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DON’T FEED THE DEER BY LANCE INGRAM News Editor

PHOTO COURTESY STOCK EXCHANGE

Above stands a whitetail deer standing in a garden. The deer’s population continues to rise in Oxford due to citizens supplementing their diets with additional food.

As part of the ordinance for the first offense the offender receives a notice of violation and the second offense is a $50 fine and for every offense after that is a $100 fine according to Allgood. The draft outlines a plan to Involve the community in an awareness program of how wildlife and humans interact and the impact that they have on each other, develop a Wildlife Task Force that will monitor and update the management plan on a regular basis and develop a community oriented set of controls that will limit or reduce the growth of the deer population. “One of the first and immediate measures we can take is by controlling the feeding,” Allgood said. “The deer browse throughout the city naturally, but there are people that are feeding them corn, grain and other things to supplement

A draft to ensure a safe and effective system to manage the growth of the whitetail deer population in Oxford was passed at the Board of Aldermen meeting Tuesday . “We have an overpopulation of deer, and it’s become a problem,” said Jimmy Allgood, Director of Emergency Management and Homeland Security. “We have been working with the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks and the United States Department of Agriculture on a deer management plan to try to control the deer population here in the city to a safe and healthy level.” The city of Oxford has completed the first step of the plan which is a “no-feeding” ordinance that makes it unlawful to feed, provide feed or other attractants to deer within the city limits and authorizes city officials to enforce the ordinance. See DEER, PAGE 4

this week FORD CENTER

LOU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The orchestra performs a preview of its fall concert for children, featuring music from Symphony No. 5 in Bb Major, Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra, and Prelude and Liebestod from “Tristan und Isolde.” 11:30 am 12:30 pm

FORD CENTER

LOU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The orchestra performs a preview of its fall concert for children, featuring music from Symphony No. 5 in Bb Major, Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra, and Prelude and Liebestod from “Tristan und Isolde.” 11:30 am 12:30 pm

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UNIVERSITY LEADERSHIP

ASSOCIATED PRESS

State lawmakers to challenge 2 Miss. congressmen

LAW SCHOOL NAMES NEW DEAN BY BRITTANY STACK

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Two of Mississippi’s Democratic congressmen will be challenged in November by state lawmakers backed by the national Republican Party. State Senate Appropriations Chairman Alan Nunnelee of Tupelo won the Republican nomination Tuesday in north Mississippi’s 1st District and will try in November to unseat Travis Childers of Booneville, a Blue Dog Democrat who has held the seat since mid-2008. In southern Mississippi’s 4th District, state Rep. Steven Palazzo of Biloxi won the GOP primary and will face 21-year incumbent Gene Taylor of Bay St. Louis, a Democrat who often votes against his own party. In central Mississippi’s 3rd District, Pickens Mayor Joel Gill won the Democratic congressional primary and will challenge Republican incumbent Gregg Harper of Pearl, who first won the seat in November 2008. Richard Cook of Byram and Bill Marcy of Meridian appeared headed for a June 22 runoff in the Delta’s 2nd District Republican primary. The eventual winner will face Democratic incumbent Bennie Thompson of Bolton, who’s held the seat since 1993 and is chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. Unofficial results from Tuesday’s Republican primary in the 1st District show Nunnelee defeated former Eupora Mayor Henry Ross and former Fox News analyst Angela See CONGRESSMEN, PAGE 4

The Daily Mississippian

When Richard Gershon was young, he wanted to be like Atticus Finch, lawyer from Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” Like Finch, he said, he wanted to be a lawyer for the capability what they can do for their society. Gershon gets a little closer to a modern-day Finch on July 1, when he will be named the new dean of the Ole Miss School of Law. Gershon graduated from the University of Georgia with a B.A. in political science. He continued his studies at the University of Tennessee, from which he graduated with a Juris Doctorate, or first degree of law. He then continued at the University of Florida, where he received a master of law in taxation. Gershon worked as a professor of law at Stetson University School of Law from 1984 to 1998 and the Academic Associate Dean at Stetson University from 1988 to 1992.

This is not Gershon’s first appointment as dean, though. He first served as the Dean of Law at Texas Wesleyan Law School and later as the founding dean of Charleston School of Law in South Carolina from December 2003 until December 2007. As the dean of Charleston School of Law, Gershon lead the school to provisional approval by the American Bar Association. Until the school opened, South Carolina only had one law school for a state with 4 million residents. “There was a definite need for a second law school in the state,” Gershon said. “Charleston is a beautiful and historic city, so we knew we could attract a strong faculty and outstanding students. I was lucky to be a part of building that law school, and I was fortunate to work with some amazing people.” Constructing the law was no easy task for Gershon though, because the entire school was created from scratch. “Every time we did something for the first time, I would say, ‘it See LAW SCHOOL, PAGE 4

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OPINION O P IN I O N |

6 . 3 . 10

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COLUMN

WHEN YOU’RE NOT WHERE YOU WANT TO BE BY EMILY ROLAND The Daily Mississippian

Summer is here— the time of fun, relaxation and a break from worrying. Since when was that true? The summer I know is the time for catching up on classes, getting a job and living back home with the parents. Yes, the trips to the beach are fun, and everyone loves catching up with all of the long-lost family members. It is during this time, though, that we really get to think about the past year and the upcoming one. I know you are probably thinking, “Who does this random writer think she is to try to get inside my head?” The truth is, I’m not. I am trying to get inside my own. High school is over, as is childhood. College is stuck in this weird place between being a child and an adult. We try to cope with this confusion with wonderful summer employment, whatever it may be: internship, coffeehouse, department store, family business. The main perk about summer jobs is the extra cash to spend on the frivolous vacations your parents won’t pay for anymore. The bad thing about it is the personal revelation that this is not what you want your life to look like—or that it is exactly what you want your life to look like a few years down

the road. So far, I have spent my summer working a local internship. It is on the same road of what I’m working toward, but a little far from the intersection I’m looking for. While I value what I am learning and am grateful for the experience and opportunity, I miss doing what I love; I miss my life in Oxford during the year filled with classes, friends and my job. One thing that I have learned so far is that in the “adult world” that comes after graduation really is not much more organized or different than what we already know. I look into my boss’ office and see her on Facebook; I glance over at my co-worker, and he is playing a game on his phone. Times like these makes me wonder who does the work when the intern is gone. It is nice to go home after a long, sometimes frustrating day at work. It is especially nice to go home to a momcooked meal. Wait, what? The home cooking has been in short supply and the rules and curfews are hard to get used to. Ever want to blurt out, “I have been living on my own quite successfully for the past year”? It’s ok. I have kept my composure and have avoided the lecture that would immediately follow that statement.

But at least you get to catch up with your old friends, right? Negative. The amount of people who take summer classes is significantly larger than what you would expect. And the fact that you are not makes you think you probably should—-there goes next summer. The fact is, we are all working towards our futures. So whether it be internships, jobs or summer classes, the summer that we always looked forward to in grade school is not the same one we see now. I laugh as my 12-year-old little brother tries his hardest to stay up all night just because he can, while I am trying to get to bed early enough to be awake for work the next day. I remember being like him—-never being completely satisfied with my day and vowing to top it tomorrow. When you’re not where you want to be, find your alley and enjoy the walk there. The bad part-time jobs will teach you something in the end, and knowing that you can do your work just as well as the people who actually work there full-time is quite a good feeling. The summer we knew when we were kids isn’t gone, it has just changed. So relax, enjoy the ride and get ready for next year.

Dear Mr. President, I Need a Freakin’ Job. Period.

DONICA PHIFER online editor

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MIA CAMURATI opinion editor AMANDA WARD lifestyles editor ERIC BESSON sports editor OSCAR POPE visual editor

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Billboards usually serve the purpose of informing the public of a particular message, whether it is an advertisement for a business or political campaign. Billboards do not usually address the president of the United States directly. That is what one controversial billboard in Buffalo, New York has recently done, drawing attention from the entire nation. The billboard in question reads, “Dear Mr. President, I Need a Freakin’ Job. Period.” and includes a photo of four college students. According to a CBS news release, the sign is part of the “I Need a Freakin’ Job Movement,” which was started by businessman Jeff Baker, who lost his own small business 15 months ago. INAFJ’s website, www.inafj. org, states that the purpose of the movement is to give voice to the millions of people affected by the

high unemployment numbers in America. Their mission statement says, “As families suffer, our political leadership seems content with their dysfunctional posturing. Together we can set the record straight, or at least just make fun of it.” Regardless of various opinions on the appropriateness of the sign, there is a fundamental message conveyed which transcends party lines: America needs jobs. Our nation was built on the muscle of manufacturing; we were once an industrial giant of the world, where jobs were available to those who wanted to work. And yet, as the nation comfortably enjoyed that success, we became lazy and less willing to work long hours in difficult positions. The bottom line? Many manufacturing jobs are leaving. Countries around the world are increasing their industrialism and exporting to us most, if not all, of the goods we consume daily. This is definite cause for concern. President Obama continues to state that those in the government

are working diligently to combat the unemployment rate, with an estimated 290,000 jobs added to the work force in April, as maintained by the Labor Department. However, of those “added jobs,” no one is really sure what they are, and whether they are the kinds of jobs necessary for stability. Even so, those without work reached a rate of 9.9 percent in the same month, according to the Washington Post, certainly breaking Obama’s promise that the unemployment rate would not exceed 8 percent. Despite the current heavy divide between the Democrat and Republican parties, the message about jobs rings loudly for both. Americans are not looking for rhetoric or political dispute, they just want employment. The future of the economy depends on a working America, and the people want their voices heard. We must return to a country where our focus is once again on industry, and begin to build not only the economy, but morale. The only way

to do that is by putting people back to work. The billboard in New York clearly demonstrates the feelings of many Americans. While its message is simple and direct, it has a profound effect. It addresses Washington and those in power straightforwardly, asking them to remember their focus. While other tasks are important and deserving of attention, the fact remains that nothing else matters unless the American people are working. Therefore, jobs need to be the number one priority. Controversial though it may be, the “I Need a Freakin’ Job” billboard serves its purpose. It represents a feeling that Americans’ needs and wishes are being disregarded by their leaders and it places responsibility on those representatives to put aside any political agenda and serve the people. Ultimately, this is what our nation is all about. The New York billboard says one thing: Dear Mr. President, when the American people speak, listen. Period.

Don’t feel pressured by anyone or any idea that you should be a certain way. You’re young and impressionable (even if you think you aren’t), and there are people who want to take advantage of that. Many businesses and organizations are eager to swoop in when fresh meat comes along, because they know the fresh meat is eager to belong. Clubs and jobs are great ways to meet people when you don’t know anyone, but be careful. Don’t pigeonhole yourself or close yourself off from other experiences and people in a misguided effort to do the opposite. Try joining a club in your major or become involved with the

new Multicultural Center. You can build valuable connections which will help you with your education and introduce you to a wide range of people – without compromising your “youness.” When preparing for this column, I consulted a friend. I asked him what he thought about being an incoming freshman. He had this to say: “College is like a do-over. Any of the pre-conceived notions people may have fairly or unfairly had about you in high school that affected the way people perceived you in your day-to-day life … don’t exist anymore.” It’s true. If you were unpopular at your high school, no one here

knows. More importantly, no one cares. The same goes for being popular or nearly any other social stigma of which you may have been a victim. The wonderful thing about college is that everyone is different, but you’ll undoubtedly be able to find people like you. Listen to me when I say you don’t have to listen to me. You’re going to make a ton of mistakes. You’re going to try to fit in and sometimes it will work, but sometimes it won’t. Please, though, try to remember who you are. You’re the only constant in your life, and if you turn your back on yourself, no one else will be able to see you either.

COLLEGE,

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responsibilities you’ve signed up for as an undergraduate, but don’t be afraid to question. If you’ve been raised liberal but have ideas you feel are conservative – research that. If you have been raised Christian and are curious about Buddhism, Google it. Love Library, located two buildings west of the Union, houses thousands of books. Don’t be afraid to read them. This is college, after all. This is a place for growth and change. A place where you find yourself and hopefully become comfortable and confident in your unique perspective – not a place to be buried by falsehoods or someone else’s expectations. It’s okay to question.

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The only life you’ve ever known has ended. The people you’ve seen every day are now people you see sometimes. The things you did every day are now things you used to do. Times are changing. You’re going to get a lot of advice. Most of it probably won’t stick, but I’m going to give you one more piece. Be yourself. Stay true to you. Watch out for number one. It’s cliché. You’ve heard it a million times. There’s no scientific evidence or scholarly journal to prove that it’s true. But it is. You’ve got to be yourself. Many moons ago, when I first ventured out on my own, I was excited to become a new person. I was going to be cool, hang out with cool people and

do cool things. All my bad habits were mates didn’t care if I smoked. They algoing to melt away, and I would be re- ready liked me. invented. If I had accepted that I was a likable I took a poetry class when I was 19. person, I’d be a non-smoker right now. It was a longer class and on breaks sev- I would have more money in the bank eral students would wander outside for and a longer life expectancy. a smoke. I liked those students. We I would have had I been myself. talked in class and seemed to click. I Now, don’t get me wrong. Healthy always went outside with them, feeling changes are always good. Having goals to awkward that I wasn’t smoking. eat breakfast in the morning or to study Halfway through the semester, I Spanish every day aren’t compromising showed up with a pack of Marlboro Ul- your identity. Eggs in the a.m. aren’t a tra Light 100s. My classmates looked cornerstone of who you are. Sometimes, at me. One of them, Ben, laughed and the restrictions college puts on you are said he was going to hell. going to make you feel like you’re losFive years later, I’m still trying to shake ing your identity. But don’t confuse not the habit. I have body spray in my car wanting to do something with who you so I don’t smell like an ashtray when I go are. This is higher education and much places, I’ll brave the cold when I have a will be expected of you. Take care of the nic-fit, and I’m in denial about the very real danger of cancer. See COLLEGE, PAGE 3 And here’s the real kicker: My class-

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LAW SCHOOL, continued from page 1

EMILEIGH’S TABLE: TAYLOR’S OTHER GEM

CONGRESSMEN, continued from page 1

BY AMANDA WARD Lifestyles Editor

will never be this hard again’,” Gershon said. Gershon said that he will miss Charleston and his friends and family there. He said he is surprised, humbled and excited, though, to be selected as the next dean of the Ole Miss School of Law. “I would have only considered leaving Charleston for a compelling opportunity in a beautiful place,” Gershon said. “Being dean at the University of Mississippi School of Law is a compelling opportunity, and Oxford is a beautiful place.” He has many plans for his new position, such as integrating more alumni involvement into the school. He said he believes that the Ole Miss School of Law is a wellkept secret in the world of legal studies and education. With that in mind, Gershon said he hopes to bring the school to the attention of law professors, judges and lawyers not only across the nation, but worldwide. “The law school has outstanding alumni, faculty, students, and programs,” Gershon said. “It prides itself on producing great lawyers, and I do not want to change that. But I do think that there are opportunities to involve the alumni to a greater level, and I look forward to working with them.” Gershon said he considers the university to be one of America’s best universities, and is excited that his family, with whom he will move, will have access to the university His wife, who is an editor of Garden and Gun magazine, also looks forward to Oxford from articles the magazine has written, according to Gershon. “She is also a poet, so she is excited to work with the literary community at Ole Miss and in Oxford,” Gershon said. In additon to the job, Gershon said he is also looking forward to Southeastern Conference football since he has studied at three SEC schools in the past.

McGlowan of Oxford. “This is not an election about one man,” Nunnelee said Tuesday night. “This is about taking our country back, taking it back from the liberal left wing that controls the United States Congress.” Childers, a self-described fiscal conservative, voted with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on federal stimulus spending but voted against her on a federal health care overhaul. Mississippi Democratic Party executive director Sam Hall said in a news release that Nunnelee is a “career politician” who’s out of touch with the middle class. “Travis Childers has been independent minded and stood up for working families while Alan Nunnelee has only stood up for himself and his own career,” Hall said. Childers and Nunnelee will be on the Nov. 2 general election ballot along with seven other candidates. In the District 4 race, unofficial results showed Palazzo defeated Joe Tegerdine in a Republican primary. Palazzo is a military veteran, certified public accountant and first-term state lawmaker from Biloxi. Tegerdine, a businessman from

Petal, courted tea party voters in his first run for office. Palazzo will face Democrat Gene Taylor of Bay St. Louis, who has represented south Mississippi in the U.S. House since 1989. The November ballot also will have a Libertarian and a Reform Party candidate. “South Mississippi wants somebody to go up there and be a leader on the issues,” Palazzo said Tuesday night. Palazzo said Taylor voted against a federal health care overhaul but did too little to prevent its passage. No incumbents were on the ballot in Mississippi; only opposing-party nominees were being chosen. Election officials reported sparse turnout in most of the state’s 82 counties. In the 3rd District, unofficial results showed Gill defeated Holmes Community College sociology professor James D. Jackson of Brandon and Shawn O’Hara of Hattiesburg, who has run unsuccessfully for many Mississippi offices. Gill, who lives outside the 3rd District, was the Democratic nominee in the district in 2008 when the seat was open. He lost to Republican Gregg Harper of Pearl.

The November ballot will have Harper, Gill and a Reform Party candidate. Because of poll workers’ problems in Hinds County, the state’s largest county, a winner could not immediately be determined in the 2nd District GOP primary. Elections officials planned to finish counting the race Wednesday, possibly by the afternoon. Cook, a teacher who ran for the seat in 2008; and Marcy, a former Chicago police officer who ran unsuccessfully for a state House seat in Meridian in 2009, had the most votes, but not more than the 50 percent needed to avoid a runoff. George Bailey, an ordained minister, retired teacher and law enforcement officer from Clinton, was running a distant third. The November ballot will have Thompson, the Republican nominee and a Reform Party candidate. Congressional candidates aren’t required to live in the district they’re seeking to represent. Neither Gill nor Marcy believe their residing outside the districts where they’re running has been an issue.

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their diet.” The draft also includes techniques and tools used to aid management by using lethal methods such as community managed hunts and trapping, and also outlines alternative nonlethal options such as fencing, repellents, landscaping alternatives and community education.

The plan was constructed due to a recent a rise in complaints from residents that said that deer are eating gardens and even at showing signs of aggression. The problem is a direct result of people feeding the deer, which attracts them into residential areas. Once they run out of that food source, they start to munch

on the next best thing which might be someone’s garden or potted plants, Allgood said. The plan is available to review for the next 30 days on the city of Oxford’s website and will be discussed during a public forum at the June 15 Board of Aldermen meeting. The first step is a new ordinance.

John and Linda Flemming opened Emileigh’s Table, a country-style restaurant in Taylor, just over two years ago. Emileigh’s Table is in the heart of Plein Air, a 15-minute drive down Old Taylor Road from Oxford. Plein Air is a small, traditional community located in Taylor. It is also the site of one of Southern Living’s Idea Homes. The atmosphere at Emileigh’s Table is laid-back and relaxed. Chatter and laughter constantly circulate through the restaurant complimented by a delicious intermingling of aromas. When I was there, the staff was friendly and eager to take care of its customers. Upon walking in, the restaurant proves itself inviting and cozy with a rustic, at-home vibe with a side order of country love. The lunch menu features plate lunches with items including meatloaf and fried chicken and a wide selection of vegetables. There is also a “choose three” salad sampler. Dinner is a presentation of competition-style barbecue, including ribs and brisket. However, the menu doesn’t stop there, Emileigh’s envelops Southern cuisine, serving shrimp and grits as well as fresh potato salads. Desserts are always fresh, de-

livered from well-known Emileigh’s Bakery in Oxford. Like Mama cooked it, everything is made from scratch; nothing is ever frozen. Dinner at Emileigh’s is a BYOB event and many nights there is live music to entertain the guests. They often book local talents to play but have had former Squirrel Nut Zippers founder and Mississippian Jimbo Mathus play at the venue on several occasions. Emileigh’s is great for lunch but for all the fun Tyler Clancy, manager of Emileigh’s Table, recommends patrons visit on the weekends for dinner. “Make a night of it,” Clancy said. “It’s great for family and students, and if you make it out here, you’ll be back. It’s food you grew up on, or should have, if you didn’t.” For students looking for a night away from Oxford, this is a great place to eat. The dinner menu ranges from $6 to $16 with plenty to choose from. The live music provides great entertainment and the BYOB is an invitation to relax and have fun. It’s just like eating at home, plates and silverware and great food; it is a restaurant, but without the white linen napkins or the prices that come with them. Lunch is served Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. and dinner is served Thursday through Sunday from 5 p.m until 9 p.m.

if you go Take Mississippi 6 to Old Taylor Road. Head away from campus and continue on Old Taylor for around fifteen minutes, until you reach the Plein Air development on your left. Turn left before you get to it, and within their shopping area (near where the parking is), you will find Emileigh’s Table.

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AMANDA WARD | The Daily Mississippian

Emileigh’s Table manager Tyler Clancy prepares a dish at the Taylor restaurant. Emileigh’s Table provides Lafayette County residents with an option for classic, southern meals in Taylor. Emileigh’s Table is located down the road from Taylor Grocery and is open for Lunch from Tuesday until Sunday and serves dinner from Thursday through Sunday.


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3BD/3BTH Great condition.. Gated w/ Pool--Available AUG 1st-$1350mo. (mcilravy4@gmail.com) (757)560-6281 2BD 2BH condo @The Mark internet, cable, all appliances, W/ D included. $800/ mth. Call 901-734-9498 (901)591-1526 2&3 bdrm condos starting at $700/ mo. Contact Walker Property Mgmt (662)281-0094

NEW Turnberry Condo

3BED/2Bath. 3rd Floor, stainless applainces, furnished, 1/4 mile from campus. Great Shape! Chirs @ 662.607.5664 Quarter Condo/ 2 BR 2 1/2 BA $500 non refundable deposit $700/ month year lease (901)753-5076

ESPLANADE RIDGE

3 bedroom/2.5 bath on lake. Close to campus. Granite, stainless, washer/ dryer. Water, cable included. $1,350/ month. (601)668-1776

Pregnancy Test Center: Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com (662)234-4414

Roommate Female-ROOMATES NEEDED

GARDEN-TERRACE to share a furnished 4-Bedroom-3.5bath house. Porch/ patio, walk-in-closets, fireplace, storage. $350/ month. 662 801 1223 1 MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 2 bedroom 2 bath apartment with washer/ dryer in Lexington Pointe split $750/ month and utilities (205)3939766

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Automobiles 2005 Chevy Cobalt Silver, 4 door, 63,000 miles. Newly detailed and in great condition, includes cruise control, air conditioning and CD player. $6,200 (662)832-0667

Miscellaneous for Sale Huge Blowout! Steel Arch Buildings Selling for Balance Owed. Only a few left, 16x24x11, 20x26x12, 30x60x14. Take advantage of incredible savings! Call today 1-866-352-0469 LSAT Powerscore Logical Reasoning, Games Bibles $25 each. NOVA’s Master the LSAT $10. Used. Text (931)980-9331

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Weekend Rental weekend rentals Spring weekend rentals available. Baseball, Red/ Blue, Double Decker, Graduation, or just because! www.oxfordtownhouse.com (662)801-6692

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The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

PET FRIENDLY.

3BR/2BA $950, 2BR/2BA $750 in Shiloh Subdivision. Available August 1st. 601.573.1172 or 662.871.3354. 4Bd/ 4 1/2 Bth, with hot tube, 3Bd/ 2 1/2 Bth, Aspen Ridge, starting May and August (662)801-2358 2,3,&4 bdrm homes for lease starting at $550/mo. Contact Walker Property Mgmt. (662)281-0094 Brick Home, Quiet Location, nice yard, near end of Anderson Road, 3BD/1 1/2BA, All appliances, plus w/d, NO PETS, water/sewer furnished, $675/ mo. No calls after 7:00pm, (662)2025459, (662)236-6278. 3BD/2BA house in Eagle Point. Fenced yard, washer/ dryer, pet friendly. Nice! $1,200 August 1st. (662)8321891 STONE COVE PATIO HOMES- 3 large bedrooms, 2 or 3 baths, deck area for grilling, quiet area only 2 miles from campus, No pets. Avail. Aug. Starting @ $675 per month. (662)234-6481 Shiloh 2 bdr, 2 bath, tile floors, fenced yard, pet OK, ready to move in, $725 mo. 662-801-1660 (662)801-7464 3 B e d room / 2 B ath &2Bedroom/2Bath with study. 1200 square fee. Nice wooded area, all appliances included & security system. 2 miles from campus on College Hill Road. Available June or August. Call 662-236-7736 or 662-832-4589 (Pets welcome). 3BDR/3BA and 2BDR/2BA on University Ave. Call for appt. 662-236-7736 or 662-832-4589. 1BDR/1BA houses available. Includes all appliances, security system, daily garbage pickup, lawn maintenance, water, sewer, cable and internet. Approx. 2 miles from campus. Call 662236-7736 or 662-832-2428. Nice spacious 2 bedroom 2.5 bath townhouse duplex. 5 miles from campus. Still under construction. front porch, deck, balcony. Hunting rights. Mature students only! Must see!$950 (662)832-0117 5 bedroom 3 bath home Sunroom 17x30. Accomadates 6 people at $275.00/each. Near Square. Ample parking. (901)216-5447

free summer rent

Room available in a furnished 3 bd/ bt unit at The Exchange. Rent $375/ mo. Low price! Great Deal! Amenities include pool, fitness center, tanning bed. (314)412-3412 ROOMS FOR RENT 4 BEDROOM HOUSE OFF ANDERSON RD. ON BOWIE DR. SPACIOUS ROOMS, CLOSETS, AND BATHROOMS! FENCED IN BACKYARD FULLY FURNISHED! SATELLITE AND INTERNET READY! 45O PER MONTH INCLUDING UTILITIES! (731)780-8110

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CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION

TAYLOR MEADOWS 2 Bed/2 Bath brick houses for rent on Old Taylor Road. Starting June, July or August. (662)801-8255 or (662)801-3736 Very quiet 3bd/2ba $795. 2bd/2ba $675. 12 month lease. No pets. (662)234-0539 4BR/2BA Big Back Yard, Close to Campus, Spacious Rooms. $1400/ Month, (601)516-1432

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SEC FOOTBALL RANKINGS: DEFENSIVE BACKS BY PAUL KATOOL The Daily Mississippian

1. South Carolina: The Gamecocks boasted the No. 2 pass defense in the Southeastern Conference last year, but the unit should be tops in the SEC in 2010. Former blue-chip recruit Stephon Gilmore lived up to the hype his true-freshman season, and will soon be a household name for college football fans. 2. Florida: Former Gator Joe Haden was the first corner taken in April’s NFL draft, but the loss of Haden to the pros is partially offset by coach Urban Meyer’s penchant for stockpiling SEC-ready talent. Ahmad Black and Will Hill are the top safeties on the team, but don’t be surprised if true freshman safety Matt Elam earns some playing time. 3. Vanderbilt: The secondary was one of the lone bright spots for last year’s 2-10 Commodores. Vandy has a pair of veterans in senior corner Casey Hayward and senior strong safety Sean Richardson. The loss of cornerback Myron Lewis to the NFL hurts, but there shouldn’t be much regression with a secondary full of Bobby Johnson’s signature assignment football players. 4. Alabama: Strong safety Mark Barron is the only member of the secondary returning for the reign-

ing national champions. The Crimson Tide had three corners drafted to the NFL, but super recruit Dre Kirkpatrick should fill in admirably at one of the cornerback spots. 5. Tennessee: Eric Berry rocked the worlds of SEC offenses during his three seasons in Knoxville, and his early departure to the NFL means less big plays on defense. Strong safety Janzen Jackson earned a starting position as a true freshman, but must learn to keep out of trouble – i.e. not getting arrested for attempted armed robbery. 6. Kentucky: The Wildcats had a decent pass defense thanks to cornerback Trevard Lindley, one of Kentucky’s all-time greats at the position. Corner Randall Burden will be counted on to help alleviate Lindley’s departure. 7. Ole Miss: The Rebels should be concerned about losing threefourths of a secondary that finished a mediocre sixth in the SEC against the pass in 2009. The corners have little experience and junior college transfer free safety Damien Jackson has yet to take a snap in the SEC. Secondary coach Chris Vaughn has to hope the front seven can pick up the slack. 8. Auburn: Three starters return to an Auburn secondary that ranked

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

The Rebels will look to improve on last season’s No. 6 pass defense dspite losing three starting defensive backs, including Cassius Vaughn.

in the lower fourth of SEC pass defenses in 2009. Cornerback Neiko Thorpe and safety Daren Bates were two of Auburn’s top tacklers last year. 9. LSU: The Tigers had an underachieving pass defense last year despite stars Patrick Peterson and Chad Jones. Peterson is the best corner in the league now that Haden is gone from Florida, but Jones’ departure to the NFL doesn’t help last sea-

son’s No. 8 ranked SEC pass defense. 10. Georgia: New defensive coordinator Todd Grantham is charged at revitalizing a once proud Georgia defense. Corner Brandon Boykin may be the key to improving last year’s No. 9 pass defense in the league. 11. Mississippi State: The Bulldogs have a young star in cornerback Corey Broomfield, who had six inter-

ceptions in 2009. Broomfield and safety Charles Mitchell are the keys to Mississippi State improving last year’s No. 11 pass defense in the SEC. 12. Arkansas: The Razorbacks finished last in the SEC in pass defense in 2009. Although former starting cornerback Isaac Mason returns from an ACL injury, this should still be the Achilles heel for a team with high expectations.

OLE MISS SPORTS INFORMATION

O L E M I S S S P O R T S I N F O R M AT I O N

Grill named to NFCA All-America team POMERANZ NAMED GOLDEN Ole Miss senior Lauren Grill was named to the Louisville Slugger All-America third team by the National Fastpitch Coaches’ Association on Wednesday. Grill was selected at the shortstop position and becomes the first two-time All-American in Ole Miss history. A 2008 first-team All-America pick by Louisville Slugger, Grill started all 56 games at short for the

Rebels in 2010. She led Ole Miss with a .443 batting average, eight home runs, 39 RBI and a .705 slugging percentage. Her .569 onbase percentage this season is the fifth-best mark in SEC history, while her 44 career homers are tied for sixth best in league history. “It is an amazing honor for Lauren to be named an All-American for the second time in her career,”

Ole Miss head coach Missy Dickerson said. “It just shows what type of player she is and the talent she brought to our program.” The Tualatin, Ore., native literally rewrote the Ole Miss record book during her four seasons as a Rebel. Grill owns Ole Miss career records in hits, runs, RBI, walks, total bases, batting average, on-base and slugging percentage. She also ranks second in doubles, triples and home runs. In addition, she holds single-season Ole Miss marks for hits, runs, walks, total bases, batting average, slugging and on-base percentage.

SPIKES AWARD SEMIFINALIST

Junior left-hander Drew Pomeranz was named one of 30 semifinalists for the 2010 Golden Spikes Award honoring the nation’s top collegiate baseball player, USA Baseball announced on Tuesday. The list will be narrowed down to five finalists on Tuesday, June 8, before the announcement of this year’s winner on July 13. Pomeranz, who was named the Southeastern Conference Pitcher of the Year last week,

has been a dominant force for the Rebels this season as he has compiled an 8-2 record in 2010. The southpaw leads the Southeastern Conference in strikeouts (134), opposing batting average (.190) and in ERA (2.21). He also garnered first team All-SEC honors last week, the league office announced prior to the SEC Tournament. The Rebels advanced to the SEC Tournament for the eighth straight season this year as the sixth-seeded team and defeated No. 7 South Carolina and No. 13 Auburn on the way to the semifinals of the event before falling to eventual tournament champion LSU. With his seven strikeouts against the Gamecocks in the opening round of the tournament, Pomeranz hit the 339 strikeout mark for his career, taking over the top spot on the career strikeout list at Ole Miss and passing Lance Lynn (332). Pomeranz, who holds 134 strieouts this year, needs 12 more strikeouts to hit the top spot for strikeouts in a season set by Lynn in 2008.

The Daily Mississippian PDF - June 03, 2010  

The Daily Mississippian PDF - June 03, 2010

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