January 28, 2014

Page 1

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSIT Y OF PENNSYLVANIA

online at thedp.com

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

Changes come to CAPS New staffers, more flexible hours added, addressing complaints

The Art and Culture Initiative exposes potential students to Penn’s arts-focused departments

BY SARAH SMITH Senior Writer Counseling and Psychological Services will extend its hours and hire more staff within the next few weeks. In addition to offering evening hours several days a week, CAPS plans to hire at least three temporary staffers to supplement its regular staff. Although CAPS Director Bill Alexander had discussed similar changes with groups of students for at least a year, funding from the Vice Provost for University Life only came through last week. The CAPS Student Advisory Board had long pushed for more flexible hours, co-chair

BY BRENDA WANG Deputy News Editor

and Engineering senior Michelle Ho said. “I think the University realized the need for it,” Ho said. “That’s what it comes down to.” The new initiative will be in place until the end of the school year. Alexander plans to evaluate its effect at the semester’s end. After three undergraduate deaths in 2014, criticisms about mental health resources have been at the forefront of campus discussions. The CAPS changes begin to address two of the main complaints about CAPS: long wait times and understaffing. ■

Statistics say that students do not want to be English majors anymore — but not at Penn. There was a 16 percent increase in in the number of applicants to the class of 2018 who indicated their potential major as English and comparative literature . There was also a 25 percent increase in interest in the visual and performing arts and — fine arts, history of art, cinema studies, visual studies, music or theatre arts. This increase is an exception to the national downward trend in the number of humanities majors, which has decreased by half f rom 1966 to 2010. Eric Furda, Dean of the Office of Admissions, attributes much of the increased interest in the arts to the new Art and Culture Initiative. Started in the summer of 2012, the initiative seeks to raise awareness

Offices may move to HUP, Student Health, Drexel campus BY SARAH SMITH Senior Writer

POTENTIAL CAPS LOCATIONS DREXEL’S CAMPUS

32nd STREET

31st STREET

CHESTNUT STREET

SANSOM STREET

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

33rd STREET

COLLEGE GREEN

34th STREET

LOCUST WALK

36th STREET

37th STREET

LOCUST WALK

~500*

SMITH WALK

16%

Class of 2018 Class of 2017

25% PR

ES

SPRUCE STREET

PINE STREET

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Graphic by Analyn Delos Santos

300

ITY

RS

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Students

YL

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HAMILTON WALK

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OR BALTIM

SEE ARTS PAGE 3

~600*

600

WALNUT STREET

38th STREET

LOCUST STREET

40th STREET

41st STREET

42nd STREET

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE

of arts-related departments and resources at Penn and in Philadelphia. T he i n it iat ive was est ab lished to change the percept io n t h at p r e - p r o f e s s io n a l programs often overshadow humanities programs at Penn. “It was a real shame that our public reputation as an institution [was] that prospective students don’t think of Penn as the place to go if you’re interested in the realm of arts and culture,” Karen Beckman, History of Art professor and coordinator of the initiative said. “I think that we have some of the best art and cultural resources of all of our peer schools.” Beckman named the Kelly Writers House, the Institute of Contemporary Art, the Penn Museum and WXPN as valuable resources that prospective

INCREASE IN STUDENTS WHO INDICATED A POTENTIAL MAJOR INTEREST IN THE ARTS

MARKET STREET

37TH AND MARKET STREETS

Humanities apps up twenty-five percent

UE

EN

AV

Counseling and Psychological Services may be moving north to Market Street or east to 34th Street. CAPS will have to move from its location in the West Philadelphia Trust Building at the corner of 36th and Walnut streets before fall 2015, when the construction work for the Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics is set to begin.

The Student Health Service building, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, a building at 37th and Market streets and an unspecified location on Drexel University’s campus have all been discussed as potential future locations, said sources who have knowledge of the selection process.

0 Cinema Studies, Fine Arts, History of Art, Music, Theatre or Visual Studies

English and Comparative Literature

SEE LOCATION PAGE 8

*Numbers are approximations

Graphics by Analyn Delos Santos

REPURPOSING ROBOTICS

‘Shattered Glass’ stays broken: alum cannot practice law Steven Glass is a disgraced former journalist currently working as a law clerk BY LAUREN FEINER Staff Writer

Yolanda Chen/News Photo Editor

Monday night kicked off the Y-Prize Competition, in which students will pitch ideas for using existing Penn robotics technologies. At the competition’s finale in April, the winning students will receive $5,000.

Editorial (215) 898-6585 • Business (215) 898-6581

Stephen Glass , disgraced journalist and class of 1994 College g raduate, has suffered an additional fall from grace. Yesterday, Glass, for mer Daily Pennsylvanian Executive Editor, was denied a license to practice law by the Supreme Court of the State of California. The court ruled that Glass “failed to carry his heavy burden of establishing his rehabilitation and current fitness,” according to the opinion released by the State Bar of California. While working at The New

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R epublic dur ing the mid 1990s, Glass published articles for this and other publications containing fabricated events, quotes and sources. According to a 1998 Vanity Fair article by Buzz Bissinger, he created fake voicemails and email accounts for his alleged sources. This ar ticle was the inspiration for the 2003 movie, “Shattered Glass,” also penned by Bissinger. The court emphasized that despite the numerous character witnesses who testified for Glass, it is their “duty to protect the public and maintain the integrity and high standards of the [legal] profession.” Glass currently works as a law clerk, which requires him to be under the supervision of a licensed attorney. He

and his attorney could not be reached for comment. Bissi nger , who is a 1976 College graduate and former DP opinion and sports editor, met Glass at the annual Daily Pennsylvanian staff banquet while Glass was a student. “He was wiling to do anything to succeed,” Bissinger added. Glass was Executive Editor at the DP and became successful soon after graduation. Bissinger is not surprised by the State Bar’s recent denial of Glass’ petition for a law license. “I don’t know how you overcome something like that,” he said. “There are certain things in life he will really not be able to do because of what he did,” Bissinger said. “He may have a future as a politician,” he added. ■

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PAGE 2 TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

All those bread sticks add up, researchers say MEDIAN OF CALORIES FOR A LA CARTE ENTREES IN DIFFERENT RESTAURANTS

IN A TYPICAL 7-DAY WEEK, HOW MANY MEALS DO YOU: 100

1500

1200

100

80

80

60

60

60

40

40

40

20

20

20

0

1-6 7+ NONE MEALS MEALS

PREPARE YOURSELF

EAT OUT

100

80

0

900

EAT AT A DINING HALL

NONE

1-6 DAYS

0

7+ DAYS

Undergrads

NONE

1-6 DAYS

7+ DAYS

Grads Source: DP 2012 Business Survey

600

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Penn and Drexel researchers found that eating at home is healthier than eating out BY JILL CASTELLANO Staff Writer You might want to think twice before you leave your dorm room for dinner tonight. A study published by researchers at Penn and Drexel University found that 30 percent of the entrees and appetizers offered at restaurant chains in Philadelphia exceeded the total amount of saturated fat and sodium you should eat in an entire day. The average meal, which consists of an entree, side dish and half of an appetizer, contains 1,495 calories. If you add a non-alcoholic

drink and split dessert, that number jumps to 2,020, also exceeding the recommended daily limit. The study was conducted with 21 restaurant chains operating throughout all of Philadelphia, but the results seem to ring true right here on Penn’s campus. A 2012 Daily Pennsylvanian marketing survey found that 21.2 percent of Penn undergraduates eat out seven or more times in a typical week, while 28.6 percent don’t eat any meals prepared in someone’s

home. The percent of undergraduates eating out seven or more times in a week changes significantly by class year: 7 percent of freshmen, 24.1 percent of sophomores, 30.6 percent of juniors and 25.9 percent of seniors eat out that frequently. For the entire Penn community, including faculty and staff, the number drops to 14.2 percent. “I think it’s symptomatic of what we’re seeing happen to the American diet at large,” Giridhar Mallya, director of policy and planning at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health said. “More and more people are eating outside of the home, and more are eating

BLOWOUT PARTY!

BURGERS & SANDWICHES

OTHER ENTREES

APPETIZERS

...THE CRITERIA FOR HEALTHIER ITEMS

60%

72%

58%

68%

...MAXIMUM DAILY LIMIT

8%

12%

7%

20% Graphic by Analyn Delos Santos

at irregular and inconsistent times.” An earlier national study found that meals and snacks prepared away from home contained more calories, total fat and saturated fat than food prepared at home. Prior to the Penn and Drexel study, researchers overlooked the particular case of restaurant chains, since there aren’t many chains that need to report information about their food. In 2008, Philadelphia passed a law that required restaurant chains to report their food’s calories, saturated fat, carbohydrates and sodium, giving researchers an opportunity to see what goes into your Applebee’s dessert.

“Restaurants think that they need to serve large portions to be competitive or that they need to give people more for their money,” Karen Glanz, one of the study’s researchers and a Penn School of Nursing professor said. “What it amounts to is that people often eat what’s put in front of them, and in restaurants that’s often a lot.” Even popular restaurants that are thought to serve healthy foods fall into this pattern. The average number of calories in a single entree at The Capital Grille was almost 600, and at Olive Garden, it was nearly 800. Red Lobster had the smallest number of calories at almost 400, and Hard Rock Café topped the list with

over 1,200 calories for an entree alone. A meal that’s high in calories will also probably be just as high in fat, carbohydrates and protein, Glanz said. “Calories is probably the biggest headline because the more calories you have, the more you have of pretty much everything else,” she added. “With calories, we’ve seen about a two- to three-fold increase in rates of obesity in the United States. That’s accounted for by an increase in 100 to 150 calories per day compared to 20 or 30 years ago,” Mallya said. “That may not seem like a lot, but over time, it’s these sorts of differences that account for the change.”

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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 3

New tours include arts resources ARTS from page 1 students did not know enough about — partly because they were often skipped over on campus tours. “We were not promoting the level of resources we had at Penn,” Furda said. “It’s not like [the resources] weren’t on our radar, but how do you tell that story?” To address this issue, a new ar t and culture tour began last winter in order to give the arts a “separate m o m e nt ,” Ly d i a F i l o s a , admissions inter n for the initiative and 2013 College graduate, said. About 400 students have attended the tours. Students might head to the ICA to he a r t he d i r e c t or sp e a k about museum internships in Turkey and Germany or enjoy cookies at the Kelly Writers House while learning about creative writing and poetry workshops. Beckman said that Penn offers unparalleled opportunities in the arts for undergraduate students. “There’s nowhere else in the country that would allow undergraduates to curate their own show [at a place] with the prestigious reputation that the ICA has in the contemporary art world,” she said. A lso unique to Penn is the Visual Studies program, which “combi nes science and history and fine arts” in a multidisciplinary course of

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Around 400 students have arts-focused tours of Penn since the Art and Culture Initiative, meant to increase the humanities’ presence, was launched in 2012. study, according to program director and History of Art professor Michael Leja. A new brochure was also created for the initiative, h ig h l ig ht i ng not on ly re sources at Penn, but in Philadelphia as well, such as the Fringe Arts Festival and the

Arden Theatre. A new artsfocused admissions video is to follow. F i lo s a ad d e d t h at she wants to find more current art students to lead the tours. “Now the goal is to get more students involved,” she said.

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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

PAGE 4 MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

Opinion VOL. CXXX, NO. 6

The Independent Student Newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania

130th Year of Publication TAYLOR CULLIVER, Executive Editor AMANDA SUAREZ, Managing Editor JENNIFER YU, Opinion Editor LOIS LEE, Director of Online Projects FIONA GLISSON, Campus News Editor HARRY COOPERMAN, City News Editor JODY FREINKEL, General Assignments Editor WILLIAM MARBLE, Enterprise Editor GENESIS NUNEZ, Copy Editor MATT MANTICA, Copy Editor YOLANDA CHEN, News Photo Editor MICHELE OZER, Sports Photo Editor CONNIE KANG, Photo Manager

STEVEN TYDINGS, Senior Sports Editor RILEY STEELE, Sports Editor IAN WENIK, Sports Editor HAILEY EDELSTEIN, Creative Director ANALYN DELOS SANTOS, News Design Editor VIVIAN LEE, News Design Editor JENNY LU, Sports Design Editor JENNIFER KIM, Video Producer STEPHANIE PARK, Video Producer

GIANNI MASCIOLI, Business Manager CHANTAL GARCIA FISCHER, Credit Manager ERIC PARRISH, Marketing Manager

SELMA BELGHITI, Finance Manager KATHERINE CHANG, Advertising Manager

THIS ISSUE JEN KOPP, Associate Copy Editor ALLISON RESNICK, Associate Copy Editor MONICA OSHER, Associate Copy Editor

JIMMY LENGYEL, Associate Sports Editor ANDRES DE LOS RIOS, Web Producer ZOE GOLDBERG, Associate Opinion Editor

SIYUAN CAO is a College senior from Bronx, N.Y. Her email address is caos@sas.upenn.edu.

S is for sisterhood THE INTERNET EXPLORER | Defining ‘sorority’ is hard. Defining ‘feminism’ is even harder. Here’s where I’ve found the overlap.

T

hree years ago, when I called my pa rents to tel l them that I had joined a sorority, my dad didn’t even know what the word meant. Is it a club? No. It’s a pre-professional thing? Well no, not really. It’s called what? Wait, say it again. What does that even mean? There’s no word for “sorority” in Spanish, but my father’s linguistic unfamiliarity with the term doesn’t mean it is easy to define. “Sisterhood” is a word that gets thrown around a lot, but for me, that’s what being in a sorority boils down to. It’s meant finding a group of like-minded, passionate individuals who both inspire and support me. That happened, and it can happen for any woman who’s willing to open herself up to new experiences. I’m from Texas. I get it. I used to practice complete apathy — not even skepticism —

toward the institution of Greek life. Back home, rush means getting to campus a week early, letters of rec in hand and finding your pledge class before you find your first lecture hall. It’s not my immediate idea of fun. It can also be incredibly hurtful for anyone who doesn’t find a home in the Greek community. There’s a culture of exclusivity that can be harmful for young women, especially that early in their college careers. So I understand why Greek life is the subject of scrutiny on a sort of cultural level — not to mention why it’s the butt of so many jokes. It is one of the many easy targets of pop culture. But as a woman, and as a sorority woman, I am done hearing about what’s wrong with Greek life. It is easy to point out the flaws. It’s not new. It’s not interesting. And I’ve found that many of the things people

will say about sororities are just untrue.

you no one wrote about fraternities or sororities.

‘‘

But as a woman, and as a sorority woman, I am done hearing about what’s wrong with Greek life. It’s easy to point out the flaws. It’s not new. It’s not interesting. And I’ve found that many of the things people will say … are just untrue.” When you join a sorority at Penn, you don’t just make 50-something new friends: you meet campus leaders that break ground in everything they do. That’s not because they’re Greek; it’s because they’re Penn students. Forget letters — think back and remember how we all got here. We wrote essays detailing where we wanted to get involved on campus. I guarantee

So why do we join? More importantly, why do we stay? There must be something of value, something interesting and important and big that helps us make the decision to go Greek. For me, I’ve found that joining a sorority allowed me to get truly inspired by my peers and to realize my own potential. So often at Penn, we are competing against each other. In my

sorority, I’ve found friends who support me no matter what. I’m constantly inspired by the example of the high-achieving women I’m proud to call my sisters. I’ve seen my sisters act and direct in the Vagina Monologues, teach classrooms of middle schoolers in the city, break records on the field and much more. Ask every girl in my pledge class where she sees herself in 10 years and you won’t get two of the same answers. But every one of them, no matter where they’re headed, makes me feel a little more confident about blazing my own trail. I love my sorority. I love the friends I’ve made and the experiences I’ve had and the moments that have taught me more about myself than I ever expected. I love how smart all the women in my chapter are and how well they carry themselves on campus and in life.

FRIDA GARZA I’ve seen how confidence and joy can be contagious, and just how important those things can be to college women. Joining a sorority has allowed me to grow in my feminism. It actually feels like one of the most supportive, feminist spaces I have found at Penn. I love mixers and Bid Day as much as the next girl decked out in letters, and those may all be good reasons to join a sorority. But the reasons that I’ve stayed in mine point to a richer experience than that. FRIDA GARZA is a College senior studying English. Her email address is frida.garza@gmail.com. Follow her @fffffrida.

A call for creativity CREATIVE VOICE | Penn has ignored the creative educational experience and, in doing so, has failed its students

T

he most severe problem plaguing the University of Pennsylvania and many other institutions of higher education is a broad-based failure to engage in creativity. The vast majority of undergraduates spend their four years taking classes that build knowledge alone rather than the ability to think creatively and engage in creation itself. It must be the goal of universities not only to broaden the knowledge of their students, but also to foster in them a desire to build new ideas and places. Universities have the responsibility to encourage and enable their students to undertake projects that have the potential to create innovative businesses, revolutionary fields of medicine and, most importantly, ground-breaking ways of seeing and understanding the world. The key to succeeding in such enterprises is the unhin-

dered development of creative thinking, in which one proposes new ways of considering problems and uncovering their solutions. However, many schools, including Penn, tend to do just the opposite — they obstruct and even shun creativity. Too often in higher education, students are trained to memorize rather than to think. In fact, in many classes, memorization is rewarded over actually understanding the material at hand because the quantity of material presented is too great to synthesize before the next exam comes around. For instance, in introductory physics, success essentially hinges on students memorizing a series of problem situations and the methods for solving them. The same is true for most introductory math and science classes. Although it is necessary to give students some basic background in these fields of study, the classes should ulti-

mately focus on more problem solving by teaching students to ask the right questions. Students are trained to be calculators rather than questioners and builders. Rather than encouraging students to engage in a truly liberal education, universities like Penn often end up churning out a student body that is fearful of risk and thus, creativity.

A n emphasis on grades tends to make students risk averse. Students take classes that they feel comfortable with rather than classes that cover material with which they have no experience. Instead of taking a creative writing class or an art class, students feel the need to take classes that will ensure a job, like economics. Moreover, Penn culture

96%

of 1,000 full-time workers over the age of 25 with four-year college degrees agreed that creative thinking is necessary for economic development.

32%

felt uncomfortable with thinking creatively in their career

78%

wish they had more creative ability

71%

indicated creative thinking should be “taught as a class” Source: Adobe

tends to encourage students to choose predetermined paths rather than to discover their own directions. Emphasis on a fast track to wealth held aloft by an ever-pervasive air of pre-professionalism often leads students into the ruts of iBanking, medicine and law before giving them any experience outside of the education bubble. It is the role of the University to encourage its students to choose a route, at least for a little while, where success hinges on creative thought and where failure is a real possibility. Although it is easy to overlook the issue of a creative drought because of the financial success that traditional tracks through education and work often lead to, it must be brought to the forefront of discussions regarding higher education. The most successful people have the capacity to think in new ways and to subsequently create new ideas. These new ideas allow

YOUR VOICE

CONTACT

HAVE YOUR OWN OPINION? Write us! The DP encourages guest submissions from the Penn community. Submissions can be up to 700 words long. The DP reserves the right to edit for accuracy, clarity, grammar and DP style. The DP does not guarantee publication of any submission. Send submissions to Opinion Editor Jennifer Yu at yu@thedp.com or 4015 Walnut St.

By mail or in-person:

By phone:

4015 Walnut St. Philadelphia, PA 19104 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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SAM SHERMAN the world to progress. Without them, stagnancy reigns supreme. Penn, being a major research university, must work to ensure that its undergraduates learn both the importance of creativity and how to engage in the creative process. Penn should focus on developing more classes that emphasize thinking and problem solving. Memorization of facts should be eliminated in these classes in favor of a direct approach to teaching the creative process and encouraging new methods of thinking. The world needs revolutionaries, not more encyclopedias. SAM SHERMAN is a College sophomore studying fine arts and chemistry. His email address is samsherman6@gmail.com.

The DP wants to ensure that all content is accurate and to be transparent about any inaccuracies. If you have a comment or question about the fairness or accuracy of any content in the print or online editions, please email corrections@thedp.com.


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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 5

Questioning enrollment at Penn Alexander Children of a possible mayoral candidate attend Penn Alexander from outside the eligibility zone BY CLAIRE COHEN Deputy News Editor Parents have gone to great lengths — including standing in line for days in the cold — to enroll their children in the high-performing and highly competitive Penn-funded public school, Penn Alexander, but a potential mayoral candidate may have used political connections to get his kids into the school despite the fact that he lives miles away. Kevin Johnson, a Philadelphia pastor, has his children enrolled at the Penn Alexander School despite living in Overbrook, four miles outside the school’s catchment zone — the residential area that determines eligibility for

attendance at Penn Alexander — the Philadelphia Daily News reported on Monday. The Daily News also reported

KEVIN JOHNSON

The potential mayoral candidate has children at Penn Alexander that 34 out of Penn Alexander’s 550 students live outside the school’s catchment zone. Registration at Penn Alexander has been a contentious point in past years, with the unanticipated implementa-

tion of a lottery system for enrollment at the school and the subsequent outcry from local parents who waited to enroll their children at the school. The Daily News’ revelation about Johnson has raised quest ions about how t he Bright Hope Baptist Church pastor, known for being an “outsider” candidate for next year’s mayoral election, could have enough political influence to get his children registered at the school. In an email to the Daily News, Johnson declined to explain how his three children are able to attend Penn Alexander. He said that he and his wife “take the responsibility of being parents very seriously, especially in ensuring that our children are safe and secure.”

The Daily News reported that Johnson was a close friend of former superintendent Arlene Ackerman, who was a member of his church. Ackerman was superintendent when Johnson’s two eldest children registered for school. There was no superintendent in place when his youngest registered. District spokesperson Fernando Gallard told the Daily

BY KRISTEN GRABARZ Staff Writer T he UA d i s c u s s e d t he c u r r ent st at e of st udent mental health and potential improvements for the Penn system of mental health services at its first meeting of the semester on Sunday. Several speakers advocated expanding the resources of Penn’s Counseling and Psychological Services. College junior and Penn Underg raduate Hea lt h Coa l it ion R epr esent at ive Elana Stern said that, due to limited space and staff, CAPS deals primarily with students facing immediate difficulties, while students seeking long-term, repetitive care are often referred to private psychologists and

mental health professionals. UA V ice P resident a nd College junior Gabe Delaney voiced a similar opinion. UA r epr esent at ive a nd Col lege sophomor e Ju l ie Bitt ar said that an inclusive working group is being formed so that any individual on campus who is interested in mental health can assist on projects. The working g roup w ill emphasize the importance of “removing the stigma” surrounding mental health. Additional propositions include a system in which students can anonymously seek answers to mental health questions. “We want to help start a conversation with many stu-

s ylv a n i a n on Mond ay. A representative from Penn Alexander could not be reached for a comment on Monday. Penn currently gives about $700,000 per year to Penn Alexander, which is located at 42nd and Spruce streets. The school was founded in 1998 and opened in 2001, with the help of the University. Staff writer Jill Golub contributed reporting.

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Mental health a hot topic at Undergrad Assembly meeting The UA also discussed extending the Add/Drop period because of last week’s snow days

News that previous superintendents were able to make enrollment exceptions for “an extenuating circumstance … that’s for the well-being and safety of the child.” He noted that the superintendent is the only person with the power to place students in a specific school. Gallard did not respond to multiple requests for comment from The Daily Penn-

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dent leaders who are not here tonight,” Stern said. Student Body P resident and W har ton and College senior Abe Sutton also announced that he has asked administrators to explore the possibility of moving the deadline for the add /drop period from Feb. 3 to Feb. 6 in light of last week’s snow cancellations. Finally, UA representative and College sophomore Varun Menon was also elected to the Budget Committee, wh ich w i l l beg i n work i n February. The election was held to replace the position vacated last semester when UA representative and College junior Anthony Cruz resigned from the Budget Committee in order to fulfill his duties as president of the Penn Republicans and co-chair of the Penn Political Coalition.

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Drug company backs Penn in lawsuit with St. Jude The lawsuit centers on conflicts over cancer treatment technology BY COSETTE GASTELU Staff Writer A pharmaceutical industry giant is seeking to join Penn in a lawsuit against St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital over research that has the potential to cure cancer. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation filed a motion on Wednesday to intervene in Penn’s ongoing dispute with St. Jude over a patent St. Jude was granted in March 2013 for a ty pe of cancer treatment technology. Novar tis entered into a par tnership w ith Penn in August 2012, receiving the r ig ht s t o si m i l a r c a ncer treatment technology developed by the research team of Penn professor Carl June. The goal of the partnership is to turn June’s treatment met hod i nt o a n F DA- ap proved drug product. As part of the deal, the Swiss company agreed to give the University $20 million as a contribution to the construction of Penn’s Center for Advanced Cellular Therapies. The drug product that Novartis is developing, known as CTL019, is currently being tested in clinical trials. “We have joined the University of Pennsylvania in this litigation to protect our ability to advance the CTL019 program,” Novartis spokeswoman Julie Masow said in a statement. She added that Novartis is “immensely proud” to be working with June and Penn researchers, and that the “clinical trials to date” have show n that CTL019 has “the potential” to treat two different forms of leukemia. June’s work is at the center of the continuing lawsuit between Penn and St. Jude. In the current suit — which is a consolidation of three court actions that the parties have filed over the past two years — the University is requesting a judgment declar ing that Penn has not infringed upon St. Jude’s patent for cancer treatment technolog y created by a scientist who previously partnered with June. Dar io Campana, one of two St. Jude researchers credited with inventing the patented technology, maintained a research partnership with June in the early 2000s. As part of their collaboration, June was privy to a cancer treatment construct that Campana created. In a July 2012 complaint, St. Jude alleged that Penn broke the terms of two materials transfer agreements relating to the exchange of technologies between Campana and June. St. Jude contended that Penn violated the agreement by seeking to commercialize the technol-

ogy and failing to properly credit St. Jude personnel in a paper that June published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In response to these allegations, the University filed a complaint later that month claiming that St. Jude “interfered with the University’s prospective contractual relations.” The University also sought a judgment affirming that Penn did not breach the materials transfer agreements. A few days after St. Jude obtained the patent for Campana’s treatment method in March 2013, the University filed the complaint that has materialized into the present lawsuit regarding Penn’s non-infringement of the patent and its invalidation. The fact that Novartis is now taking action in the lawsuit is not unusual given the situation. Lee Petherbridge, a professor at Loyola Law School and 2002 Penn Law g raduate, ex pla i ned t hat universities often partner with companies or license their research to companies because “the universities themselves are usually not in the position to develop new technologies and fully carry through with marketing.” If the technology proves to be successful, it “could have a broad impact on the way that people receive cancer treatments,” Petherbridge said. Gar y Stephenson, a spokesperson for St. Jude, said in a statement that while the hospital does not normally comment on ongoing litigation, it is “disappointed that the University of Pennsylvania has refused to honor contractual agreements.” He said that one of St. Jude’s “key goal[s]” is to “ensure that promising discoveries get turned into treatments or diagnostics that benefit patients worldwide.” He added that St . Jude took on the litigation be cause the organization is “obligated to safeguard [its] reputation on behalf of our many donors, researchers, physicians, employees and, most of all, our patients and their families.” Susan Phillips, a spokesperson for Penn Medicine, sa id i n a st atement t hat while Penn Medicine doesn’t normally comment on active cases, she wanted “to emphasize that this litigation in no way distracts from Penn’s ongoing research and clinical efforts in using T-cell therapies for patients with blood cancers.” Novartis is now the second company to intervene in the lawsuit. Juno Therapeutics Inc., a biotechnology firm, joined St. Jude in the suit in December 2013. Juno became involved in the case after St. Jude licensed the Seattle-based company the right to commercialize the patented technology. Juno officials could not be reached for comment.

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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

New to networking? Researchers give advice

Penn and Harvard grad students and professors talk about how to seem likable and trustworthy activates the same regions of the brain that are activated by food and sex. This shows t hat t a l k i ng about oneself has intrinsic value to people, just as food and sex do. T he r e s e a r c he r s u s e d monetary compensation to measure the value candidates attributed to talking a b o ut t he m s e l v e s . T he y could either earn money by

talking about themselves, or earn more money answering fact-based questions. The c a nd id ates renou nced 17 to 25 percent of the potential earnings, preferring to “self-disclose,� or discuss personal information. “If you want someone to like you, let them self-disclose to you, and self-disclose back,� Tamir, who is a doctoral student in psychology at Harvard, said after giving a talk sponsored by the Psychology Department at Solomon L aborat or ies yesterday. However, she advised au-

The possibility of moving to Student Health Services at 3535 Market St. would provide CAPS with additional space, Alexander added. “It could also destigmatize mental health because you can just say you’re going to SHS and not have to say why,� said Undergraduate Assembly member and College sophomore Julie Bittar, one of the UA leaders on mental health issues. “The only downfall is

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BY ALICE GEROW Staff Writer You’ve got the resume, but did you w in the recr uiter over at that coffee chat? Several psychological studies recently unveiled ways to make yourself likable. Ask about their lives, and talk about your own According to experiments by Harvard neuroscientists Jason Mitchell and Diana Tamir, talking about oneself

Decision on location yet to be finalized LOCATION from page 1 However, the University hasn’t yet settled on a building, CAPS Director Bill Alexander said.

d ience members to show curiosity about their conversation partners but not to ask about “their deepest darkest secrets on your first encounter.â€? Senior Associate Director of Career Services Barbara Hewitt had similar advice. She encouraged students to be “authentically interested in what the other person has to say and ‌ appreciative of their time and any wisdom EASYCARE BRANDasAD they [can] offer, as well being willing to reciprocate if you [can] help them out with anything.â€?

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For Release Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Crossword

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PUZZLE BY DAVID J. KAHN

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THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Penn’s search in good hands with Price TONY from page 10 Penn Athletics starts now, why is it taking so long to arrive? The next athletic director needs to be in place sooner rather than later if he or she hopes to have agency over the future of Penn’s winter and spring varsity sports. The future of coach Jerome Allen looms large for all Penn basketball supporters, and the decision on whether to give a vote of confidence to Allen should rest squarely with the next athletic director, who should therefore be hired soon enough to observe the team in conference play and determine whether or not Allen should stay. It would also benefit the next athletic director greatly to evaluate the rest of the winter and spring sports firsthand as well — not to be able to enact sweeping changes, but to simply measure what’s best for Penn Athletics going forward before Penn’s varsity schedules for this academic year are all but over. That’s almost certainly not going to happen now. Nominations and applica-

tions for the position will be accepted by the Office of the Provost until Feb. 28. Tack a thorough vetting period onto the end of that deadline, and you’re looking at the end of spring break, which lasts from March 8-16. Suddenly, St. Patrick’s Day doesn’t seem so lucky. Texas had the right idea with its recent athletic director succession. Texas Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds announced on Oct. 13 that he’d be stepping down effective Aug. 31, 2014. By Oct. 14, a committee was in place to hire his successor. By Nov. 5, his successor, Steve Patterson, was hired and given full authority to decide how to approach struggling signature coaches like football coach Mack Brown. Likewise, Princeton Athletic Director Gary Walters announced that he would retire at the conclusion of the 2013-14 academic year on Sept. 4. It took Princeton just 12 days to announce a 12-member committee to conduct the search for Walters’ successor. So it shouldn’t have taken nearly as long as it did for Penn to identify folks within its community who deserve to be guaranteed a voice in this crucial vetting process and reach out to them. It’s true that the advisory committee that Price ultimately came up with is a fair and balanced one, a com-

mendable mix of administrators, coaches, alumni, students and faculty. But that doesn’t excuse the wait. And while Princeton may not have chosen Walters’ replacement yet, at least transparency is on the Tigers’ side. Princeton held three on-campus open forums inviting comments and suggestions about its athletic director search in October and November, and that kind of transparency is crucial. Princeton even has a website designed solely for the purpose of distributing information about its search process. Price didn’t rule out open forums when I spoke with him earlier this month, but I don’t expect committee members to push hard enough for them specifically. That’s a shame. And yet this search is in good hands with Price. He said last month that Penn will be reaching out proactively to candidates, and you can bet that Price is going to be diligent in this process. If you’re rooting for a successful search, thoughtfulness and thoroughness are on your side with Price at the helm. Time isn’t, though. Advisory committee, you’re on the clock.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014 PAGE 9

WHO COULD BE BILSKY’S SUCCESSOR? Here are a few potential candidates that could succeed Penn Athletic Director Steve Bilsky

Tony Vecchione

Alanna Shanahan C’96

- Penn Senior Associate Athletic Director: May 2012-present - George Washington Associate Athletic Director for Facilities and Operations: 1998-2006 - Penn Director of Athletic Facilities and Operations, Associate Director of Athletic Operations: 1995-98

Jennifer Strawley C'98

Donna Woodruff C’90

- Stony Brook Interim Athletic Director: November 2013-present - All-American for Penn field hockey, led Quakers to Final Four of 1988 NCAA Championship

- Miami Senior Associate Athletic Director for Admininstration: June 2012-present - Two-time Penn softball captain

MIKE TONY is a senior English and history major from Uniontown, Pa, and is a senior staff writer for The Daily Pennsylvanian. He can be reached at dpsports@thedp.com.

- Penn Deputy Athletic Director: June 2012-present - Penn Senior Associate Athletic Director: July 2007-June 2012 - Has been administrator throughout Penn Division of Recreation and Intercollegiate Athletics since 1999

Graphic By Jenny Lu

rochelledong's

Racetothetop

Head coach Mike Schnur has praised freshman Rochelle Dong’s abilities as a swimmer and as a teammate. Schnur has commented that Dong’s abilities may soon reward her a bid in the NCAA tournament. He’s employed Dong in the 200 medley and 50 freestyle — and in both races, Dong has consistently dominated.

Wharton and coaches drew Dong to Penn W. SWIMMING from page 10 Schnur was able to identify her talent immediately and acted swiftly to get her into his program. “Mike was actually the first [coach] to call me,” Dong said. As recruitment progressed for Dong, Penn began to separate itself from other potential destinations for reasons including and extending beyond the scope of athletics. “I really liked [the coaches] a lot,” she said. “And going to Penn also gave me the opportu-

Princeton AD farther along in process AD SEARCH from page 10 While Penn is in the beginning stages of its search for a new athletic director, rival Princeton is much further along in the process, having begun this fall. And unlike Penn, the Garden State Ivy decided not to hire a search firm to assist in the process, going for a more open search. Princeton has

nity to go to Wharton.” As time went on, Dong has become more comfortable within the social context of the team, demonstrating that she is much more than her outwardly soft-spoken persona would suggest. “I’m actually a little quiet and shy when I first get to know people,” Dong said. “But I do these weird, quirky things, and they’re like, ‘Oh, this girl’s funny actually!’” Schnur has seen firsthand how her personality has blossomed as the season has progressed. “She fits in great,” he said. “Rochelle is very quiet, but when she talks she’s hilarious.” While it took some time for her to open up socially, her results in the pool have largely spoken for themselves. Dong

had multiple open forums to get input from students, faculty and alumni. But with Princeton going with a public process, the process is also moving slowly. And with Penn going to an outside consulting group — which can alleviate the dayto-day work and help narrow the field of candidates — the University could find its new AD in much less time. With whatever firm Penn hires, the outside group will also be able to provide Penn with not just prospective candidates but also background checks and other verification to assist the committee in the important process.

has consistently impressed with her performances throughout the season, becoming the clearcut star of the freshman class and, largely, of the team in general. “Rochelle is one of the best swimmers we’ve ever had, and I think she’s going to be an NCAA qualifier pretty soon,” Schnur said. Her success has been no revelation to the coaching staff, but Dong claims that her teammates may have had reason for surprise. “I’m actually one of the worst swimmers during practices,” she said. “So they were really surprised to see how well I did in meets.” As one of the squad’s top swimmers, Dong will invariably need to take on a leadership role in future years. For now, she is

content to stay true to herself and yield to upperclassmen. “I kind of just do what I do and hope that others will follow in my footsteps,” she said. Schnur, for one, is more than happy with Dong’s progress as a swimmer. “Down the road, in a few years, she’ll probably have to become a little more verbal, come out of her shell a little bit,” he said. “But [the freshmen] really feed off of her success.” When asked if there were any anecdotes that would illustrate Dong’s quirky personality, Schnur responded as any concerned coach would. “Nothing I would say in print,” he said with a smile. Regardless, Dong’s performances in the pool will surely give Penn fans plenty to talk about for years to come.

Quakers win fourth straight home match M. SQUASH from page 10 Turner to capture the clinching victory of the match. T he u p s e t w a s s e a l e d with Turner’s four set vic-

tor y at the No. 9 position, which gave the Quakers an extra-sweet 12th victory in the rivalry. “ It mea ns ever y t h i ng,” Wyant said. “This is the biggest win we’ve had.” After a 1-6 Ivy finish that put them at the bottom of the standings last year, Penn has shocked the Ivy League with two quality wins early in the season. “I think we’re impressing

THE

In Penn’s losing effort vs. Columbia, Dong wins the 100 free again, this time adding a victory in the 50 free as well.

Jan 18 Jan 11

Caitlin Lally/ DP File Photo

dec 5-6 NOV 16

NOV 9

Dong wins in her very first intercollegiate race, swimming the third leg of the 200 medley relay in a victory over UConn. She also added victories in the 100 free and 100 butterfly.

Dong dominates again at the Total Performance Invitational, swimming the third leg in the victorious 200 medley relay and second at the 400 free relay while swimming the opening leg.

Swimming in an Ivy dual against Dartmouth and Yale, Dong’s 200 medley relay finishes in first place.

Against Brown, Dong’s 200 medley relay posts yet another victory.

Graphic by Jenny Lu

people ever y day,” Maine said. “ We didn’t k now we could beat Princeton that badly.” The Quakers continued to protect their home court with their fourth consecutive victory at Ringe Squash Courts — and they have not given up more than two individual wins to an opposing squad in those four matches. Ringe has also become a place where rankings can

BUZZ

be thrown out the window, as two of Penn’s three wins over higher-ranked teams have come at home. “We don’t leave anything on the court,” Maine said. “ This is a big conf idence builder for our team.” Next up for Penn is a Saturday home date with No. 3 Yale, assistant coach Richard Dodd’s alma mater. Perhaps another upset is in order.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2014

Penn looking for consultant firm to assist AD search

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THE CLOCK IS TICKING

Depsite slow start, Provost Price seeking confidential process while searching for Steve Bilsky’s replacement BY STEVEN TYDINGS Senior Sports Editor With Penn looking for its new athletic director, it is time to call in the consultants. After naming a 14-person search committee to find a replacement for Steve Bilsky — who is retiring effective June 30 — Provost Vincent Price told The Daily Pennsylvanian last week that Penn has begun looking for a consultant firm to help the search move forward. “Like all of our searches, we’ll start with a process of consultation,” Price said. “We’ll be gathering ideas from around the campus community, helping refine our thinking about what people view as the biggest opportunities and challenges for Penn Athletics. “That process will go on for the next month and a half or so and will absolutely inform the way we approach the search.” By hiring an outside firm, the University will be able to keep its search out of the limelight, turning to another group to help come up with candidates that fit the school while helping to inform the decision of the 14-person committee. “These processes work best when there is a lot of information that flows into the committee and no information that flows out,” Price said. “So we have at our disposal a good sense of what the community wants and needs to inform our process, but we don’t let that trip us up when recruiting the best candidate.” With multiple dean searches going on, the University will be conducting the AD search in a similar fashion, albeit with the possibility of more outside interest in this particular search. “We do this with all high level searches,” Price said. “The consultants, we evaluate them on their experience. We do a lot of referencing to know what searches have happened recently.” One recent search that came to an end was at Virginia Tech, where the university hired Todd Turner, a former athletic director in the NCAA, to head its process. Yet while Turner’s firm, Collegiate Sports Associates, has worked on many national AD searches, Penn may be looking for a firm with more experience within the Ivy League. Among Price’s hopes for the consultants is that the firm will work hard to understand Penn.

SEE AD SEARCH PAGE 9

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With Athletic Director Steve Bilsky set to retire effective June 30, Provost Vincent Price has a 14-member committee named and has begun the process of looking for an outside consultant firm to help with the search process. However, other AD searches, including the one ongoing at Princeton, have moved much faster compared to Penn’s deliberate pace thus far.

H

MIKE TONY

ow the search to find Penn Athletic Director Steve Bilsky’s successor will play out over the course of this semester is anyone’s guess. But what’s troubling is that we’re still playing the guessing game in the first place. Bilsky announced he would retire effective June 30 back on Nov. 21. Then Thanksgiving Break happened. Then nothing happened.

On Dec. 9, Leo Charney, a spokesperson for Penn Provost Vincent Price , told The Daily Pennsylvanian that there would be an announcement soon about the formation of an advisory committee for the athletic director search. Then nothing happened. Then Winter Break happened. And finally, on Jan. 15, Price announced the formation of a 14-member advisory committee

Quakers end 40-year drought vs. Tigers M. SQUASH | The Red and Blue ended a 45-match losing streak to the Tigers in easy win BY COREY HENRY Staff Writer

vs. Princeton After nearly 40 years of heartbreak at the hands of Princeton, the Quakers were finally able to snap the streak. Up against coach Jack Wyant’s alma mater, Penn men’s squash seemed to want it more en route to their 7-2 upset of the Tigers, ending a 45-match losing streak against the rival school that dated back to 1974. “It ain’t pretty what’s happened over the years between our two schools,” Wyant said. “I think this win signifies that we’re coming.” Freshman Rahil Fazelbhoy got the No. 10 Quakers (6-2, 2-1 Ivy) moving with a three-set sweep before the two most exciting individual matchups of the night took place. After dropping the first two games to Ben Leizman, Jack

Maine dug deep and forced a decisive fifth game that he easily won, 11-5. What was Maine’s key to victory? The answer was a simple one. “Using my teammate’s enthusiasm off the court and listening to my coaches in between games,” he said. Just two courts over, freshman George Lemmon found himself in another tight battle, as he and Sam Ezratty of the No. 7 Tigers (3-4,1-2) battled to another fivegame match that energized the mixed crowd of Penn and Princeton fans. The game went back and forth, but luck was on the Quakers’ side as Lemmon won the deciding game in a 17-15 gutcheck. After winning two clutch Ivy matches — the Quakers topped Dartmouth on Jan. 11 — Lemmon gave credit to the team’s work off the court as the primary reason for Penn squash’s newfound winning ways. “The training we have done as a team is something we have never done before,” he said. Augie Frank made quick work of his opponent at No. 3 to capture his first Ivy victory of the season and set up freshman Benton Turner to capture the clinching

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co-chaired by himself and Penn Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli. If you’re keeping score, that’s eight weeks separating Bilsky’s goodbye and the proclamation of a plan to replace him. That’s too long and too problematic for whoever turns out to be Bilsky’s successor, because if the future of

SEE TONY PAGE 9

Dong comes out of her shell for Red and Blue W. SWIMMING | Despite her quiet demeanor, Dong has dominated and shown that she will be one of Penn’s best BY COLIN HENDERSON Associate Sports Editor

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Junior co-captain Jack Maine’s comeback from two sets down at the No. 8 position gave SEE M. SQUASH PAGE 9 No..10 Penn men’s squash a key match win in its upset triumph over No. 7 Princeton.

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The freshman class has stirred the waters for Penn women’s swimming, but it has been one of the quietest freshmen who has made the biggest splash. Rochelle Dong may not try to be the center of attention in person, but she has quickly become the standout underclassman in coach Mike Schnur’s program. Dong has helped Penn to many wins this season, having success in the 200-yard medley relay and 50 free as well as other races. As a young swimmer, it did not take long for her to realize her love for the sport and potential to excel at it. “It was around eighth grade when I realized I really enjoyed it,” Dong said. “It’s partly the competitiveness of the individual sport but also the team aspect of training together that I really enjoy.” Before she knew it, she had become one of the top high school swimmers in the country. As a swimmer at Pacific Ridge High School in Carlsbad, Calif., her numerous athletic accomplishments included qualifying for Nationals and making the Scholastic All-America team.

SEE W. SWIMMING PAGE 9

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