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t h e da i ly or a nge f o o t ba l l se a son pr e v i e w Inside you’ll find The Daily Orange sports section’s football preview issue. The Daily Orange has provided a comprehensive 24-page look into anything and everything Syracuse football, including analysis of the opponents and beat writer predictions as well as a full-page pullout schedule.

Car strikes student on Comstock

fr at er nit y a nd s o r o r i t y a f fa i r s

Party rules to undergo overhaul In Year Two, Ma with core of new rrone aims for bowl and old faces

By Michael Boren

University proposes rules to limit alcohol, guests

Asst. News Editor

A vehicle hit a student Wednesday afternoon on Comstock Avenue in front of the Theta Chi fraternity house. He sustained non-life threatening injuries and was taken to the hospital, Department of Public Safety Chief Tony Callisto said. “The driver was changing lanes when the person stepped off the curb,� Callisto said. DPS did not issue tickets to the driver or the pedestrian, Callisto said. The driver’s name was not released. But several Theta Chi brothers confirmed the car hit Colin Robinson, a brother in the house. Right after the accident, Mike Smith, one of the brothers in the Theta Chi house, said he went out to Robinson. He declined to comment on the incident further. Jared Lanphere, a senior in the Theta Chi house, said Robinson did not appear to be badly injured immediately following the incident. Lanphere watched as Smith went out to help his friend. “He had him up against a tree,� said Lanphere, an economics and entrepreneurship and emerging enterprises major. “He was bleeding a little bit.� Lanphere had seen Robinson walk out of the Theta Chi house several minutes before he saw Robinson being hit, he said. Several DPS squad cars and an ambulance lined the street around 12:45 p.m. The windshield of the car that hit the student, a Kia Sorento, was smashed in on the left side. A teary-eyed girl was taking pictures of the windshield and talking on the phone after the incident. She declined to speak for the article. “It’s a very busy pedestrian area,� Callisto said. “And, certainly, we encourage both the drivers and pedestrians to be mindful of each other.� In April, an ambulance side mirsee accident page 4

By Beckie Strum News Editor

daily orange file photo The open parties typical of Greek life at Syracuse University may become a thing of the past as SU works to place stricter rules on alcohol distribution and event size.

Students heading to fraternity parties this semester might have to get their names and ages cleared by Syracuse University staff, according to the administration’s new guidelines for fraternity and sorority events. The guidelines, distributed to fraternity and sorority chapters this week, consisted of a number of major changes to social events. The new rules could control underage drinking, allow SU to monitor who attends parties and make Greek organizations more vulnerable to disciplinary action. The new rules apply to all Greek organizations — Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, National

see policy page 4

Students on active-duty reflect on end of Iraq war By Dara McBride Asst. News Writer

Should Syracuse University student Paul Mancuso be asked about American military presence in Iraq, he and his classmates would be ready for the discussion. “Of course it gets really heated because all of us have been involved in the war one way or another,� said Mancuso, a sergeant in the Marine Corps and a student in this year’s Military Visual Journalism Program at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. President Barack Obama announced the end of U.S. military presence in Iraq after seven years and promised to begin the withdrawal of U.S. forces in Afghanistan next summer on Tuesday evening in an address broadcast from the Oval Office. For those at SU associated with the Navy, Marine Corps, Army

or Air Force, the announcement was a conversation topic throughout the next day. Newhouse’s Military Visual Journalism Program, sponsored by the Department of Defense, is a 10-month long course open to 32 active-duty military personnel who learn about photojournalism and broadcast journalism skills. The president’s address was discussed Wednesday morning among students, but there were different ways people were focusing on the topic, Mancuso said. While it reaffirmed one of Obama’s campaign promises, Mancuso said he is still in the mindset that troops will eventually go back. Mancuso served with the 2nd Marine Division for six months in Afghanistan, between November 2003 and May 2004, and for nine months in Iraq, between February

bridget streeter | photo editor robert storm , a student in the Military Visual Journalism Program and a Marine Corps staff sergeant, is skeptical the Iraq war is over. and November 2005. Mancuso was stationed in Al Karmah, Iraq, just east of Fallujah, militarily recognized as the most violence-prone Iraqi area. He said he thought there was still a job to be done. “We were fighting two wars,� Mancuso said, referring to the initial invasion and then the mission to combat terrorism. “The second

war is still going on and people kind of forget that.� Army specialist Alex Torres, a military program student, said he did not think people were surprised by the announcement, but that many were only waiting to learn the specific date. “We’ve been getting out of there see veterans page 8


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Hostage situation ends in death

Police shot and killed a gunman who had been holding three hostages inside the headquarters of the Discovery Channel in Maryland on Wednesday afternoon, according to The New York Times. The situation lasted a total of four hours, with the three hostages escaping the headquarters unharmed. Montgomery County Police Chief J. Thomas Manger said the suspect died at nearly 6 p.m., according to The New York Times. Manger said the final minutes of negotiations with the gunman were frantic. Officers first heard what he was doing and saying on camera as they got into position to enter the building. At one point, the gunman even pointed the handgun at one of the three hostages. As soon as the gunman pulled the gun, tactical units entered the building and shot and killed the suspect. A Discovery spokesman said that the gunman, James Jay Lee, had a history with Discovery Communications, according to The New York Times. Lee owned and ran a website for two years that asserted that Discovery’s programs were hurting the environment, according to The New York Times.

Leaders call for peace at meeting

President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with President Obama on Wednesday, according to The New York Times. Obama urged the leaders to produce long-term change during their peace talks in Washington. Obama also made the opening remarks at a dinner with the two Middle East leaders, calling the gathering an event that would have an impact on future generations. Following Obama’s remarks, both Abbas and Netanyahu made similar remarks involving peace. Netanyahu said he came to Washington to make peace and not to make excuses, saying to Abbas that he will work to improve the future for both countries, according to The New York Times. Abbas then made his remarks, asking Israelis and Palestinians to live peacefully together. Obama began one-on-one meetings with the two leaders on Wednesday, just one day after four Israeli settlers were killed by Hamas militants during a violent attack, according to The New York Times.

Bombers in Pakistan kill dozens

Three suicide bombers hit a procession of Shiite Muslim worshippers on Wednesday in Eastern Pakistan, killing at least 25 people, according to The New York Times. Pakistani officials said that two of the attackers set off explosives as the gathering was ending. The third bomber detonated explosives in a crowded city square where many of the worshippers were leaving, about 20 minutes after the initial attacks. The thousands of worshippers were observing an annual Shiite day of morning when the attacks occurred. In total, at least 200 people were wounded in the attack, and that number, as well as the number dead, is expected to rise, according to The New York Times. The attack by the three suicide bombers has set off violent conflicts between local police forces and mourners who are irate with the attack. As rescuers hurried to help the wounded, protests broke out in Lahore, Pakistan’s second-largest city. Protestors set police vans on fire and attempted to do the same to a police station, as they blame the police for failing to prevent the attack, according to The New York Times.


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the daily orange

AirOrange network to speed up

Students resent cut to hospitality By Lorne Fultonberg Staff Writer

By Rebecca Kheel Asst. News Editor

The university began the process of updating its entire wireless network to a system that is potentially five times as fast as the current one. The change is part of a number of updates Information Technology and Services completed over the summer in an effort to ease Internet accessibility and provide better services for students. MySlice received an aesthetic touch-up, as did ITS’ website. In addition, ITS’ website became the first SU website to have a mobile phone-specific version of its page. It also completed a wiki page that started last year to give students a community resource for technology-related issues. Wireless network The first phase of a multithousand dollar wireless network upgrade was completed this summer, as South Campus and a couple of academic buildings were equipped with the latest in wireless network technology, said Peter Morrissey, director of networking. The new network, technically called 802.11n, will be between three to five times faster than SU’s current wireless system, depending on the machine used to access the network. Though the faster technology has existed for a few years, SU held off on the update until the technology was “mature,” Morrissey said. “We were waiting for the vendors to go through a few iterations of it to make sure it was stable,” he said. “The other issue was in order to take advantage of it, the users and see its page 7

danielle parhizkaran | staff writer Free weights are among the new features the fitness center in Goldstein Student Center has added, along with an expansion in size. Officials expect the changes to attract more students to work out there.

Goldstein gym sees needed expansion, upgrades By Alexandra Hitzler Contributing Writer

Planned renovations to the fitness center in the Goldstein Student Center on South Campus were successfully completed in late August. Readjustments to the fitness center began in July and were completed in August with the intention of providing more equipment while maintaining students’ privacy and comfort within the facility. In order to make room for new weight machines, cardiovascular machines, such as treadmills and elliptical machines, were moved outside of the fitness center to where the pool table was previously located. The move made room for a variety of benches, weight plates, dumbbells, racks and bars, and a flat-screen television. Plans to improve the gym facility in the Goldstein Fitness Center began in fall 2009 when students from the

State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry living in the SkyHalls approached the Department of Recreation Services, said Joseph Lore, director of the department. “Eugene Law, a student at SUNYESF and a representative for ESF with the SU Student Association, approached myself and Bridget Talbot (director of Student Centers and Programming Services) during the fall 2009 semester regarding the possibility of adding free weights to the Goldstein facility,” Lore said in an e-mail. A survey was sent out on the South Campus listserv in the spring semester to receive feedback from the students, and additional surveys were available in the fitness center for faculty and staff. “The surveys indicated a strong desire for free weights to be added to the facility,” Lore said.

Focus groups composed of South Campus residents were also held in the spring semester to gain the student body’s opinion on the fitness center’s new setup. Student Centers and Programming Services and Recreation Services wanted to ensure that all of the users of the facility would be comfortable with the new arrangement, Lore said. The facility has experienced a steady increase in the number of users since the start of the semester, Lore said. The renovations have evoked positive reactions from some South Campus residents who said they felt the gym was previously inadequate. “It’s great to have a good workout facility so close to where I’m living,” said Ashley Brown, a sophomore in the Martin J. Whitman School of Management. “It’s definitely an encouragement for students to be more active.” adhitzle@syr.edu

New York state budget gap threatens internship program, work-study By Lorne Fultonberg Staff Writer

Students and the university are being forced to make some adjustments in light of the late and significantly reduced New York state budget. Although Syracuse University officials said financial aid is safe, some students said they have seen a decrease in their aid this year, and other programs will still be affected by state cuts, including a 10-year-old

internship program. The state’s veto included $100,000, which was to be put toward SU’s Renaissance Internship Program, a collaboration that assists engineering students through local internships. The students intern in the engineering and computer science fields and can work 20 hours per week during the academic year — or 40 hours per week during the summer — while continuing their full

academic course load. One hundred seventeen students have received internships since the program’s inception, leading to jobs in the Syracuse area for many, according to an April SU news release. Despite $115,000 of grants to SU being vetoed during the course of the 125-day-late budgetary process, university officials said planning ahead allowed them to take this year’s financial plan in stride. “I think SU is well-positioned in

terms of the period of time when the government is cutting aid,” said Kevin Quinn, senior vice president for public affairs. “We provide about $180 million a year that are SU money that go to SU students in the form of financial aid.” The vetoed funds for the Renaissance Program are a setback, Quinn said, but he expects larger employers will continue to hire students. Smaller employers, though, will be see work-study page 8

Students and the university are being forced to make some adjustments in light of the late and significantly reduced New York state budget. Although Syracuse University officials said financial aid is safe, some students said they have seen a decrease in their aid this year, and other programs will still be affected by state cuts, including a 10-year-old internship program. The state’s veto included $100,000, which was to be put toward SU’s Renaissance Internship Program, a collaboration that assists engineering students through local internships. The students intern in the engineering and computer science fields and can work 20 hours per week during the academic year — or 40 hours per week during the summer — while continuing their full academic course load. One hundred seventeen students have received internships since the program’s inception, leading to jobs in the Syracuse area for many, according to an April SU news release. Despite $115,000 of grants to SU being vetoed during the course of the 125-day-late budgetary process, university officials said planning ahead allowed them to take this year’s financial plan in stride. “I think SU is well-positioned in terms of the period of time when the government is cutting aid,” said Kevin Quinn, senior vice president for public affairs. “We provide about $180 million a year that are SU money that go to SU students in the form of financial aid.” The vetoed funds for the Renaissance Program are a setback, Quinn said, but he expects larger employers will continue to hire students. Smaller employers, though, will be more affected because SU covered 50 percent of the interns’ compensation. “I can tell you that, of course, the reduction in funding is disappointing, but we remain firmly committed to continuing the Renaissance Internship Program,” he said. “The program is a win-win for students and local businesses and has helped keep many SU alumni in the region.” University officials assured students they will not see a change see hospitality page 6


4 sep t ember 2 , 2 010

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policy from page 1

Association of Latino Fraternity Organizations, National PanHellenic Council and Multicultural Greek Council. Eddie Banks-Crosson, director of the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs, said the new guidelines are not finalized and met with students and chapter advisors Wednesday night. Banks-Crosson said he wished to discuss the changes further with chapters and committees before he spoke about the plans.

“That’s just going to make people pre-game on alcohol a whole lot more.” Will Utley

a senior communication and rhetorical studies major and brother of Alpha Chi Rho

The new guidelines say chapters must submit a list of guests to the university on the Thursday or Friday before a party. The list cannot include more than 150 people, including chapter members, or whichever attendance number exceeds fire safety regulations. “Your guest lists must be typed and numbered with underage guests (under 21) clearly identified,” according to the guidelines obtained by The Daily Orange. If the policy is adopted, parties could be cancelled if the names and ages of guests are found to be incorrect.

The university will have to check 2,700 names if all 18 fraternities hold parties one weekend with lists of 150 people. If the name list is checked out, the fraternity would have to purchase wristbands for everyone at the event. The wristbands would be one color for students 21 or older and another color for students under 21, according to the guidelines. Adam Bottorff, a junior marketing and management major in an SU fraternity, said the number of guests they’ll have to check will be overwhelming, and it will be hard to keep everyone safe. But Bottorff also said regulating Greek parties is not all bad. “It’s nice to feel like we’re looked over, though,” he said. After parties are over, fraternities would be required to return the guest list with signatures — the “sign-in list” — which will show who came to the party, according to the guidelines. Limiting the number of guests, including chapter members, to 150 also has implications for parties this year. Most sororities have more than 150 members alone. This means some members would have to be cut from the guest list of closed fraternity-sorority mixers. Will Utley, a senior communication and rhetorical studies major and brother of Alpha Chi Rho, was at a meeting Tuesday night about the new guidelines. “People were outraged at the meeting,” Utley said. Utley also said the extensive regulations could hurt small fraternities. “We don’t have the manpower to do a lot of

this stuff,” he said. The new guidelines add that fraternities can’t serve alcoholic drinks, and people who plan to drink and are of age need to bring their own drinks. The guests would be limited to bringing six beers per person or four wine coolers per person. The regulations SU places on parties are meant to protect students from the obvious dangers of drinking and crowded parties, according to the guidelines. The purpose of the rules is to “manage unnecessary risks to any member of Greek organization or University community,” according to the guidelines. But members of Greek organizations worry that limiting the amount of alcohol allowed at a party will cause people to binge drink before they get to the fraternity houses. “That’s just going to make people pre-game on alcohol a whole lot more,” Utley said.

The danger is especially great when students drink hard liquor before they go to a party, because they may underestimate how much it will affect them once they get to the party, he said. Although fraternity members are skeptical as to how well the university can enforce such extensive measures, the guidelines spell out the consequences if Greek organizations break the rules. Breaking several of the potential new policies, including falsifying information on the guest list, would result in immediate suspension of activity for a chapter, according to the guidelines. “I don’t think they’ll really check the lists,” Utley said. “They seem to be overstepping their bounds.” rastrum@ syr.edu – Asst. News Editor Michael Boren contributed reporting to this article.

The New Rules

The Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs has not yet finalized the party regulations and guidelines. But the first draft has considerable changes that have implications for changing nightlife on campus this year.

The guidelines say… • The maximum number of guests, including chapter members, at any registered party is 150 • Fraternities cannot serve alcohol at parties • Guests 21 or older have a limit of six 12-ounce beers or four 10-ounce wine coolers; drink tickets are required • Fraternities are required to give the university a guest list indicating who can and cannot legally drink; the list can then be checked by the university • The guest list must be returned after the party with the signatures of those who attended, along with receipts for any non-alcoholic beverages purchased. The number of non-alcoholic drinks must equal the number of underage guests. • Parties on Thursdays must start after 8 p.m. and end before midnight and have a maximum time limit of 2.5 hours • Parties on Fridays and Saturdays must start after 7 p.m. and end before 2 a.m. and have a maximum time limit of four hours • Date parties, such as formals, cannot be overnight, and beginning in spring 2011, formals cannot be held in Canada or any other foreign country

accident from page 1

ror hit a student who stepped off the curb on Comstock Avenue around 11:55 p.m., according to an article published in The Daily Orange on

April 6. The incident occurred after a party at Sigma Phi Epsilon let out. The student, a senior at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, was treated at the hospital for minor injuries, according to the article. mcboren@syr.edu


OPINIONS

THURSDAY

september 2, 2010

PAGE 5

the daily orange

IDE AS

Potential policy regulating fraternity events creates problems without providing solutions Syracuse University recently put forth a proposal that, if passed, will require SU fraternities to follow strict regulations for their events. The said proposal includes guidelines that would require fraternities to create a guest list capped at 150 people, with under-21 attendees clearly marked. The list would need to be turned in to the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs up to 12 days before the party. All guests would require a wristband, with students under 21 receiving a different color wristband. In addition, fraternities would no longer be able to serve alcoholic beverages. Over-21 students would be allowed to bring with them either six beers or four wine coolers. If passed and enforced, these new guidelines will certainly affect the historic tradition of SU Greek life. It will deter recruitment and cause current membership to drop. No one joins Greek life to have limits placed on their social experiences.

EDITORIAL by the daily orange editorial board SU should have at least considered the maximum amount of members that could potentially attend a closed fraternity-sorority mixer. With most sororities surpassing 150 members, this new proposal is unreasonable and unnecessary. Regulating such policies and managing guests once inside the house seem unenforceable. Guests under 21 will inevitably drink more while “pre-gaming” before heading to a fraternity house, putting them at an even greater risk for alcohol poisoning. SU may think this new proposal will limit underage drinking and create a safer weekend environment, but the effect of the rules will be quite the contrary. If fraternity houses are no longer an option, attempts

at drinking in dorms will rise and South Campus apartment parties will become more of an issue. Foot traffic in off-campus areas, such as Euclid and Comstock Avenues, will increase, placing an even larger number of students in danger. SU has been attempting to crack down on Greek life for some time now. But such strict guidelines appear to come as a surprise — there has been no recently publicized increase in alcohol-related incidences at fraternity events. The negative repercussions that will ultimately affect the rest of campus are not worth the potential gain of a more controlled fraternity party. Nor will it solve the problem of binge or underage drinking. This proposal is unfounded and could create more problems, without solving any. The Daily Orange encourages those involved to appeal the proposal.

SCRIBBLE

Hipster students provide entertainment, sense of predictability for SU community

A

fter three and a half months of summer, coming back to school can generate a stomach full of butterflies. Although I’m entering my third year at Syracuse University, I still get a little weary of all the uncertainty a new semester has to offer. While walking through the Quad on the first day of classes, my anxiety starts to build as I question how my classes and professors will be. But my anxiety suddenly settles once I see a recognizable SU icon: the suburbanite hipster. The familiarity of this unknown SU student taking a drag off his American Spirit cig — one he probably rolled himself — eases all of my fears. Only a few feet in front of hipster kid No. 1, I spot hipster kid No. 2 sweating through his long-sleeved plaid, which assures me that school is back in session.

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Hipster kids infiltrate SU like shoppers in Macy’s the day after Thanksgiving. I don’t necessarily dislike hipsters, I just wish they would step out of their world of disillusionment. I hate to break it to you, SU indie kid, but not only is your attempt at “cool” a joke, you have willingly embraced everything you verbally oppose: consumer culture. First, let’s get real: The tuition of this school alone is enough evidence to prove you can never be a true hipster. The pure subculture is known for the individual sustaining a lifestyle on his or her artist and musician wages. Second, your ratty, vintage looking T-shirt was not purchased at some indie, underground shop. It was purchased at Urban Outfitters. Yes, the opening of Urban Outfitters in downtown Syracuse has

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AMANDA ABBOT T

heart racin’ in my skintight jeans unlocked the floodgates for more diluted kids to join the crowd. During my first class of the semester, I overheard a girl boasting about her shirt, which she had bought at a “totally unheard of secondhand store back home.” Curious, I turned around to see this gem of a shirt. Not only was it evidently from Urban Outfitters, it had been pictured in the same fall catalogue from which I purchased my overpriced fedora. Hey, I’ll be the first to admit that I do shop at Urban Outfitters versus

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lying about some off-the-road secondhand store. And this girl wasn’t fooling anyone — authentic hipsters don’t need to brag about getting things at secondhand stores because it’s their norm. Even her friend looked unconvinced as she folded up her Ray-Bans and placed them in the collar of her American Apparel deep v-neck tee. Third, hipsters love to seem worldly. It’s always entertaining when students return from their journeys abroad with five over-the-shoulder leather bags from Italy and an “I’m cooler than you, because I have more stamps on my Visa” hipster attitude. We get it: You went to Italy, took pictures with your totally unique Lomography camera and, now, you’re all about photography. Spare us, please, and embrace the ubiquity: I can spend $1.99 on the Hipstamatic iPhone app and get the same results.

T H E I N DE PE N DE N T S T U DE N T N E W SPA PE R OF SY R ACUSE, NEW YORK

Katie McInerney

Kathleen Ronayne

EDITOR IN CHIEF

MANAGING EDITOR

Lastly, and perhaps my favorite act of the SU hipster kid defiance, is his or her quest to be mightier than the weather. The weather has been straddling in the lower to mid-90s all week, yet the amount of kids wearing their plaid long-sleeves, combat boots and dark skinny jeans is both impractical and hygienically insensible. In all honesty, SU’s pseudo-hipster culture provides me with as much entertainment as it does frustration. So please, hipster kids: Wake up, smell the black coffee and take heed of the all-mighty Kurt Vonnegut. Be careful what you pretend to be because you are what you pretend to be. Amanda Abbott is a junior geography and IST major. She is the assistant opinion editor at The Daily Orange, where her column appears occasionally. She can be reached at aeabbott@syr.edu.

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HOSPITALITY FROM PAGE 3

in need-based aid as a result of the budget or tough economic times. But at the same time, not all students received the same financial aid package as they did last year, like sophomore political science major Nathaniel Berger. Berger received grants and work-study last year, but when he went to apply for a job as a main desk assistant, he was told the position was only for those with work-study. To his surprise, when he checked his financial portfolio online, he found no work-study had been given. As a result, he took out loans for the first time. Berger only received a small amount of aid last year, he said, but the amount was enough to make a dent in SU’s $51,960 in tuition and fees. Though he was expecting less aid following his sister’s graduation from college, a factor used in determining aid levels, he wasn’t counting on losing it all. Youlanda Copeland-Morgan, director of scholarships and student aid, said a change in federal work-study amounts is not unusual. “We have to be careful when you try to say why or why not a student did or did not get work study,” Copeland-Morgan said. Morgan said late applications or a change in family situation or income could cause a student to lose work-study eligibility. “Lots of factors go into whether a student will

have access to work study,” she said. “There are always students who may get work-study one year but not the next year. It’s the same as grants and scholarships. It’s always based upon the family’s individual circumstances.” Berger argued his case to the financial aid office and submitted a formal appeal. In return, he received a phone call telling him all the year’s aid had been dispersed and that no further aid would be given. He was placed on a waitlist, but was told it was unlikely he’d make it off. Work-study is in higher demand, CopelandMorgan said, because of increased expenses and potentially less cash at home. But still, SU is trying its best to meet the growing demand for student employment, she said. As of Wednesday, all students who were on the waitlist for work-study were granted the funds, Copeland-Morgan said. The work-study program is a federal program, Copeland-Morgan said, meaning the amount that can be awarded is not in SU’s control. But she said SU will continue to do all it can to aid its students however possible. “Of course we are always disappointed when we see that there are cuts in federal programs or state programs that could benefit our students,” she said. “But our commitment does not rely solely on what happens with the federal government or state government. So, it’s disappointing, it weakens the partnership, but we’re certainly no less committed to our students.” lefulton@syr.edu

FAST FACTS

7:30-10:00 AM

Program Inception: 1986 Number of students in the major: About 200 The Class of 2014 is the last class that will be able to complete the degree. What will happen? The program may be broken up into more concentrated versions of the degree, such as food studies and event management.

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its

from page 3

the different laptops that get on the network — that has to also have the capability, and initially, not many of them had it anyway.” The first phase focused on the areas of campus most in need of an upgrade, he said. South Campus had spotty coverage on the old network, and the academic buildings that were upgraded, such as Smith Hall, had no wireless access before. “As far as we can tell, it’s working very well,” he said of the completed installations. All Mac laptops support the new network. PC users will have to purchase higher-end models in at least the $600 to $700 range to take advantage of the faster network speed, though they will still be able to access the network as it is still compatible with older models, Morrissey said. North Campus residence halls will be equipped with the new wireless system throughout the academic year beginning this fall semester and should be completed by the end of next summer. The rest of the academic buildings could take a few years to finish upgrading, Morrissey said. Morrissey said ITS is not anticipating any difficulties updating the residence halls and that there should be little to no network disruptions during the process.

Answers wiki ITS will provide answers to common technology questions, as well as a range of other topics of interest, through a new website similar to Wikipedia called Answers.syr.edu. “It’s really just trying to build communities, online communities, that share information or share knowledge,” said Jenny Gluck, director of Academic Applications and Service Centers. “It’s

sep t ember 2 , 2 010

a dynamic place that has changing content that is authored by the community.” The website was initially launched a year ago, but the summer saw upgrades to include information verified by ITS professionals, as well as the ability to create private pages. In addition to community authored and edited pages, the Answers wiki includes what Gluck called “gold” pages that are authored by ITS professionals and include tips for technological problems that have been used and verified, such as how to connect an iPad to the SU network. Though the focus of Answers is currently technology, the topics could cover anything community members desire, Gluck said. Popularity of Answers is slowly growing, Gluck said, and the library and students in the College of Law and the School of Information Studies currently use the website the most. “We really just want more students to use it,” she said. “My goal is to really make it the how-to place for Syracuse University.”

MySlice MySlice, students’ self-service portal, was redesigned to match SU’s main website and provide more ways in which students can help themselves. The changes, implemented June 13, but planned for six months prior, were sparked by the need to upgrade the application that runs the site. “Our applications are only supported by our vendors for a certain year period, and then we run out of support,” said Erik Anderson, director of ITS’ Enterprise Technology Group. “So if we don’t upgrade to the next version, we end up on an unsupported version and that causes more trouble.” Thus far, ITS has received positive feedback on the changes, Anderson said, with reactions

saying the website is warmer and friendlier. Though mostly an aesthetic update, the changes also laid the groundwork for future updates to functionality and features, which Anderson said is an ongoing, unending project. ITS is currently reaching out to student groups and administrative groups to determine what additions people think MySlice needs. Some new features have already been added, such as ways to get financial aid information and more details on classes.

7

site — the completed site will include a few hundred of ITS’ original 8,000 web pages — and because ITS is comprised of approximately 10 different units, it decided to break the process into phases, Barry said. In the first phase, the look of the website was changed to that of other SU webpages. ITS also switched the program it uses to manage information on the site so that it does not need to rewrite the same information multiple times for different subpages of the website.

“It’s really just trying to build communities, online communities, that share information or share knowledge. It’s a dynamic place that has changing content that is authored by the community.” Jenny Gluck

director of Academic Applications and Service Centers

“Self-servicing is the main focus from the administrative side to help with the students’ experience,” Anderson said. “The other side, the student groups, we’re still working with them to define their priorities and initiatives.”

Website redesign ITS completed the first phase of an overhaul to its website, cutting down the number of pages and adapting the template of SU’s other webpages. Along with the redesign came the creation of a mobile phone-accessible version of the site, the first at SU. Prior to implementing the changes, ITS planned the redesign for three months, said Cindy Barry, ITS’ webmaster. The complete overhaul is expected to be completed by the end of December. Because there are many components to the

Accessibility to ITS’ website will be easier with the addition of a mobile version of the site, Barry said. Over the course of last year, ITS saw an increase in the amount of traffic coming from mobile users each month. “We figured because we’re ITS, we should have a mobile site,” Barry said. “We wanted to make our site mobile because a lot of the computing devises that come in aren’t just PCs and Macs anymore.” Other updates * AirOrange, SU’s wireless network, now offers unsecured guest access on a temporary basis. Guests can be self-sponsored or sponsored by a student, faculty or staff member. * Windows 7, Microsoft’s latest operating system released in October, and Microsoft Office 2010 are now available on all public PC labs. rhkheel@syr.edu


8 sep t ember 2 , 2 010

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work-study from page 3

more affected because SU covered 50 percent of the interns’ compensation. “I can tell you that, of course, the reduction in funding is disappointing, but we remain firmly committed to continuing the Renaissance Internship Program,” he said. “The program is a win-win for students and local businesses and has helped keep many SU alumni in the region.” University officials assured students they will not see a change in need-based aid as a result of the budget or tough economic times.

“I can tell you that, of course, the reduction in funding is disappointing, but we remain firmly committed to continuing the Renaissance Internship Program. The program is a winwin for students and local businesses and has helped keep many SU alumni in the region.” Kevin Quinn

senior vice president for public affairs

But at the same time, not all students received the same financial aid package as they did last year, like sophomore political science major Nathaniel Berger. Berger received grants and work-study last year, but when he went to apply for a job as a main desk assistant, he was told the position was only for those with work-study. To his surprise, when he checked his financial portfolio online, he found no work-study had been given. As a result, he took out loans for the first time. Berger only received a small amount of aid

last year, he said, but the amount was enough to make a dent in SU’s $51,960 in tuition and fees. Though he was expecting less aid following his sister’s graduation from college, a factor used in determining aid levels, he wasn’t counting on losing it all. Youlanda Copeland-Morgan, director of scholarships and student aid, said a change in federal work-study amounts is not unusual. “We have to be careful when you try to say why or why not a student did or did not get work study,” Copeland-Morgan said. Morgan said late applications or a change in family situation or income could cause a student to lose work-study eligibility. “Lots of factors go into whether a student will have access to work study,” she said. “There are always students who may get work-study one year but not the next year. It’s the same as grants and scholarships. It’s always based upon the family’s individual circumstances.” Berger argued his case to the financial aid office and submitted a formal appeal. In return, he received a phone call telling him all the year’s aid had been dispersed and that no further aid would be given. He was placed on a waitlist, but was told it was unlikely he’d make it off. Work-study is in higher demand, CopelandMorgan said, because of increased expenses and potentially less cash at home. But still, SU is trying its best to meet the growing demand for student employment, she said. As of Wednesday, all students who were on the waitlist for work-study were granted the funds, Copeland-Morgan said. The work-study program is a federal program, Copeland-Morgan said, meaning the amount that can be awarded is not in SU’s control. But she said SU will continue to do all it can to aid its students however possible. “Of course we are always disappointed when we see that there are cuts in federal programs or state programs that could benefit our students,” she said. “But our commitment does not rely solely on what happens with the federal government or state government. So, it’s disappointing, it weakens the partnership, but we’re certainly no less committed to our students.” lefulton@ syr.edu

veterans from page 1

for so long, it’s not really a shocker,” Torres said. Torres returned in June from serving six months in Afghanistan. He had been creating documentary style films on local villages for the Army’s Psychological Operations unit. He said the Afghani people are some of the most polite he has ever met, but the area’s religious conflict has fostered an atmosphere of hatred, and local corruption has also created problems. Troops in Afghanistan are currently helping to train the Afghani army. Obama said, in his address, next August would begin the transition to Afghan responsibility. “We can only help them so much,” Torres said. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Robert Storm, a military program student, served in Iraq at the start of the war. He said he was guarded when he heard the news that troops were moving out. “The final word is never the final word,” Storm said. Storm served two tours within the first two years of the Iraq war and one in Afghanistan in 2006. He said the conditions in Iraq were poor

during his tours, and he once saw a home made of garbage. Storm said he was unaware of how the area looked at present. Storm has not heard the topic of Iraq and Afghanistan being widely discussed outside the military circle at SU, but he said that was likely because he and his classmates were more connected and affected by the decision. He expected the topic would come up during his mass media class. But for Storm, rather than finalize a situ-

“Of course it gets really heated because all of us have been involved in the war one way or another.” Sgt. Paul Mancuso

a sergeant in the Marine Corps and a student in this year’s Military Visual Journalism Program at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

ation, Obama’s announcement created more questions. “Do I think there’s a chance two years from now I’ll be sent back?” Storm said. “Bush said we were done with all the hostility, but how many years ago was that?” dkmcbrid@ syr.edu

leading quotes Tuesday night President Barack Obama gave a speech in light of combat ending in Iraq. Here are some one-line quotes from Obama’s Tuesday night speech. “It should also serve as a message to the world that the United States of America intends to sustain and strengthen our leadership in this young century...” “At every turn, America’s men and women in uniform have served with courage and resolve...” “Ending this war is not only in Iraq’s interest – it is in our own. The United States has paid a huge price to put the future of Iraq in the hands of its people. We have sent our young men and women to make enormous sacrifices in Iraq, and spent vast resources abroad at a time of tight budgets at home...” “Today, our most urgent task is to restore our economy, and put the millions of Americans who have lost their jobs back to work. To strengthen our middle class, we must give all our children the education they deserve, and all our workers the skills that they need to compete in a global economy...” 252080A02

you can study in

PRAGUE INFORMATION MEETINGS: September 3, 3:00 pm @ SU Abroad NEW PROGRAM! Jewish Studies in Prague. SU Abroad is happy to announce a new opportunty to study in Prague with CET’s Jewish Studies Program. You will receive SU credit and most financial aid is applicable. Unable to come to the meeting? Information is available on our website under “Programs By Location.”

Syracuse University Abroad 106 Walnut Place, Syracuse, NY 13244 / (315) 443-3471 / suabroad.syr.edu / 1.800.235.3472

The “I’ll Just Have One More” Martini 3 oz. gin or vodka 1/2 oz. dry vermouth 3 olives 1 automobile 1 long day 1 diminishing attention span 1 too many Combine ingredients. Drink. Repeat. Mix with sharp turn, telephone pole.

Never underestimate ‘just a few.’ Buzzed driving is drunk driving.


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CITY

sep t ember 2 , 2 010

every other thursday in news

bridget streeter | photo editor Environmentally friendly homes are being built in the Near West Side of Syracuse after the School of Architecture held a design competition for the new homes. The new homes are meant to showcase green building and spruce up the area.

Near

SU architecture competition yields eco-friendly housing in city neighborhood

west sidestory

By George Clarke CONTRIBUTING WRITER

A new home being built on the Near Westside — the result of a School of Architecture competition —will showcase the latest in green living technology. The home is part of the Near Westside Initiative, a Syracuse University partnership that serves as an umbrella nonprofit for a diverse set of programs, said Karen Schroeder of Home HeadQuarters, the company heading the construction. From the Ground Up, an Architecture-sponsored national competition, chose the winning design, along with two others that will also be built in the near future. The goal of the competition was to generate innovative, practical, energy-efficient designs for replication across Syracuse and across the nation, according to the competition’s website. All three winning designs — SU architecture alumnus Rick Cook’s “Live Work Home” at 319 Marcellus St.; Philadelphia-based development company Onion Flats’ “TED” at 619 Otisco St.; and New York City-based architecture firm Della Valle Bernheimer’s “R-House” on 621 Otisco St. — are under construction in Syracuse by Home HeadQuarters. “Live Work Home” is due for completion in October, delayed from the original completion date in June. The home, sold at approximately $80,000, is projected

to be certified either LEED Gold or Platinum through the international green building certification system. Pursuing a higher LEED rating costs more because of more exotic materials and more precise workmanship, Schroeder said. But Home HeadQuarters keeps prices practical with a variety of “funding injections,” including state and local funding, Schroeder said. “We’re working to make all these green bells and whistles affordable,” Schroeder said. Inside, the 1,400-square-foot home is taking shape. A hardwood floor, made of commercial wood planks laminated with recycled, rock-hard Georgia pine, covers the ground level. The pine was carefully reclaimed from the former home at 319 Marcellus St., which was deconstructed piece-by-piece last July, according to an article in The Post Standard on Sept. 15. Under the hardwood lies a series of plastic hot-water tubes, known as ‘radiant heating,’ that keep the ground level comfortable in winter. A layer of ultra-efficient foil insulation called ‘radiant barrier’ insulates the tubing from the basement below, directing any thermal radiation back to the ground level, said John Miranda, the presumptive owner of “Live Work Home.” An additional layer of radiant barrier beneath the concrete basement floor prevents thermal energy transfer between the basement and the ground, keeping the basement, which is about as large and deep as the ground level,

surprisingly cool in the summer and pleasantly warm in winter months, Miranda said. Though the home has no air conditioning, the panels on the east side of the home can be rotated to maximize airflow through the windows, Miranda said. When that fails, even the smallest fan can blow cool basement air to the ground level. Miranda said he plans to use the home to both operate his company, CNY Renewable Energy Associates, and to experience the latest renewable technologies in his everyday life. Miranda said his mission is to prove efficient inner-city construction is a livable path to a post-petroleum reality. With innovations ranging from a three-zone thermostat to natural light fixtures that can shine just as bright as bulbs, this home is a progressive proof of concept, he said. Though Home HeadQuarters urged him to take the home as is when the former proposed owner backed out, Miranda added what few customizations he could before the tight construction deadline. Miranda is planning solar panels and gardens for the rooftop. These and other extras may come at a premium, but Miranda said he sees them as a sound investment in the future. “If you’re going to make it a showcase,” Miranda said, “why not make it a showcase?” geclarke@syr.edu

9


10 s e p t e m b e r 2 , 2 0 1 0

com ics& cross wor d bear on campus

apartment 4h

by tung pham

| tinobliss@gmail.com

by joe medwid and dave rhodenbaugh

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thursday

sep t ember

page 11

2, 2010

the daily orange

the sweet stuff in the middle

Brain

SU, local orchestra join forces

Freeze

By Aaron Gould Asst. Feature Editor

around here.” The Big Dip purchases its ice cream from Byrne Dairy, a staple in the Syracuse area. Although it isn’t homemade, they have a variety of sundaes that definitely make the ice cream one-of-a-kind. With choices like a cotton candy confetti sundae and a pumpkin pecan caramel sundae, you’re sure to find something you haven’t tried before. One of the benefits of heading all the way out to North Syracuse is the prices. With four sizes, ranging from the perfect snack size kiddie cone for $1.50 to the large, which still rings in at a bargain with a price of $2.90, it’s worth the gas money to get there. And once you head out there, you’re sure to enjoy yourself. Have a seat at in the sun on the grass field next to the Big Dip, or maybe sit under an umbrella at one of their picnic tables and soak it all up. “It’s a good atmosphere,” Dennis said. “All the people are really friendly and engaging.”

Black tuxedos and crisp bow ties replace musty tweed jackets. A grand symphony stage is substituted for a lecture hall. The pupils are transformed into a live audience, as the usual study on music theory is suddenly molded into a grand concerto, complete with blaring trumpets and rumbling drums. No, this isn’t magic. It’s what Syracuse University students have to look forward to, courtesy of Daniel Hege, conductor of the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra. “I think it’s really cool,” said senior music industry major Abigail Ottenjohn. “If you’re developing a relationship with a professor, kids are going to be much more inclined to go (to the concerts).” Hege, the conductor of the SSO for the past 10 years, will join the Setnor School of Music within the College of Visual and Performing Arts as a professor of practice. In the midst of its 50th year of operation, the SSO and SU are expanding and deepening their relationship beginning this season. The SSO and the university have agreed to put on three on-campus shows every year through 2012, all free of charge. The SSO guest artists will also become more involved with the SU community, taking part in seminars, master classes and other special presentations. This new agreement has already started sparking student interest. Included in the previous artistic partnership were master classes, open auditions and one annual SSO concert. “I think it’s a very natural next step in the relationship we’re trying to forge between Syracuse University and the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra,” Hege said. “I’m hoping that my presence there will help us to come together more.” Effort is one thing. For all the knowledge and expertise a practical professor may have, Hege thinks students need to be engaged professionally as well. Bringing out that interest in students is where the job becomes trickier, he said. “What would be great is to raise the profile of the symphony at the university so that more students know about it and get enthused about it,” Hege said. “Students who are part of an educational institution get to learn technique, which is very important — but I think it’s very important to have a very direct relationship to the real world. I think that’s something that

see ice cream page 12

see orchestra page 18

Dishing out on Syracuse hot spots for cold treats By Flash Steinbeiser and Katie McInerney

A

The Daily Orange

student can only chase the ice cream truck up and down Euclid Avenue so many times before he or she realizes there must be a better option. But ask anyone on campus where to find a decent ice cream cone, and you’ll be met with a blank stare, and a quick shrug of the shoulders. Sure, you could head over to Kimmel Food Court for some Haagen Dazs, but nothing beats slurping up a cold cone outside on a hot day. Outdoor ice cream joints may not be a hot commodity right off campus, but Syracuse has plenty of places to enjoy the essential warm-weather treat. And as we’ve seen over the past week, even though classes may have started, summer is hardly over. Give the 100-meter-ice-cream-truck dash a break and try out some of Syracuse’s local creameries instead.

ARCTIC ISLAND ICE CREAM

Where: 210 Seneca Turnpike, Syracuse Distance from campus: 2.7 miles The Scoop: All year long With a giant plastic ice cream cone standing tall on the roof, Arctic Island Ice Cream is, in itself, a landmark to the East Colvin area. “We’ve been here forever,” said Elizabeth Quesinberry, an Artic Island employee who lives in DeWitt. Arctic Island boasts a lengthy menu that ranges from dog treat sundaes to giant ice cream cookie sandwiches. Before you deviate from the norm right off the bat, it might be better to kick it old school with some classic hard serve ice cream. “We’re the only place in the valley area that makes homemade ice cream,” Quesinberry said. Featuring homemade, exotic flavors like Burgundy Cherry, Bavarian Raspberry Chip and “Dirt,” a chocolate ice cream with crumbled Oreo cookies, Arctic Island’s hard serve is a pedigree above the competition. For such quality, the hard serve is set at bargain prices, too. Their “kiddie” cones, priced at $1.65, are just about as big as any other place’s small. Not to leave the health-conscious customer out to melt, a generous amount of dietary options are offered, too. Sugar-free, low-calorie, dairy-free and yes, even gluten-free options can be scooped onto your cone. Although the outdoor benches encourage you to stick around in the summer months, these delicious flavors can also be enjoyed all year long. The outdoor section of the shop closes in early November, but no snowstorm is going to get between you and your ice cream, even if the treat is 20 degrees warmer than the temperature outside. To keep patrons warm, there’s an indoor café attached

photo illustration by joe lingeman | asst. photo editor to the building as well. Beyond being a great breakaway from ho-hum coffee shops, Artic Island conveniently packs their ice cream in pints to go.

BIG DIP ICE CREAM

Where: 216 North Main Street, North Syracuse. NY Distance from campus: 9.2 miles The Scoop: Historic Although the Big Dip may require a car ride up I-81, with season flavors like their pumpkin spice soft serve, it just might be worth it. Big Dip has a limited but quality menu, and is known for its soft serve twists such as chocolate-peanut butter and pumpkin spice-vanilla. In addition, the Big Dip knows what it’s doing when it comes to ice cream. After all, they’ve been around for decades. “Not a lot of people have heard about us, but we’ve been around for over 50 years,” said Maggie Dennis, a sophomore wildlife science major in the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry and a four-year employee of Big Dip. “There’s a lot of good history


12 s e p t e m b e r 2 , 2 0 1 0

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ice cream f r o m p a g e 11

A-La-Mode Ice Cream & Sandwich

Where: 331 Nottingham Rd., Syracuse Distance from Campus: 1.8 miles The Scoop: Easy Access Though it prides itself on being a sandwich shop, A-La-Mode isn’t too shabby when it comes to ice cream. The fact that it’s less than 10 minutes (by car) from campus doesn’t hurt its appeal, either. It’s still early in the semester, so you probably still have some extra time on your hands. What better way to kill it than by strolling down East Colvin Street for quality ice cream? Featuring an Akron, N.Y.-based company, Perry’s Ice Cream, you get some

Self serve

Don’t feel like heading out for some delicious ice cream? Try out these quirky recipes to eat something homemade. Nothing gets more local than your own house.

Ice cream made from snow

All you need is a cup of heavy cream, some sugar and vanilla. And snow. Come on, Syracuse gets tons of that every winter. Add snow to mixture slowly until desired consistency. Chill in a snowbank or eat right away. Source: www.cooks.com

Ice cream made in a bag Ingredients: . 1 tablespoon sugar

local flavor without having to travel too far off campus. Their Maple Walnut flavor is rich, but offers enough of a sweet twinge to mimic the taste of pure maple syrup. Their other top flavor, “Piece of Cake,” pretty much says it all. Since A-La-Mode is, first and foremost, a sandwich shop, the setting obviously differs from a traditional ice cream stand. The frozen pickings are limited to just 10 hard serve flavors. No worries though — the walk back to campus is plenty of time to enjoy every one of them. The prices are reasonable, so don’t hesitate to make an entire meal out of the trip. Once you put away one of their generously portioned sandwiches, pack your dairy treat in an extra big cone for a snack that will keep you cool the entire way back. With this summer heat of late, you’re going to need it. ansteinb@syr.edu knmciner@syr.edu

. 1/2 cup milk or half-and-half . 1/4 teaspoon vanilla . 6 tablespoons rock salt . 1 pint-sized plastic food storage bag (e.g., Ziploc) . 1 gallon-sized plastic food storage bag . Ice cubes 1. Fill the Ziploc bag halfway with the ice and rock salt. 2. Put everything else in the small bag and seal it. 3. Put the small bag in the big bag and shake. Each half cup of milk makes about a scoop of ice cream. Source: www.allrecipes.com

Beer Bites Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA

Brewery: Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales Milton, Del. Cost: $10.99/4 pack, 12 oz. each ABV: 9.0% IBU: 90

This is an Imperial India Pale Ale from Milton, Del. Though its alcohol, by volume, weighs in at 9.0 percent, it hides its alcohol content relatively well, making it a robust, but smooth, India pale ale. It has a bright floral and citrusy nose, primarily of grapefruit and orange. The fruits come out in the taste of the ale.

Ommegang Abbey Ale

Brewery: Brewery Ommegang Cooperstown, N.Y. Cost: $7.99/750 ml bottle, $8.99/4 pack, 12 oz. each ABV: 8.5% IBU: 27

Ommegang, out of Cooperstown, N.Y., makes great Belgian-style beers. The Abbey Ale, a Belgian-style Dubbel, is a rich and dark beer rooted in old brewing traditions. It pours a dark caramel and has a nose of dark fruit, like plum, and a mild hoppy bitterness. But upon first taste, it is all malt. It’s not too sweet, whereby the hops balance the malt just on the aftertaste.

Founder’s Breakfast Stout

Brewery: Founders Brewing Company Grand Rapids, Mich. Cost: $24.99/6 pack, 12 oz. each ABV: 8.3% IBU: 60

Founder’s comes in around 8.3 percent ABV for this amazing American Imperial Stout. It’s a beer drinker’s beer for sure, with massive roasted malty notes, complete with a lovely bitter, dark chocolate and coffee nose and taste. It pours almost pitch black, and the oatmeal flavor comes through in initial taste, shortly followed by the bitter chocolate and coffee notes. It is a truly humbling drinking experience for anyone adventurous enough to tackle an Imperial Stout. —compiled by Lucas Sacks, contributing writer, ldsacks@syr.edu


2010 new yOrk state Fair

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Sep t ember 2 , 2 010

splice

17

every thursday in pulp

e r n e G exorcise illustration by luis rendon design editor

‘The Last Exorcism’ chills as mockumentary horror film, but hardly breaks mold By Sam Littman STAFF WRITER

W

hile most faux-documentary horror films are littered with uninspired scares that build to a climax, “The Last Exorcism” is a true oddity in that case. Commencing with a surprisingly long opening act, mistakable for a television documentary, director Daniel Stamm encourages his audience to view the film from different perspectives, defined through several mediums. Stamm wisely takes his time in detailing the persona of the charismatic Reverend Cotton Marcus (Patrick Fabian), a highly sought-after exorcist who understands that demons do not truly exist. Anyone who thinks he or she is possessed just needs to be convinced that the demon has never entered his or her body for the exorcism to be completed. A fatally botched exorcism has led Cotton to view the practice as dangerous and immoral, and he has become increasingly eager to share those feelings. Stamm takes special care in developing his protagonist, ensuring that characters — not barrages of senseless carnage — define his film. In order to expose the ridiculousness of exorcising demons, Cotton lets a documentary crew tag along with him as he ventures to save the soul of Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell), a cheery

teenager whose soul is at the mercy of a demon called Abalam. Cotton impresses the crew with his fraudulent practices as he plants recordings of demon sounds around the Sweetzers’ house and uses wires to make Nell’s bed shake, but realizes he is in for more than he bargained for when Nell’s personal traumas are illuminated. Nell’s backbreaking and voice-altering stunts do not terrify Cotton nearly as much as the notions of incest and the volatility of Nell’s alcoholic father. This could, indeed, prove to be more dangerous than the demon. That is, if the demon inside her exists at all. The movie will not provoke many heated debates concerning religion and belief, though its depth is hard to ignore. Stamm magnifies from a simple case study and numerous intriguing themes, the most prominent being the relationship between belief and psychological vulnerability. Stamm presents a fascinating family dynamic that might have made for interesting drama on its own, while the father’s dangerous insecurities and Nell’s brother’s untapped anger augment the tension concerning Nell’s well-being. In keeping with the likes of “The Blair Witch Project” (1999) and “Paranormal Activity” (2009), the existence of a tantalizing villain remains unclear until the closing moments. Unlike those two superb chillers, however, “The

Last Exorcism” bears meaningful themes the audience can latch onto and consider. In his first substantial screen role, television actor Patrick Fabian (“Veronica Mars,” “Ugly Betty”) is surprisingly good, blending infectious charm with a natural effect that accentuates the documentary feel of the picture. He is still overshadowed by Ashley Bell, whose performance is significantly more haunting than it is terrifying. Bell’s pleasant demeanor is entirely disarming, her gentle smile proving to be one of the film’s most endearing images. The picture can pride itself on elevating the thematic potential of the horror mockumentary, though it falters where the likes of “The Blair Witch Project” and “Paranormal Activity” made their fortunes. The ending is creepy, but very contrived, and threatens to dilute the film’s power. Any slow-burning horror film essentially requires a satisfactorily chilling ending, and where one might expect “The Last Exorcism” to shock, it is shockingly unoriginal. The sting of the picture persists, though, and exists as a better companion piece to the more intelligent horror films of the late 60s and early 70s than the cheap creepers with which it is most often aligned. “The Last Exorcism” might not be in the same league as those classics, but it is certainly a superior exercise in horror. smlittma@syr.edu

lyricis.fr

“THE LAST EXORCISM” Director: Daniel Stamm

Cast: Patrick Fabian, Ashley Bell and Louis Herthum Rating:

3.5/5 Popcorns


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Ah, September in Syracuse. A time that brings new classes, a new address and new wardrobe additions you can finally dig out of storage. The possibilities are endless, but none is more exciting than the opportunity for another batch of themed parties. Fist pumping until your knuckles are blue at Jersey Shore-themed parties isn’t as exciting as Snooki and the gang make it seem. Instead, try a party theme that allows guests to amp up the creativity and tone down the hair gel. Anything-But-Clothes: Ever wrapped your entire body in duct tape or turned your laundry basket into a fashion statement? The anything-but-clothes theme is perfect for unleashing your creative side. Grab all the random knickknacks you’ve collected from home and learn the best way to wear them. Just go easy on the duct tape, or undressing will be much, much more painful than usual. Stoplight: It’s 2 a.m. and your memory isn’t quite up to par. You spot a cute girl standing by the beer pong table. Only problem is, you can’t tell if the 250-pound Hulk standing by is her boyfriend, her pong partner or the guy who sits 10 rows in front of you in astronomy class. Cue the stoplight-theme magic. If she’s wearing a red shirt, you may want to think twice. Yellow shirt, and you can make a move once “Roid Rage” goes to the bathroom. If you’re lucky enough to see green, head on over and thank God for traffic signals. Highlighter: This may be the one and only time you have free rein to write whatever you want on a random stranger. Instead of highlighting your history notes, save the ink and be ready to sign your autograph anywhere you want. Pick-up lines, smiley faces, phone numbers, inappropriate pictures are all fair game. Just don’t plan on wearing that shirt again in public. Pajamas: No, we’re not in fifth grade, but consider the logic: It’s Friday night, and you’ve been ready to go out and do some damage since your Monday morning class. Problem is, now that Friday night has rolled around, all you want to do is throw on some sweats and pass out in bed. The pajama party is the perfect compromise — you can still go out, and when you’re ready to fall on your bed by the end of the night, the daunting task of changing is already complete. Luau: It may be 90 degrees now, but in a few weeks, the sun will be a relic of the past. A luau-themed bash is the perfect way to forget we go to school in a winter wonderland and warm things up for a few hours. Go all out with bathing suits, inflatable beach balls and “California Dreamin’”-esque music. If you know a sand salesman, make it happen. Who knows, you may even get lei’d. -Compiled by Elora Tocci, asst. copy editor, ertocci@syr.edu

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ORCHESTRA F R O M P A G E 11

the SSO and I can bring to the table.” Four years ago, Ottenjohn, along with most of her class, went to watch Joseph Downing, an SU associate professor of music composition, perform with the SSO. She said it was a positive

“I’m hoping that my presence there will help us to come together more.” -Daniel Hege, conductor of the SSO experience that could become more frequent with the expanded agreement. “It’s definitely a relationship that could make a big difference,” Ottenjohn said. The six total on-campus concerts, which will take place during the fall, spring and summer of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 seasons, will be free of charge. The final goal is to bring jazz and concert music into the larger culture, both on campus and in the community, said Andrew Waggoner, co-interim director of the Setnor School of Music. “The Symphony and the Setnor School of Music have a long history of mutual support; this is only natural,” Waggoner said. “Having Daniel Hege work with our students is just one part of what will be a broad and imaginative interaction between the school and the orchestra.” akgould@syr.edu


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s y r a c u s e at a k r o n

The rock By Allison Guggenheimer

B

Staff Writer

rian Wagner was having trouble finding gaps. As an inside linebacker gearing up for his third season with the Akron football team, finding gaps and locating the ball are his primary duties. But on that first day of practice this past spring, Wagner might as well have been a freshman. Well, almost. New head coach Rob Ianello was hired over the winter, bringing with him a new defensive formation: a 4-3 scheme. That left Wagner to fill the all-important middle linebacker spot in the defense. On this first day of spring practice, Wagner and the rest of his teammates had to begin to learn Ianello’s new playbook. More than five months later, it is no longer the new defense, it is just the defense. “I think everybody getting to know each other was part of it,” Ianello said. “I think we’ve made great strides in that, and I think any growing pains in regards to that transition are over with.” Ianello’s 4-3 defense is the third defensive formation Akron has played in the past three years. This season, the shift is from an unconventional 3-3-5 back to a standard 4-3. Each year when Wagner and his teammates have arrived at camp, they have had to learn a new set of plays, new calls and new positioning. For Wagner, that turnover has been the hardest part of his offseasons. On Saturday, Wagner and the Zips will test out their new scheme for the first time when Syracuse makes the trip to Ohio in a season opener (6 p.m., ESPN3). Senior defensive tackle Almondo Sewell has been with Wagner through all three defenses. He credits some of Wagner’s success last season (132 tackles) to his ability to pick up the playbook quickly and foresees a similar season for him in 2010. “(The transition) is going pretty well,” Sewell said. “We have a new defense, but we’ve had a good, long time to get it down pat. Now (defensive coordinator Curt) Mallory gives it to us,

and we just run the plays.” Last season, the Akron defense struggled in the 3-3-5 formation. It gave up an average of nearly 30 points per game. Although the Zips defense got noteworthy numbers from Wagner, they were not enough to get the team past a 3-9 record. Akron struggled to put pressure on the quarterback (11 sacks all last season) or stop the run because it lacked men on the line. Ianello’s plan to have four men up front this year is intended to allow Akron to pack the box and stop the run. Before he came to Akron or met Wagner, Ianello knew that when he ran his own team, he would play a 4-3. He thinks it gives his defense a better chance to put pressure on the quarterback. Centered behind the four men on the line, the middle linebacker, Wagner, orchestrates the plays. “You’ve got to have a ‘Mike’ linebacker that can get everybody lined up, knows what everybody’s got to do, knows what he’s got to do and can be a real run stopper,” Ianello said. “Brian does a nice job of all those things.” Wagner worked all summer to adapt to his new role as the sole man in the middle and the play-caller for the defense. The new responsibilities fit well to the exceptional skill set he displayed last year. He finished second in the Mid-Atlantic Conference in tackles, with an average of 11 per game. His 132 total tackles were 61 more than the next best on the team. A 4-3 defense should allow Wagner the opportunity for even more tackles, because he will be part of every play. “I’m right in the middle,” Wagner said.

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19

In midst of three defensive schemes in three seasons, Wagner is Akron’s constant

“You’ve got to have a ‘Mike’ linebacker that can get everybody lined up, knows what everybody’s got to do, knows what he’s got to do and can be a real run stopper. Brian does a nice job of all those things.” Rob Ianello

Akron head coach

“I’m right in the middle of the defense, so I’m a part of everything. Instead of two linebackers, there’s just me in the middle, so you get a little bit of everything.” From the experience gained last season and the muscle mass he put on during his summer workouts, Wagner’s statistics have the potential to be even better this year. But Wagner is taking on a lot of responsibility with his duties as the defensive play-caller. Ianello views the middle linebacker as the “quarterback of the defense,” the man who has to get the plays from the bench and then ensure that his teammates are all in position before any given play. Vocal leadership is not something Wagner has taken to in the past. Despite leading his high school team to the playoffs each of his four years and his impressive numbers last season, Wagner tended to lead by example rather than

by voice. “He was never the boisterous kid out in front or a talk-it-up kind of leader,” said Steve DeWitt, Wagner’s coach from Catholic Central High School in Springfield, Ohio. “Rather his style of play, the intensity that he always practiced with and that he always played with was a real credit to his work ethic. It drove up the intensity of play in all his teammates.” The quiet Wagner is concerned about becoming more confident on the field. Only a sophomore, he is the anchor of the defense. He has to be more familiar with the playbook than anyone else on the field. His anxiety stems from the responsibility of ensuring everyone is set each play. Wagner will test his confidence in the new defense for the first time Saturday against SU. He was sick for last year’s game at the Carrier Dome, so this will be his first time facing the Orange. The new defense aims to prevent a repeat of Syracuse’s 234 yards rushing against Akron last year. Ianello has faith that the work his middle linebacker did in the offseason will overshadow any insecurity and anticipates Wagner will only lead his defense to improve as the season progresses. “I think you gain confidence through knowing what to do,” Ianello said. “Every day, Brian and the other players will continue to grow in their confidence with knowing what to do and being able to play fast.” alguggen@syr.edu


MEN’S SOCCER

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Siena takes advantage of SU mistakes with 3 set-piece goals By Allison Guggenheimer STAFF WRITER

Siena midfielder Joey Tavernese grabbed the ball on the right sideline. He was about 30 yards out from the Syracuse goal line. He stepped back to take a throw in. And then he stepped back a few more times. He began to skip forward. Suddenly, he leaned down and touched the ball to the ground. His legs whipped over his head as he did a somersault with the ball in his hands. As Tavernese flipped over, he catapulted the ball into the middle of the field. It sailed directly to Falko Friedrichs, who headed it into the goal past the hesitating Syracuse goalie Jeremy Vuolo. The goal gave Siena a two-goal lead, and the Saints would go on to win 5-1. Three of those five goals came on set plays. In addition to the score on the throw in, Siena was able to put in two corner kicks. “We conceded some soft goals on restart,

and ultimately, we have to take responsibility to prevent them,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. The first goal was also a header by Siena. Again, Vuolo made the wrong snap decision, only this time he went too far out of the goal as opposed to waiting back. The third set play goal ended with the ball coming out of a scrum in front of the goal and some miscommunication about coverage. In all three situations, however, Syracuse players neglected to take charge and step up to the ball. There were no glaring reasons as to why all three goals scored. Little missteps were the downfall of the Orange on Wednesday — a slight hesitation on the part of Vuolo or unwillingness of a defender to go hard into a tackle in the box. “Little decisions, key decisions, at the wrong time, cost us today,” SU defender Robbie Hughes said. “Communication a lot of the time, knowing who your man is, knowing who to mark. If

someone’s going to go up and win the ball, if the keeper’s going to smash through everyone, just little things like that, really.” Some of the miscommunication can be attributed to the fact that it was the team’s first game of the season, and its first game under McIntyre. Some of it stems from a bad practice the team had the day before the game. But primarily, the players have to be more comfortable playing with each other to allow explosive play at the appropriate times. “They got to spaces before us,” McIntyre said. “We’ve got to do a better job of not allowing players to get across us ultimately.” SU will go into its next few days of practice with a clear idea of what needs to be done better. At the most basic level, the team needs to keep set plays from scoring. But beyond that, it needs to also try to keep its opponents from getting set play opportunities. “We need to be a little bit more aggressive in

getting across our men. And me, personally, I just need to come out and make a better decision on those,” Vuolo said. “So I think we just need to get some repetition in. Tomorrow, we’ll work a lot on set pieces and Friday, so just repetition and getting disciplined in how we’re marking.” Syracuse’s personnel have been shaken up since its 3-15 season last year, and the focus is returning to quality of play as opposed to team politics. McIntyre wants his players to commit to tackles, something the team struggled with against Siena. He wants the players to develop a confidence that will keep them in the game in set play situations. “Ultimately there is a mentality of saying, ‘The guy that I’m marking won’t score,’” McIntyre said. “It’s not just about physical ability, but it’s that willingness to get there first.” alguggen@syr.edu

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dave trotman-wilkins | contributing photographer steve covino (11) goes up for a header against two Syracuse defenders. Covino was part of a relentless Siena attack that scored five goals against the Orange Wednesday.

siena

from page 28

around. Siena’s second goal was much the same. Just minutes before the half, Friedrichs headed in another after, connecting with a flip throw from teammate Joey Tavernese. Again Friedrichs found himself alone in front of the goal. Two instances of miscommunication by the Orange defense. Two goals for the Saints. “I think a little bit of naivety and some poor defending cost us ultimately,” McIntyre said. After the half, SU came out with energy and dominated the opening minutes. The increased pressure on the Saints defense led to a goal from freshman Brett Jankouskas in the 49th minute, after a cheeky back-heel pass by sophomore midfielder Mawuena Agbossoumonde. But the shaky SU defense would be exposed again. This time by speed. Siena striker Emery Welshman, the fastest player on the field, scored two goals and an assist, all in the second half. Welshman got in behind the Orange defense twice in the second half, resulting in two Saints goals. “He’s one of those guys that when we play the

ball up to him and he turns, we can’t get there to support him because he’s so quick,” Siena head coach Gareth Elliott said. “He definitely has some jets.” SU’s team isn’t at full strength. Defender Konrad Andersson tore his meniscus and midfielder Nick Roydhouse, who was All-MAC second team in 2009, was suspended. “There were a couple of guys that we expected to play (for Syracuse) that didn’t play,” Elliott said. “… It’s very difficult if coach McIntyre doesn’t know his strongest starting 11 right now because, then, we’re not going to know the strongest starting 11.” In addition, the Orange is still toying with its formation. Tonight’s lineup came out in a flexible 4-3-3 alignment from defense to forward. But Hughes admitted the number of attackers and midfielders still isn’t set in stone. The Orange may use different lineups in hopes of finding a unit that clicks by the time Big East play gets underway on Sept. 25. Despite Wednesday, McIntyre has time. “We’ve got a lot of faces that we’re trying to work out,” he said “… I think a little bit of naivety and some poor defending cost us ultimately.” mjcohe02@syr.edu

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big e a st no t ebook

Devine, Sanders aim to return Mountaineers to BCS contest By Mark Cooper Asst. Copy Editor

Noel Devine and Jock Sanders remember the high points of their respective careers: winning the Big East and a BCS game. Back in 2007, the explosive running back Devine and dynamic wide receiver Sanders were freshmen who both contributed in small roles as the Mountaineers rolled to a Big East title. Quarterback Pat White and running back Steve Slaton carried the load for the season, and Devine ran for two touchdowns in the Fiesta Bowl. But two seasons have passed since those high points. Since there are no BCS bowl games to show for them. Now, at the dawn of their senior years, the two leaders of the Mountaineer offense know that they have to shoulder the heavy lifting. It’s their last chance to win another Big East title. And they’re channeling the lessons learned from the leaders of the 2007 team to get this season’s team back to a BCS game. “Pat and Steve always practiced hard, no matter what the situation was,” Sanders said. “Their minds (were) in it all the time. You could see it on the field because, when they were on the field, they always dominated. We took parts of their games and put them in our games to make ourselves better.” Both Devine and Sanders had the best seasons of their careers last year. Devine ran for 1,465 yards and 13 touchdowns and Sanders caught 72 passes for 688 yards and three touchdowns. It wasn’t enough, though, as the Mountaineers finished second in the Big East and lost in the Gator Bowl to Florida State, while Cincinnati captured the Big East crown. Sanders believes this year’s Mountaineers can have the same success the team had in his freshman year. He said they are a more complete team this season than last, and the lessons they learned in clock management in late game situations last season will carry over to success this year. West Virginia head coach Bill Stewart agreed with his star receiver’s sentiments. “We’re going to take one game at a time,” Stewart said in a Big East coaches teleconference Monday. “Probably like most teams in America, we’ve set our goals as high as we should.” There are some differences with this team. A different coach — Stewart was an assistant to then-coach Rich Rodriguez back in 2007,

although he did fill in as interim coach during the Fiesta Bowl. A different quarterback situation — Geno Smith has only played in five games, Pat White had two years of experience heading into 2007. That’s not to say Smith can’t have a breakout season, though. He completed 65.3 percent of his passes last season (32-for-49), and he has two of the best options in the country with Devine and Sanders. Devine could even be a Heisman Trophy favorite if he has the banner year for which he seems poised. “He can win the Heisman, no doubt,” Sanders said. “As a teammate and as a team, we’ve got to help him get that goal. If the team’s not doing well, his Heisman hopes are done.” Stewart and Sanders both say the biggest change they’ve seen in Devine over his college career is his maturity level. He used to be a quiet freshman who kept to himself, no matter how much coaches and players nagged at him, Sanders said. Three years later, he’s opened up and taken on a leadership role. Some credit for his growth as a person is also due to Slaton, who is entering his third season as a running back for the Houston Texans, but still keeps in touch with his former teammate. “We chat here and there, mostly through e-mail,” Slaton said. “I just tell (Devine) to keep mastering (his) craft, and there is no room for let up.” Devine and Sanders have gone through the gauntlet of a college football season together three times. That experience gives them a unique relationship that Sanders describes as “a brotherly bond.” They were the only two freshmen skill players to get significant playing time on offense the last time the Mountaineers won the Big East title, and ever since, they’ve been the best of friends. Both players have evolved from talented players to complete players. They lead by example. They lead vocally. And now, they’re poised to get the Mountaineers back to where they were as freshmen. This time, they’re the leaders. “It’s something you can’t even explain,” Sanders said. “(Devine and I are) always on the same page, no matter what. If one of us down, if one of us is down and out, the other one knows instantly.

courtesy of west virginia athletic communications noel devine enters the season as a contender for the Heisman Trophy. The senior ran for 1,465 yards and 13 touchdowns in 2009, helping West Virginia to nine wins. “It’s like a brotherly love.” Edsall faces familiar foe While Connecticut is preparing for its firstever meeting with Michigan on Saturday, the Huskies will see a familiar opponent when they walk into the “Big House” in Ann Arbor. That opponent is Wolverines’ coach Rich Rodriguez, who used to coach West Virginia from 2001-07. Rodriguez had incredible success with the Mountaineers, going 60-26 and winning two BCS bowl games. He was only 8-16 in his first two seasons at Michigan, but perhaps the opener against UConn (Saturday, 3:30 p.m., ABC) could start to change his fortunes with the Wolverines. UConn and its head coach Randy Edsall have never beaten a Rodriguez-coached team, losing

to West Virginia every year from 2004-07. It hasn’t even been close — Rodriguez’s teams have beaten Edsall’s by an average of 28.75 points, including a 66-21 thrashing in 2007. This matchup could yield a different result, though. Michigan doesn’t have the same personnel West Virginia had. Although it will likely be the same playcalling that shredded Edsall’s defense to the tune of almost 45 points per game, he believes his defense’s experience can limit the damage. “(Michigan) averaged almost 30 points a game last year, so not too many people shut them down,” Edsall said. “It’s going to be difficult, but like I said, it does help having some experienced players back on the defensive side of the ball.” mcooperj@syr.edu


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akron

from page 28

But Akron is the worst team with which the Orange has been scheduled to open the season on the road of any mid-major in the last 20 years. The Zips were picked to finish last in the MAC’s Eastern Division and are in their first year under head coach Rob Ianello. And for a program that prides itself on Taylor, the Zips ranked 118 of 120 FBS teams in sacks in 2009, with 11 in 12 games. Compared to the rest of the Big East, SU is one of three conference teams to open the season on the road against a mid-major. Pittsburgh will travel to national power Utah for one of this weekend’s most high-profile games, and Cincinnati will face the WAC’s Fresno State, a team it only beat by eight points last year in Cincinnati. “I would love to open up for our fans (at home),” SU head coach Doug Marrone said, “but, hopefully, we’ll be able to do that down the road. I’m really just excited about playing. … The greatest thing I was ever told was it doesn’t matter where you play.” The former All-Pro Taylor’s bewilderment at Akron’s hosting of Syracuse is merely an example of a question many have been asking of the scheduled game. Just like Taylor, many have pondered: Why is Syracuse going to Akron? Why is the Big East going to the MAC? Is it a testament to Akron’s growth? Is it a statement speaking to SU’s decline since Taylor graduated as Akron’s career sacks leader in 1997? Is it an example of the drop off of the Big East conference as a whole? Or is it just another

john

from page 28

the answer is. Though the offense only returns two starters from a year ago, the group coming back is more talented, collectively, than the group Marrone coached last season. They are in their second year of the system and have players at key positions that have shown they can produce when needed. Defensively, Syracuse looks even better, and deeper, than the group that ranked 13th in the nation (101.83) in defense against the run in 2009. The unit returns nine of 11 starters from a year ago. Because of that, and the plan Marrone has instilled in his program, talk of a bowl might not be all that ludicrous. “The goal of our football team is to go to a bowl,” Marrone said Monday. “We haven’t done that since 2004. … We know we have to win seven (games) to go to a bowl, but right now we’re just trying to win one, and that is the one we play this week.” Marrone wasn’t going public with that goal in year one. He was building the foundation for

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“It’s at Akron? Syracuse, going to Akron? Damn, times have changed. We used to go everywhere for the paycheck. It’s a big change. I know that. They never came to us before.” case of the evolution of college football where it is now normal, and perhaps even expected, for a Big East team to travel to a bottom-feeder? Marrone doesn’t prescribe to any of the notions at all. He sees it as just another football game. He doesn’t see any problem with his BCS team opening against a rebuilding mid-major. A game is a game. Competitiveness is competitiveness. “I don’t even think about it, to be honest,” Marrone said “… I don’t look at BCS, home, away or anything like that. I just feel fortunate to have an opportunity to play.” Having an opportunity to play this weekend will be SU sophomore strong safety Shamarko Thomas. After tweaking his hamstring in summer camp, Thomas is second on the depth chart behind Max Suter at strong safety, and he said he will play this weekend at “95 percent.” But on Wednesday, when informed of Taylor’s interest in Saturday’s game in SU’s football

cafeteria, Thomas’ eyes lit up, much like a gradeschool kid at lunch hour to the mention of an NFL star. Eyes widening just like Taylor’s had, cracking a smile from ear to ear, Thomas said it was “like an honor” to know Taylor expressed interest in coming to the game. But he did have a message for Taylor and Akron as well. In a summer of conference realignment in which the Big East conference has been slighted throughout, Thomas wanted to let it be known that he and Syracuse will be bringing the Big East to the MAC on Saturday. Thomas said he wants Taylor to know that like Akron is a new team, SU is a new team as well. He doesn’t care about the comparisons or where the game will be played. Thomas is bringing the Big East hurt. “Akron is not a BCS team,” Thomas said, “but you see in the newspaper that sometimes people say we are not a BCS team. It’s just a mentality to go hard every game.” Added Thomas: “(Taylor’s) a Pro Bowl-player, so I am going to be professional. But I would tell him we are going to go to Akron and show him how the Big East plays. Syracuse has got a new team around now.” It’s a new team in Akron since Taylor’s departure as a third-round pick by the Miami Dolphins in 1997. They no longer play at The Rubber Bowl. The Zips have attained success in the time since Taylor went just 12-32 over the course of his four years as a Zip. He never once played Syracuse. But, as Taylor recalled in Cortland in August, he and the Zips did host a big-time team once. A real big-time team, which has been a prick in

SU’s side in the past. In 1996, Taylor and Akron hosted No. 15 Virginia Tech a year after the Zips were clobbered 77-27 in Blacksburg, Va. In a year in which Taylor propelled himself on the strength of 10 sacks to a spot with the Dolphins, he led the team in a valiant effort, eventually losing by just three. But come Saturday, the bad news for the Zips is they don’t have a Jason Taylor. He is long departed from Ohio. And on Sept. 6, 2008, he was, once again, far removed from his alma mater. That night, as a member of the Redskins traveling back from New York with a 16-7 seasonopening loss to the Giants, Taylor had a similar quizzical reaction to that day’s news of his former football team. When looking down at his phone, he thought the score was wrong when he saw it: 42-28, Akron over Syracuse. Really? His question was soon answered. On Saturday, the overarching inquiry into just what Syracuse will get out of a trip to the mid-major will begin to be answered as well. And like Marrone, Taylor believes the game is not a step back for “them.” He will take pride in whatever occurs. He is proud of Akron. “I’m not going to slight Akron,” Taylor said. “It speaks more for the progress that Akron has made than any type of a regression for Syracuse. I didn’t watch the game (in 2008). … I have to admit, I thought the score was wrong when I first saw it. “It’s bigger strides. It’s great.”

future seasons. 2009 was a stepping stone. And although Syracuse needs seven wins to get to a bowl, that’s a goal he and his players are now openly discussing. So when all is said and done Saturday night, a lot will be revealed about this year’s SU squad. Only then will we find out, as Dennis Green might say, Are they who we thought they were? Though we will certainly not know how good this year’s team can be from just one game, we can sense if this will be another sour year for Syracuse football fans. “Our whole motto this year is, ‘It ain’t good enough,’” senior linebacker Derrell Smith said during preseason camp. “So everything we do out there, we want to make sure we do it a little better. … That goes with everything we did last year, too. We feel that we can definitely take that next step, improve, and, for us seniors, leave with a bowl ring.” A loss against Akron would be a catastrophic blow to SU’s bowl hopes. And for fans, a ‘here we go again’ mentality would set in even sooner than a year ago. Imagine that. Since 2005, every group of seniors at SU has tried to go out in a bowl game. Yet every last one of them came up empty in their quest. Whether

it was due to injuries, bad luck or just not putting enough talent on the field, the Orange has failed to reach the postseason in each of the last five years. Yet some believe this could be the year. It’s not just that there appears to be a sense of urgency with this squad. It’s because both the offense and defense are deeper and more talented than a year ago. “There’s a sense of urgency every year,” center Ryan Bartholomew said. “But this year, I think we have the best chance, talent-wise and work ethic-wise, since I’ve been here. So we just have to capitalize on that.” A win against the Zips, and the Orange heads to Seattle next weekend, riding some momentum — and with two Football Championship Subdivision teams in Weeks 3 and 4, the Orange would be looking at, potentially, its best start in years. That makes this week’s opener against Akron all the more intriguing — and pivotal — for the Orange. Reaching seven wins doesn’t look all that impossible if the first four games go as predicted. But a loss to Akron obviously wipes all that away. Not only does a loss put a dent into all

that early season confidence, but it also makes getting to seven wins an even more grueling task. Instead of collecting a victory against the Zips, SU would then likely have to win its fair share of games in the Big East schedule — a slate that includes road games at West Virginia, South Florida, Rutgers and Cincinnati and home games against Connecticut and Pittsburgh. That’s a daunting task for any team. Not matter how you shake it, win or lose, this week’s game at Akron can’t be overlooked in terms of significance to SU’s postseason hopes. Fans want to see the progress. They want a reason to buy into what Marrone is doing at Syracuse. A win this weekend is the first step. And for the seniors, such as Smith and Bartholomew, this Saturday provides an opportunity to take one step closer to the bowl game with which they hope to end their career. The game isn’t in the Dome. But if you really think the Orange is going to a bowl, don’t sleep on this Saturday. Saturday is significant.

Jason Taylor

New York Jets lineman and Former Akron lineman

aolivero@syr.edu

Andrew L. John is the sports editor at The Daily Orange, where his columns appear occasionally. He can be reached at aljohn@syr.edu.


SPORTS@ DA ILYOR A NGE.COM

sep t ember 2 , 2 010

SYRACUSE AT AKRON

25

SATURDAY, 6 P.M., ESPN3

KEY MATCHUPS

BIG EAST STANDINGS BIG EAST PRESEASON POLL (FIRST-PLACE VOTES IN PARENTHESES)

BRIAN WAGNER LB

DELONE CARTER RB

JUSTIN PUGH LT

Carter returns from a summerlong suspension in a fitting homecoming. The Orange’s chief threat, Carter will try to maneuver his way around the Zips’ best defender in Wagner. Wagner led Akron with 132 tackles last season.

BY THE NUMBERS

HASAN HAZIME DE

ALEC LEMON WR

After redshirting last season, Pugh takes over the most crucial role on the line: protecting Ryan Nassib’s blind side. Hazime isn’t an explosive passrusher, but he had three sacks last season.

MANLEY WALLER CB

The Orange’s biggest question on offense might be the weapons at wide receiver surrounding first-year quarterback Ryan Nassib. Enter Lemon, who caught 29 balls as a freshman. Can he become Nassib’s go-to, true No. 1 wide receiver?

6

54 75

82

11

25 94

64

The number of miles to Delone Carter’s first high school, Archbishop Hoban, down Akron’s East Exchange Street from InfoCision Stadium.

51

73

93

71

72

7

MAINE ON OFFENSE

9

4 49 1 82

96 67

87

7:30 p.m., ESPN3 8:30 p.m., Versus

56 75

60 70

8 66

3:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., 6 p.m., 7:05 p.m., 10 p.m.,

BEAT WRITER PREDICTIONS

6 74

Syracuse 24, Akron 10

15

85

SYRACUSE ON OFFENSE

ANDREW L. JOHN

3 AKRON DEFENSE 8 DE Shawn Lemon 56 DT Almondo Sewell 60 DT Dan Marcoux 96 DE Hasan Hazime 49 LB Matt Little 34 LB Brian Wagner 20 LB Mike Thomas 6 CB Manley Waller 1 CB Diamond Weaver 33 SS Josh Richmond 4 FS Jared Province

3:30 p.m.,

Two of Akron’s assistant coaches, Mitch Browning and Derrick Jackson, are former assistant coaches of Syracuse. Browning, UA’s offensive line coach, was SU’s offensive coordinator in 2008. Jackson, the Zips’ defensive line coach, was a co-defensive coordinator at Syracuse from 2007-09.

20

34

12

SYRACUSE OFFENSE 12 QB Ryan Nassib 3 RB Delone Carter 15 WR Alec Lemon 82 WR Van Chew 87 WR Aaron Weaver 85 TE Jose Cruz 67 LT Justin Pugh 75 LG Zack Chibane 70 C Ryan Bartholomew 66 RG Andrew Tiller 74 RT Michael Hay

Norfolk State vs. Rutgers Pittsburgh vs. Utah

This is the Orange’s first game at Akron in program history. Syracuse has played the Zips at the Carrier Dome in each of the past two seasons, losing 42-28 in 2008 and winning 28-14 in 2009.

33

The number of games Akron’s Rob Ianello has under his belt as the Zips head coach.

The number of points separating Akron and Syracuse’s final score in each of the teams’ two previous meetings. In 2008, the Zips beat the Orange 42-28, and in 2009 SU beat Akron 28-14.

Thursday

DID YOU KNOW?

10

0

The number of players slated to start in new roles since the start of preseason camp for the

35

99

40

14

BIG EAST SCHEDULE

Kentucky vs. Louisville ABC/ESPN3 Connecticut vs. Michigan ABC Coastal Carolina vs. West Virginia ESPN3 Syracuse vs. Akron ESPN3 Stony Brook vs. South Florida ESPN3 Cincinnati vs. Fresno State ESPN2/ESPN3

24

32

1.5

13

Merkerson moves into a fulltime starting role, and his first task will be stopping the Zips’ only viable threat. LaFrance led Akron with 43 receptions last season. No other returning player on the team had more than eight catches.

190 142 142 131 99 79 41 40

Saturday

1

The number of rushing yards Akron’s leading returning rusher, Broderick Alexander averaged per game last year.

The Zips’ rank out of 120 teams in scoring offense in 2009.

JEREMY LAFRANCE WR

STARTING LINEUPS

39.6

106

DA’MON MERKERSON CB

1. Pittsburgh (22) 2. Cincinnati 2. West Virginia (1) 4. Connecticut (1) 5. Rutgers 6. USF 7. Syracuse 8. Louisville

AKRON OFFENSE 7 QB Patrick Nicely 10 RB Alex Allen 40 FB Austin Bailey 9 WR Gary Pride II 82 WR Jeremy LaFrance 93 TE Richard Hall 75 LT Corey Woods 64 LG Mitch Straight 71 C Mike Ward 72 RG Zac Kasparek 73 RT Jake Anderson

SYRACUSE DEFENSE 54 DE Mikhail Marinovich 94 NT Bud Tribbey 51 DT Andrew Lewis 99 DE Chandler Jones 11 SLB Marquis Spruill 25 MLB Derrell Smith 32 WLB Doug Hogue 6 H Da’Mon Merkerson 35 CB Mike Holmes 24 SS Max Suter 1 FS Phillip Thomas

BRETT LOGIURATO

Akron will keep it close early, but the SU defense will keep the Zips in check.

Syracuse 28, Akron 6

Year Two of the Doug Marrone era gets off to a good start. Akron’s offense is beyond anemic.

Syracuse 31, Akron 7

TONY OLIVERO

Akron is bad. Perfect homecoming for Gulley and Carter as each back shreds apart the poor Zip defense. No Jason Taylor to save them Saturday.

Returning Leaders PASSING

Ryan Nassib

NASSIB

COMP-ATT

36-68

YDS

422

TD

3

RUSHING

INT

1

ATT

Delone Carter 236 Antwon Bailey 67

CARTER

YDS

AVG

1021 4.3 312 4.7

TD

RECEIVING

Alec Lemon Marcus Sales Antwon Bailey

11 1

LEMON

REC

YDS

29 295 28 324 27 200

AVG.

10.2 11.6 7.4

TD

1 3 0


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1‘them’ of

SPORTS

page 28

the daily orange

SYRACUSE AT AKRON SATURDAY, 6 P.M., ESPN3

SU’s trip to midmajor Akron is modern rarity By Tony Olivero

A

Asst. Sports Editor

s Jason Taylor recalled — with his 14-year NFL-eyes widening, shocked — “they” never came to Akron before. For Taylor, a former Akron standout now with the New York Jets, “they” refers to a BCS conference team. Any BCS conference team. During his time as a Zip from 199396, Taylor said he and his Akron teammates always had to travel to “them.” That’s just the way it was. Standing on the SUNY Cortland practice field at Jets training camp on Aug. 14, Taylor could only think of one response when he found out that, no, he wouldn’t have the outside opportunity to trek up to Syracuse to watch his alma mater play. Rather, “they” would be traveling to Akron to open the season. Perplexed, he had to question the validity. “It’s at Akron?” Taylor asked. “Syracuse, going to Akron? Damn, times have changed. We used to go everywhere for the paycheck. It’s a big change. I know that. They never came to us before.” On Saturday, “they” — Syracuse — will open their season on the road

court hathaway | staff photographer andrew lewis (51) and the Syracuse football team will start Year Two of the Doug Marrone era Saturday at Akron. Lewis and the rest of the Orange defense held Akron to zero net yards rushing last season in a meeting at the Carrier Dome. The Orange won that game, 28-14. at InfoCision Stadium in Akron, Ohio (6 p.m., ESPN3). It is just the third time in the last 20 years SU will open the season on the road against a mid-major team, and the first time since losing to Brigham Young in 2002. The Orange defeated Toledo and East Carolina in 1999 and 1992, respectively. In the series history, the Orange and Zips have split 1-1, with Akron defeating SU 42-28 in 2008 and Syracuse getting the best of the Zips last year 28-14. Those games were both in the Carrier Dome. see akron page 24

With bowl talk aplenty, SU must back it up

A

s Syracuse begins its second season under the direction of Doug Marrone at Akron Saturday, the talk surrounding the team is whether or not the Orange is bowl-caliber this year. It’s a topic that gets thrown around at nearly every school, nearly every year. But if this year is to be any different for SU, it begins with this weekend’s visit to Akron, Ohio. The mystery surrounding this

Andrew l. John

goin’ hogwild team is still there. Though nearly every season spurs some sort of optimism, some sort of clean slate relief, it’s been a while since the

Orange was talking seriously about a bowl appearance. But now, for the first time in recent memory, the talk is starting again. The question remains: Is it legitimate? Is SU finally ready to climb the stairs out of the Big East basement? Until this weekend, it’s anyone’s guess. And until the Orange exits InfoCision Stadium Saturday evening, we won’t have a clue as to what

see john page 24

m e n ’s s o c c e r

SU allows 5 goals, falls to Siena in McIntyre’s coaching debut By Michael Cohen Asst. Copy Editor

With an ice bag pressed to the side of his head, Robbie Hughes trudged across the field. Seventy-five yards. Then back siena 5 again. the heels syracuse 1 of On Wednesday’s 5-1 blowout loss to Siena and with a “little bump” — actually the size

of a ping pong ball — sticking out of his head, the Syracuse freshman defender looked gassed. “After the final whistle tonight we wipe the slate clean, and we go again,” he said. “And we work hard.” The sooner the Orange can wipe the slate clean, the better. Players and coaches have a lot of goals to erase from their minds. Not since 2003 had SU allowed an

opponent to score five goals in a game, and unfortunately for new head coach Ian McIntyre, it happened in his debut. Syracuse (0-1-0) dropped its 2010 season opener Wednesday night to Siena in front of 1,231 spectators at SU soccer stadium. The Saints (1-0-0) scored three of their five goals on set pieces and took advantage of an inexperienced Syracuse lineup that is still searching for the right combination

“We started seven new guys,” McIntyre said. “I think we played over 10 new guys. A lot of them made their collegiate debuts. But that’s not an excuse, and we don’t want to use that as an excuse.” McIntyre doesn’t want Wednesday’s result labeled a product of new faces in new places, but that might be the problem. Twenty of the 30 players on SU’s roster are new to the program

this season, and 11 of those saw playing time. Siena took advantage early of a defensive unit that hasn’t seen much time on the field together. The Saints got on the board just five minutes into the game on a header by Falko Friedrichs off of a corner kick. Friedrichs was all alone at the sixyard box with no Orange defenders see siena page 21

August 9, 2010  

August 9, 2010

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