w i l l be t hei r f i r st per for m a n c e o n Iv y t r a c k a n d f ield’s biggest stage. More experienced athletes have encou raged t hem to keep their approaches simple. “We just like to let them k now to just go out there, compete and represent Penn,” sophomore sprinter Tim Hamlett said. Additionally, the Quakers have prepa red a l l se ason for this meet, tapering their training in recent weeks to ent er Hept agona ls i n t op form.

“You train to peak at Heps, and that’s the main goal,” Hamlett said. As a result, Penn’s athletes w ill need to deal w ith the additional pressure of performing at their maximum potential. F ur ther more, several of Penn’s elite athletes — like Hamlett, who will compete in the open 500 meter dash and in relays — will need to adjust their approaches to the weekend’s events. “[I’m] looking to score points and not necessarily run for time,” Hamlett said. “So it’s different in that sense.” This weekend presents the Quakers with several notable conf licts bet ween ind iv idual development and team achievement , as well as a consistent approach vs. new expectations. Dolan understands these conflicts better than anybody but has pushed past them to get his team to focus on the meet itself. “W hen you get the eight schools together from the Ivy league, the intensity’s high,” he said. “You can either be nervous about the pressure, or you can embrace it and bring out greatness.”

thedp.com/sports

Try our NEW South Philly Roast Pork Sandwich

with Sharp provolone, broccoli rabe or hots.

$8.75 A little bit of South Philly in West Philly!

BY JIMMY LENGYEL Staff Writer

Dallas Baptist 6-2 Four games Friday-Sunday Dallas

New coach. New schedule. New attitude. After a disappointing 2221, 7-13 Iv y season, Penn baseball str ipped the old h a r dwa r e a nd br oug ht a new vigor to its squad. And this weekend, the Quakers will have a chance to put a positive stamp on the new regime when they travel to play four games against Dallas Baptist. The Quakers have been hard at work rebuilding their strategy under the tutelage of new coach John Yurkow who has spent the last few seasons as the top assistant coach under former coach John Cole . I n Yu r k o w ’s f i r s t f e w months with the team, it is evident that team chemistry and friendship are the crux of this new style. The Red and Blue have been active in philanthropy by donating a few thousand dollars and a lot of hair to the Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, an event junior pitcher Ronnie Glenn said “brought the team closer than ever.” “It’s been really great because a lot of players have really bought into it,” Glenn added of the fundraiser. “I think the competition aspect of our fundraiser has been positive for the team.” Dallas Baptist (6 -2) has had an impressive start to

Carolyn Lim /DP Staff Photographer

After hitting .320 near the top of Penn’s batting order last season, sophomore infielder Mike Vilardo will have to anchor the Quakers’ lineup in 2014. its season, look ing to improve on a 30-30 campaign from a year ago. In the Patriots’ first few games, they dominated Mississippi Valley State, scoring 52 runs in three games while splitting with Sam Houston State. They have looked strong, but Penn’s revitalized squad will not back down from the challenge. W hi le of fseason preparation is hard for baseball teams up north due to its lack of hospitable play ing conditions, the Red and Blue have been hard at work, improving their conditioning and doing ever ything possible in the air structure at Penn Park. As for returning players, Penn will look to staples in its roster like junior pitcher Connor Cuff and sophomore infielder Mike Vilardo to help make a statement in the early goings of this season. They were consistent producers at

the end of Cole’s tenure and will not only need to contribute in their roles, but also get the ball rolling early. Even more so, Yurkow and the team will look to their star recruits to begin their careers at Penn. It’s hard to say what the new season will bring for the Quakers, but all signs point to a positive change under Yurkow. The players seem excited, and the coaches will look to foster their excitement in the early part of the season before Ivy play. “I think what coach Yurkow has already done has been really g reat for the team,” Glenn said in an earlier inter view. “We are excited to get out there and start playing ball.” What the rest of the season will hold, only time will tell. But as of now, this new slate of personnel and fresh start look to be exactly what the Red and Blue need.


SP OR TS

PAGE 10 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

QuakersGameday

THEY SAID IT Miles JacksonCartwright Senior captain

Friday vs. Brown, Saturday vs. Yale

Togetherness of senior class remains

PENN-BROWN WHEN: Friday, 7:30 p.m. WHERE: The Palestra TELEVISION: NBC Sports Network RADIO: WNTP 990 AM

THE RECORD

M. HOOPS from page 12

ALL TIME RECORD: Penn leads, 103-22.

7-16

and has come agonizingly close to a one-game Ivy playoff in a fourth. It’s almost inconceivable to imagine a Penn basketball game at the Palestra without Jok leading cheers from the sidelines or Jackson-Cartwright driving the lane, but that day is coming — and soon. “This day has been a day that I haven’t really been looking forward to,� Jackson-Cartwright said. “But it’s been a great experience. Regardless of wins and losses, it’s been a blessing to play as many games as I’ve had in this building. I’m gonna miss it.� A nd the cohesiveness of Penn’s senior class may be what stands out most in the end. “Obviously we all wish that we could celebrate more wins,� Allen said. “But in my book, just their maturity, their sense of awareness about community and selflessness has made me proud.� Despite its struggles, after the clock hits triple zeroes in Penn’s Saturday Senior Day matchup against the Bulldogs, that may just be the legacy this senior class leaves behind.

“With McGonagill, we’re gonna really try and wear him out,� Jackson-Cartwright said. “It’s gonna take Steve [Rennard to] really start going at him.� But the key to a potential Penn sweep may be a matter of simply holding on to the basketball on the offensive end. In their losses to Brown and Yale two weeks ago, the Quakers committed a combined 42 turnovers. In last Saturday’s win over Dartmouth, Penn committed only 11 giveaways. “I think this has to be a weekend where we can’t have unforced errors offensively and high teens in terms of the turnovers per game,� coach Jerome Allen said. The biggest story of this weekend, though, is the impending Palestra swan song for a senior class that has fought through three losing seasons

14-10

THE LAST TIME: Saturday Feb. 15, 62-55 Brown, in Providence, R.I. After six consecutive victories against Brown over the previous three seasons, the Quakers were overtaken late by the Bears. Penn led 51-47 with 4:45 left in the game, but Brown’s star senior guard Sean McGonagill would not be denied. He drained three-pointers on consecutive possessions to give his team a lead. Brown would go on to put together a 12-0 run, and never looked back. Cedric Kuakamensah contributed 18 points to take down Penn.

Quakers focus on stopping Brown’s Clarke W. HOOPS from page 12 spacing as they head to Providence to take on Brown (8-16, 2-8), which may try to replicate Dartmouth’s defensive strategy. “There’s always the copycat thing,� McLaughlin said. “If things work, someone else is going to try it. But I’d be comfortable if another team did that because I think we missed some shots that our threes are capable of making.� Penn’s guards will be important in the two games this weekend, as Busch and fellow junior guard Kathleen Roche will be a focus of Brown and Yale’s defenses. The duo combined to hit eight threes over two games against the Bears and Elis (12-12, 6-4) two weeks ago, playing an essential role in Penn’s victories in both contests. “Going back to something coach always tells me, the one thing I can do well is space the floor which creates space for people inside,� Busch said. “Also, just coming off the bench, I just want to bring some energy or keep the energy that

FOR RENT

4043 SANSOM TOWNHOUSE. 5BR, 3BTH, hardwood floors, newer kitchen, baths, basement, storage, W/D. $3,750/month, includes water. 215-280-5512.

40TH AND LOCUST, house sharing, rooms available June. Call 215-386-1806.

Corbett said. “I think that’s a huge confidence builder when your coaches tell you some things to tweak and you do it and it works.� Moving into this matchup with North Carolina (4- 0), Penn will look to stop one of the most prolific offensive attacks in the nation. Thus far, the Tar Heels are averaging 21 goals per game, the thirdhighest mark in the nation. When it comes down to stopping this offensive onslaught, the Quakers are going to need to rely on the steady hand of Ferguson, a unanimous firstteam All-Ivy selection last season. The junior had five saves against Delaware, including one on each of the Blue Hens’ free-position attempts, an effort that helped her earn coIvy Defensive Player of the Week. However, it won’t come down to Ferguson alone against one of the deepest and most athletic programs in the nation. “We can’t play person to person matchups against

HELP WANTED EARN MONEY AND gain valuable experience selling advertising for The Daily Pennsylvanian’s print and Internet products. Positions available now and for the fall 2014 semester. Email Katherine Chang, Advertising Manager, at chang@theDP.com to set up an interview.

Please recycle

this Daily Pennsylvanian!

3 7

3

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9.

4

Solutions to Previous Puzzle: 

6 4 3

2 5

8 5 1

Sam Sherman/Associate Photo Editor

Name here/DP Staff Photographer

After shutting down Delaware in the Quakers’ season opener and being named co-Ivy Defensive Player of the Week, Penn senior goalkeeper Lucy Ferguson will need to put together a similar performance against No. 1 North Carolina. them. We have to play as a team,� Corbett said. “We need seven defenders and [Ferguson] to be playing all together and helping one another and making sure we’re not leaving people in one-on-one’s.� On the offensive side of the ball, Penn will look to sustain its early momentum from last weekend, particularly that of senior midfield Tory Bensen, who notched a career-high

9 7 3

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

(215) 898-6581

Crossword

ACROSS 1 Frigid 7 Question at the door 15 Miss out on a board

57 Nips in the bud

37 “What’s it gonna be?�

58 Bank guards?

38 Feature of a certain bandit 39 20-Down, e.g. 40 Nut

17 Subject for a golf lesson

41 What a nonconformist ignores

18 Emphatic approval 19 Petition

44 “___ magnifique!�

20 51-Down and others: Abbr.

46 Big employer in Hartford, Conn.

26 Group that no one on earth has ever joined 29 Sun disk wearer, in myth

at:

“Daily Pennsylvanian�.

C O P E

29

8 Shop alternative

52

50 Green shade

9 Takes credit?

A S T H E

S L E E T

S U M E U R R Y N S E R BLOCK A D E S O O Z E B U X O M A R T I E S B A E D R E W S U E D E R M O V I E O I E B B A R A L I R K L E T

14 Lose a lot? 20 Nissan ___ 22 Italian friend 24 Question in a long-distance relationship 25 Humble dwellings

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

32

33

34

21

24

25

27

28 30

31

36

37 39

41

49 Doesn’t just grab

N E C M I O N T D U H E B E R E R BLOCK P A Q A L U N D O S T E E L S E A

23

38

44

6 Civic leader?

13 Australia’s ___ Rock

7

18

4 Stick with it

12 Iron-pumper

6

20

35

48

56 “I’d like you to leave�

I D A S

2 Thallium sulfate, e.g.

11 Basic library stock

5

No. 0124

16

22 26

10 Gabriel or Giorgio

4

19

7 “Beg pardon?!�

52 Public, as views

3

17

1 “Cute� remarks

3 Figure out on the street?

2

15

48 One who’s trustworthy?

31 “That’s quite enough!�

G J O O A V A M I W K I D A I N Y X S W H T C H E S E A U L L A N E BLOCK B U N A L D O G E E W E R S

DOWN

1

5 One way to pay

30 Petition

I N V E R T

59 Ambush locale in Episode 1 of “The Lone Ranger�

Edited by Will Shortz

47 Canal checker?: Abbr.

54 Instruments played with mizraabs

B U A T A Z

prizesudoku.com

The Sudoku Source of

35 Abridged

16 “’Sup?�

F I E N D S

Create and solve your Sudoku puzzles for FREE.

underdogs, with the potential to shake up the national rankings by dethroning the Tar Heels in their annual earlyseason matchup. “It’s a great test for us. To see what the top teams look like and for us to have to work towards that,� Corbett said. “We’re the underdogs, they’re supposed to win, and all we can do is upset them and learn from it if we don’t.�

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Friday, February 28, 2014

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

Play Sudoku and win prizes

five goals against Delaware on Saturday. However, Pen n w i l l be forced to deal with North Carolina’s Megan Ward , the Tar Heels starting goalkeeper. Ward has combined with backup goalie Caylee Waters to hold opponents to a mere 7.5 goals per game so far this year. As a whole, the Quakers are preparing for their role as the

NEWYORKTIMESCROSSWORDPUZZLE

25 Birds in a clutch

Skill Level:

5

14-10

THE LAST TIME: Friday Feb. 14, 2014, 69-54 Penn, in New Haven, Conn. After bringing their Ivyrecord to 3-2 after a sweep of its doubleheader the week before, Penn dropped to 3-3 in the Ivies and 6-14 overall in a disappointing performance against the Bulldogs. The Quakers’ offense struggled mightily for the majority of the contest, as Penn fell behind 4326 midway through the second half. The Quakers picked up the slack on offense for the rest of the game, paced by a 19-point performance by Tony Hicks, but the effort was far too little and too late.

Having started 102 games for Penn in his four seasons with the team, senior captain Miles Jackson-Cartwright will start at the Palestra for the final time on Saturday.

23 Clobbered

Š Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

6

7-16

22 Hunky-dory

7 4

2

ALL TIME RECORD: Penn leads, 146-73.

21 Nighttime



6 7

THE RECORD

www.theDP.com/classifieds

SUDOKUPUZZLE

3

WHEN: Saturday, 7:00 p.m. WHERE: The Palestra TELEVISION: None RADIO: WXPN 88.5 FM

W. LACROSSE from page 12

For breaking news & sports updates anytime, visit theDP.com!

7 1 8

PENN-YALE

Ferguson will be key to slow potent attack

the starting five have brought to the game.� Penn will need energy right at the start of the weekend against Brown’s strong threepoint shooting. The Bears are 11th in the NCAA in three-point percentage with senior Lauren Clarke and junior Sophie Bikofsky combining to hit over five triples per game. Because Clarke got off to a hot start in Penn’s first meeting with Brown, the Quakers will pay extra attention to her on Friday. “ S he c a n r e a l l y pl ay,� McLaughlin said. “She can shoot it. She forces you to play all over the court ... We’ll have to contain her. A lot of their offense runs through Lauren.� The games this weekend also have major Ivy implications. Penn needs wins to stay ahead of Harvard for second place in the Ancient Eight while trying to stay within striking distance of first-place Princeton. And while she won’t need to shoot 500 three-pointers this weekend, Busch is looking to help in any way she can as her team approaches its final games of the season. “I remember [what Kristen Kody], one of our captains, said before the games last weekend, ‘Seize the moment. Take every game as it comes and play every game as if it’s your last,’� she said. “I think we’re going to relish these last opportunities.�

Classifiedads

FOR RENT

“This day has been a day that I haven’t really been looking forward to.� — On the impending end of his Palestra career

40

42

45

43

46

47

49 53

50

51

54

56

57

58

59

55

PUZZLE BY IAN LIVENGOOD

32 1969 hit with 42 Possible protein the repeated lyric shake ingredient “Big wheel keep 43 Sample in a on turnin’� swab test 33 So that one can 44 Weber per 34 Takes some hits square meter 36 Red states 45 Turn red, say 37 Humble 48 Drill bits? dwellings 39 Short trunks

49 Away from port

51 Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Hwy. 53 Kind of port 54 Pouch 55 Frequent form request: Abbr.

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. 28 Square, in AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. old slang, as Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past indicated by puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). forming a square with one’s Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. hands

27 Civil engineering safety feature


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 11

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

GET THE DOOR, IT’S DOMINO’S FREE! FREE! FREE! JUST FOR YOU!!! Go ahead & Place Your Order Online & Receive a 2pc Order of our Delicious Chocolate Lava Crunch Cakes FREE! Enter Promo Code: 9152 Hurry! Limited Time Offer

Open Late

DOMINO’s

GET THE DOOR, IT’S DOMINO’S

215-427-3000 3400 Aramingo Ave Philadelphia, PA 19134

215-535-1860 6391 Oxford Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19111

215-886-1300 538 Mt. Carmel Ave. Glenside, PA 19038

215-557-0940 401 N. 21st St. Philadelphia, PA 19130

215-457-5000 4229 N. Broad St. Philadelphia, PA 19140

610-734-1500 157 S. 69th St. Upper Darby, PA 19082

215-592-8534 716 South St. Philadelphia, PA 19147

Store Hours Sun - Thurs 10 am until 1 am Fri & Sat 10 am until 2 am

215-379-0800 503 Fox Chase Rd. Hollywood, PA 19111

Store Hours Sun - Thurs 10 am until 2 am Fri & Sat 10 am until 1 am

Store Hours Sun - Thurs 10 am until 1 am Fri & Sat 10 am until 3 am

215-662-1400 4438 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, PA

2-ITEM MINIMUM. Any delivery charge is not a tip paid to your driver. Our drivers carry less than $20. You must ask for this limited time offer. Delivery charge and tax may apply. Prices, participation, delivery area and charges may vary. Returned checks, along with the state’s maximum allowable returned check fee, may be electronically presented to your bank. ©2012 Domino’s IP Holder LLC. Domino’s ®, Domino’s Pizza ® and the modular logo are registered trademarks of Domino’s IP Holder LLC.

Store Hours:

Sun–Thurs 10am–1am

Fri & Sat 10am–3am

Two Locations!

215-557-0940 401 N. 21st St.

215-662-1400 4438 Chestnut St.


Sports

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014

BROWN

PENN

YALE

FRIDAY 7:30 P.M. THE PALESTRA

online at thedp.com/sports

PENN SATURDAY 7 P.M. THE PALESTRA

Palestra swan song nears for Penn seniors

M. HOOPS | Quakers face difficult matchups against Brown and Yale in final home weekend BY IAN WENIK Sports Editor

It’s not a storybook ending, but it will have to do. For a Penn basketball senior class that has battled through all sorts of

W. HOOPS | Renee Busch and her teammates are looking to rebound after Dartmouth loss by beating Yale and Brown BY STEVEN TYDINGS Senior Sports Editor

adversity over four seasons, what’s one more challenge? With their postseason hopes all but gone, the Quakers (7-16, 4-5 Ivy) will host Brown and Yale this weekend, hoping to pick up a sweep in the final Palestra home games for Miles Jackson-Cartwright, Fran Dougherty, Dau Jok, Steve Rennard and Cameron Gunter. Both the Bears (14-10, 6-4) and Bulldogs (14-10, 8-2) present similar challenges for the Quakers, as each

team is anchored by an imposing inside presence to go along with strong guard support. Brown is led by imposing sophomore forward Cedric Kuakumensah, the reigning Ivy Defensive Player of the Year, while Yale’s offense flows through sophomore forward Justin Sears. Sears has scored in double figures in nine of his 10 Ivy games this season and torched the Quakers for 25 points in a 69-54 Bulldogs victory two weeks ago in New Haven, Conn.

But neither player’s presence on the block intimidates the Red and Blue. “Both of them are not the most disciplined players,” sophomore forward Darien Nelson-Henry said. “They go for a lot of shot-fakes. I think it would be easy to get them out of the game if me and Fran [Dougherty] do what we’re able to do down low.” On the outside, while Yale is largely dependent on the tandem play of guards Javier Duren and Armani Cot-

ton, Brown’s perimeter offense rests largely on the shoulders of one man — senior guard Sean McGonagill. The second-leading scorer in the Ivy League, McGonagill’s late threepoint shooting burned the Quakers in a 62-55 loss to the Bears in Providence, R.I., the last time these two teams met. The Red and Blue are aiming to prevent a similar scoring burst this time around.

SEE M. HOOPS PAGE 10

SEIZING THE MOMENT

Brown 8-16, 2-8 Ivy Tonight, 7 p.m. Providence, R.I.

Yale 12-12, 6-4 Ivy Saturday, 7 p.m. New Haven, Conn.

Fifteen minutes before practice starts, junior guard Renee Busch goes out to begin taking shots. She starts near the basket, shooting from all around the charge circle before practicing mid-range jumpers while mixing in a few reverse layups. She continues until her teammates join her on the court and begin stretching. “I’m at the office at probably 10 after three and the ball starts bouncing,” coach Mike McLaughlin said. “We were in a meeting and we asked, ‘Who do you think it is?’ We all said Renee. “The kid is a machine. She shot 500 threes the other day ... the kid’s work ethic, her drive is as high as anyone’s could be.” All in a day’s work as Busch and Penn women’s basketball prepare to hit the road to face Brown and Yale in two crucial Ivy matchups. Last weekend, the Quakers (17-6, 7-2 Ivy) went through an emotional roller coaster, taking down Harvard on the road for the first time in 10 years before falling to a weak Dartmouth squad the following night. The Red and Blue have had to change things up this week after the Big Green clogged the lanes to shut down Penn’s inside game last weekend. Trying to adjust their play, the Quakers are looking to improve their

SEE W. HOOPS PAGE 10

Michele Ozer/Sports Photo Editor

After playing a big role in Penn’s victories two weeks ago against Yale and Brown, junior guard Renee Busch will look to have a similar impact when the Quakers take the road in rematches against the Bears and Elis. Busch hit five three-pointers against Yale and Brown combined in Penn’s first meetings with the two schools, including two triples that sealed the win over the Elis.

Penn preps for biggest meet of year TRACK & FIELD | Up against toughest lineups of all Ivy schools, Quakers take pragmatic approach

W. LACROSSE | After season opening win, Penn hits the road for annual matchup with North Carolina

BY COLIN HENDERSON Associate Sports Editor The wait is finally over. After almost a full season of preparation, Penn track and field will take on their Ivy foes at this weekend’s indoor Heptagonal Championships , hosted by Dartmouth. The Quakers will field their men’s and women’s “A-teams,” filling out their 33 allotted slots on each side with their top athletes across most events. With two relatively young and inexperienced squads, Penn’s 66 total par ticipants r un the gamut f rom young up-and-comers like freshman

SEE TRACK & FIELD PAGE 9

Sports Desk (215) 898-6585 ext. 147

Tar Heels pose topranked test for Quakers BY HOLDEN MCGINNIS Associate Sports Editor

Imran Cronk/DP File Photo

At the Heptagonal Championships in Hanover, N.H., this weekend, Penn sophomore Tim Hamlett will compete in the 500-meter dash and relays against very difficult competition.

Visit us online at theDP.com/sports

It is still early in the year, but this weekend may be the toughest challenge Penn women’s lacrosse faces all season. It’s hard to imagine a situation more difficult than going on the road to face the defending national champions. But that’s exactly what No. 17 Penn (1-0) will do on Sunday when they travel down to Chapel Hill to face No. 1 North Carolina. “It’s a great opportunity to play a team as good as [North Carolina]

No. 1 North Carolina 4-0 Sunday, 1 p.m. Chapel Hill, N.C.

and we just want to show them and ourselves and everyone else what we’re capable of,” junior goalkeeper Lucy Ferguson said. Coming off of last weekend’s 11-8 victory over Delaware in their season opener, the Quakers will look to continue their success. That game saw the Red and Blue take advantage of a decided edge in terms of free-position shots and adapt in the second half on their way to the win. “We really responded at halftime and made the changes that we needed to make,” coach Karin Brower

SEE W. LACROSSE PAGE 10

Send story ideas to dpsports@thedp.com


February 28, 2014