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MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PENN BRACKET SEE PAGE 6 CHECKING UP ON GOP For some, living far from campus is the best decision Students living outside of University City find comfort, excitement

HEALTH CARE REFORM Will vaccine coverage be required?

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Can they stay on their parents’ plan?

CATHERINE DE LUNA Staff Reporter

For many Penn students, areas west of 44th street or across the Schuylkill are dubbed ‘far away.’ And for the students who live outside the inner University City area, getting to campus often means taking Uber or SEPTA. College junior Nolan Wein is originally from the suburbs of Philadelphia and currently lives in Rittenhouse Square with her parents. “For me, I am an only child and I’ve always been sort of a homebody... so it really wasn’t that SEE LIVING PAGE 9

PENN STUDENTS FIGHT AGAINST HUMAN TRAFFICKING PAGE 3

Will mental health coverage be included? Millions are expected to lose coverage, but taxes may drop KELLY HEINZERLING Staff Reporter

The 2016 presidential election has changed lives across the nation — and with new legislation that could replace the Affordable Care Act, it could even affect Penn students’ medical care. House Republicans, who revealed their plans to replace Obamacare on March 6, are in favor of a system of tax credits that would encourage people to buy insurance on the open market. The bill would also roll back Medicaid, which has provided health care coverage to more than 10 million low-income Americans. Although the legislation has not yet passed, it would have significant effects on many Americans. “I think that as we evaluate the current GOP plan, it’s important to keep in mind that nothing is certain yet,” Executive Director of Student Health Service Giang Nguyen said. “There’s still a lot of detail within

the bill that a number of Republican voices have concerns about. I don’t know what the ultimate shape of this will be.” The proposals in the GOP Health Care Plan is significantly different from Obamacare — but what would this mean both nationally and for Penn students? The Daily Pennsylvanian broke it down. Who does it hurt and who does it help? “[The bill] benefits young, healthy moderate-income individuals,” said Daniel Polksy, the executive director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, an interdisciplinary venture at Penn that studies the national health system. “What this bill would do is make it much more difficult for people who already have difficulty getting insurance.” Nguyen said a number of Penn students have taken advantage of the expansion of Medicaid. If this coverage was reduced, they would be at risk to lose their health insurance. But Wharton Health Care Management Department Chair Scott Harrington pointed out the positive

benefits for many college students. “Generally people who graduate from college make enough money that they would have very limited support, if any, from the Affordable Care Act,” he said. “In fact, those who do have relatively low incomes will most likely get more from the Republican proposal in terms of tax credits than they would with premium subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.” This tax cut comes with a tradeoff, as another Health Care Management professor Mark Pauly, said. “For the average American who will not be taking one of the Obamacare plans, as a taxpayer they’ll have lower taxes but they may be, and I hope they will be, more concerned about the larger number of uninsured people,” Pauly said. A recent Congressional Budget Office report estimates that under the GOP plan, 24 million people would be at risk for losing health insurance by 2026. “Financing of care for low- to middle-income people is due to be fairly drastically reduced,” Pauly

SEE HEALTH PAGE 9

… like any good social policy, health care reform should come from a place of concern and empathy.” - Penn Democrats

No. 5 TEXAS A&M 63 61 No. 12 PENN

PAGE 4

WOMEN’S HOOPS SUFFERS HEARTBREAK

Penn falls in NCAA Tourney heartbreaker W. HOOPS | Quakers victim

of record 21-point comeback

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WILL SNOW Senior Sports Editor

ZACH SHELDON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Despite leading by 21 points with less than nine minutes left in the game, Penn women’s basketball crashed out of the NCAA Tournament to Texas A&M.

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LOS ANGELES — Heartbreak. Absolute heartbreak. There’s no other way to sum up Penn women’s basketball’s 63-61 loss to Texas A&M in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. The No. 12 Quakers (22-8, 13-1 Ivy) led by 21 points with nine minutes to go. But in March Madness, no lead is safe. The No. 5 Aggies (23-11, 9-7 SEC) huffed, puffed, and blew Penn’s California dreams away in the final minute to complete the largest comeback in NCAA Women’s Tournament history. They ended the game on a 26-3 run, and stole victory right out of the Quakers’ hands. “I wish I knew where to start,”

coach Mike McLaughlin said. “I’m super proud of this group, it was probably one of the hardest ones I’ve ever been a part of. We just played so, so well and just didn’t finish the last eight minutes.” It seemed locked up with eight minutes left. Penn was coasting en route to a second round date with No. 4 UCLA, and Texas A&M was crashing out of the tournament with the upset. Multiple Aggies were melting down during the first three quarters, with guard Curtyce Knox and center Khaalia Hillsman even devolving into a shouting match in the middle of open play. The Quakers were up 58-37, courtesy of an offensive explosion from senior Sydney Stipanovich and juniors Michelle Nwokedi and Anna Ross. The three were dominating the floor, scoring a combined 41 of SEE HEARTBREAK PAGE 11

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2 NEWS

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

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‘Pay it forward’ pizzeria to open second location Restaurant encourages patrons to pay for others CHRIS DOYLE Staff Reporter

A restaurant that helps the homeless is opening a new location right off-campus. Mason Wartman, owner of Rosa’s Fresh Pizza, recently announced he was opening a second store on 40th and Market streets, which will maintain Wartman’s “pay-it-forward” business model. Under Rosa’s system, slices of pizza are a dollar, and customers can pay additional money to reserve future slices. That food is later given to a person in need who comes into the store for something to eat. Customers are

also encouraged, after making their donation, to leave an inspirational Post-It note. Since appearing on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” Wartman has seen demand for his business increase dramatically. Wartman responded by expanding — both purchasing a second location and hiring five employees, three of whom have experienced homelessness. Wartman said a combination of affordable rental-rates and rising consumer-traffic prompted him to move west. Once open, he looks forward to continuing to work closely with Penn students and other universities. “We work with a lot of groups, like Penn Appetit, or other food related networks, or other social

giving networks, or business related clubs,” Wartman said. “We’re just very involved in not just getting our story out there, but also sharing what has made our business successful, and paying it forward and having students learn from that.” Wartman will be speaking at a Drexel University Close School of Entrepreneurship social entrepreneurship panel on Monday. Last month, Wartman spoke at Penn for a similar event hosted by the Wharton Undergraduate Giving Society. Penn Appetit is in talks to host Wartman for another speaker event. College and Wharton sophomore Daphne Fong, vice president of WUGS’ annual “Giving Month,” is eager for Wartman

TECH. SGT. HEATHER REDMAN | WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Rosa’s Fresh Pizza owner Mason Wartman has appeared on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” which he believes has dramatically increased his business. Wartman can now afford to open another location.

to move so close to campus. She said she feels confident that Rosa’s will give Penn students a

great opportunity to help the local community. “I’m very excited [that Rosa’s Fresh Pizza] is coming to University City,” Fong said. “A lot of students may be very busy at times, and [Rosa’s] is such a low cost and low difficulty way to give back.” Fong added that her group would seek to work closely with Rosa’s in the future. “I think we’d like to do as much work as possible, whether that’s through marketing or helping out in the kitchen … , or fundraising,” Fong said. “Anything he really wants us to do we’d be happy to help out with.” Nursing junior Laura Ng, the president and founder of Penn Project One, believes Rosa’s Fresh Pizza will do much to advance the cause of her organization, which is dedicated to feeding people experiencing homelessness. “One of the things that Project One aims to do is make volunteering or outreach easy for Penn students, so the convenience of

Rosa’s Fresh Pizza complements what we do," Ng said. “[Rosa’s] also raises awareness that these people are out there in the community and that there are easy ways to reach out and give back.” Wartman also hopes Rosa’s encourages Penn students to interact more with people experiencing homelessness. “[Rosa’s] has been a great way to build community and have two disparate groups that otherwise wouldn’t interact to share ideas, learn about each other and literally share the same space here,” Wartman said. “That’s definitely coming down the pike [at Penn].” Wartman wants his restaurant to serve as an example. A finance major and former Wall Street researcher, Wartman thinks Rosa’s story can be an inspiration for Penn students and former vice presidents. “A lot students at Penn are very good at a myriad of different things, just like we are at pizza,” he said. “They can do similar work to us, and help a community that often gets overlooked.”

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NEWS 3

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

March Madness has taken hold of Penn’s community College houses are planning watch parties HARI KUMAR Staff Reporter

The Penn men’s basketball team is not participating in the NCAA tournament this year and the women’s team just experienced a devastating lost in the first round, but many Penn students are still excited for the competition. March Madness, the colloquial term for the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, is a single-elimination competition among 68 top basketball programs from across the country. One of the most time-honored traditions of the season is to craft a bracket of picks to win each game of the tournament.

The students in the fourth floor halls of Speakman and Butcher in Ware College House created such a challenge amongst themselves. Engineering freshman Ransford Antwi, who lives in the fourth floor hall of Butcher, said the “[bracket challenge] will be a fun way for [his] hall to compete against each other.” He said that he is looking forward to watching the games over the next couple of weeks with his hallmates, around 15 of whom created brackets for the hall’s pool. Some college houses are also throwing watch parties for the tournament’s championship game, which will take place on April 3. College freshman Adam Alghalith, one of the board members for the Ware College House

Council, said that the council is “definitely planning to throw a watch party for the final game with Chipotle or pizza for food.” The watch party will likely occur in the lobby of the McClelland Express dining hall, located in the center of the quad. Rodin College House is also planning a watch party for students living in the building, although details have yet to be finalized. In the spirit of the season, The Daily Pennsylvanian has even gotten in on the game, creating the Penn Bracket Challenge, pitting various on-campus clubs and student organizations against each other in a bracket format. However, many clubs not included in the Penn Bracket are joining the newly created “Bracket of Sadness.”

On Monday, WQHS Radio, Penn’s student-run radio station, will unveil a competition consisting of 16 clubs that were not included in the Penn Bracket Challenge. College junior and President of WQHS David Reinis said that the popularity of one of his Facebook posts sparked the idea. “I posted on Facebook jokingly about how WQHS wasn’t included in the [Daily Pennsylvanian] bracket, and it got over 4,000 views,” Reinis said. “Then we thought we could make a fun, spinoff bracket.” He noted that this is an additional way to include clubs on campus in the challenge while also promoting WQHS. “Who knows, maybe we’ll do this again next year,” Reinis added.

PHOTO FROM NCAA BASKETBALL | WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Penn’s student-run radio station, WQHS Radio created a spin-off bracket for the clubs not included in the DP’s Penn Bracket Challenge.

Snow day forces profs. and students to adjust syllabi, schedules Class cancellations result in variety of responses LEXI LIEBERMAN Staff Reporter

Winter storm Stella’s arrival in Philadelphia last Tuesday prompted the cancellation of classes and excitement for many Penn students. But the missed class time also prompted significant disruption to course proceedings. Professors had to ma ke changes to their classroom plans, since the loss of a day of classes reduced time to teach course content. Approaches to making up lost time varied greatly from class to class, causing students to face a wide array of schedule adjustments. Wharton freshman Samantha Freeman missed her BEPP 250 class on the day off. She usually has the class — Introduction to Managerial Economics — on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

“Professor [Ulrich] Doraszelski scheduled a makeup class for the next day, so on Wednesday,” she said. “And we could go to that and he would actually go through the lecture slides.” According to Freeman, this was a different approach than those taken by her other professors. “I thought it was really nice that he gave us that option to actually go there and learn the material in person and not have to just rely on the slides,” she said. “Basically all of my other professors just said, ‘Look through the slides in your free time.’” Freeman appreciated the accommodation, but unfortunately could not attend the makeup lecture. College junior Catherine Oksas missed two classes due to the snowstorm. Each class took a different approach to syllabus adjustments. “I have biochem, which is normally lecture-based, and for

JOY LEE | NEWS PHOTO EDITOR

In the wake of the first full snow day of 2017, students and professors had to reorganize their plans for class assignments and lectures.

that one everything was kind of just pushed back,” Oksas said. This was a stark contrast from her creative writing class,

which Oksas described as a much smaller and more intimate learning environment. “My creative writing class

is more discussion-based,” she said. “We usually talk about some assigned pieces and have a small writing exercise in class. And so our professor sent us an email that was two discussion questions for pieces we were supposed to have read of about 200 words each, and then a 300-ish word little fiction writing exercise to make up for the class.” The assignment didn’t take Oksas too long, but she said she wished she could have seen what other people in the class wrote, since normally in class she gets to hear the thoughts of her classmates. However, she thought it was a fair way to deal with the missed class, especially since it would have been very difficult for the professor to adjust Thursday’s class plan. “On Thursday we were workshopping [critiquing classmates’ writing], and that was something that she didn’t want to have to squeeze in,” Oksas said.

College sen ior Ma r ielle Trubowitsch missed a threehour science and technology seminar that meets once a week. Because so much class time was missed, professor Dong-Won Kim adjusted the lectures. “It was extra weird since we didn’t have class during spring break or this week, so it just seems like a very long time to not have class,” Trubowitsch said. “So he just shifted the lecture that he would have had last week to this week and then … combined two of the readings.” Trubowitsch also missed a health care management class. Professor Jeffrey Silber took a similar approach to Kim, distilling two lectures into one while assigning readings as planned. “None of the professors took anything out, they just combined things differently,” she said. “So in lecture we’ll cover things a little bit less, but we’ll still do the same amount of reading.”

Penn students fight human trafficking in the United States Roughly 20 to 21 million are trafficked each year TYLER LARKWORTHY Contributing Reporter

Some crimes are less visible than others, and the Students Against Human Trafficking club at Penn is determined to end one of the most insidious. While many students may think of human trafficking as a rare crime removed from their lives, it is actually very prevalent in the United States. Trafficking cases occur in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. annually, Students Against Human Trafficking

Co-President and W ha r ton sophomore Geeta Minocha said. She noted that roughly 20 to 21 million people are trafficked each year, and it is a $150 billion industry. The goal of SAHT, Minocha said, is to raise awareness of human trafficking as an issue and work to eradicate it, because “it happens right here at home.” “This is the kind of club that isn’t a typical Penn club that’s here for pre-professional reasons,” College and Wharton senior and former SAHT President Serena Advani said. “The point is for people to get awareness and exposure to a really

big plight that so many people are facing.” Advani said the club was founded four years ago as an anti-sex trafficking organization, but over time it has changed its focus to all forms of human trafficking. It currently has about 30 active members. SAHT often hosts speakers and organized an intercollegiate conference on human trafficking at Penn last year. In April the club will host two speakers, Louise Shelley, a faculty member at George Mason University who researches trafficking, and Alexis Krieger, an FBI victim

specialist. SAHT also presents documentary series and holds fundraisers to further the cause. The club is also holding a drive to gather supplies to donate to the FBI for victims of trafficking who are taken in after raids. Wharton and College senior and SAHT Co-President Isaac Berg said his motivation for joining was his experience growing up in Guam, where he said trafficking is especially prevalent. Berg emphasized the need to recruit men for the organization, noting that it can be difficult to do so.

PHOTOS FROM SERENA ADVANI

SAHT will host Louise Shelley, a George Mason University faculty member who researches trafficking, and Alexis Krieger, an FBI victim specialist.

Unorthodox ESL class focuses on slang and American culture

Course held at Penn Christian Association IHALEY SUH Staff Reporter

Forget elementary English grammar books, banal conversation topics and grades. William Kelly’s “Slanguage” class, held every Tuesday at the Christian Association at the University of Pennsylvania, takes an unconventional approach to teaching English to non-native speakers. Students Ling Xu and Song Han came into Thursday’s class —postponed from Tuesday due to the snowstorm — to the beat of U2’s ”I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For.” Rather than staring at grammar textbooks, Xu and Han probed for grammar errors while analyzing the lyrics to the song. Thursday’s lesson plan also included analyzing a newspaper article from that day and learning a new list of slang vocabulary that included phrases like “B.Y.O.B.” Recent popular conversation topics have revolved around

President Donald Trump’s new policies and Kelly’s latest mission to Cuba, where he has been involved in the installation of water-purification systems. Kelly purposefully tries to encourage a relaxing learning experience in order to minimize the stress of his students. “We listen to music, talk a lot about Korean and Chinese culture, festivals and traditions in U.S.A and sometimes bake together,” Xu said. It’s relaxed and interesting. I love it.” Kelly founded the class 20 years ago when he stumbled upon the Christian Association building after getting off at the wrong bus stop. After speaking with organizers at the association, he decided to hold a class that would serve as a “friendly place for foreign visitors” by teaching English and American culture. Over his 20 years of teaching, Kelly estimates that he’s taught a total of about 600 students, predominantly from East Asian countries. He approximates that 60 percent of his students are from China.

HALEY SUH | STAFF REPORTER

Rather than focusing on traditional ESL teaching methods such as conversation starters, Penn’s Christian Association has created a new course that teaches common American slang and culture.

“A big issue for my students is that they are intelligent, highly educated people,” Kelly said. “Many of them worked at home, and they come here [to the US], and the Visa doesn’t let them

work so one of the things they decide to do is work on their English.” Xu, whose husband works as a researcher at Penn, recently immigrated to the US

from Germany. Similarly, Han accompanied her husband to Philadelphia from Seoul, South Korea. “I think [the class] is a good way to improve my English and

make friends in Philadelphia,” Xu said. “All in all, it’s been really helpful and Bill has done a good job. He is a very nice man.” “We talk about American politics through some news articles and social systems such as the health insurance system in the United States,” Han said. “It helps me to understand this society. On special days, like Christmas, Valentine’s day, etc., we exchange our cultural experiences and do some special activity like baking King cake for Mardi Gras.” The classes are free for anyone who is interested, but students mostly come from the Penn community or occasionally Drexel University and Temple University. Kelly’s passion for teaching the course comes from his experiences traveling all over the world. “I spent time in other countries, and there were things that I didn’t understand, but people were very nice to me,” Kelly said. “We hope to create a friendly environment where students can meet each other, but also to equip them to better make friends with Americans.”


4

OPINION

A tax cut for the rich in health care’s clothing TOE THE LINE

MONDAY MARCH 20, 2017 VOL. CXXXIII, NO. 33 133rd Year of Publication CARTER COUDRIET President DAN SPINELLI Executive Editor LUCIEN WANG Print Director ALEX GRAVES Digital Director ALESSANDRO VAN DEN BRINK Opinion Editor SYDNEY SCHAEDEL Senior News Editor WILL SNOW Senior Sports Editor CHRIS MURACCA Design Editor CAMILLE RAPAY Design Editor JULIA SCHORR Design Editor VIBHA KANNAN Enterprise Editor GENEVIEVE GLATSKY News Editor TOM NOWLAN News Editor ALLY JOHNSON Assignments Editor COLE JACOBSON Sports Editor JONATHAN POLLACK Sports Editor TOMMY ROTHMAN Sports Editor

The primary aim of any large-scale government program is not to save money. Social Security does not aim to reduce the deficit. The military does not turn a profit. The same is true — or, at least, should be true — of any federal health care policy. These policies should not first and foremost function as tax breaks for those who need them least. Instead, like any good social policy, health care reform should come from a place of concern and empathy. It should orient itself towards humanity, towards bettering and saving lives. It should assist not just those who have the least among us, but all of us. The American Health Care Act loses sight of this. The Congressional Budget Office, a nonpartisan agency within the legislative branch tasked with providing estimates on the effect of proposed legislation, recently released numbers on the AHCA. 14 million individuals will lose health insurance within two years. That number will rise to 24 million by 2026.

Through 2019, health care premiums will soar — they’re predicted to be as much as 20 percent higher than they are under current federal law. That number will start to decrease by 2020, but only because the sickest Americans will have their insurance coverage dropped altogether. The AHCA rolls back Medicaid expansion, one of the most successful facets of the Affordable Care Act. The ACA established a matching program, in which the federal government provided a certain amount of funding for each dollar a state provided for Medicaid. To replace this, the House Republicans’ bill provides capped subsidies per enrollee, resulting in much less federal support for each state’s expansion program. This matching system allowed for individual states to meaningfully expand Medicaid. Several traditionally red states that swung hard for Trump implemented Medicaid expansion, enabling poorer states like Kentucky, West Virginia and Arkansas to save thou-

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THIS ISSUE

nected from health care. The tax cut particularly harms the “white working class” that gave Republicans their near-universal federal power. It is not populism. It is not the will of the voters. It is Congressional Republicans pushing through a reckless ideology that was a key contributor to the Bush administration’s failures and wealth inequality.

This bill is essentially an $200 billion tax cut for the nation’s top 2 percent — totally disconnected from health care.” demning the AHCA. Beyond rolling back Medicaid expansion, irreparably harming the lives of millions of citizens, the AHCA provides unnecessary tax breaks for the richest Americans. This bill is essentially a $200 billion tax cut for the nation’s top 2 percent — totally discon-

Defenders of this socalled “replacement” bill will claim it provides choice. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and other Ayn Rand-obsessed sycophants in the House majority repeat their favorite buzzwords endlessly: access, freedom, liberty. These are misleading. There is no choice if

someone cannot afford care. And with rising premiums, that is sure to be the case. As President Trump so aptly pointed out the other week, health care reform is hard. And the ACA is not perfect. Premiums are too high, and it is does not provide complete coverage for every single American. But its flaws are not that it provides too much, but too little. The ACA is essentially modified RomneyCare, the Republican Party’s onetime “conservative” answer to the much more expansive health care proposals Hillary Rodham Clinton put forward in the 1990s. It is the most conservative health care policy available that simultaneously provides coverage and is functional. To go to the right of the ACA means gutting coverage, which is precisely the effect of the AHCA. The wealthiest, most powerful democracy in history can afford to provide coverage for its sick and its healthy. It can afford to provide coverage for its young, and its middle-aged, and its elderly. The choice

LAINE HIGGINS Sports Associate

Obamacare is a disaster. This has become an unavoidable reality in recent years. In Michigan and Colorado, for instance, premiums are increasing at rates of 16.7 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Nationally, premiums rose 25 percent this year on average. Some counties don’t even have multiple insurance companies on the exchanges. Speaking to an Aetna employee made me feel like a counselor; after all, the company has been in a “death spiral” as a result of the Obamacare exchanges. Only half of the projected 25 million enrollees have materialized. Any promise of deficit neutrality has long been forgotten; “not one dime” to the deficit changed very quickly to a trillion dollars in deficit spending. The Obamacare “penalty” for not purchasing insurance became a tax overnight, when it was convenient for the president to portray it as such in court. This is by no means a

shocking outcome to Republicans, who opposed the bill unanimously in Congress. A system that depends on coercing a group of largely healthy and young people to buy expensive insurance they don’t want or need in order to subsidize other sectors of the population is bound to fail. Guaranteeing coverage for those with preexisting conditions and putting caps on premium costs for the elderly further increased this burden, and the Affordable Care Act ultimately collapsed as a result. What’s nearly as troubling as the bill’s practical impacts is the seemingly permanent blow to public confidence that it engendered. President Obama and his allies promised, ad nauseam, that families would save $2,500 a year on average. Infamously, President Obama promised that Americans would not lose their plans — between 3 and 5 million did, with their insurance replaced by

generally expensive, arguably unnecessary and certainly unwanted plans. The American Healthcare Act is by no means perfect. It does not eliminate many of the regulations in Obamacare, apparently because Republicans are worried about a resulting filibuster. It also keeps

it’s an entitlement, not insurance. The bill keeps the taxfree status of employerprovided health care — while this FDR-era policy disincentivizes individuals from purchasing insurance, the solution is to expand tax credits to the individual market, not to eliminate

The mission of Congress and the president is to try and lower costs to the point that purchasing insurance is economically rational.” the well-intentioned but illogical policies regarding health care costs for the elderly and pre-existing conditions. Buying health insurance to cover a condition that already exists, with no impact on cost, is kind of like buying life insurance for the deceased;

them completely. The current bill does this by issuing age and income based refundable tax credits for individuals buying insurance. While the aforementioned reservations are real and legitimate, it is important to note that this bill is

but one step in the GOP’s three-step health care reform effort. This one step would, according to CBO figures that are being celebrated by the left, lower premiums by 10 percent, while cutting taxes by $883 billion. It would also decrease the deficit by $337 billion. The most common line of attack against the bill is the claim that over 20 million people will lose coverage. While facially true, most of the initial decline in coverage will be caused by the repeal of the individual mandate. Alternatively stated, people who didn’t want insurance will no longer be forced to purchase it, leading to a decline in coverage. The mission of Congress and the president is to try and lower costs to the point that purchasing insurance is economically rational. It was, admittedly, unwise for Republicans to unveil one part of the reforms and to keep the public waiting on the other

CARTOON

COSETTE GASTELU Copy Associate CATHERINE DE LUNA Copy Associate NADIA GOLDMAN Copy Associate STEPHEN DAMIANOS Copy Associate PETER RIBEIRO Photo Associate MORGAN REES Photo Associate GIOVANNA PAZ Photo Associate JULIO SOSA Photo Associate RYAN TU Design Associate CAROLINE LU Design Associate WENTING SUN Design Associate

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to do otherwise is not only imprudent, but has lost focus of what Americans owe to each other as human beings. Government can and should be a force for good. In health care policy, where the stakes are so high and the effects are so deeply felt, this force for good is absolutely necessary. The AHCA is not the answer. TOE THE LINE examines issues from two different sides. Both Penn Democrats and College Republicans argue why their collective positions on major political issues is best for the country. ARI GOLDFINE is a College sophomore and the vice president of Penn Dems.

TOE THE LINE

MOSES NSEREKO Sports Associate YOSI WEITZMAN Sports Associate

PENN DEMOCRATS

A good opening statement, but not the final word

AMANDA GEISER Copy Editor HARRY TRUSTMAN Copy Editor

sands of lives. Eight of the states that expanded Medicaid have “trigger” laws on the books, which will automatically undo any Medicaid expansion if federal funding is cut. Within these eight states alone, the AHCA will cause over 3 million Americans to lose insurance. Because of this, four Republican governors issued a joint statement con-

CLAUDIA LI is a College junior from Santa Clara, Calif. Her email is claudli@sas.upenn.edu.

COLLEGE REPUBLICANS two. Regardless, this bill is an imperfect step in the right direction, away from government control of the health care system. Hopefully Republicans on the hill can get past their infighting and deliver a refined and improved set of bills moving forward. TOE THE LINE examines issues from two different sides. Both Penn Democrats and College Republicans argue why their collective positions on major political issues is best for the country. MICHAEL MOROZ is a College freshman and a co-chair of the College Republicans Editorial Board.


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university university square square a complete list retailers visit visit for aforcomplete listofof retailers, ucnet.com/universitysquare ucnet.com/universitysquare

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at penn shopping shopping american Ann Taylor Loft apparel 3661 WALNUT ST. 120 S. 36th St. ann taylor loft AT&T Mobility 133 SOUTH 36th ST. 3741 Walnut St. at&t mobility Bluemercury 3741 WALNUT ST. 3603 Walnut St. bluemercury Computer Connection 3603 WALNUT ST. 3601 Walnut St. cvs CVS 3401 WALNUT ST. 3401 Walnut St. eyeglass encounters 3925 Walnut St. 4002 CHESTNUT ST. Eyeglassthe Encounters gap 4002 Chestnut St. ST. 3401 WALNUT Hello World hello world 3610 Sansom St. 3610 SANSOM ST. House ofhouse Our Own of our own 3920 SPRUCE ST. 3920 Spruce St. Last Word Bookstore last word bookshop 220 SOUTH 220 S. 40th St. 40th ST. Modernmodern Eye eye 3401 WALNUT 3419 Walnut St. ST Naturalnatural Shoe shoe store 226 226 S. 40thSOUTH St. 40th ST. penn book center Penn Book Center 130 SOUTH 34th ST. 130 S. 34th St. penn bookstore Penn Bookstore (Barnes & Noble) 3601 WALNUT ST. 3601 Walnut St.

services philadelphia Philadelphia Runner runner 3621 WALNUT ST. 3621 Walnut St. piper boutique Piper Boutique 140 SOUTH 34th ST. 140 S. 34th St. united United By Blue by blue 3421 WALNUT ST. 3421 Walnut St. urban outfitters Urban Outfitters 110 SOUTH 36th ST. 110 S. 36th St. verizon wireless Verizon 3631 Wireless WALNUT ST. 3631 Walnut St.

dining dining au bon pain 421 CURIE BLVD.

Auntie Anne’s auntieSt.anne’s 3405 Walnut 3405 WALNUT ST. Beijing Restaurant beijing restaurant 3714 Spruce St. 3714 SPRUCE ST. Ben and Jerry’s ben and jerry’s 218 S. 40th St. 40th ST. 218 SOUTH Blarneyblarney Stone stone 3929 Sansom St. 3929 SANSOM ST. BRYSI brysi 233 S. 33rd St. 33rd ST. 233 SOUTH Cavanaugh’s Tavern tavern cavanaugh’s 119 SOUTH 119 S. 39th St. 39th ST.

Cosi chattime ST. 140 S. 3608 36th CHESTNUT St. Dunkin cosi Donuts 140 SOUTH 36th ST. 3437 Walnut St. magrogan’s Federaldoc Donuts oysterSt. house 3428 Sansom 3432 SANSOM ST. Fresh Grocer dunkinSt.donuts 4001 Walnut 3437 WALNUT ST. Greek Lady 222 S. federal 40th St. donuts 3428 SANSOM ST. Hip City Veg fresh grocer 214 S. 4001 40th WALNUT St. ST. honeygrow gia pronto 3731 walnut st. ST. 3736 SPRUCE HubBubgreek Coffeelady 3736 Spruce St. 40th ST. 222 SOUTH kitchenharvest gia seasonal grill 3716 spruce st. & wine bar Kiwi Yogurt 200 SOUTH 40th ST. 3606 Chestnut St. hip city veg Mad Mex 214 SOUTH 40th ST. 3401 Walnut hubbubSt.coffee Mediterranean CaféST. 3736 SPRUCE 3409 Walnut St. yougurt kiwi frozen 3606 CHESTNUT Metropolitan Bakery ST. 4013 Walnut St.

madTavern mex New Deck 3401 WALNUT ST. 3408 Sansom St. mediterranean cafe Nom Nom Ramen 3401 WALNUT ST. 3401 Walnut St. metropolitan bakery o’Chatto 4013 WALNUT ST. 3608 Chestnut St. NOMFactory RAMEN PhillyNOM Pretzel 3401 WALNUT ST. Philly is Nuts! PHILLY PRETZEL factory 3734 Spruce St. PHILLY IS NUTS POD Restaurant 3734 SPRUCE ST. 3636 Sansom St. POD Qdoba3636 SANSOM ST. 230 S. 40th St. QDOBA Quiznos 230 SOUTH 40TH ST. 3401QUIZNOS Walnut St. Saladworks 3401 WALNUT ST. 3728SALADWORKS Spruce St. Saxbys Coffee 3728 SPRUCE ST. 4000SAXBYS Locust St. COFFEE 4000 LOCUST ST. Smokey Joe’s 210 S.SMOKEY 40th St.JOE’S 200 Taco BellSOUTH 40TH ST. 3401TACO Walnut St. BELL 3401 WALNUT ST. Wawa 3604WAWA Chestnut St. 3604 CHESTNUT ST. 3744 Spruce St. 3744 SPRUCE ST.

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This destination district includes over 100 businesses, cultural and recreational venues, and public spaces in and around This penn’s destination district over 100 businesses, cultural and recreational venues,between and public in and around campus, alongincludes the tree-lined blocks of chestnut, walnut and spruce streets 30thspaces and 40th streets. penn’s campus, along the tree-lined blocks of chestnut, walnut and spruce streets between 30th and 40th streets.


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

LIVING

>> FRONTPAGE

much of a transition,” Wein said. Wein tries to schedule her classes in clumps to minimize going back and forth to campus. When she is at Penn she tries to utilize her time to see as many friends as possible. Wein’s life in Center City has provided her with new opportunities and allowed her to gain perspective on her college experience. “Since I live downtown [I don’t] feel like I’m only a student, I feel like I’m also a real person that has real responsibilities.” College junior Vanjessica Gladney lives by the Philadelphia Zoo.

HEALTH

>> FRONTPAGE

said, “especially if they’re older.” What does this mean for Penn students after graduation? The effect of the bill will not be immediately apparent for many students after graduation, but they will likely see a greater benefit from the AHCA. “Current Penn students — almost all of them — are going to make enough money when they get out of school so that they won’t be eligible for Medicaid,” Harrington said. “Almost all Penn students will end up getting their coverage through work.” Will Penn’s universitysponsored health care plan change? “Most of the health care benefits that our students have, if they are on the Penn Student Insurance Plan, should be about the same because we, as the purchasers of that plan, have a lot of control,” Nguyen said. “We decide we’re going to cover a certain benefit.” Penn currently offers the Penn Student Insurance Plan through Aetna, Inc. The only way Penn would not be able to cover a condition was if a new piece of legislation specifically said it could not be covered. “I don’t think it would ever

NEWS 9

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

Her life outside of University City has presented more academic and social challenges than she initially expected. “It has complicated things a lot more than I was prepared for, social things are a lot harder to commit to,” Gladney said. “Studying has [also] been really difficult because I don’t live with any other students, so the whole concept that we may need quietness and silence doesn’t really fly.” Gladney has also found benefits of her new address, like being able to escape the noise of rowdy Penn parties. But Gladney has noticed another, more significant change. “I’m not so stressed out. There

is a line around campus where I cross it and immediately I just get a lot more anxious,” Gladney said. “It’s really interesting seeing the different sides of Philly that you might not run into if you stay on campus.” College senior Hannah Noyes lives at 23rd and Walnut streets and spent her first three years at Penn living in University City. “For my mental health’s sake, I needed to get off campus,” Noyes said. “At Penn it’s easy to get caught up in the Penn environment.” Noyes is moving to Washington D.C. next year and says living farther from Penn’s campus has prepared her for life beyond

college. “I feel so much more adult... it is a really good transition,” Noyes said. “It’s refreshing to be able to walk around Rittenhouse Square instead of University City. There is so much to do.” Noyes wanted a space where she could keep her dog and have access to her job downtown. Despite worries of being isolated from her friends and a longer commute, Noyes has been satisfied with her move away from University City. “Honestly, it’s probably been the best decision. I have been the happiest I have ever been because at the end of the day I am able to go home,” Noyes said.

Students who live outside of the University City neighborhood find that the distance from campus can help them destress.

get to the point where insurance to avoid that confrontation, plans cannot cover something,” which would require 60 senators Nguyen said. to block, by treating the AHCA He noted that Obamacare cre- as a “budget” bill. This means ated requirements that certain it can pass the Senate through preventative care like vaccines “budget reconciliation,” a probe covered in all plans. Under cess which is not subject to a the GOP plan, those require- filibuster. ments may not be included. How will the bill affect cov“You can’t count on [coverage erage for mental health care? of certain areas] being autoOn this issue, Molly Candon, matic — you have to look and an LDI postdoctoral fellow was choose your insurance plan,” blunt: the bill is “worse, unNguyen said. equivocally.” If changes to policy were en“Unfor tunately, and unacted, he encouraged people to surprisingly, I think mental make sure that their plan offered the benefits they needed and didn’t “change in a way they’re not aware of,” he said. Can students remain on their parents’ plan? One of the expansions that the ACA introduced was the ability for young adults to stay on their parents’ plan until the age of 26. Pauly anticipates - Daniel Polksy this provision, which was included in the House Republicans’ initial draft of the health care gets the raw end of AHCA, will survive the bill’s the deal,” she said. “Because legislative battle. Medicaid provides the bulk “It’s just not worth the back- of services to individuals with lash of taking young people off mental health care, it’s potentheir parents’ plans,” he said. tially devastating.” A potential repeal of that parPenn Benjamins counselor ticular item in the bill would and College freshman and subject the bill to a possible fili- Camila Johanek said she was buster in the Senate. As of now, frustrated to see the lack of emHouse Republicans have aimed phasis on mental health in the

proposal. “Without getting the proper treatment, these people are really vulnerable,” Johanek said. “The fact that they’re even considering [cutting mental health coverage] is kind of disgusting.” Candon concurred, adding that “until we reassess our values, I think mental health care is going to continue to take a back seat.” How about the effect on reproductive health care and abortion? The AHCA does not directly address reproductive care, so it is not clear how it will affect birth control and other related issues, Harrington said. What qualifies as “minimal essential benefits,” which included things like birth control under the ACA, could change on a state-by-state basis. The GOP bill would also cut back on federal funding that can be used at Planned Parenthood clinics, meaning that Medicaid recipients would not be able to use the clinics as a provider. “The ACA required all insurers to cover reproductive services and other kinds of preventative care,” Pauly said. “[Any future GOP plan] certainly won’t cover abortions.” Will entrepreneurs be

affected? Entrepreneurs are a unique case in the health insurance sector, since they typically don’t get health insurance through an employer. These individuals are part of the non-group insurance market, which would be restructured in this GOP bill. “The new law would give [someone who’s very young] tax credits to buy insurance in this non-group market,” Polksy said. “Young healthy individuals would typically fare better under this law than the Affordable Care Act, and as long as they’re not very low income, they will get a credit.” However, he said entrepreneurs might encounter difficulty in places where insurance is more expensive. Unlike with Obamacare, where tax-credits were granted to individuals based on income and local cost of insurance, the GOP health insurance plan only proposes tax-credits based on age. What about in Pennsylvania as a whole? While Obamacare granted Medicaid subsidies to states based on the cost of health care in each state, the GOP plan distributes funding based on a flat rate. It is up to the state to reorganize Medicaid to adapt to the reduced funding. “We don’t know how one state will be affected,” Polksy said. However, he predicted

The new law would give [someone who’s very young] tax credits to buy insurance in this non-group market”

PHOTOS FROM (LEFT TO RIGHT): NOLAN WEIN, VANJESSICA GLADNEY, HANNAH NOYES

that “Pennsylvania, especially this part of Pennsylvania, has more expensive health care, so that change in the subsidy structure will have a more negative impact in Pennsylvania than in other states.” Overall, what is the experts’ assessment? Health Care Management professor Mark Pauly: “My personal view is they left out the good improvements in Obamacare that Republicans had been talking about for seven years and put in all the undesirable things, so I was disappointed.” Health Care Management chair Scott Harrington: “It’s hard to view it as a negative. It could end up being a positive.” Executive Director of Student Health Service Giang Nguyen: “The major issues to keep an eye on are the expanded access for contraceptive care, the access to preventive services without cost-sharing and Medicare, as they are the biggest issues that will affect Penn students as well as most Americans.” Executive Director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Hea lth Econom ics Da n iel Polksy: “I’m not in support of the new plan — I think it’s a step backwards. There’s a prediction that this new plan would cause 24 million people to lose health insurance and I think that is putting our country in the wrong direction.”

vote for your favorite at:

THEDP.COM/PENN-BRACKET-2017 ROUND 1 (64 GROUPS): MONDAY, MARCH 13 - THURSDAY, MARCH 16

ROUND 4 (8 GROUPS): MONDAY, MARCH 27 - TUESDAY, MARCH 28

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON MONDAY AND CLOSES AT 11:59PM ON THURSDAY

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON MONDAY AND CLOSES AT 5PM ON TUESDAY

ROUND 2 (32 GROUPS): MONDAY, MARCH 20 - TUESDAY, MARCH 21

ROUND 5 (4 GROUPS): WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 - THURSDAY, MARCH 30

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON MONDAY AND CLOSES AT 5PM ON TUESDAY

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON WEDNESDAY AND CLOSES AT 11:59PM ON THURSDAY

ROUND 3 (16 GROUPS): WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 - THURSDAY, MARCH 23

ROUND 6 (2 GROUPS): MONDAY, APRIL 3 - TUESDAY, APRIL 4

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON WEDNESDAY AND CLOSES AT 11:59PM ON THURSDAY

VOTING OPENS AT 2PM ON MONDAY AND CLOSES AT 5PM ON TUESDAY

WINNER ANNOUNCED WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5


10 SPORTS

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN | THEDP.COM

Quakers place sixth at ECAC Championship GYM | Caroline Moore

took home vault trophy

GRIFF FITZSIMMONS Sports Reporter

Another season has come and gone for Penn gymnastics. The Red and Blue wrapped up the year yesterday with a sixth-place finish up in Providence at the Eastern College Athletic Conference Championships. Though the competition may not have brought the results Penn was hoping for, it was marked by a number of remarkable performances, including a first-place finish by Caroline Moore on the vault. With her 9.800, she beat out competition from five other ECAC schools, three of which — Yale, Brown, and Cornell — Penn squared off against last month at the Ivy Classic. The other two, William & Mary and Temple, were familiar adversaries from Quad Meets earlier in the year.

WRESTLING

ZACH SHELDON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Though her team finished in last place at the ECAC Championships, sophomore Caroline Moore’s 9.800 was good for first place in vault.

Despite the fact that Penn has beaten all these teams save for Temple at some point throughout the season, the Quakers

University City, and Ken even earned an All-American nod after his fourth place finish in the 174-lb. bracket at last year’s tournament. “For Brooks and Casey it was kind of their last hurrah. They’ve both contributed a lot to the program, in terms of wins but also leadership, guidance for our young guys, helping everyone take steps forward,� said Tirapelle. “Brooks wrestled in the national tournament twice, Casey three times and all-American honors last year, they really set the tone and showed the younger guys that we’ve raised the bar a little bit, that this is now the standard and the expectation. “Both are great examples of being great wrestlers, but also incredible students. Their going to make big impacts in their careers going forward.� For the remainder of the team, including the other three that went to St. Louis this past

>> BACKPAGE

received his third caution of the match. He stepped on the line, reached across, and touched the other kid before the whistle blew. After three cautions, a point is awarded and in sudden victory, that’s what decided the match. “It was frustrating for everybody. Frank I’m sure was frustrated with himself and how the match unfolded, the coaching staff was disappointed, and I would say even, by my impression of the crowd, the whole corner of that arena was disappointed in the call, so it was tough to take.� The other three Quakers would all go 1-2 on the weekend. Seniors Kent and Martino, both seeded 12th, ended their illustrious careers with the Red and Blue in St. Louis. Both wrestlers earned multiple All-Ivy recognitions during their careers in

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spent most of this season in the top 25. As much as it hurts to admit, Penn was simply unprepared to play with a lead, and its inability to put the hammer down is what separates it from the top tier. But just as winning masks problems, losing can hide some positives — so while the last eight minutes of this game provided hard evidence that the Quakers aren’t at their desired level yet, the first 32 minutes showed just how close they are. As the scoreboard suggests, Penn dominated this game. The Red and Blue certainly weren’t used to being slower or smaller than their opponents after sixteen games of Ivy competition, but they adjusted to the Aggies as well as possible. They completely stymied Texas A&M in transition on defense, and their passing and off-ball movement on offense was perhaps its best in years, finishing with 17 assists on their 23 made field goals. In fact, even after the Aggies’ insane run, their players not named Hillsman still finished the game with only a

COLE JACOBSON is a College sophomore from Los Angeles, California, and is sports editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian. He can be reached at jacobson@thedp.com.

highly valued as the season progresses. Joining Keating in the scoring column for the Quakers were Mathias with two goals, sophomore attackman Tyler Dunn with a goal and two assists, junior midfielder James Farrell with a goal, and midfielders Kevin McGeary and Reilly Hupfeldt with a goal and an assist each. This balanced scoring could be seen as a positive for Penn, but it must be noted that four of these goals were scored in the fourth quarter after Princeton had iced the game. As was the case last weekend against Michigan, Penn’s slow start ultimately buried them, but unlike in the Michigan loss, there was no spirited comeback this time for the Red and Blue, as Princeton’s lights-out shooting

kept Penn from threatening at any point in the game. Both teams entered the game coming off of a loss — Penn to Michigan last Saturday and Princeton on Wednesday to Rutgers, the fifth-ranked team in the nation according to the USILA. Whereas the Tigers were able to use the loss as a motivational tool, the Quakers appeared sluggish, which is surprising given that they were playing at home against their arch rival on Alumni Weekend. The loss is not only detrimental to morale and momentum, but it also puts Penn in a hole for Ivy play. With seven teams battling for four spots in the Ivy League Tournament, every game truly matters, making next Saturday’s contest at Cornell a must-win.

combined 36 points on 11-for52 shooting — a pretty stellar defensive effort by any measurement. Penn turned a contest against a more athletic team into a halfcourt game, and that’s how it almost pulled off the biggest win in program history. To sum it up, the talent and the coaching scheme are there; the last step is that killer instinct that the great teams across sports have. So as the emotions pour out after coming up agonizingly short of March Madness glory, the challenge for this program is clear. If the Red and Blue can turn the heartbreak from Saturday into fuel for the ensuing summer and fall months, we could see them finally take that next step that they’ve been on the verge of for so long. Can McLaughlin and his personnel pull it off? We’ve got just over eight months to find out.

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ZACH SHELDON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Penn women’s basketball utilized its young blood against A&M, like guard Ashley Russell, but they weren’t able to kill the game off.

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Saturday evening was the latest example of a fact that’s impossible not to accept now: those heights haven’t reached prominence on the national level yet. As impressive as the 49-7 record in Ancient Eight play over the past four years has been, the signature win to establish relevance outside of the Ivy League just isn’t there. In the regular season, Penn has played Duke twice, Notre Dame and Tennessee over the last four years, but has not secured a bigtime upset yet. Within the Big 5, the Red and Blue did snag a share of that mini-conference’s title in 2015, but even there, the team needed to rely on Villanova being upset by St. Joe’s in order to take that much. (Yes, one could look at last year’s win over a Colorado State team that finished 31-2, but that was ultimately a squad bounced in the Round of 64 in the NCAA Tourney.) But the postseason is what ultimately matters, and in three of the last four years, the narrative has been brutally identical. Three straight times, the underdog Penn team led in the first half — twice by double digits — and three straight times, it blew a lead against bigger, deeper, and ultimately better major conference teams. Needless to say, with a 21point lead in the fourth quarter, this was the worst of the bunch. As soon as Texas A&M went into its full-court press in the fourth quarter, Penn had no answers on either side of the ball. 6-foot-5 Aggies center Khaalia Hillsman had a ridiculous 15 points in the fourth quarter — six more than Penn’s entire team. After Sydney Stipanovich’s jumper put Penn up 58-37 with 8:54 remaining, Penn didn’t make a single field goal the rest of the way; in fact, the amount of shots the Red and Blue even got up in that span without turning the ball over could probably be counted on two hands. The Quakers were understandably confident entering this game, but even they didn’t expect to be leading by north of 20 points against a team that

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experience. “It’s actually a lot different from club because it’s more team oriented, which is something that I love about college gymnastics. It’s a different kind of pressure because it’s not so much on yourself, but you want to do it for the team,� she said. “Now that I’ve been exposed to that pressure I feel like I know what to expect and I’ll be able to channel it better next year, and keep continuing to get better so I can contribute more to the team each time.� Though the freshmen are optimistic about what the future might hold, reaching this point in the year means that the collegiate careers of the team’s two seniors — 2017 ECAC ScholarAthlete of the year Kelly Tan, and 2014 USAG All-American Graham — are drawing to a close. They will certainly be missed next season, and there is no doubt that Penn’s younger gymnasts will no doubt need to step up in a big way to fill their shoes.

>> BACKPAGE

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9.

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individually in this event. Moore went on to win the vault immediately after, an event which marked freshman Kellie Flavin’s third of the day. She had previously notched career-bests on the floor (9.750) and on the bars (9.775). She was Penn’s top performer in the latter, where she was followed closely by Caroline Mitsch and Emma Mills with scores of 9.725 and 9.700 respectively. “Each meet, I’m just thinking about it as one routine at a time, so as not to get ahead of myself,� Flavin said when asked how she maintains focus throughout a multi-event competition. “It’s easier for me to focus on the one routine and not so much on all three routines.� Apart from the women who qualify individually for the USA Gymnastics Collegiate National Championships in Seattle in a few weeks, ECACs marks the end of the road this season. For freshmen like Flavin, this year was a new and inspiring

W. HOOPS

weekend, Tirapelle realizes the value of the experience for the wrestlers and the necessity for them to bring it back to Philadelphia next season. “I think it’s important to get to the tournament before your last year of competition,� said Tirapelle. “Knowing the process of the tournament, just having a clear expectation of what it’s going to be like, what you’re training for, how you’re going to have to perform in order to get the podium is really important. For most guys, that first year is really an experience year. They need to get a sense of how they have to compete. So the fact that we have three guys returning who have been there before is huge.� While the Quakers send off Kent and Martino for the last time, we will be sure to see them come out of the gate next season ready to send a new crop of talent all the way to nationals.

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competition in a field that was otherwise separated by less than a point. Penn found difficulty on its first two events, the uneven parallel bars and on the balance beam. Finishing last as a team in both, none of the women were able to break into the top ten for either event. “I mean, it just wasn’t really our day,� senior Rachel Graham said. “We didn’t totally take advantage of all our opportunities, but the fight was totally there and the way that we were able to turn it around in the last two events was pretty awesome.� While the largest disparities between Penn and the rest of the ECAC schools coming on the bars and the beam, the Quakers fared much better with their feet on the ground. The team held strong above the middle of the pack during the floor exercise. Sophomore Caroline Moore and junior Kyra Levi both dropped 9.800 scores, tying for third place

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>> BACKPAGE

Luckily for Princeton, Sowers was not alone, as fellow attackman Gavin McBride contributed five goals of his own and AllAmerican senior midfielder Zach Currier was all over the field, de-sticking Penn midfielders and picking up loose balls seemingly at will. Combatting Currier in the midfield was Connor Keating, one of the few Penn bright spots on the day. The junior long stick midfielder scored two goals for the Quakers and was effective on the face-off wing throughout. Especially as Penn’s difficulties scoring goals from their settled offense continue, Keating’s abilities to generate scoring chances from the defensive end will be


THEDP.COM | THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

SPORTS 11

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

No. 12 PENN 16 6 No. 16 DUKE

Balanced attack propels Penn to victory over Duke W. LAX | Three

Quakers had at least four goals

SANJAY DURESETI Sports Reporter

In front of players of Quaker past, Penn women’s lacrosse proved that after 10 years, not much has changed. It has been a decade since Penn ushered in a period of Ivy League dominance, a rise that began with a miraculous run in the 2007 NCAA Championship. That season’s squad, led by first-team All-Americans Hilary Renna and Sarah Waxman, piloted the Red and Blue to an undefeated Ivy season, a Final Four appearance on their home turf and earned Karin Corbett a National Coach of the Year distinction. Their astounding performance marked a distinct change in the program’s culture and recruitment ability, leading to Penn’s constant presence at the top of the conference standings after two decades of futility.

It was appropriate, therefore, that members of the same 2007 team that started it all were standing on the sidelines on Saturday, watching the heirs of their athletic fortune reap the benefits of their success. Penn’s current team certainly delivered a display worthy of a particularly historic Alumni Day. The No. 12 Quakers beat No.16 Duke at Franklin Field by a score of 16-6. The ten goal deficit represents the largest margin of victory for Penn (6-1) so far in the 2017 campaign and is indicative of an offense that has ramped up significantly over the past month. Since their 10-4 loss against Cornell on March 4, the Quakers have recorded an average of 15.7 goals per game. Against the Blue Devils (5-4), four players carried the entire load, as junior Caroline Cummings and senior Emily Rodgers-Healion sent nine goals combined into the back of the net. Junior Natalie Stefan delivered four scores, all from free position shots, and senior Alex Condon,

whose 3.17 goals per game average ranked 28th in the country entering Saturday, tallied a hat trick of her own. And, as is typical of a Condon box score, the senior added two assists to complement Rodgers-Healion’s three. Such outright dominance was not expected against Duke, particularly after they grabbed a 4-2 lead in the middle of the first half. The tall, athletic Blue Devils were converting their transition opportunities and prevented Penn’s usually formidable defense from settling in place. “We knew we had to limit them in fast-breaking,” Corbett said. “We had to do a good job of slowing the ball down which I think we did after the early goals. For the attack, we had a couple of nice early goals, but we weren’t on the same page. We weren’t running what we needed to run and we weren’t in the right spots. Once we called a timeout and went over that, they executed really well.” After the coaching staff reprioritized its game plan, the

Quakers hunkered down on both sides of the field. Penn’s defensive performance was particularly impressive and was spearheaded by the goalkeeping of senior Britt Brown. Brown tallied eleven saves, adding to her stellar 55.9% save percentage that ranks eighth in the country. Brown and her defensive compatriots shut down Duke for the majority of the second half, limiting the Blue Devils to just two goals and facilitating an explosive Penn offense. In doing so, the Quakers reinforced their status as one of the nation’s top defenses, which ranked eighth in goals entering Saturday. Penn’s ability to overcome their initial sluggishness and to deal with less than ideal conditions may be owed to the presence of the 2007 alumni. “They started the run for us,” Corbett said about the alumni. “They were able to come into the locker room and one of the captains from that team gave the pregame speech. It was just energized in [the locker room]. She

FILE PHOTO

Jumior attacker Caroline Cummings led the Quakers with a careerbest five goals against No. 16 Duke, needing only seven shots.

talked them as she would have talked to that 2007 team and what it means to be on this team and what kind of family this is. I think that they got really inspired and I felt, kind of for the first time this year, that this team showed a lot of courage, a lot of fight. We’ve won some games this year,

but in this game you could really feel some of the past.” The Quakers will need to continue channeling the successes of old for their next matchup. They will travel to College Park on Wednesday to face No.1 Maryland in this season’s most difficult test.

Penn Athletics Weekend MVP: Emily Rodgers-Healion W. LAX | Senior secures

four goals, three assists

YOSEF WEITZMAN Sports Reporter

After a dominant performance that helped lead No. 12 Penn to victory over No. 16 Duke on Saturday, this week’s Penn Athletics Weekend MVP goes to women’s lacrosse senior Emily Rodgers-Healion. Rodgers-Healion was a force to be reckoned with against the Blue Devils on the Quakers’ Alumni Day. The East Setauket, N.Y. native got the game’s scoring started with a quick goal two minutes in, but Duke fought back quickly to take a 4-2 lead

midway through the first half. From there, it was all Rodgers-Healion and the Quakers though, as Penn went on an 13-1 run to help pull out a 16-6 triumph. The senior attack was instrumental in the run, finishing the game with four goals and three assists for a career-high seven points. Rodgers-Healion’s production was incredibly efficient, as the attacker took only five shots with all four of her shots on target finding the back of the net. With top-ranked Maryland up next on the Red and Blue’s schedule, Rodgers-Healion will look to continue her dynamic play and lead Penn to another impressive victory.

HEARTBREAK >> FRONTPAGE

Penn’s 58 points to that point. But then A&M implemented a brutal press that froze Penn in its tracks. The momentum shifted on the Quakers’ defensive end as well, as the previously successful mixture of man and zone defense stalled, opening the door for the Aggies to come to life. “Their press was really getting us,” Stipanovich said. “They sped us up, that was it, that press. We couldn’t break it very well.” Penn’s last field goal came with 8:54 left on the clock. Three free throws were the only points the east coast team could put up in the game’s final eight minutes. Meanwhile, Texas A&M put up 26. A&M’s star on the day Hillsman scored 27 points in the end, while Curtyce registered 15. Clearly, the two had settled their

difficulties to move on and win. They hit the go-ahead basket with 19 seconds left on the clock. The Aggies led the game for a grand total of one and a half minutes, to the Quakers’ 36 and a half. “It was hard to go in that locker room to watch this group, because we had the game won, and they knew that, and it’s gonna be tough for them to process it,” McLaughlin said. “We talked about respecting the team, respecting our opponents, representing who we are at Penn, and we did that really well. The only thing we lost was that last eight minutes, because I thought we were really special for that first 32.” It had everyone thinking that Penn women’s basketball was on the verge of winning its first NCAA Tournament game in program history. After three trips in four years, though, the wait must

continue. For all three trips to March Madness, the Quakers went into halftime with a lead. Against Texas and Washington, the margin was in the single digits, but against Texas A&M, the gap was at 12. It really seemed to be happening, that the stars were aligning in Penn’s favor, but it wasn’t meant to be. The Quakers fell victim to the biggest comeback in NCAA Women’s Tournament history. The Red and Blue can leave California knowing it took a great team right down to the wire, but it wasn’t enough. A heartbreaking end to the season, but an admirable one, nonetheless. Penn won the Ivy League title, the first-ever Ivy League Tournament championship, and set records in the process. For both Penn and Texas A&M, for better and for worse, it was one for the record books.

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DOWNING THE DEVILS

A SAD ENDING Penn gymnastics finished its season out this weekend, and it didn’t go very well

With most positions settled, two freshmen battle for Penn’s starting punter spot

>> SEE PAGE 10

>> SEE PAGE 11

MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2017

COACH MIKE MCLAUGHLIN REACTS TO PENN WOMEN’S LOSS TO TEXAS A&M

ILANA WURMAN | SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Penn women’s hoops left knocking on the door, again COLE JACOBSON

LOS ANGELES — It doesn’t get worse than this. There’s no sugarcoating what we saw in Penn women’s basketball’s 63-61 loss to Texas A&M: the Red and Blue choked. A 26-3 run over

the last eight-plus minutes by Texas A&M. Seven turnovers — which felt more like seventeen — by Penn in that same stretch. The Aggies winning the rebound margin 16-7 over the final period; in fact, the Aggies having more offensive rebounds (eight) than Penn had total boards in the final ten minutes. The largest deficit overcome to win any game in the 36-year history of the NCAA women’s basketball tournament. In the blink of an eye, it went from

what would’ve been unquestionably the best win in program history to what’s arguably the worst loss. As telling as any of these aforementioned stats are, the most important one is the simplest: zero. By the slimmest of possible margins, that’s how many alltime March Madness wins Penn holds — and as much as it pains me to say it both as a journalist and a fan, that’s the evidence that coach Mike McLaughlin’s program isn’t quite at the next level yet.

Ma ke no m ist a ke — what McLaughlin and his senior class have accomplished is no laughing matter. Three Ivy League titles in four years is, quite simply, dynasty status. It parallels the runs by the New England Patriots of the early 2000s or the New York Yankees of the late 1990s. And it’s not like it’s an easy conference to have that type of success in; the Ancient Eight just finished the season eighth nationally in conference RPI, and it had four teams qualify for postseason play

for the first time in its six-decade history. The bottom line is that after inheriting a team that went 2-26 in his debut season seven years ago, McLaughlin has turned what used to be a laughing stock into a juggernaut in less than a decade — and if you don’t consider that to be worthy of respect, you’re foolish. But while the program has been raised to new heights in recent years, SEE W. HOOPS PAGE 10

Penn wrestling enjoys Men’s lacrosse trounced solid showing at NCAAs by Tigers on Alumni Day No. 16 PRINCETON 17 8 No. 19 PENN

May Bethea advances to Round of 12

Penn overwhelmed by Princeton’s offense

DAVID FIGURELLI Associate Sports Editor

Penn wrestling officially finished its 2016-2017 season this past St. Patrick’s Day weekend, with five of the team’s top wrestlers taking on the nation’s best at the Scottrade Center in St. Louis. Seniors Brooks Martino, Casey Kent, and Frank Mattiace joined junior Joe Heyob in earning automatic bids to the NCAA tournament at the 165, 174, 197, and 184-lb weight classes, respectively, due to their strong performances in the EIWA conference championships. Junior May Bethea’s regular season record earned him an at-large bid in the tournament at the 157-lb. weight class. 2017 was Bethea’s second appearance at the Big Dance, coming off of a disappointing conference tournament that saw him win just one match, leaving his berth in to the NCAA tournament up to the selection committee. He would make the most of the opportunity, however, as he made it the farthest of any of the Quakers competing in the NCAA tournament. Bethea defeated the 12-seed, Oklahoma’s Clark Glass, in his first matchup of the weekend before losing to Oklahoma

BREVIN FLEISCHER Associate Sports Editor

ZACH SHELDON | SPORTS PHOTO EDITOR

Junior May Bethea was eliminated in his second NCAA tournament appearance, but not before pulling out three victories.

State’s Joseph Smith in the second round. That defeat would send him to the consolation bracket, where he would score two victories before being defeated by eventual third-place finisher Michael Kemerer, the two-seed from Iowa. Mattiace nearly mirrored Bethea’s performance in his match, falling one match earlier in the consolation bracket than did Bethea. The outcome of the match, however, was one of the most controversial of the weekend.

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“It was a compilation of things really in Frank’s final match, so it was unfortunate,” said Penn coach Alex Tirapelle. “There was a series of close calls that just didn’t go our way. Those kind of added up, and the grand finale was really in the second period of overtime, after we had just come close to a takedown which I thought could have been called for us, the guys ended up out of bounds. Frank maybe lost focus for a second, and SEE WRESTLING PAGE 10

The rain wasn’t the only thing putting a damper on Penn men’s lacrosse’s Alumni Day. After blitzing the No. 19 Quakers with a 7-1 run to open up the game, No. 15 Princeton proceeded to dominate the rest of the contest en route to a 17-8 victory. In a perfect example of the workings of Murphy’s Law, everything that could potentially go wrong for Penn (3-3, 0-1 Ivy) went wrong. The Red and Blue were outplayed in virtually every facet of the game — from settled offense and defense to ground balls and the turnover battle. Especially problematic for the Quakers was their overall inability to win one-on-one battles. On the offensive end, established scorers like sophomore attackman Simon Mathias and junior midfielder Kevin McGeary worked tirelessly to beat their defensemen off the dodge, but their efforts went largely unrewarded. Additionally, on the few occasions that a Penn offensive player

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PRANAY VEMULAMADA | ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR

No. 19 Penn men’s lacrosse sophomore attack Tyler Dunn’s goal and two assists weren’t enough to match No. 16 Princeton on Saturday.

was able to gain an advantage, the Princeton defense clamped down with perfectly executed slide packages. Unfortunately for the Quakers, Penn’s defense was unable to replicate the defensive clinic put on by the Tigers (5-2, 1-0) . Quick passing and precise shooting by the Princeton offense left the Penn defense and goalie Reed Junkin looking confused all game long. Junkin, in particular, was left out to dry all too often, with a

large percentage of Princeton’s goals coming from right on the doorstep, contributing to his 34.8 save percentage. Leading this offensive onslaught by the Tigers was attackman Michael Sowers. Posting a stat line of five goals and four assists, he proved again why he’s not only one of the best freshmen in the nation, but also one of the best players, period. SEE M. LAX PAGE 10 CONTACT US: 215-422-4640

March 20, 2017  
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