Page 1

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019 VOL. CXXXV

NO. 36

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Penn Law launches new diversity initiatives

FOUNDED 1885

PENN RISES TO No. 4 IN WSJ COLLEGE RANKING

Students hope for more funding and tangible support from the changes GIANNA FERRARIN Staff Reporter

Penn Law School Dean Ted Ruger has announced several new initiatives to increase diversity and inclusion. The move comes after a summer of controversial remarks from Penn Law TED RUGER professor Amy Wax. The initiatives include the formation of a student advisory board, alumni advisory board, and a newly appointed associate dean for inclusion and engagement. Ruger sent an email late last month to the Penn Law community to introduce structural changes to Penn Law’s Office of Inclusion and Engagement, which was established in May. “We recognize that these expanded programs carry increased urgency this semester as they come in the midst of a time when our school, and our nation, have been called upon to confront increasingly extreme and exclusionary rhetoric,” Ruger wrote in the email. In July, Wax spoke at the inaugural National Conservatism Conference, where she claimed that immigrants are responsible for an increase in “litter,” and America would be “better off” if it were dominated by Western people. In response, thousands signed a statement released by the Latinx Law Students Association demanding the removal of Wax from her teaching duties. Ruger released a statement denouncing Wax’s past remarks, and wrote in an email to The Daily Pennsylvanian that supporting a diverse student body and faculty is one of Penn Law’s “highest institutional priorities.” SEE WAX PAGE 2

GRAPHIC BY LINDA TING

Penn’s 2020 placement in the ranking is a jump from years past. AMY KAPLAN Staff Reporter

Pe nn wa s ra nke d No. 4 in t his ye a r’s Wa ll Stre et Jour na l/ Time s H ighe r Educ a tion C ol-

le ge Ra nkin gs, r i si ng f rom No. 10 in la st year’s ranki ngs. Le a ding t he ranki ng were H a r va rd Uni ver si t y, Massachus etts Institu t e of Technol ogy, a nd Ya le Un i ver si t y. Fol l owi ng Pe nn, C a lifor ni a I nst i t ut e of Te chnology and Pr i nceton Uni ve rs ity tie d for f i f t h pl ace.

SHS director to leave for Harvard

The WSJ/ THE ranki ng cl ai m s to emphasi ze t he ret ur n on i nvest m ent f rom at t endi ng a school , i n cont rast to ot her ranki ngs t hat focus on school s’ sel ect i vi t i es. Ti m es Hi gher Educat i on reSEE RANKING PAGE 7

Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett speaks at Penn Jarrett recounted her childhood and career GRANT BIANCO Senior Reporter

SOPHIA LEE

Giang Nguyen has served as executive director of Student Health Service since 2015 but has been affiliated for over a decade. He earned a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology at the Perelman School of Medicine in 2007 and has been a part of Penn’s faculty ever since.

Giang Nguyen will assume his new role on Nov. 18 SARAH FORTINSKY Senior Reporter

Executive Director Giang Nguyen of Student Health

Service will leave Penn after over a decade to lead Harvard University Health Services as its executive director. He will assume the new position Nov. 18, Chief Wellness Officer Benoit Dubé announced Thursday.

Dubé did not address specific questions on the timeline of the sea rch process for Nguyen’s replacement. However, he wrote in an email to The Daily Pennsylvanian that once Nguyen leaves his post, Dubé will take on some of

OPINION | The influence of big donors at Penn

“If Penn’s goal is to provide equal opportunity, regardless of wealth or privilege, it is failing.” PAGE 4

SPORTS | Wagner wins final alumni game

Coach Bill Wagner’s retirement announcement attracted Penn sprint football alumni from around the world to return for the alumni game. BACKPAGE FOLLOW US @DAILYPENN FOR THE LATEST UPDATES ONLINE AT THEDP.COM

Nguyen’s responsibilities with the help of the SHS chief operating officer and the SHS medical director. “We are committed to maintaining the excellent level of

NEWS Students upset about PVP moving off Locust Walk PAGE 3

SEE NGYUEN PAGE 7

Valerie Jarrett, a former senior advisor to President Barack Obama, recounted fond memories of her time at the W h ite House a nd expressed optim ism that today’s politica l climate would improve at an event hosted by the Fels Institute of Government. The event, held at the Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics on Friday evening, featured Jarrett in conversation with Fels Distinguished Fellow E l i z a b et h Va le. Ja r r et t ref lected on her upbringing, her time in the Obama White House, and the current state of politics in the United States. Ja r ret t ser ve d i n t he Obama administration for all eight years of his presidency, and was seen as a close confidant and trusted advisor who pushed for

liberal policies in the administration. Jarrett said her turbulent childhood — during which she lived in Iran, the United K ingdom, and the United States, and was bullied — played a role in shaping her desire to stand up to the voiceless. “I used to get beat up and bullied all the time,” Ja r rett said. “My pa rents raised eyes to kinda expect a cer tain amount of discrimination, whether I was a woman or whether I was black. The world is not necessarily a fair place.” Jarrett spent much of her time talking about her relationship with the Obamas. She said she started off as a mentor for the couple, but be ca me subord i nate to Barack once he won the 2008 presidential election. “I had always been the ol d e r m e n t o r,” Ja r r e t t ref lected. “I had considered myself not just the boss of Michelle, who had SEE OBAMA PAGE 7

NEWS Lauder College House Photo Gallery PAGE 6

SEND NEWS TIPS TO NEWSTIP@THEDP.COM CONTACT US: 215-422-4640


2 NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

‘Restorative Practices at Penn’ offers mediation services

acknowledge them, to ensure we are focusing on the needs of everybody involved,” Glickman said. RP@Penn was formed in August 2018 and is comprised of more than 70 campus partners who work together to provide mediation and conflict services, Nettleton said. Though they

collaborate with several administrative departments including Penn Violence Prevention, RP@ Penn is not used for cases of sexual violence or extreme acts of physical violence. The program is also not applicable to cases of academic integrity violations. Nettleton said the OSC’s new

model is derived from traditional practices of Native American, First Nation and other Indigenous people of North America. “We did not invent this,” Nettleton said. “It’s something that has been a part of various cultures for a very long time, and now we’re seeing the benefits in the college campus

environment.” Traditional Native American values of justice prioritize teaching peacemaking to community members from birth, while American culture tends to respond to crime after the fact and with a focus on punishment, according to Robert Yazzie, chief justice emeritus of the Navajo

Nation Supreme Court. Malik Washington, acting director of Penn Violence Prevention, said he hopes students see RP@Penn as a culturally integrated tool for student groups. “There are a ton of things that happen within student groups that do not rise to a policy violation but are still really harmful to the community or harmful to individuals within it,” Washington said. “We also have students who want to deal with stuff but don’t want to get the administration involved, which is common and understandable.” After mediated conversations between students, there can be consequences for students who were found to have caused harm, such as sanctions. Glickman said, however, these are not considered a punitive measure but rather a way for those who were harmed to have a sense of closure. OSC requires that participants are willing to accept responsibility for their actions in order to move forward with restorative practices. “One of the main concepts of restorative justice is that it cultivates an environment for students where it’s safer to take accountability,” Nettleton said. Glickman said OSC is looking to form a student advisory committee, which would be a team of students trained to moderate restorative practices and conflict resolution. Offices such as PVP can nominate students to become part of the program, adding a peer-to-peer aspect to mediation.

and recommend inclusion strategies to further a culture of belonging at Penn Law,” Ruger wrote. Third-year Penn Law student JiLon Li said he is hopeful about the new student advisory board, but also wants to see actions that indicate that Penn Law is “invested in more than discussion and talk.” Li is also the co-president of the Asian Pacific 1 American 8/14/2019 3:17:53 LawPMStudents Associa-

tion, which sponsored LALSA’s statement on Wax. Li added that he hopes the board will produce “tangible takeawaays” such as a physical space for students of color in Penn Law or cultural intelligence training during student orientation. “I think that there needs to be a lot of consciousness by both

the students and the administration that, yes it’s good that this [advisory board] was formed, but it shouldn’t be a thing that is formed and that doesn’t bring results,” Li said. Li also said he thought Penn Law could have responded more strongly to Wax’s statements, such as opening an investigation into whether Wax violates Penn

Law’s commitment to equal opportunity for students. Second-year Penn Law student Sharon George, who is the president of the South Asian Law Students Association, said she hoped to see increased funding and promotion by Penn Law for affinity groups serving students of color. George said that Ruger and other deans at Penn

Law have been “very willing” to discuss improvements surrounding diversity and inclusion. “I don’t find Professor Wax to be a useful point of conversation ever just because it’s boring and I think she does it for attention,” George said.“I’m far more interested in working to build spaces for minority students that support them.”

RP@Penn is a voluntary program for students HAWTHORNE RIPLEY Staff Reporter

In a recent disciplinary report, Penn announced that mediation and conflict services for students have been expanded to the Restorative Practices at Penn Program within the Office of Student Conduct. RP@Penn decides cases that are in violation of the code of student conduct and uses restorative practices such as conflict coaching and communication workshops to help resolve disputes in student groups, Director of the Office of Student Conduct Julie Nettleton said. The program is never mandated and is suggested on a case-by-case basis by the OSC when resolving violations of the Code of Student Conduct, Nettleton said. OSC’s old process followed a more traditional “retributive model,” said Marcia Glickman, OSC deputy director and mediation coordinator. Under the former system, administrators made a determination about what a person did wrong, and then determined the appropriate consequences. “In a restorative model, the goal is really to flip that on its head and to think about who was harmed, what the needs of everybody are, and to come up with a resolution that helps to heal some of those harms, or at least

WAX

>> PAGE 1

Though the alumni advisory board is currently active, the student advisory board has not yet been formed. “All of these leadership teams will convene regularly to discuss DPHalfPage_Rt49Map_081419.pdf issues impacting the community

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

ALEC DRUGGAN

The goal of RP@Penn is in part to decide cases that are in violation of the code of student conduct and use restorative practices to help resolve disputes in student groups.


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

NEWS 3

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

Penn offers new environmental anthropology major The new concentration started this semester JASON YAN Staff Reporter

Penn undergraduate students majoring in anthropology can now concentrate in environmental anthropology for the first time starting this semester. Anthropology professor and Undergraduate Chair Katherine Moore said the new concentration was created because of interest from students and faculty in past years, amid the growing benefit of studying anthropology through an environmental lens. “We really care about these topics ourselves, both from a teaching point of view and personal point of view,” Moore said. Moore said the proposal for

this concentration was submitted in October 2018 by the Anthropology Department to the College Curriculum Committee for review and was approved in April. “Because of [the] increasing interrelationship between health and the environment, we are trying to offer people more tools that give them [a] more nuanced sense of the environment,” Moore said. A nt h ropolog y professor Nikhil Anand said environmental anthropology allows scholars to understand the connection between humans and the environment. “Environment is much better understood with the perspective of an anthropologist with the historical, political, cultural, and spiritual aspect of how people use resources,” Moore said.

“It is no longer plausible to look at humans and the environment separately,” Anand said. College junior Maria Murad is one of two students currently majoring in environmental anthropology. Murad, a Daily Pennsylvanian news photo editor, originally wanted to major in ancient history and environmental science. But she became convinced that environmental anthropology could provide the link between the statistical aspect of environmental science and the people-centric aspect of ancient history. Anand and Moore both suggested students that are interested in the environment should take introductory environmental anthropology courses to see how anthropology approaches some of the basic environmental

questions. Environmental anthropology is an anthropological subfield that studies the relationship between humans and their environment. The new environmental anthropology concentration will have a different set of requirements. They include foundational courses in Political Ecology; Science, Technology, Environment; Material Worlds, Landscapes, Archaeology; and Biology, Environment, and Health. Currently, 11 out of 16 Penn Anthropology professors teach courses that are approved for electives of the environmental anthropology concentration. Many students work with faculty from the Anthropology Department in research funded by various grants and programs on campus. An environmental anthropology degree can have more career

outlooks than research and academics in anthropology, Moore said. Moore said the concentration is also beneficial for students interested in going into medical schools, law schools, business, and consulting. The unique nature of the environmental anthropology major can be seen as a benefit in the job market, said Murad. “It’s interesting to people when you have a major that is not commonly done — you have a different skill set and you’ve gone through different experiences,” Murad said. Currently, there are two students signed up for the new concentration, Moore said, with a few more students expressing interest in the new concentration. Although the numbers are low at the moment, Murad said she expects the major to grow in

KATHERINE MOORE

popularity as more learn about its benefits. “If people want to take a different spin on environmental science and focus on the human aspect of it and how we interact with our environment, I think it’s a different and unique angle that a lot of students aren’t studying,” Murad said.

Students upset about PVP moving off Locust Walk

GARY LIN

Penn Violence Prevention is now located at 3535 Market St., multiple blocks away from its former location on Locust Walk.

GRAPHIC BY JESS TAN

Penn Violence Prevention is now at 3535 Market St. DANIELLE CAPRIGLIONE Staff Reporter

Penn Violence Prevention is moving to a new office in the the same building that houses Student Health Service due to limited campus space, administrators said. However, some students involved in PVP groups are saying the relocation puts constraints on their advocacy work. In the new office on the mezzanine level of 3535 Market St., PVP will be sharing a floor with Alcohol & Other Drug Program Initiatives as well as Campus Health. From November 2016 to May 2019, PVP was located in the second floor of 3539 Locust Walk, which is a former fraternity house. The office was used as a space for PVP staff, as well as a meeting space for PVP student groups, such as Penn Anti-Violence Educators and Men Against Rape & Sexual Assault. Other groups are looking to occupy the PVP’s former location on Locust, but it’s unclear which group will take over the space, said College senior and PVP work-study student Sarah Hahn-Du Pont. Du Pont added she and other students involved in PVP are “deeply upset” with the administration’s decision to relocate the office. “I think primarily, number one, it signifies a clear rejection of the acknowledgement that sexual violence is a serious problem on this campus,” Du Pont said. “Also, having it be on Locust Walk sort of signifies that Penn takes sexual violence and sexual education as a problem that they’re willing to work on.” PVP Interim Director Malik Washington said the Locust Walk location was a temporary solution, and staff at PVP were

aware that the address would change at some point in the future. Washington said they will host an open house later in the semester. The new office includes offices for PVP staff, meeting rooms, confidential rooms, and student spaces. The student spaces in PVP will be open 24 hours a day. Unlike the Locust Walk office that was on the second floor and had no elevator, this location on Market is ADA accessible. In a written statement to The Daily Pennsylvanian, Chief

Wellness Office Benoit Dubé said he thinks the relocation will benefit PVP programming. “This relocation give[s] PVP a permanent home and furthers our mission to promote holistic and integrated approaches to health and wellness,” Dubé said in the statement. “By bringing Campus Health, PVP and AOD together, we will see synergies resulting in new, innovative, and impactful programming.” Du Pont said that even though PVP will now be closer to other student health resources, by moving the office away

The Frasure-Kruzel-Drew Memorial

FELLOWSHIP

Open to college seniors, grad students and recent graduates

FULL TIME

from the rest of campus, the University is creating a divide that makes PVP less accessible to students. PVP is still in the process of moving to the new office, all while being understaffed due to the search for a new director. The most recent PVP Director, Jessica Mertz, left Penn in May after a decade on campus. Washington said PVP students groups are currently not meeting in the new location because the meeting rooms are not completely furnished yet. In the meantime, student

APPLY NOW!

2-Year PAID Position

WITH BENEFITS Starts July 2020 Located in

WASHINGTON, D.C. at the

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE Career Development in

National Security and

Humanitarian Assistance

Potential overseas

TRAVEL Applications due NOVEMBER 7, 2019 For more information visit: http://jmu.edu/cisr

groups such as PAVE are holding meetings in the Penn Women’s Center. Melissa Song, a College senior and the chair of Abuse and Sexual Assault Prevention, said she was not aware the location had changed until she returned to campus for the new semester. Song, who is also co-chair of the Consent Collaborative, said the move was frustrating because she thought the University would focus on the group more and move them to a location that was more accessible to students. “At this stage it’s sort of like PVP is not only missing a di-

rector, we’ve now been transitioned to another location that’s farther off campus, really tucked away,” Song said. Washington said the location further from campus may allow the office to be a “respite from the day-to-day bustle of Locust Walk,” but the response to this change is ultimately up to the students. “We really want to emphasize that it’s for students to decide how they feel about this and how they want to use the space,” Washington said. “It’s really up to them, and we’re going to respond to them in the best way that we can.”

Live music • Film • Dance • Theater Art Education • Community FREE Workshop on Crowdfunding Sep 9 @ 6:00 PM Secret Cinema: Archive Discoveries, Unseen Curiosities Sep 12 @ 8:00 PM Free Admission Eurydice: A Rock Opera Sep 13 @ 8 PM & Sep 19 @ 7:30 PM Tickets are $8 50th Anniversary of the Original Woodstock 1969! Rock on Pointe Dance Company Sep 14 @ 4:00 PM and 7:30 PM Sep 15 @ 3:00 PM Tickets are $28 Al-Bustan pres. Words from Home: Poetry Series Sep 17 @ 6:00 PM MYOB: Mind Your Own Body: Irreconcilable Differences & Other Stories Sep 18 & Sep 20 @ 7:00 PM Free Admission 13th Annual Black Women’s Arts Festival Sep 21 & Sep 22 @ 1:00 PM Free Admission

As an alcohol-free/smoke-free venue, The Rotunda provides an invaluable social alternative for all ages.

4014 Walnut • TheRotunda.org


4

OPINION

Lauder College House highlights a flawed admissions process

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN EDITORIAL BOARD

VOL. CXXXV, NO. 36 135th Year of Publication

The naming of Lauder College House is a reminder of the outsized influence that money has in college admissions, especially at Penn.”

JULIA SCHORR President SARAH FORTINSKY Executive Editor ALICE HEYEH Print Director BEN ZHAO Digital Director ISABELLA SIMONETTI Opinion Editor MADELEINE NGO Senior News Editor THEODOROS PAPAZEKOS Senior Sports Editor GILLIAN DIEBOLD Senior Design Editor JESS TAN Design Editor LUCY FERRY Design Editor TAMSYN BRANN Design Editor GIOVANNA PAZ News Editor MANLU LIU News Editor MAX COHEN News Editor DEENA ELUL Assignments Editor DANNY CHIARODIT Sports Editor MICHAEL LANDAU Sports Editor

ISABEL LIANG

L

ast week, New College House was renamed Lauder College House at a ceremony featuring Penn President Amy Gutmann and members of the Lauder family. The family, which contains generations of Penn students and alumni and includes Estée Lauder of the popular cos-

metic brand, is a large and frequent contributor to the University. Several members of the Lauder family have been trustees, and the family’s name is attached to the Lauder Institute along with the building which houses it. The naming of Lauder College House — and the generations of

Lauder Penn alumni lined up for the unveiling — is a reminder of the outsized influence that money has in college admissions, especially at Penn, and is a wake-up call that it’s time to reform the process. Financial aid and the opportunities afforded by attending a top

college are both touted by Penn as great equalizers. Penn’s student body, however, is one of the most financially disparate in the country. It is one of five Ivy League schools and 38 schools nationally that have more students from the top 1% than from the bottom 60%. In a recent college ranking from the Wall Street Journal, too, Penn ranked fourth overall, but 135th for environment, a category that measures inclusivity and diversity on college campuses. Although Penn claims to promote a diverse student body, the environment on campus is divided by class. The way that college admissions is practiced at schools like Penn systematically reinforces class divisions after graduation too. A study from 2017 found that elite colleges like Penn rank far below public schools and many less-prestigious private schools in socioeconomic mobility of their students. When Harvard’s affirmative

action trial in 2018 revealed that legacy applicants and children of wealthy donors were given preferential treatment, Dean of Admissions Eric Furda said, “I don’t think it should be surprising to people that [the] Admissions Office should know who’s applying [to Penn], particularly if there is a deep connection to the institution.” Propagating family connections within wealthy circles has become commonplace at elite institutions like Penn. In recent years Penn has publicly maintained its commitment to diversifying the student body and providing resources for those from low-income backgrounds. In order to truly prioritize the diversity of the student body and to level the playing field for students during their four years at Penn and once they graduate, Penn must reform the system that claims to prioritize equality, but in its current state fosters a culture that rewards donors.

WILL DiGRANDE Sports Editor

Why we donate to the Penn Fund

KATIE STEELE Copy Editor TAHIRA ISLAM Copy Editor DANIEL SALIB Director of Web Development AVNI KATARIA Audience Engagement Editor CHASE SUTTON Senior Multimedia Editor MARIA MURAD News Photo Editor ALEC DRUGGAN Sports Photo Editor SAGE LEVINE Video Producer SAM HOLLAND Online Projects Manager

GUEST COLUMN BY PENN FUND CO-CHAIRS

G

iv i n g i s p e r s o n a l . We a l l have u n ique backgrounds a nd interests that are expressed through the causes we put resources into. We personally see the value of our Penn undergraduate experience in everything we do: from freshman hall memories to Senior Week festivities and everything in between.

SAM MITCHELL Podcast Editor REMI GOLDEN Business Manager SARANYA DAS SHARMA Marketing Manager JAMES McFADDEN Director of Analytics JOY EKASI-OTU Circulation Manager SHU YE DP Product Lab Manager

THIS ISSUE TAMARA WURMAN Design Associate ISABEL LIANG Design Associate LINDA TING Design Associate ALISA BHAKTA Copy Associate EMMA SCHULTZ Copy Associate DANA NOVIKOV Copy Associate CAROLINE DONNELLY MORAN Copy Associate JACOB WESSELS Associate Sports Editor JACKSON SATZ Associate Sports Editor

LETTERS

because it doesn’t meet someone else's definition of worthy? Of course not. The goal of philanthropy is to promote causes that you personally care about. As the co-chairs of Seniors for The Penn Fund for the Class of 2020, we encourage philanthropy of all forms. Philanthropy is not, by design or in practice, an endeavor that requires mutual exclusivity. Some of the greatest philanthropists have committed themselves to multiple causes, individuals like Andrew Carnegie, J.K. Rowling, and John D. Rockefeller. We invite Penn students to follow suit, putting resources into the ventures that speak to them personally. The Penn Fund is different from the University’s endowment. When people make endowed gifts, that money is typically restricted for the specific purpose outlined by the donor. Less than 25% of the University’s annual operating expenses are provided by the endowment. The Penn Fund, which raised $11 million in unrestricted dollars in

We give to The Penn Fund because Penn changed all of our lives.” To rank philanthropic causes on a binary good-versus-evil dichotomy is both biased and problematic. One person may split their philanthropic efforts evenly between a childrens’ hospital and a free legal clinic. If someone else concludes that a donation to the hospital is marginally more “impactful” than a donation to the legal clinic, is the person wrong for donating to the legal clinic at all? Should we shame this person for giving back to the community

BIRUK TIBEBE

in some respects, help us to improve it for others going forward. Taking President Gutmann's advice from her guest column last week, we “learn and discover best when we roll up our sleeves and engage with all of the resources that Penn offers us.” If you’re interested in joining our efforts to maintain and cultivate the undergraduate experience, join us at a wine and cheese mixer on Wednesday, Sept. 25 from 5-8 p.m. at E. Craig Sweeten Alumni House, or catch us at Octoberfest this semester!

HAYLEY BOOTE is a College senior from Wilkes-Barre, Pa. studying Political Science. Her email address is hboote@sas.upenn.edu. AUSTIN COOPER is a College senior from Denver, Colo. studying Physics and Consumer Psychology. His email address is austinco@sas.upenn.edu. DANIELLA WIRTSCHAFTER is a College senior from Boca Raton, Fla. studying Communications and Consumer Psychology. Her email address is dwirt@sas.upenn.edu.

Students must take action regarding health care inequities

A

UROOBA UNPLUGGED | Getting sick at Penn opened my eyes to a broken health care system

s students, it’s imperative that we educate ourselves on the ails of the American health care system. Otherwise, we may be shocked at what appears on our next medical bill. Like many freshmen, my first year at Penn was riddled with sore throats, colds, and the occasional virus. I found myself at Student Health Service more times than I can count. On the first reading day prior to spring semester finals, I had the worst bout of illness I’ve ever experienced in my

life. Over night, I developed a fever, nausea, and extreme exhaustion. I couldn’t eat or sleep. After almost a week of not getting better, my parents insisted that I go to the emergency room. My hospital visit only lasted around four hours. I was given an IV drip, a blood test, and a blanket. My bill was over $1,000. My experience isn’t unique. Many Americans share similar stories of going to the emergency room and being expected to pay exorbitant costs

Have your own opinion? Send your letter to the editor or guest column to letters@thedp.com. Editorials represent the majority view of members of The Daily Pennsylvanian, Inc. Editorial Board, which meets regularly to discuss issues relevant to Penn’s campus. Participants in these meetings are not involved in the reporting of articles on related topics.

2019, is spent the next academic year, specifically on enhancing the undergraduate student experience. That is no small sum of money, and it goes directly to initiatives that may not be covered by a specific endowed gift. Most notably, this includes support of undergraduate financial aid, one of the University’s highest priorities. The dollars raised by the Penn Fund reach areas all across campus and help create some of our most treasured memories inside and outside the classroom. We see the value in The Penn Fund all around us; it is necessary for our undergraduate community. While both resources make a visible impact on the University, you will immediately feel the benefit of The Penn Fund throughout your time on campus. We give to The Penn Fund because Penn changed all of our lives. We study different things, are from different states, have different backgrounds, yet still are united by the shared Penn community. If you were thrilled with your Penn experience, help us to continue providing students with joyful moments. If you felt like your time at Penn was lacking

ZACH SHELDON

— even with insurance. Research has shown that the average emergency room visit costs 40% more than one month of rent. For families or individuals living paycheck to paycheck, this kind of expense can be devastating. At the hospital, my dad insisted that I get a chest X-ray. My doctor agreed, saying that it couldn’t hurt to cover all my bases. I wonder if I would have gotten one had I known that getting a chest X-ray would add $400 to my bill. More horrifyingly, I wonder how many people don’t “cover all their bases” because they simply can’t afford to. According to the Pennsylvania Health Law Project, a family of four that has an income above $35,000 is ineligible for Medicaid benefits. However, while these families are technically over the federal poverty line, they can still struggle to endure costly health care premiums. Even then, those who are able to obtain insurance plans may still end up with steep bills. Our time at Penn is a time of extreme privilege. Penn requires that all full-time undergraduates

have health insurance that abides by specific parameters. In addition, all full-time students have access to SHS, which is paid for through the clinical services fee in our tuition, and includes full-service primary care. For some students, this is the first time in their lives they have had health insurance or access to adequate health care. Still, Penn’s strict insurance waiver requirements can pose issues for many students. If your health insurance does not meet Penn’s requirements, or your family does not have health insurance at all, Penn automatically enrolls you in the Penn Student Insurance Plan (PSIP), which costs $3,585 annually. Ultimately, growing up in America makes it impossible to ignore the inequities in the health care system for long. In a few short years, most of us will be forced off of our parents' health coverage, and have to start navigating this system on our own. Given this, health care should be a primary issue leading our generation into the voting booths. Recently,

UROOBA ABID policies that aim to establish singlepayer, universal health care have been at the forefront of presidential campaigns. Many Democratic candidates want to emulate countries like Canada, where health care is a right of every citizen. While it’s not necessary to agree with any particular health care policy, it should be our priority as students, voters, and future leaders to consider solutions to this broken system. The fact that financial restraints can force anyone to hesitate in seeking medical care is appalling. We must do better. UROOBA ABID is a College junior from Long Island, N.Y. studying International Relations. Her email address is uabid@sas.upenn.edu.


5

Not going into finance? Take advantage of opportunities outside of OCR.

A

THE OXFORD C’MON | Students whose career aspirations aren’t represented by On-Campus Recruiting can turn to other options

f t er nea rly spi l l i ng my c a p puc c i no a l l over my British poetry homework, a stranger and I began talking the other day about what I wanted to do when I graduate. She asked what I study here at Penn, and when I replied, “English,” she touched her hand to her heart and lightly smiled. “I studied Russian Literature myself, and I loved it. Do you love what you study?” I could confidently answer that "Yes, I do love what I study," which was an amazing feeling.

She then proceeded to ask about future jobs and if professors here have useful connections. In answer to her practical question: Yes, professors at Penn are hugely connected, and are often willing to share those connections with their students, strengthening the network that makes a Penn education so invaluable. Though Penn’s pre-professionalism is largely cultivated by On-Campus Recruiting events, humanitiesfocused students aren’t limited by our inability (or unwillingness) to participate in scheduled

schmoozing. We need to take advantage of our opportunities outside of scheduled OCR events, or we’ll miss out on the few available. It’s hard enough to find a job in the arts, let alone a job in the arts at a school that prioritizes everything else. This can make for an extremely stressful and disproportionately competitive job search. However, Penn is rife with pseudo-OCR opportunities. For example, RealArts@Penn is a program dedicated to connecting Penn students to arts-related jobs

There is an entire world out there that celebrates creativity and divergence.” in the real world or funding otherwise unpaid arts internships. Other opportunities can be found at Kelly Writers House events, or through special guest lecturers or speakers. Just because there

ISABEL LIANG

The Student Side Hustle Because everyone needs beer money

aren’t distinguished booths and time slots for English major types to forge their connections doesn’t mean these opportunities don’t exist for us. I spent last summer working at McSweeney’s headquarters in San Francisco, where I put to use my ability to read three books a day. I copy-edited, proofread, fact-checked, and ordered coffee. All of these are skills that my English classes and extracurriculars have fortified. At an intern level, I was given immense responsibility and tasks that were incredibly enjoyable because it was the kind of work I love to do. Give me a book and a coffee and I’m happy. This opportunity for practical work experience in a field not typically known for its high demand was made possible because of RealArts@Penn. However, it is a highly competitive program that I applied to multiple times before being selected. If you truly want a career in the arts, it will involve dedication. Sometimes it will require multiple rounds of applications. But if that’s your passion, then it’s worth it. Beyond structured programs like RealArts, Penn’s beauty lies in its excess. In my magazine journalism class last year, my professor Avery Rome disclosed that she used to work as an editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer. She was more than willing to sit down

Servers Bartenders Campus Recruiters Apply estratex.com/Jobs/Jamshop online!

with any willing students and share the knowledge that years of work has taught her, as well as connect us to people she thought could facilitate our ascent into the real-world job market. Seeing our friends shake hands with employers that sign hefty checks can be discouraging in the small and competitive bubble that is Penn. But there is an entire world out there that celebrates creativity and divergence. We might have to dig a bit deeper into Penn’s folds in order to find the doors that can lead to our dream journalism or art critic job, but once we find them, we shouldn’t be afraid to ring the bell and start our lives. The woman who nearly spilled my cappuccino left me with a parting thought. She said she didn’t remember a thing about her classes except how they made her feel. My classes make me feel inspired and in love with what I’m studying, and because I’m not afraid to go searching for opportunities in the job market, that’s enough for me. How do your classes make you feel? SOPHIA DUROSE is a College junior from Orlando, Fla. studying English. Her email address is sdurose@sas.upenn.edu.

THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE CAN RISE IN ORDER TO AVOID THE WORST CONSEQUENCES OF GLOBAL WARMING IS 1 .5°C.

WE’RE ALREADY PAST 1°C.

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 11

JEFFREY A. MILLER CATERING IS HIRING!

SOPHIA DUROSE

AT NOON

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STATUE IN FRONT OF COLLEGE HALL RAIN LOCATION: READING ROOM, HOUSTON HALL

LESS A PUZZLE TO SOLVE THAN A DECISION TO MAKE Mark Alan Hughes, Professor of Practice and Faculty Director, Kleinman Center for Energy Policy

AN ASTROPHYSICIST’S VIEW OF EARTH’S CLIMATE

Gary Bernstein, Reese W. Flower Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics

I’M SENSING CLIMATE CHANGE, WHAT’S YOUR STORY? Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

ADAPTING OUR CITIES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE: REVOLUTION OR EVOLUTION?

Howard Neukrug, Professor of Practice and Executive Director, The Water Center

BUSINESSES THAT “GET IT” ON CLIMATE CHANGE MUST ALSO GET POLITICAL

Flexible schedules, set your own hours!

Eric Orts, Guardsmark Professor; Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics; and Director, Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership

www.sas.upenn.edu/climate-1point5

Jeffrey A. Miller (W’82) founded JAM Catering in 1980 as a sophomore!

#1point5 WATCH OUR LIVESTREAM ON FACEBOOK OR TWITTER @PENNSAS


6 NEWS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Lauder College House Naming Photos by Emily Xu

Amy Gutmann and members of the Lauder family revealed the college house’s new name on stage. The plaque mentions the members of the Lauder family who have attended Penn.

Members of the Lauder family pose with Penn President Amy Gutmann and Provost Wendell Pritchett. Gutmann and the Board of Trustees made the decision to name the dorm after the family.

The ceremony took place in Heyman Courtyard, which is named after another major donor to New College House – Stephen Heyman, a 1959 Wharton graduate and trustee emeritus, and his wife.

The celebration was filled with Penn students and staff members. In addition to revealing the house’s new name, the ceremony was also for the first class of fourth-year residents at the college house.

Penn Science Café Get a glimpse into the innovative and impactful research taking place at Penn Arts & Sciences at the Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.

MONDAY NIGHT

Football! $6 Nachos & Quesadillas $7 Crown Royal Cocktails $10 Buckets of Yuengling Golden Pounders

40th & Spruce | copabanana.com

BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS IN CHILDREN: THE SPECIAL CASE OF CALLOUS-UNEMOTIONAL TRAITS

REBECCA WALLER, Assistant Professor of Psychology

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2019 • 6 P.M. SUZANNE ROBERTS THEATRE 480 South Broad Street, Philadelphia

Disruptive behavior problems, including aggression, defiance, tantrums, and rule-breaking, are extremely common and the leading reason for childhood referrals to mental health services. As parents and educators, we know that these types of problems are harmful for children’s school outcomes and life chances, as well as being stressful and challenging to deal with. In this talk, Rebecca Waller presents an overview of her research examining the development of behavior problems, including the development of callous-unemotional traits, along with what we know about best-practice treatments and interventions for childhood behavior problems.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

HOUSE MUSIC & COCKTAILS 10 PM in the lounge. over 21 only

Visit SAS.UPENN.EDU/EVENTS for more information.

LLN_9619.indd 1

9/6/2019 1:06:52 PM


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

OBAMA

>> PAGE 1

worked for me, but the boss of [Barack] too,” prompting laughter from the crowd. Ja r r e t t p r a i s e d O b a m a for creating an inclusive envi ron ment, pa r ticula rly in encouraging women in the administration to speak up at meetings. “In meetings where [Obama] wasn’t present, I noticed that the women’s voices were beginning to sh r ink,” Ja r rett said. “It was in his nature [to] want to have a culture that’s inclusive.” Jarrett said Obama’s ability to remain calm in the face of personal attacks was admirable. “If he is indulging himself by going off on a tangent on who said something that wasn’t kind to him, then he’s not doing the people’s work,” Jarrett said. “If you truly are a public servant, it is not about you, it is about to whom you are there to serve.” Despite displaying frustration with Republican obstructionism during the Obama administration, Jarrett said she had a state of optimism despite today’s polarized climate. “I wish we could give all of us a little bit more wiggle room

and have some humanity. I don’t see that in politics, I do see that in our country.”Jarrett said. “My energy, my enthusiasm, my optimism, comes from traveling a round the countr y, and continuing to meet ordinary people who do extraordinary things.” T he event at t ende es, a broad mix of undergraduates, graduate students, and outside ind ividua ls, genera lly sa id they were inspired by Jarrett. Lucas Asher, who is on track to ea rn his Master of Public Administration in Fels in 2020, said he heard of Jarrett before the event, but was still inspired by her background. “Her message about taking risks in life and to listen to your inner voice are important lessons,” Asher said. M i ke Holtz, a f i rst-yea r graduate st udent in P ublic Administration at Fels, said he heard Jarrett speak before while interning at the White House, a nd noted that her messages during the Tr ump administration was strikingly similar to her tone during the Obama years. “Even with the political climate as it is, I was surprised just [by] how similar her message is,” Holtz said. “She’s an amazing, inspiring person.”

GRANT BIANCO

The event attendees, a broad mix of undergraduates, graduate students, and outside individuals, generally said they were inspired by Valerie Jarrett.

NGYUEN >> PAGE 1

care Penn students have come to expect under Dr. Nguyen’s stewa rdship. I will be assisted by Erika Gross, Chief Operating Officer of Student Wellness Ser vices, and Dr. Vanessa Stoloff, Medical Director of the Student Health Service, to ensure things continue to r un smoothly once Dr. Nguyen assumes his new leadership role at Harvard in November,” Dubé wrote. Nguyen has held the top position at SHS since 2015 but has been affiliated for over a

NEWS 7

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

decade. He earned a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology at the Perelman School of Medicine in 2007 and has been a part of Penn’s faculty since. Ng uyen ha s fo cuse d on promoting healthcare access for diverse populations. He started the Penn Asian Health I n it iat ives prog ra m at t he Medical School, giving out 3,0 0 0 vacci nat ions to t he Asian American community in Philadelphia. Ha r va rd’s a n nou nc ement h igh l ighted Ng uyen’s comm it m ent t o d ive r sit y a nd ment ioned t he fact t hat i n

RANKING >> PAGE 1

por te d t ha t s chools we re ra nke d ba s e d on four c r ite r ia , e a ch of w hich wa s give n a dif fe re nt we ight. Ac c ording to t he Wa ll Stre et Jour na l, Pe nn ra nke d f if t h for t he f irst c r ite r ion, “ outc ome s ,” w hich ma de up 40% of t he ra nking de c is ion. O utc ome s qua ntif ie s s chools’ g ra dua tion ra te s , s a la r y a f te r g ra dua tion, a c a de mic pre stige , a nd me dia n stude nt de bt a c quire d. Pe nn a ls o ra nke d nint h in t he “ re s ourc e s ” c a te gor y, w hich ma de up 30% of t he ra nking de c is ion a nd me a s ure s how much s chools s pe nd on te a ching a nd stude nt s e rvic e s . Pe nn ra nke d s ignif ic a ntly lowe r in t he re ma ining two c a te gor ie s , “ e nga ge me nt” a nd “ e nvironme nt.” It wa s ra nke d No. 93 for e nga ge me nt, w hich wa s we ighte d a t 20%. Enga ge me nt re pre s e nts stude nts’ a c a de mic expe r ie nc e s , s uch a s w het he r t hey have oppor tunitie s to inte ra c t w it h profe s s ors , w het he r t hey fe e l cha lle nge d by t he ir c ours e s , a nd how ma ny s ubje c ts a re ava ila ble for t he m to study. Pe nn wa s a ls o ra nke d No. 135 in t he e nvironme nt c a te gor y, w hich c a r r ie d a 10% we ight a nd qua ntif ie s dive rs ity a nd inc lus ion on c a mpus . O t he r

his ter m leading SHS, Penn a ch ieve d Na t ion a l L e a d e r st a t u s i n t h e He a lt h c a r e Equality Index. “ T h roug hout h is ca re er, Gia ng has been com m it ted to adva nci ng d iversit y, i nclusion, a nd b elong i ng i n his communities,” read Ha rva rd’s announcement, which was signed by Provost Alan Ga rber a nd Executive Vice P resident Kat ie Lapp. “He has also led and collaborated with organizations that focus on racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, and LGBTQ p o p u l a t i o n s , p a r t ic u l a rly transgender people.”

top s chools overal l al so fe ll s hor t in t he l east weighted categor ies: Harvard was ranked 150th for environment, MIT was ranked 107th, and Yale wa s ra nke d 93rd. Pe nn holds t he top ra nking a mo ng school s in Pe nns ylvani a. I t i s followe d by Car negi e M e llon Uni ver si t y and Swa r t hmore Col l ege, w hich pla c ed 25t h and 28t h, re s pe ct i vely. When ra nking s chool s by spec if ic a re a s of st udy, Penn wa s liste d as No. 2 for

bot h heal t h professi ons and busi ness- rel at ed f i el ds, t wo of t he m ost popul ar f i el ds am ong underg raduat es. Penn’s 2020 pl acem ent i n t he WSJ/ THE ranki ng i s a j ump f rom year s past . The 2019 l i st , publ i shed in Sept em ber 2018, ranked Penn 10t h, whi l e t he Uni ver si t y was ei ght h i n t he 2018 ranki ngs. Penn was al so ranked four t h i n t he 2017 l i st , t he f i r st t i m e t he ranki ngs were publ i shed. The Wal l St reet Jour-

nal repor t ed t hat si nce last year, it has changed its ranking methodology to look at median student debt as opposed to student loan default rates. It also now includes par ttime and transfer students in addition to f irst-time, full-time students. Last year’s U.S. News and World Repor t ranking also listed Penn as No. 8 overall for the third year in a row. The 2020 U.S. News and World Repor t rankings have yet to be rel eased.

You should join the DP

AD Design Staff

if this ad makes you cringe

If interested, send your resume, class schedule, and work-study allotment to Christine Knooren at knooren@thedp.com


8 SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Football Supplement

September 19th

Hand out newspapers. Get money.

The Daily Pennsylvanian is hiring students to work in its circulation department. Distribute papers, manage the database, check rackboxes, place posters and earn $10 an hour. Contact Joy Ekasi-Otu at: ekasi-otu@theDP.com to schedule an interview


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

F. HOCKEY

>> BACKPAGE

test, however, Wake Forest scored again to go up 2-0 and put the finishing touch on the game. “All season long, we are going to be facing tough competition,” Rosati said. “Especially with a short preseason, we have to use every game as a learning opportunity and make sure we come out even stronger in the next game.” Sophomore defender Madison Woods was a bright spot and a feel-good story for Penn. Woods, who suffered a season-ending injury in the second game of the season in 2018, started for the Quakers and made a defensive save, the first of her career, in the second quarter. “It’s been quite the journey since I got injured last year, but anytime I was doing an exercise in physical therapy, or learning how to run again with my workout packet, I

kept a vision of taking those first steps back onto the field,” Woods said. “It was even more special knowing how much my team has supported me during recovery, so I almost feel like I have to give it back to them by trying my very hardest whenever I’m practicing or playing in a game.” Following the defeat to Wake Forest, Penn played the defending national champion Tar Heels (4-0) on Sunday afternoon, dropping the game in a shutout. Once again, the Red and Blue got off to a strong start defensively, holding North Carolina scoreless with six shots and three saves by Rosati. The majority of the damage came in the second period, as the Tar Heels opened up the scoring at the 18:48 mark. They would go on to score four more goals in seven and a half minutes to take a commanding 5-0 lead after two periods. “Although we didn’t get the

PattayaRestaruant.com | 215.387.8533 4006 Chestnut Street

Dine-in, Catering & Delivery

SPORTS 9

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

outcomes we wanted, I think we did a decent job of communicating with each other and adjusting to the other teams’ style of play,” Woods said. Even with the large deficit, the Quakers came out hot defensively in the second half, keeping the Tar Heels off the board in the third period. With both teams stagnating for most of the fourth, North Carolina added another goal to its total with less than three minutes left in the contest. Rosati compiled five saves in the fourth period and ended the game with a careerhigh 12. “It was great to see some freshmen getting solid playing time. The entire freshman class is very strong and bring a whole new level of energy to the team,” Rosati said. The Quakers will next travel to West Long Branch, N.J. to face off against Monmouth on Friday, as they look to get into the win column for the first time this season.

Happy Hour: Mon-Fri 5-7 Lunch Special: Mon-Fri $9.95 Early Bird: Sun-Thur $11.95

Wisdom Teeth Study

If you have impacted wisdom (3rd molar) teeth that need to be removed you may qualify for a clinical research study that involves taking both approved pain relievers after surgery and providing us with blood and urine samples. Compensation is available for your efforts and time completing the study. If you are interested please call Stacey Secreto in the Oral Surgery & Pharmacology Research Unit at 215-746-8871 or 484-354-4442

The Povich Journalism Program at

The Nora Magid Mentorship Prize

Careers in Journalism New Media present

&

What you need to know to get a real job in print or broadcast journalism, book publishing, new media & beyond

beer springfield distributor

Studying too hard?

Take a break with us.

Hoping to work in journalism or publishing after college? A dynamic panel of four Penn alumni — all of whom worked in different roles at the DP as undergrads — will discuss the early trials, tribulations, and eventual bliss of working in the media. Come get the scoop, as these professionals will field your questions and advise aspiring writers and editors on the everchanging landscape of new media.

ASHLEY PARKER C’05 is a White House reporter at the Washington Post, where she was part of the team that won a 2018 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for their coverage of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Previously, she worked at the New York Times, where she covered politics (including the campaigns of Mitt Romney, Jeb Bush and Donald Trump). She has also written for Glamour, The Huffington Post, The Washingtonian, Philadelphia Weekly, and is an NBC/MSNBC senior political analyst. JESSICA GOODMAN C’12 is a senior editor at Cosmopolitan magazine, where she edits stories about caeeers, money, travel love and food. She and her team won a National Magazine Award in Personal Service for a 2017 story, How to Run For Office. Previously, she was a digital news editor at Entertainment Weekly and an Entertainment Editor at Huff Post. Her debut YA novel will be published next year. LUIS FERRÉ-SADURNÍ C’17 is a reporter for The New York Times covering housing in New York City. Turning a 3-month internship at the Times into a full-time reporting job, he has covered crime, criminal justice issues, and spent a month reporting from Puerto Rico on the devastating impact of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017. STEPHEN FRIED C’79 (moderator) is an award-winning journalist and bestselling author who teaches non-fiction writing at Penn and Columbia. He is the author of 7 nonfiction books — the latest, a biography of Founding Father Benjamin Rush, was recently named a finalist for the 2019 George Washington Book Prize — and has been a writer at Vanity Fair, GQ, Glamour and Philadelphia Magazine.

Thursday, September 19 • 5:00 pm

WE DELIVER

Kelly Writers House Arts Café • 3805 Locust Walk

22nd & Washington ave, Philadelphia | (215) 546-7301

No registration required; this event is free & open to the public

WE DELIVER! Corner of 27th and South St. DIRECTIONS: East on Chestnut,

(215) 546-7301

springfie


10 SPORTS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

Penn Athletics revamping marketing to raise interest New initiatives seek to bring it was received really well and increased student attendance something that worked. Now

looking to utilize the stadium’s outdoor space differently. One major rollout this year is a new initiative to attract more students to enjoy pregame downtime on Shoemaker Green. “Pregame on the Green� is scheduled for the Brown, Cornell, and Princeton home games this season and will allow anyone to rent a space for friends, student groups, and fraternities and sororities. “[G]roups can get their tented space, come in, have food and alcohol for those who are 21 and over, bring their cornhole, little bluetooth speaker, and have their setup out there,� Fitzpatrick said. This new event is a perfect example of the overarching goal of Penn Athletics marketing: engaging with student groups to develop personal, long-lasting partnerships. To achieve this, the team has recently launched a new campaign, Student Org of the Game, in which student groups will be both recognized during football games and able to participate in the team introductions. They have also recently allied with veterans’ groups on campus to designate special seating at football games, further develop their Military Appreciation Day, and collaborate with Princeton groups to create intercollegiate sport outings. The marketing team also has its eye on Greek life at Penn. They are brainstorming ways to target these groups, such as by establishing a Greek night at basketball games, but these initiatives are only in their early stages. While keeping Penn students enthusiastic about their sports can be challenging, the Penn Athletics marketing team is eager to give them the full college experience. “We’re in the business of creating fun for others, so we want to make sure we’re having fun,� Jakimowicz said. “And if we’re not having fun or making it a fun environment for the students, then we’re not doing our jobs right.�

we know in the future we can leverage those big-time games to support attendance at other events,� Fitzpatrick said. “We are seeing what sticks because the student population is extremely important to building our fanbase in the long run.� Other initiatives, such as the 10K Saturdays and student-athlete MCs center on creating an electric yet homey environment for students to display their pride. “[For example, there’s] everything from our guerilla marketing — our game week marketing when we are out doing pizzas with Priore, donuts with Donahue, and touch points like that with our coaching staff. We really want to create an atmosphere students want to return to,� Fitzpatrick said. While the marketing team works on improving the feel of basketball games in the Palestra, it is hoping to explore ways of directly engaging with students come football season. With the kickoff home game fast approaching, the athletic marketing team wants to build an in-game interactive experience by focusing on what works: Merch giveaways, “punt, pass, kick� games, and “run the field� games proved to be most popular last year. Due to limiting seating, the major construction on Franklin Field threatens to disrupt fan participation, but Fitzpatrick sees it as an opportunity to change fan-athlete interactions in a distinctive way. “Our team is shifting our sideline so all of our fans, even the visiting fans, everyone in the stadium, will be right behind them and supporting them,� she said. “I think it’ll actually create a unique atmosphere.� This unusual arrangement is scheduled to last two seasons and will hopefully help fans galvanize the Quakers into winning some home games. The marketing team is also

MARC MARGOLIS & EMMA RONZETTI Sports Reporters

With many students feeling too busy or ambivalent to attend Penn sporting events, some believe that the Red and Blue will never have as many fans as they deserve. Assistant Athletic Director of Marketing and Fan Engagement Denise Fitzpatrick, and Assistant Director of Marketing Emily Jakimowicz see it differently. In an effort to roll out new marketing initiatives for the basketball and football seasons, Fitzpatrick and Jakimowicz hope to re-engage current Penn students in the sports culture. “We want to be an avenue to bring out Penn pride and Penn spirit in our students and let them know that the entire time that they’re here [will] not be, ‘I have to wait until I’m an alum to be proud that I went to Penn,’� Fitzpatrick said. “While you’re here you should be proud that you went to Penn and let us be the avenue in which you show that.� To attract more students, the marketing team collected survey data to use a “throwing spaghetti� approach: “We are coming from a place of throw it on the wall and if it sticks, great. We’ve got that and we can keep improving,� Fitzpatrick said. So what are they throwing the students’ way this year? After trying out a few new programs targeting Penn basketball fans last season, the marketing team found the strategy of leveraging big-ticket games especially effective. This was used leading up to the momentous Villanova game last year; Penn students were eligible for a free ticket to the event as long as they went to several games with lesser-known opponents. “We weren’t sure how that was going to be received, but

SUDOKUPUZZLE 

Skill Level:

5 3 6 9 Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) 2 7 1 3 6 contains every digit 1 to 9. Solution to Previous Puzzle: 8 7 1                   3 9                   5 4          8 6                   1 5 9                   6 3 1 The5New8York Times Syndication Sales Corporation The New York Times Syndication Sales 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y.Corporation 10018 Eighth Avenue,Call: New1-800-972-3550 York, N.Y. 10018 For Information 4 3 6620 7 prizesudoku ForRelease Information Call: September 1-800-972-3550 For Monday, 9, 2019 © Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com



Create and solve your Sudoku puzzles for FREE.

Play Sudoku and win prizes

For Release Friday, September 6, 2019

The Sudoku Source of

NEWYORKTIMESCROSSWORDPUZZLE Crossword rossword C

ACROSS ACROSS 1 Group in a play 1 General plan? 5 Plasterwork 7 backing Reproductive part 9 Bracelet securer 13 Arthur Locks with that a 14 might not be stadium named totally secure? after him 15 fluish, in 15 Feeling Cause of awheezing way 16 me� (“Go 16 “___ Put on the line, along with it�) perhaps 17 ___ the Man 18 Check names (old baseball 19 nickname) It gets cleared for overrun takeoff (with) 18 Be 21 “E� Bit on of a gas 19 gauge gymnastics equipment 20 Pre-snap 22 powwow Important thing to know, if you 22 Garden munchkin will was ___ 24 “How 24 know?� Big biceps, in slang Best 25 2012 25 Picture Photoswinner from set in Irane.g. drones, 27 Kind of toy that 26 Trail mix morsel moves when you 27 turn “Howa key ___ it?�

31 Semiaquatic

28 Some works salamanders

by poets laureate 33 Flowers on 29 Crime trellisesfor which Al Capone went 35 to Billprison in a tip jar 36 Slangy 33 Yank “sweetheart� 34 Put on the line 37 Horace, as a poet 35 PC “brain� 38 Barrister’s 36 Character headgear in 39 raised Scrub vigorously “Rosemary’s 41 Baby� Manipulate 42 In Littlest ones of in 38 the thick litters 39 One relatively 44 close Contagious eitherviral infection way? 45 Female Cross ___ with 40 role in Fiction� 47 “Pulp Side-to-side nautical 41 Silly movement 42 Pitfall 48 Plural “is� 44 Theater ticket 49 First appearance, option as of symptoms 46 Debtor’s letters 50 Toronto N.H.L. team, flying for short 47 Ones in 53 circles Common ankle injuryoffering 48 BBQ

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE PUZZLE CS O P M A B M A TJ O SH SN M S I P N A N OS M W

O H P O I B U O M S U K AE S M E SP U I P O P W AY

W O E R LS L O O K N A MI F O D E LR RI O N GL

TE R T E C K S K Y P S E K A O D E V RI CI E O

O A F H O U G U C P O M S EI L C VI L O K N S N

W B H O NI P A S M AI W A E N D I M T E A N G S

N O A L G D S I N L A E N X D C E S W S O R D

L TI H E E T D E N R T M I S N TA T X O RI I

T O D M A YA S SI R A A G Q E R H YP D A EI

S C O FT ET D TT O R A U M SS AT G O EP S

SA R W AC GS RC AA PR R AY I D O ES SS A

L M II GT H TR YO T HI AS R PS U NS HH LI

AA LM LA AZ HO N MI IA C EE N CS I U AE OD

SD HA CE OA O OV W NI IN EL EL D I VO PN EG SE T S SC TO O W EL NE ZM ES RE ET AS DO

55 Biggest bear in

50 Settlers of and “Goldilocks

disputes the Three Bears� 54 library 57 Noted “V for Vendetta� actor Stephen opened in 2001 58 Traveler Grind, aswho teeth 55 up three 60 picks Withstands 62 companions Gemstone in ameasure classic film 56 todown 65 Pledge Chopped 57 will 67 Ill 3:1 or 4:1, e.g. 68 Superior beef grade DOWN 69 They’re mined 1 One-time and refined connection 70 Large, scholarly 2 Affected book response to an 71 “For ___ waves allegation of grain� (line in “America 3 Prickly huskthe Beautiful�) 4 Keeps current 72 Water swirl 5 First podcast 73 to Elderly win a

Peabody Award (2015) DOWN 61 Job requiring Redeem, as a a savings car, say bond Uncommonly 72 Fruit in the perceptive custard apple 3 family Air-punching pugilist 8 “Here’s my two 4 cents Manage, ‌â€? as a bar “Ciaoâ€? 95 Dump Unreturned 106 Tony winner set tennis in Riverserve City, 7 Iowa 2006 Matt Damon spy film 11 “Um ‌ er ‌â€? 8 Song sung on 12 Doesn’t Sunday die 149 Singer with Place with the #1 albums beakers and BunsenDanceâ€? burners “Stars 10 (2013) Measureand of light’s “Revivalâ€? brightness 11 (2015) Electric guitar accessory 17 Pie that comes loadedâ€? 12 “fully Drunkard

Edited by by Will WillShortz Shortz Edited 1 1

2 2

3

3

4

4

5

6

5

14 13

15

17 16

18

20 24

19 22

39 33

43

45

54

63

18 20

24

38 43

60

30

31

32

38

51

4556

66

29

35

4150

65 50

72

28 35

27

42

59

71 56

11 12 13 10 11 12

21

30

55

69

10

19

47

68 54

9

16

23

34

37

44

64 49

9

27

40

58 47

46

8

46

49

39

7

41

34 37

48

62 48

29

40

44 36

53 42

22

.com

No.0802 0805 No. 15

17

33 26

36

8

26

32

28

7

14

21 25

23

31 25

6

at:

“Daily Pennsylvanian�.

52

57 61 67 51

52

53

70

55 57

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Player of the Week: Junior Woodard W. SOCCER | Woodard scored both Penn goals JACOB WESSELS Associate Sports Editor

A super performance from Penn women’s soccer’s super sub. Junior midfielder Breukelen Woodard has earned DP Sports Player of the Week for her efforts in this weekend’s games against Fairfield and Mount St. Mary’s. Woodard entered Friday’s game against Fairfield as a sub in the 27th minute. Just 20 minutes later, she found herself in on goal courtesy of a pass from her senior midfield partner Emily Sands. Upon receiving the feed, the junior calmly netted her first goal of the weekend and Penn’s only

goal in its 1-1 tie against the Stags. Two days later in the Quakers’ matchup against Mount St. Mary’s, Woodard — now in the starting lineup — found the back of the net in the sixth minute, once again off a feed from Sands. Woodard’s goal propelled the Quakers to a 1-0 shutout win, their second of the season. Woodard is no stranger to scoring against the Mountaineers. In her first game for the Red and Blue, a 5-0 win over Mount St. Mary’s last season, she recorded her only previous goal while also picking up an assist. Despite being a junior, Woodard is only playing in her second season for the Quakers. After transferring from South Carolina, where she appeared in 23 games and racked up four

assists as a freshman, Woodard saw action in 13 games last season, getting the start in 12 of those while recording one goal and two assists. With a season under her belt for the Red and Blue, Woodard’s success early on is a great sign for the Quakers who will need her chemistry with the other midfielders to be on point if they are going to defend their Ivy League title and challenge Princeton for a berth to the NCAA Tournament. Her recent impact has been especially evident, with both of her goals this weekend coming in tight matches. Next on the docket for Woodard and Penn is another weekend set against Bucknell and Loyola as the Red and Blue continue to prepare for the start of Ivy League play.

TAMARA WURMAN

W. SOCCER >> BACKPAGE

game we play,� coach Nicole Van Dyke said. Going into their Sunday matchup against Mount St. Mary’s (0-6), the Red and Blue wanted to be aggressive and more organized with their attack. “After Friday’s game, we spent a couple days trying to focus on doing things a little higher up on the field,� Van Dyke said. “We wanted to get into the final third and create better opportunities.� They did just that. Against Fairfield, the Quakers put just six shots on goal. Against Mount St. Mary’s, they had 11 in addition to 20 shots overall. Among those creating opportunities was senior forward Emily Sands. Sands had nine shots overall, including five

M. SOCCER >> BACKPAGE

For the rest of the first half, play was more even between the two teams as the defenses got more comfortable on their respective sides. Going into the second half, Penn still commanded a 2-0 lead. Again, the Quakers started strong, with another shot from Bhangdia. However, Monmouth also started ramping up its offensive production as well. The Hawks did have some opportunities, with four shots to their credit. However, they could not get the ball on frame, giving Penn sophomore goalkeeper Dane Jacomen the easiest possible debut: zero shots faced in a shutout effort. “In the second half, when

on goal. She was constantly in the mix, creating chances and controlling the ball in the final third. Last year, Woodard scored just one goal. This weekend, she scored two, recording the only goal of the game against Mount St. Mary’s in the seventh minute. “I definitely think working hard in the summer has really paid off for me. I was injured most of last season; I had a restrictive wrap most of the season,� Woodard said. “This season, it feels really good to not have that on me, to be free, to be loose, take shots, and make runs.� Woodard’s positioning and timely runs led to her two goals. Both shots were onetouch strikes, and both were assisted by Sands. Though the match against Fairfield didn’t yield the result

the Quakers wanted, they are encouraged by their progress thus far. “After our first 15 minutes, we settled in a little bit. We were being too methodical, almost thinking too much,� Van Dyke said. “We’re getting good opportunities. Now it’s just those final couple inches where you need to be that much better.� “This weekend, we’ve really found our attacking mindset. We’ve been able to put a couple goals away,� Woodard said. “It’s playing as a team, getting that last through ball.� The Quakers clearly improved from the match against Fairfield to the match against Mount St. Mary’s. The conditions helped; Sunday’s game was sunny and 75 degrees. Their next chance to improve comes against Bucknell next Friday.

they came out really peppering us and coming at us, we had to defend in a block well,� Bhangdia said. “We needed to sit in and weather the storm a little bit. The organization and communication we all had as well as the guys playing for each other was really helpful.� As the game ticked closer to the final whistle, Monmouth’s momentum continued to grow. With two corner kicks in the last 10 minutes, the Hawks came increasingly close to finding the back of the net. Tensions started to run higher as increased desperation from the Hawks elevated the level of physicality. “I feel like it might have been just the emotions at the end of the game, guys trying to close out,� Bhangdia said. “But it didn’t hurt us too much at the

end.� And when the final whistle sounded, it was Penn who ultimately prevailed, keeping Monmouth scoreless and coming away with a season-opening win. Throughout this game, the many strengths and skills of the Red and Blue were apparent. Outshooting Monmouth 9-4, with a 5-0 margin in shots on target, Penn’s energy offensively could be a preview of what’s to come this season. The Quakers’ defense also had a great showing, holding Monmouth scoreless for the first time in their last three meetings. Following this strong win, the Red and Blue look to keep this momentum going into their home opener versus Marist (1-1) on Monday.

me almost want to have tears. I’m so overwhelmed.� Penn’s current team got started early with two rushing touchdowns from senior quarterback Eddie Jenkins on the team’s first two possessions en route to a dominant shutout win. Jenkins completed 14 of his 18 pass attempts, accounting for 129 of Penn’s 398 total offensive yards. Sophomore running back Sam Mintz showed his versatility, rushing for 55 yards and going 6-for-6 on extra points. With the 125-year celebration of Franklin Field and the celebra-

tion of Wagner’s final year, this season is bound to be a joyous one. The team will look to add another reason to celebrate with a Collegiate Sprint Football League Championship win at Franklin Field at the end of the season. “We want to send [Wagner] out on top. Our goal is to win a championship,� Jenkins said. “It really hits home even more this year that it’s championship or bust.� Penn will start their championship push on Friday at the Frank against a tough opponent in Army.

73

PUZZLEBY BYANDREW TRACY GRAY PUZZLE J. RIES

13Green Jimmyprotector (open) 20

32Titian’s Letter after 32 “Venus

Best effort, 4454Modern

informally handbag 56portmanteau Colorful flower border with aarea “faceâ€? 45 Shady 34 and ozs. 39Lbs. Pampering 4759Zymurgist’s Pump or oxford places 23dinosaur Is indebted to interest 37 Tiny bit 26Wonderful Fills, as tiletime joints 40 Bus. concern 61 Smidgen 24 49 Animal that 38 “Friendsâ€? 43 Persian Gulf 28 Popular yoga doesn’t Helper have duringa 25 Tiny co-star country, for short 62sound posebit ‌ or a taxingcoming times, for literal hint to the 46 Actress Kendrick out of its head? short? 27 Roll of bread ends of 3-, 7-, 9- 41 One of the 51Gandhis What “woofâ€? or 51 Series end and 21-Down 63 Triceps location 29 Road goo “meowâ€? may 52 P 29 The “Uâ€? in I.C.U. 42 Shankbone mean 30 Peace sign 64 Poke fun at 53 Aleppo’s land: 30 Cribbage 52 Talked back to 31 Pontificate 43 Romps scorekeepers with ’tude 66Abbr. Marry 21 Lecturer’s 22 Become, finally implement with a light at the 23 Colorado’s end state official

sigma Anadyomene,� 34e.g. Nap south of the

Online Onlinesubscriptions: subscriptions:Today’s Today’spuzzle puzzleand andmore morethan than7,000 7,000past past puzzles, puzzles,nytimes.com/crosswords nytimes.com/crosswords($39.95 ($39.95a ayear). year). Read Readabout aboutand andcomment commenton oneach eachpuzzle: puzzle:nytimes.com/wordplay. nytimes.com/wordplay.

ALUMNI

>> BACKPAGE

come full circle. He had been able to see players that he coached come back and play on the same field that he coached them on years and sometimes decades ago. “Memories flash back through my mind that go all the way back to the 70s. Players that I coached are now 50 and 60 years old, and they were able to come out and have fun playing a football game,� Wagner said. “They’ve been so loyal and generous to me, it makes


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

SPORTS 11

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

Pack strategy helps cross country to solid showing at Fordham

The Penn women took nine straight places in their race DANIEL WITTMER Sports Reporter

The Quakers turned the Fiasco into a fantastic showing. Both Penn men’s and women’s cross country showed promise at the Fordham Fiasco in Bronx, N.Y. this weekend. The men finished third in a field of 12, while the women garnered a fourth-place finish out of 11 teams. The phrase “slow and steady wins the race” may be from a fable, but it’s a legitimate strategy employed by Penn’s coaching staff. Early in the season, the staff focuses on keeping a steady pace with minimal differences in individual runner times. “[The story of the day is] them running together to set the stage for

the races that are bigger later in the season,” coach Steve Dolan said. “There were runners who could have run faster, but we asked them to stay together as kind of a teambuilding camaraderie at the first contest.” This event was also the perfect warm-up for the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships later in the season, which will also be held at Van Cortlandt Park. This early race allowed the Quakers to get a feel for the course and observe all of its ebbs and flows without too much pressure and at a consistent place. Also notable about Saturday’s results is how much accountability and trust is employed on the players. Both teams only had their first official practice on Aug. 27, leaving the bulk of the preparation for the first meet up to these athletes during the summer. Dolan added that the team members get a very extensive game plan at the end of the school

year for training over the summer, and then it’s up to them to work toward the desired results in the fall. On the women’s side of things, senior Julianna Catania carded the fastest time for the Quakers at 20:03.57 to land her at 21st overall. There were eight runners who finished sequentially behind Catania in a group, with freshman Delia Russo rounding out the pack, only 3.48 seconds behind Catania. Penn was the only team to have nine runners finish in a row, with Princeton the next closest at five runners. Although this strategy kept the Quakers easily in the top half of competition, they were behind Ivy League foes Harvard and Princeton, who claimed the top two spots, respectively. As for the men, junior Ryan Renken broke into the top 20 with his time of 27:47:09, good for the 20th spot overall. The men also employed the pack tactic, placing 11

runners in positions 20-32, including a pack of seven from 20-26, followed by a group of four with only two runners from other schools in between. For both teams, the previous experience running this course for the juniors and seniors was evident, as the 2017 Ivy Heps was also held at Van Cortlandt Park. Out of 21 runners for the men and women who placed in the top 32, a total of 14 were either juniors or seniors. This event was a strong seasonopening showing for both teams. The game plan moving forward is controlled and efficient speed that allows all of the Quakers to finish well on average as a team with speed increasing across meets, and individual fast runners will begin to show later in the season. Looking ahead, the Quakers will suit up again in two weeks at Boston College for the Coast-to-Coast Battle in Boston, Mass.

CHASE SUTTON

Penn men’s cross country turned in a strong showing in New York at the Fordham Fiasco, placing 11 runners between 20th and 32nd place.

Red and Blue pick up pair of wins in season-opening tournament VOLLEYBALL | Freshman Fourticq led team in assists MARIANA SIMOES Associate Sports Editor

Penn volleyball has a lot to look forward to after its first weekend of the new season. In the team’s first three matches of the year, at the Crosstown Invitational in Easton, Pa., the Quakers finished with a 2-1 showing. The two-day event saw the team pick up wins over Maryland-Eastern Shore and host Lafayette, but come up short against Lehigh. The tournament was the team’s first since players alleged mistreatment at the hands of coach Iain Braddak in the spring. Multiple players quit the team citing their mental and emotional well-being. Penn Athletics stood by Braddak despite protests. “We got the new recruiting class and we honestly are considering

the season a clean slate — nothing to lose, no pressure,” sophomore middle hitter Margret Planek said. “Our chemistry I think is great.” The Red and Blue started their first match of the trio off strong, holding a 24-22 lead against UMES (2-5) in the first set, but they were unable to secure the opener, eventually falling behind 26-24. Penn quickly responded in the second set, winning five points in a row and evening up the match at 1-1. After splitting the next two sets, the Quakers and Hawks went to a tie-breaking fifth set. None of the teams could take an early lead, but tied at 13-13, Penn scored two consecutive points to seal the victory — thanks to freshman Caroline Douglas’ ace and freshman setter Taylor Fourticq’s 50 assists over the match. “Overall, I think we’re really happy with how the freshmen are responding, they put in so much work and if there were any first-

VARUN SUDUNAGUNTA

Penn volleyball sophomore Margaret Planek led the team with 35 kills as the Quakers won two of three games to open the year this weekend.

game jitters, we obviously didn’t see them,” Planek said. “We try to leave age off the court.” Less than an hour later, the Red

and Blue were back into action against Lehigh. The teams traded points early on, before the Mountain Hawks (4-3) scored four points

OPEN LATE & LATE NITE DELIVERY

in a row, closing the first two sets, 25-15 and 25-14, respectively. The Quakers bounced back in a thrilling third set, led by junior Raven Sulaimon’s performance of 13 kills, but they were not able to carry the momentum into the fourth set, falling 25-23 and 3-1 overall in the match. Penn stormed back the next day in the match against Lafayette. Once again, the Quakers had a close first set, with the Leopards notching the final two points to clinch the set at 29-27 and take an early lead. However, the Red and Blue managed to flip the script in the remaining part of the match, rattling off three straight sets to come away with the win in Lafayette’s home gym. Penn dominated the second set and pulled away late to win the third, but the fourth was where the Quakers really needed to dig in as a team. After leading 20-12, the Leopards clawed their way back and brought Penn’s lead down to one.

After the Red and Blue called a timeout, they held firm for the final two points and their second win of the weekend. While it may be too early to say, Penn volleyball showed signs of improvement after having the worst season in its history last year. Besides the freshmen’s impressive debut on Friday, Planek also led the team in kills (35), while sophomore libero Carmina Raquel had 62 digs over the three games. “I’m just really excited to see what else we’re going to do. For where we’re at in the season, our first tournament with the jerseys on, I’m super excited for our growth even over those two days [of the tournament],” Planek said. The Quakers will hope to continue the trend next weekend, when they host the Valley Forge Sports Invitational Tournament at the Palestra. Penn will try to grab its first wins at home against Duquesne, Chicago State and St. Francis Brooklyn.

R O F G N I K O LO ? K R O W E M I T-T R A P R O ! L L G U F N I R I H WE’RE UR LOCAL STORE CONTACT YOR DETAILS! FO

Domino’s

TM

SUN-THURS: 10AM - 2AM • FRI-SAT: 10AM - 4AM WE MAKE ORDERING EASY!

CALL DIRECT OR CHOOSE YOUR ONLINE OR MOBILE DEVICE Smart Phones

215-662-1400

4438 Chestnut St.

Tablets

215-557-0940 401 N. 21st St.


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2019 VOL. CXXXV

NO. 36

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

FOUNDED 1885

Sprint football secures shutout in Wagner’s final alumni game

GARY LIN

Wagner’s 50th season as coach kicked off on Saturday TYIRA BUNCHE Sports Reporter

This year’s Penn sprint football alumni game had special meaning for both sidelines, as it marked the beginning of the last season for

coach Bill Wagner. The Quakers took the field on a beautiful Saturday afternoon to play in the annual alumni game. As Wagner enters his 50th and final season as coach of the Penn sprint football, the alumni weekend was about looking back on his long career at Penn. In line with recent alumni game history, this year’s game was a 44-0 blowout in favor of the current

Men’s soccer kicks off season with road win over Monmouth

Penn team. The alumni game is always an enjoyable event for alumni, as they get a chance to come back to Franklin Field and reunite with old teammates. However, this weekend had a more emotional touch as they celebrate Wagner’s career and the impact he has had on Penn sprint football. Former foreign exchange stu-

dent Henrik Ager played for Penn in 1992 and travels to Penn each year from Sweden, planning his job around the game. Former wide receiver Dave Lopez was actually unsure that he would be able to play in the game after getting hurt playing baseball over the summer. “Once I heard the announcement, I made the decision that I was going [to play] because if for nothing else

JUSTIN DECHIARIO Sports Reporter

FIELD HOCKEY

PENN No. 10 WAKE FOREST

FIELD HOCKEY

PENN No. 1 NORTH CAROLINA

CHASE SUTTON

Kai Lammers scored a goal in his first game with Penn DUSTIN GHANNADI Sports Reporter

MEN’S SOCCER PENN MONMOUTH

2 0

Penn men’s soccer started the season off on the right foot on Friday, dominating both sides of the ball for a 2-0 hard-fought victory against Monmouth on the road. After scoring just 12 goals all of last season, the Quakers were eager to improve their offense against the Hawks and did just that, with help from both returning players as well as newcomers. Traveling to West Long Branch, N.J., the Quakers (1-0) looked to showcase not only their defensive skills but also their offense. The Red and Blue have opened their previous two seasons against Monmouth (0-2), with the home side winning the contest

both years. Last year’s game was a thriller, with the Quakers edging the Hawks out 3-2 in overtime on Rhodes Field. The visiting Quakers started the game off with great intensity, putting up two shots in the first six minutes. The first breakthrough came shortly after, with freshman Kai Lammers finding the back of the net less than 10 minutes into his Penn career. Despite taking an early lead, Penn kept the offensive pressure on, taking two more shots in the next three minutes. The Red and Blue made another breakthrough in the 16th minute, with junior Joey Bhangdia doubling the lead. “Guys that can step up and make plays really propel us forward. We have all been working this season to gel with our attack better and to make better runs,” Bhangdia said. “We were very organized, we shifted well. Guys were cutting out passes and we were able to transition going forward.” SEE M. SOCCER PAGE 10

them to know that they’ve made me a part of their lives,” Wagner said. While this may be the last time Wagner coaches against the alumni team, Ager hopes that Wagner will be back to coach for them next year. Wagner was in awe of how many people came out to celebrate his final season and to see everything SEE ALUMNI PAGE 10

Penn field hockey falls to No. 1 North Carolina and No. 10 Wake Forest in opening weekend The Quakers were unable to score in either contest

Junior midfielder Joey Bhangdia notched a goal for Penn men’s soccer in the team’s 2-0 win over Monmouth in the Quakers’ season opener.

just to be here to pay my respects,“ Lopez said. “This program actually changed my experience at Penn, so it was very important to come back.” Once the game was over, everyone was excited to take pictures with Wagner and thank him for the impact he has had on them. “They keep thanking me for being a part of their lives, and I want

0 2

0 6

On the road against two top-10 opponents to start the season, Penn field hockey struggled to find its footing.

To begin their year on Friday, the Quakers fell, 2-0, in a tough battle against No. 10 Wake Forest before falling to No. 1 North Carolina by a score of 6-0 on Sunday. After a scoreless first period in the first game, the Demon Deacons (1-3) found the back of the net in the middle of the second period. The Red and Blue (0-2) locked up on defense after conceding the first goal, as senior goalie Ava Rosati made a bevy of saves to keep it at a one-point deficit. With three minutes left in the conSEE F. HOCKEY PAGE 9

DAVID ZHOU

Senior goalie Ava Rosati made several saves to keep Penn in the game against Wake Forest, but the Quakers eventually fell, 2-0.

Quakers pick up win and draw in second weekend of play Junior Breukelen Woodard scored both goals for Penn CHARLIE DOLGENOS Sports Reporter

WOMEN’S SOCCER FAIRFIELD PENN

WOMEN’S SOCCER MOUNT ST. MARY’S PENN

1 1

0 1

It wasn’t without hiccups, but Penn women’s soccer finished with a successful weekend. On Friday and Sunday, the Quakers took on Fairfield and

FOLLOW US @DAILYPENN FOR THE LATEST UPDATES ONLINE AT THEDP.COM

ALEXA COTLER

Junior midfielder Breukelen Woodard scored the only two goals for Penn women’s soccer against Fairfield and Mount St. Mary’s.

Mount St. Mary’s, respectively. On paper, Penn’s opponents weren’t incredibly imposing. Fairfield lost to Yale, 5-1, last week, and Mount St.

Mary’s has yet to secure a victory. However, that didn’t mean that the games were easy for the Red and Blue. On a cold, rainy Friday

night, Penn drew Fairfield, 1-1, before defeating Mount St. Mary’s by a score of 1-0 on Sunday. Junior midfielder Breukelen Woodard scored quickly for the Quakers (21-1) in the second half of the first game, and they seemed to have the match under control, outshooting Fairfield (3-2-1) by a 15-8 total. However, that control waned in the 58th minute, when Fairfield equalized the game. The Quakers were unable to score a go-ahead goal and left disappointed with their performance. “[Coming into this weekend,] we expected to get two wins. We expect to win every SEE W. SOCCER PAGE 10

SEND STORY IDEAS TO DPSPORTS@THEDP.COM CONTACT US: 215-422-4640

Profile for The Daily Pennsylvanian

September 9, 2019  

September 9, 2019  

Profile for dailypenn
Advertisement