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1911 2011 MISSISSIPPIAN T H E

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Th e M i s s i s s i p p i a n PUBLISHED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

Animal Cruelty Complaint Filed Against UMMC Claims Medical Center Illegally Uses Anesthetized Pigs In Classes BY CAIN MADDEN Campus News Editor

The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine of Washington, D.C., has filed a complaint of animal cruelty against the University of Mississippi Medical Center with the United States Department of Agriculture. PCRM Senior Medical and Research Advisor Dr. John J. Pippin said the medical center illegally uses anesthetized pigs in undergraduate physiology laboratory classes, an act that the committee feels is in violation with the Animal Welfare Act because of the superior methods available for instructing students, such as computer simulation. “What will happen, is that the department of agriculture will send an inspector to the University,” Pippin said. “Hopefully, they will find similar to us, in that the University is not compliant with the Animal Welfare Act, and ask them to change.” On Friday, Jack Mazurak, with the UMMC division of public affairs, said the physiology labs do use the computer simulation along with live pigs, which he added was done legally. “We are one of the schools that pioneered the computer programs,” Mazurak said. “We have the technology, and we believe it is important in the learning process, but that it can not yet replace working with a live organism.” In a state that consistently ranks among the highest in heart disease, obesity, stroke, hypertension and kidney disease, UMMC must use animal and simulation methods to produce the highest quality physicians to serve Mississippi’s population, University officials said in a press release. Officials also said that the pigs, overseen in the lab by veterinarians, are humanely treated and euthanized at the end of the exercise. The University monitors advancements in technology and will use any advancement to replace the use of live pigs when faculty and the administration feel it is an adequate replacement, UMMC officials said. Pippin said he believes the technology needed to replace the use of live pigs was already here, and added

that it was telling that only seven allopathic schools out of 124 in the United States still use live animals. “What we have are programmable human simulators that can be programmed to show natural human responses, which is much more efficient than using a live pig because it is not like a human,” Pippin said. “It is educationally superior, and 95 percent of schools no longer use live animals.” Pippin said it would actually save the University money to discontinue the use of live pigs in labs. “You would not have to keep, anesthetize or euthanize 34 pigs a year,” Pippin said. “You already have the technology, so there are no up-front costs.” While the pigs are anesthetized, Pippin said there is always the chance that one could wake up during the lab. “The pigs are lifted up on a table, anesthetized, and the students open up the chest and neck, place catheters in the arteries and veins of the animals, block the arteries, inject them with drugs and massage the pigs hearts before the animals are killed,” Pippin said. “A pig may have never woken up in all the years that the University has used live pigs, but there is still the possibility.” Officials at the University said that students are able to opt out of these labs, and the vast majority of students find the experience valuable. The Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care has given the facilities, staff and procedures top rankings, University officials said in a press release. University officials added in the release that the program is overseen by an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, which includes members of the community. Pippin said PCRM communications with the University Medical Center date back to May of 2006, and he is only filing this complaint after consideration. “We reluctantly filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, because, frankly, we felt like they have ignored us,” Pippin said.

Board of Aldermen Approves Alcohol Sales On Sundays Restaurants Can Now Sell on Select Sundays From 11 a.m Till 9 p.m.

GPS Technology on OUT Buses Allows Riders To Track Arrival Times

BY ASHLEIGH DAVIS

BY MARIDANE HEWES

The Daily Mississippian

The Daily Mississippian

The Board of Aldermen approved the proposal for the request of occasional sale of alcohol on certain Sundays in the city of Oxford between the hours of 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. Mayor Pat Patterson said that sometime in the next few weeks he will be going to Jackson to meet with the State Tax Commission and seek permission for those exceptions. The approval was a 4-3 decision at the regularly scheduled December 7, 2010, meeting. The said Sundays would be Mother’s Day (May 8), Father’s Day ( June 19), Valentine’s Day when on a Sunday and after every Ole Miss home football game. Sales would be limited to these nine or possibly ten Sundays out of the year. The proposal to sell beer in grocery stores and convenience stores on Sundays was declined at the January 4 meeting. Oxford Police Chief Mike Martin said that he does not expect the approval to change things too drastically. “I do not expect it will be as busy as a Friday or Saturday night, but I expect it to be a lot more reserved,” Martin said. “The times that the board is requesting to be allowed to serve are normally busy weekends anyway, so I don’t believe it will add that much more to what we have to deal with.” Scott Michael, owner and founder of Rooster’s Blues House, said he thinks the approval of the decision is beneficial for Oxford and his business. “With 18 restaurants closing in the past year, the city could use the revenue from sales on Sunday,” said Michael. Michael said he believes that families would be more willing to stay the entire weekend and this would generate more revenue that we need to embrace. The Board of Aldermen has been considering the approval of Sunday sales for several months and has investigated different options to satisfy both sides of issue.

The Oxford University Transit system has incorporated new technology to create a better riding experience. The buses are now equipped with Next Bus GPS services, a program that allows riders to know the exact time their bus will arrive at their stop. There are different ways to access the information including visiting nextbus.com, calling 662-550-2039, sending a text message to “41411” with a message saying “nbus agency stop” or using a smart phone to access the website on the go. Applications for smart phones are being developed, which will make accessing the bus schedule even more convenient. “These changes were brought about by modern technology,” Ron Briggs, general manager of OUT said. “OUT is advancing with the times and most other bus systems already had these things.” All the buses have also been recently equipped with security cameras, providing passengers with a safer riding experience. The cameras are used to ensure that drivers are following proper protocol and have already been used in determining whether a complaint was valid or not. “We with Oxford University Transit strive to provide a safe, sustainable ride for the community and the University,” Cory Washington from the Office of Campus Sustainability said. “We are now happy that students, faculty and community riders are now able to look on the internet, call or look on their mobile  devices  to see when the next bus is arriving and it’s current location.” With more than 70 percent of the Ole Miss community of students and faculty using the OUT bus system, these changes will be incredibly helpful, providing exact times for the arrival of the next bus. Briggs said he hopes these changes will provide an even safer riding experience than before and benefit every passenger aboard the OUT buses.

Students Seen Sledding on Ironing Boards, Mattresses During Wintersession Oxford Covered In Eight Inches of Snow Students, Community Reminisce On Snowball Fights BY KAYLEIGH WEBB The Daily Mississippian

On January 9, snowmen outnumbered people at any given moment in the Grove. With snow still hanging in the forecast, students recollect the day during the Wintersession where snowball fights and snowmen dominated the Ole Miss landscape. “I probably spent an unhealthy amount of time in the snow.” Ryan Felder, a freshman public policy major said. “I was in so many snowball fights. I also made many attempts at improvised sledding, which didn’t work out quite too well. I think Oxford was just as crazy about the snow as I was. Everyone was out and having a great time. I saw someone skiing in the Grove – not something I ever thought I would see.” While students were found sledding all over campus, the most popular area for sledding was a large hill by Kincannon. Garbage can lids, cardboard boxes, ironing boards, laundry baskets and even mattresses were used as makeshift sleds that students tumbled down the snow-covered hill on. “I was very disappointed when it finally melted,” Felder said. “But, then again, it was on the ground for so long that I got more than enough fun from it.” Wintersession classes were cancelled for two days due to the icy conditions caused by the Oxford snowstorm. See SNOW, PAGE 4


OPINION O P IN I O N |

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CAROLINE LEE editor-in-chief

EMILY ROLAND managing editor

BY JOSH CLARK

LANCE INGRAM city news editor

Cartoonist

CAIN MADDEN campus news editor VICTORIA BOATMAN enterprise editor MIA CAMURATI opinion editor EMILY CEGIELSKI features editor RYANNE FLANDERS arts & leisure editor PAUL KATOOL sports editor ADDISON DENT photography editor KATIE RIDGEWAY design editor

PATRICK HOUSE business manager

Bad politics in Arizona? Like most of the country, the state of Arizona is in a budget crisis. But Governor Jan Brewer’s proposed cuts to Medicaid are some of the most provocative cuts in state government. Brewer has requested a federal waiver that, if approved, would temporarily remove 280,000 BY JON MOSBY adults from Medicaid in the state. Although Columnist Brewer may see the waiver as a solution to the state’s projected $1.1 billion shortfall, it will have disastrous effects. For many in Arizona, the state’s Medicaid program, formally called the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System is a be-all endall. The cut will gravely affect Arizona residents with pre-existing health conditions and residents of poor areas of the state. Brewer’s proposed cut of over $500 million would affect mostly single adults, like Pat Elliot. According to Phoenix CBS affiliate KPHO, Elliot was once a successful small business owner but had a pre-existing condition. “I did not have insurance because I’m a breast cancer survivor,” Elliot said. Because she had a pre-existing condition, no health insurance provider would cover her. Following her struggle with breast cancer, medical costs began to bankrupt Elliot. Elliot did, however, qualify for the health care containment system, which pays for Elliot’s leukemia treatments. Elliot’s treatment, an oral chemotherapy drug called Gleevic, must be taken daily for the rest of her life. Gleevic costs $5,000

T H E

for a one-month supply. Brewer’s plan would also affect hospitals and clinics serving rural areas of the state. Many residents of rural areas are dependent on the system for health coverage. Hospitals in many rural areas serve a significant number of patients who could not afford health insurance otherwise. One such hospital is the Southeast Arizona Medical Center, which provides health care to residents of the Douglas area. About 32 percent of the patients at the hospital rely on AHCCCS. Brewer’s efforts to reduce the number of beneficiaries would be disastrous for the hospital – the proposal could even force it to shut down. By law, a hospital cannot turn a patient away from emergency room care. Administrators at the Southeast Arizona Medical Center believe many ill patients would simply turn to the emergency room for health care needs. The hospital, and others like it, would have a difficult time balancing patients with an inability to pay for health care and administrative costs. Ultimately, cutting health care cost in Arizona will hurt the state itself. Ill patients who are in need of health services will show up at hospitals and those services will cost money. And that money will come from the taxpayers. But public health care is not the only place Brewer is making proposed cuts. The governor also plans to make cuts on the state’s education budget. Brewer told the Flagstaff, Ariz., Chamber of

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Commerce, “The bottom line is that things are tough. We don’t have the money, education was spared last year and this year they are going to have to make those reasonable adjustments to get a better bang for the buck.” Brewer proposes cutting $25.8 million of Northern Arizona University’s $133 million in annual state funding, about 20 percent. State funding accounts for about 41 percent of the university’s budget . NAU will determine how to handle the cuts. NAU is largest employer in the Flagstaff area. The budgets also proposes cutting $50 million in salary cuts at Arizona universities. Community colleges in Arizona currently receive more than $132 million in state aid, that will now drop to $64 million. I understand that times are tough in Arizona – sales tax revenue has fallen by 10. 5 percent and income-tax collections are down 15.7 percent – but making cuts to two of the most vital state programs is the wrong thing to do. The cuts, while some may be temporary, will have a long term effect on the state on the back end. What would be the effect on the state with an ill, less educated workforce? If President Obama accepts Brewer’s federal waiver request to cut Arizona state health care costs along with her other proposals, she will effectively balance the state’s budget. But at what expense? Her proposals would literally leave people for dead.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

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PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser ARVINDER SINGH KANG manager of media technology DYLAN PARKER creative/technical supervisor DARREL JORDAN chief engineer MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager STEPHEN GOFORTH broadcast manager DARCY DAVIS administrative assistant


O P IN I O N |

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NEWS NEWS |

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CAIN MADDEN | The Daily Mississippian

Second year law student Bailey Fair said he was happy to be out of the old bunker of a law school. Fair works on his computer in the new law school library.

We l c o m e B a c k O l e M i s s S t u d e n t s ! Want to be a part of a distinctive organization that represents all students on campus and welcomes visitors to The University of Mississippi?

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June to August. Residential. Enjoy our website. Apply online.

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Applications are now available in the Office of Enrollment Services, 145 Martindale Student Services Center. Applications are due back by 5PM Friday, January 28th.

ASB Officer Spring Election Petitions are now available!

Pick one up in Union 404!

Petitions are due by January 28th, 2011 by 5 PM. Questions? Contact Mary Margaret Johnson • mjohns03@olemiss.edu

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N E W S | 1 . 24 . 11

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Law school up and running in new building BY CAIN MADDEN Campus News Editor

Ole Miss law students are not lurking in the dungeon for the first time in years. Second year law student David Long said he was excited to see the sun shining into classrooms during his first two weeks at the new Ole Miss law building Friday afternoon. “I focus better in the new classrooms,” Long said. “I don’t know if it is the natural light, the improved acoustics or the fact that you feel like you are closer to the professors, but I feel like I get more out of class.” Long’s fellow second year law student, Jacob Jordan, said the new school actually felt like stepping into the professional environment. “It feels like you are meeting for school at the courthouse,” Jordan said. “I love it. It is strikingly beautiful, and the classrooms are more spacious and adequate to meet the needs of the student body.” Associate professor Matthew R. Hall said he thought the new building was beautiful, but he was more excited about the classrooms.

“One thing I like about the building is the windows,” Hall said. “In the old building, I believe all but one of the classrooms were windowless.” Second year law student Jeffrey Graves said he has enjoyed being in the new classrooms so far. “You are able to sit at your desk without being directly on top of someone — they are much more spacious,” Graves said. “Now, there are also enough outlets for you to plug up your computer, and Internet access seems to be improved. We had a lot of problems at the old building.” Not that all is perfect. Hall said he missed being near the Grove, and Long and Jordan missed what they called the “Law Mall.” “It was a nice social place, the center of the building, where all of our lockers and the entrances to the classrooms were,” Long said. “That does not exist here, which is OK for me because I already know everyone I want to meet, but it may make it worse on the first year students who are still meeting people.”

CAIN MADDEN | The Daily Mississippian

Students sit in Professor Parham Williams’ evidence class Friday morning. Law students have been in the new building for approximately two weeks.

They also missed being near the Student Union, but Jordan said there was something to make up for that. “It is nice to have our own cafe in the building,” Jordan said. “That will help.” Melissa Groover, who was recently accepted to the school of law, visited the new building Friday. “The building is modern with all the technology a law school needs, but the architecture gives it that old charm,” said Groover, who completed her undergraduate degree at New York Institute of Technology. “I am excited to start classes in the fall.” Law School Dean Richard Gershon said he felt fortunate to have the school of law in the

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new building. “It is wonderful,” Gershon said. “We are all excited to be in

this building, but it is really the people that make this law school special– the people that work in the building.”

Congratulations to the following outstanding students to be inducted into the 2010-2011 class of Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities & Colleges on Friday, February 4, 2011, at 4:00 p.m., in the Ford Center. The University of Mississippi Hall of Fame inductees will be announced at the ceremony. Carla Aguilar Laurie Alexander James Allen Victoria Applewhite Ann Atkinson Jessie Austin Brett Barnes Chad Berry William Bogan Melissa Bond George Bordelon Meagan Boykin Sarah Bransford Mallory Britt Elizabeth Brock Caitlyn Brown James Buchanan Paris Buchanan Molly Burcham Virginia Burke Sara Burns Etoshia Butler Brooke Cantwell Chelsea Caveny Jake Chandler Thomas Chandler Lauren Childers Taylor Corso Martha Frances Dalton Matt Daniels Nathan Darce Sandipan Datta Amber Davis Katie Dennis Vihara Dharmaratne Jasmine Dixon Laurin Dixon Ben Dobbs Angela Duff Brittany Duhon Kelsey Durocher Sam Egger Samuel Farris IV Martin Fisher Brian Flanner Brian Foster Lauren Freeman Sharon Frierson Echarial Gaines Meaghan Gandy

Christin Gates Ella Gentry Paige Gordy Tucker Gore Mary Katherine Graham Sara Grantham JaMeshia Graves Julia Harris Katie Hewes Andrea Hodge Locke Houston Brian Hovanec Sarah Howard Gloria Howell Jonathan Hughes James Humphries Margaret Hutter Sara Hyde Chiedozie Ibekwe Jimmy Jackson Frazier Jenkins Rachel Jenkins Jennifer Johnson Stuart Johnson Kara Jumper Paul Katool Barnabas Kirui Taylor Kitchens Allison Kneip Don Lazarus Barrett Lingle Erin Lotz Nickolaus Luckett Eugene Lukienko Laura Luther Edwin Lutken Richard Martindale Catherine McCoy Craig McMenamy Victoria Meadows Hallie Mosby Jeffrey New Trey Nordan Neal Ann Parker Robin Parker Ryan Parsons Elizabeth Sillers Pearson Lindsey Perry Amber Phillips Thomas Powell

Diana Price Courtney Randall Leslie Johns Ray Taylor Reese Laura Beth Rider Mallory Roberts Sarah Rogers Bill Rosenblatt Ben Satyshur Audrey Seal Edward Seals Zainab Shahpurwala Sarah Shaw Alexandra Slivka Juliana Smith Elizabeth Spence Kimbrell Spencer Francis Stanley Cathryn Stout Douglas Strahan Steve Stringer Jessica Summers Sue Sweeney Colleen Tillson Adrian Turner Jessica-Phillips Tyson Laura van de Stroet Lane Varner Sara Vaughn Harsha Vinnakota Kristen Vise Justin Wallace Anna Wardlow Elliott Warren Natalie Watanabe Katherine Watson Richard Weiland Gabriel Weiss Rebecca Werner Taylor West Marie Wicks Diarria Williams Brandon Willingham Rachel Willis Emelia Wilson Karen Wilson Jamie Windham Catherine Woodyard Stephen Worley Emilee Young


NEWS NEWS |

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ABOVE: Students build a snowman inside VaughtHemingway Stadium.

SNOW,

BELOW: Students pelt each other in a snowball fight in front of the Grove stage. Oxford got approximately 8 inches of snow over the break.

Classes resumed for Wintersession students on Jan. 12. “I really liked all the snow,” freshman theatre major Lydia Reed said. “It was so pretty seeing the whole campus covered in a solid blanket of white. I got up early and went out and just walked all around campus taking pictures of the undisturbed snow, but I wasn’t crazy about classes being canceled.” Not all students were completely enamored with the snow, including senior political science student Matt DeLoach. “I was glad to see that it snowed that night,” DeLoach said. “I was glad to be in the snow in the morning, but af-

continued from page 1 ter that, I was ready to see it gone.” Snow was expected again on January 21. However, due to warmer temperatures, it was not as spectacular as the approximate eight inches of snow Oxford received during Wintersession. “I wasn’t here to experience it but feel like I would have enjoyed being here when it happened; to play in it and just see the campus covered in snow.” Nathaniel Weathersby, a freshman journalism major said. “I am excited for the snow. It doesn’t seem to be staying though. If it does stick, I would very much like to play in it.”

Followtwituser/thedm_news Anywhere all photos EMILY ROLAND | The Daily Mississippian

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LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

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Don’t pass up a ‘deal of the day’

all photos EMILY ROLAND | The Daily Mississippian

ABOVE: Panini employee Ashley Maloney, Panini owner Tori Puckett, William Watts and Addison Edmonds look over the menu at Panini as they decide what to spend their discount on. Edmonds, Rae Corley, Smoothie King manager, and William Watts discuss the advantages of advertising with aroundtown-oxford.com.

BY EMILY CEGIELSKI Features Editor

Every once in a while, something comes along that is too good to be true. The perfect pair of shoes just happens to be on sale, or someone happens to offer great tickets for the Ole Miss vs. LSU game. Two recent Ole Miss graduates have made it their goal to lay out magical deals all in one place with their website,

aroundtown-oxford.com “We came up with the idea in early September and tested it out for a few weeks before Christmas,” William Watts, accounting graduate and founder of the website, said. “We put out three good deals, and it seems the concept works.” The website offers deals and discounts for Ole Miss students and Oxford locals alike. Offering a “deal of the day,” the website allows savings up to

50 percent or higher on things such as food, drinks, spa visits and more. Before the winter break, Watts and his associate, Addison Edmonds, decided to test their website by offering three “deals of the day.” One deal saved buyers 64 percent of their purchase at Smoothie King and another offered 50 percent off of lunch at Panini. Their plan is to offer one deal per day during the spring semester, and they are not limiting their deals to things that they like. Both Watts and Edmonds hope to receive input from students and residents about what they would like to see come to the website. The deals are simple to take advantage of. Buyers can buy online using a credit or debit card, print their proof of purchase at home and then redeem their deal at the store or restaurant. Acording to Watts and Edmonds these deals help publicize businesses to freshmen and other people who might not even know they exist. It is a type of advertising for the businesses themselves, so it benefits everyone as a whole. Edmonds, who works for the advertising company The Indoor Advantage, uses his connections to get a foot in the door, and from there the dynamic duo play off each other to promote both businesses. “We share a sales force,” Edmonds said. “It’s a collaboration. We make sure that it’s a deal that is going to work for everybody, the business and us.” The two Ole Miss alumni met while collaborating for a mutual client through the Pink Dress Run. The run, which is a fundraiser to fight breast cancer, brought the two young men together and got them talking. “We talked about business and realized our models don’t compete,” Edmonds said. “And

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it became a joint venture.” of Panini, said. “When I first What Watts and Edmonds re- heard about this, I said ‘sign me fer to as “business,” does seem up!.’” to be paying off for everybody Other business owners in Oxinvolved. Students and Oxo- ford agree. nians alike receive the best deals “Oh, I love it,” Rae Corley, around, and businesses get ex- manager of Smoothie King, posure, too. said. “I think it’s awesome. “It’s basically a win-win situation,” Tori Puckett, owner See DEAL OF THE DAY, PAGE 8

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LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

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Our love-hate relationship with the first day of the semester BY RYANNE FLANDERS

that one has dropped and is no longer in the class. Basically, it is just a bunch of nonsense. 2) Long bookstore lines Why people wait until the first day to buy books, I will never know. Semester after semester it is drilled into our brains: “Buy books early!” Who wants to buy a book when a student’s schedule is probably going to change 17 more times? Then we find out the professor does not even use the book. Hopefully, there are no eager beavers out there removing the shrink wrap, because the bookstore will not give a full refund for that. Take it from me guys: wait a week. In fact, wait two. That’s when it will be clear if the book is a necessity.

Arts & Entertainment Editor

Five reasons to hate the first day: 1) IT’S REALLY EARLY! I’m going to go out on a limb here and say most college students do not like getting up early. I know I hate dragging myself out of bed on the first day (or any other day). Most of us are accustomed to staying up into obnoxious hours of the morning and sleeping till 5 p.m. Now, we have to drag our zombie selves out of our not-so-comfy dorm beds and warm apartments. Unfortunately, the first day cannot be skipped because, apparently, professors assume

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3) Long financial aid lines These are the worst because there is nothing to be done about it. There’s never a good time to come, and it is impossible to wait until a month from now to do it. Students cannot control how their finances are handled with the school. Bring a book, a Nook, an iPod, a smartphone or knitting supplies. The entertainment will be needed. 4) It is still freezing! The beginning of the semester always has horrid weather. At the beginning of the fall semester, it’s roughly 437 degrees. At the beginning of the spring semester it’s a breezy -140... Celsius. Even better is the fact that some students will be dressed as warm as the nomadic Eskimo people of Antarctica, but when they step into their classroom they will feel like nomadic Eskimos in Mexico at the peak of summer. By the time the layers are peeled off, class will be over. 5) Parking There are two days when parking is the worst. These are the two days when every

student actually goes to class. What days are these you ask? – The first day of the semester and the review day for finals. The first day is definitely worse than finals because nearly every single student shows up. This is everyone’s “year” in which they are going to do better. No fear though, parking will have slacked off in a few weeks when people either drop classes or stop going alltogether. Until then, happy parking wars.

Five reasons to enjoy it: 1) Financial aid was disbursed This means money to celebrate the end of the first day. Go out to dinner, the bar, Walmart; it really doesn’t matter. Go ahead and squander it away. Parents will be expecting the “I’m broke” call anyway. 2) Summer Vacation is only five months away Five months really isn’t that long when thinking about how

generous the break is. Just picture the warm sun, beach breezes and all the time to do absolutely nothing. For those taking summer classes, disregard this. 3)Everyone has all As This is the highest everyone’s grades will ever be – GPAs are perfect. Don’t mess it up, and the wonderful feeling can last all the way through May. 4)The thought of eating on campus isn’t repulsive yet Everything is fresh for once so the idea of JC grub won’t make perfectly sane students want to throw themselves off any tall buildings (or eat off campus). Everything is good again. The same thing hasn’t been eaten for the last 13 days. Revel in it, because it will be ruined soon. 5) Nearly every class gets out early I have never stayed the entire time in a class on the first day of the semester. It’s a freebie. Once again, revel away. This will probably be the only time it happens, so take advantage of it.

DEAL OF THE DAY, continued from page 7

It’s a great way to get out there. Some people who have lived in Oxford for 10 years have never been to Smoothie King, and this brings in those new customers.” “It really is the best kind of advertising,” Edmonds said. With online media and advertising becoming a crucial part of business, Watts and Ed-

monds are keen to keep ahead of the times. “Our website is really neat, really cool, and we are in the work of creating apps,” Watts said. “We are in the process of getting all over Facebook and Twitter. It’s a great thing we have, we just need people to find out about it.” In addition to keeping every-

thing high-tech and up-to-date, Watts and Edmonds want to expand. While determined to remain a constant presence in Oxford, they are always on the lookout for new towns and new businesses to recruit. “We really want input from the community about what they want to see on the website,” Watts said.

Campus Book Mart of Oxford

Welcome Back Students! Ole Miss Clothing and Gifts!

Lowest Prices on Textbooks & Art Supplies Fall and winter merchandise

30-60% OFF! 145 Courthouse Square • Mon-Sat. 10:00-5:30

Best Prices & Friendly Service Store Hours: Mon-Fri. 7:30 - 8:00 Sat. 9:00 - 8:00 Sun. 1:00 - 6:00

Art Supplies 1111 Jackson Ave. West In the Oxford Mall next to Malco Theater 662-234-5993

www.campusbookmart.com/um/


C L A S S IF I E D S |

CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline. com/classifieds. The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday year round, when school is in session.

RATES: - $ . 25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run Additional Features (Web & Print): Jumbo Headline - $3 Big Headline - $2 Bold Text - extra $ . 50 per word

To place your ad online: www.thedmonline.com/classifieds

The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

201 BISHOP HALL 662.915.5503

Homes for Sale

Property for Sale Ole Miss- Lafayette Co. Land73 unspoiled acres 15 miles south of campus, 7 miles south of Taylor. Balanced mix of pasture, hayland and pristine timber. Paved road, comm. water. Ideal for hunting, livestock or family retreat. Numerous beautiful home sites. $280,000. Lowe Realty. (662)473-4444

Apartment for Rent 1 & 2 BR Apartments- On Orange Bus Route!! Unfurnished Starting at $545 or We Will Make Moving Easy and Furnish Your Apartment for $50/mo (2BR) or $25/mo (1BR)! Free Golf and other Amenities! Call The Links today at 662-513-4949. 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath, Grad/ Law/ Professionals, Close to Campus, www. leaseoxford.com, Massey Prop Mgmt (662)816-8685 Lafayette Place 1BR Fully furnished, Utilities included, near campus full kitchen, tanning beds and more, 770/ month available mid-Dec 2010 (228)238-7277 (228)238-7277 1BR Apartments $495, 2BR $585. The Cove Apartments. (662)234-1422. 2 Lofts for rent above 208 Restaurant. Call (662)234-0005. 1,2,3 bedroom apartments less than 1 mile from campus. HUGE floor plans! All appliances included and pets welcome. 662-281-0402

House for Rent FURNISHED

3 bedroom/2bath home Like new; lawn service included. $1100 mo. Mature only. 662-329-1442 (662)574-0066 1, 2, 3, and 4 BD Houses/Duplexes near Square. Many with hardwood floors and porches. (662)234-3208.

3BR/2 Full Bath House for Rent Completely renovated. $750/ mo. located in Water Valley. 18 minutes to Ole Miss campus. www.fischerproperties.net, 105 Simmons Street. (662)473-6009

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 9

For adoption: rescued lab/ pit mix, female, friendly, spayed, housebroken, 10 months old. $100 rehoming fee. Please call (901) 833-9585 or (901) 833-9582.

Condo for Rent TURNBERRY CONDOS, 3br. 2ba. Old Taylor Rd. Near Campus. All appliances. Available Immediately. (901)2392267 (901)239-2267

Weekend Rental Nice 3BD/2BA House- 4 miles from campus. $800 weekend. (662)3972534. Furnished 3 Bedroom apt. near hospital fully furnished $1000.00 per month. 662-202-5020 are you ready?? Football weekends and more! Check out our availability list online. www.oxfordtownhouse. com (662)801-6692

Miscellaneous Pregnancy Test Center Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com. (662)234-4414

Part-time BARTENDING $300/DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training Provided Call 1-800-965-6520 EXT155

Miscellaneous for Sale

Created for your morning pleasure

The Daily Mississippian The STudenT newSpaper of The univerSiTy of MiSSiSSippi

$6 Fall Food and Drink Specials: THURSDAY

Please Drink Responsibly

Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted.

FSBO: 3BR each w/ private bath. 1800 SqFt., Great Storage, Large Fenced Yard, Close to Everything! $119,500. Call (228)217-0278 New home for sale or rent. 3BD/2BA. Oxford school district. Hwy 334. (662)236-3614

11 . 4 . 10

CHICKEN QUESADILLA

Beer Specials- All Day, Every Day Natty Lights: $1.25 Coors Light Pitcher: $5.50

311 S Lamar Blvd 662 238 2929

Fall Special $5.00 Jumbo BBQ Sandwich Plate

Golf Carts for sale- Club Car Precedent 07. Ole Miss Navy Blue. $2900. Cell (662)514-3698. $1 sales New&Used Creations North Lamar/Molly Barr. Furniture, clothes/ shoes, miscellaneous. Donations Accepted/Pickup Available. (662)6074256

Pets for Adoption Save 9 LIVES! Adopt a rescued cat or kitten. www.9livescatrescue.org.

Deal’s Auto Repair & Glass Co. Full Service Repair Center

For all your auto repair and glass needs 281-4417 • 2100 S. LAMAR

recycle your DM

NEXT TO MARQUIS CHEVRON

Please join us for an Exclusive Jude Frances Jewelry Trunk Show Saturday, November 6, 2010 10:00am - 5:30pm

211 S. LAMAR, OXFORD

• 662-236-0050

HT NDS TONIG U O S R E AST NEW M S LS BRAS E B E R SOUL Y

FRIDA

MENT

T ADJUS R O N I M DAY

SATUR

145 Courthouse Square Oxford, MS 38655 662.234.8217

BAND


COM I C S |

11 . 4 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 10

GARFIELD

BY JIM DAVIS 236-3030

THE FUSCO BROTHERS

BY J.C. DUFFY

3 MEDIUM 1 TOPPING

5

$

DILBERT

EACH

BY SCOTT ADAMS

3 LARGE 1 TOPPING

7

$

EACH

DEEP DISH EXTRA

NON SEQUITUR

BY WILEY OPEN LATE

236-3030

DOONESBURY

BY GARRY TRUDEAU

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 with no repeats

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

SUDOKU©

Puzzles by Pappocom

HOW TO PLAY

DIFFICULTY LEVEL

11.03.10

BEACON RESTAURANT Join us for the homecooked breakfast, lunch & supper you’ve been missing!

MONDAY-SATURDAY: 7AM-9PM • 1200 N. Lamar

Baked Ham w/ Pineapple Sauce • Fried Chicken • Hamburger Steak • Potato Salad • Brussell Sprouts • Mashed Potatoes • Creamed Sweet Corn • Marshmellow Potatoes • Whole Baby Carrotts

Feel free to enjoy our full menu.

Experience a MAZE

zing!


S P O R TS |

1 . 24 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 11

Applications Available for

The Columns Society Humble Service – Leadership – Integrity Where: Rooms 422 and 401 in the Student Union Deadline: February 4th, 2011 by 4:00PM in room 422 Student Union Sign up for a first round interview when you turn in your application.

All applicants must attend one interest session:

January 26th 7PM 405 Union January 27th 7PM 405 Union

Candidates must be full time, rising third-year or above students with at least one year of tenure at The University of Mississippi and a minimum of a 2.75 cumulative grade point average. For more information please email: mpc@olemiss.edu


SPORTS S P O R TS |

1 . 24 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 12

Rebs get first conference win against Tigers BY ALEX LAKE The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss basketball coach Andy Kennedy was probably not

expecting his team to notch their first conference win on their trip to Baton Rouge this past weekend. Nevertheless, the Rebels (13-

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35¢Wings Happy Hour 3-7 PM

1/2 off appetizers 2 for 1 domestics and wells

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7, 1-4 SEC) thrashed conference rival LSU (10-9, 2-2 SEC) Saturday 78-51 to halt the team’s worst start in conference play since 2000. Ole Miss turned a six-point lead at the half into a 52-36 advantage after four 3-pointers – one apiece from Terrance Henry and Trevor Gaskins and two from Chris Warren.

MOVIE

RATING

SHOWTIMES

The Dilemma

PG-13

1:00 4:05 7:05 9:35

True Grit

PG-13

1:25 4:25 7:20 9:50

The Green Hornet 3D PG-13

1:10 4:15 7:15 9:50

No Strings Attached R

1:15 4:20 7:10 9:40

Little Fockers

PG-13

7:10 9:30

Black Swan

R

1:20 4:25 7:35 10:00

The King’s Speech

R

1:30 4:35 7:25 10:00

Country Strong

PG-13

1:10 4:20 7:05 9:40

Yogi Bear 3D

PG

1:10 4:10

Henry had his first doubledouble of his career by posting 13 points and ten rebounds while playing in his home state. The Rebels shot 62.2 percent on the day while making 13 3-pointers. Seniors Warren and Zach Graham led the scoring for the Rebels, scoring 18 and 17, respectively. Transfer Nick Williams continued consistent play for Ole Miss with 14 points. Former Rebel Malcolm White, now sporting purple and gold, scored six points in the afternoon while playing only 21 minutes. Over the break, the Rebels won nine games and lost five, four of those losses coming in conference play. The Rebels lost an emotional game to Mississippi State 69-64 in their first SEC game on Jan. 13, despite having the lead for the majority of the game. The Rebels have the week off before playing host to Tennessee on Saturday and to Kentucky on Feb. 1.

234-UNIV(8648)

sports briefs BY PAUL KATOOL Sports Editor

LADY REBS STAGE COMEBACK AT ARKANSAS Trailing No. 23/24 Arkansas (15-4, 3-4 SEC) by 12 points early, Ole Miss (9-9, 2-4) battled back for a 69-65 win Sunday afternoon over the Razorbacks.

ROBERTSON SHATTERS HIGH JUMP RECORD Sophomore Ricky Robertson broke his own high jump record at the Arkansas State Invitational by leaping 7-05.75 to break his own record of 7-05.00. Robertson has the highest jump in the nation this year.

RIFLE FALLS TO KENTUCKY Ole Miss lost a home match to Kentucky this weekend despite posting a team aggregate score of 4654, a school record. The Wildcats defeated the Rebels 4676-4654.

TENNIS SHUTS DOWN USM The Ole Miss men’s tennis team, No. 18 in the country, shut out Southern Miss 6-0 on Saturday in Oxford. Senior Kalle Norberg, the 2009 SEC Tournament MVP, was back on the court for the Rebels in the win.

........It’s kind of a BIG deal!

Join with your fellow students in saying “Thanks” to the Oxford and Lafayette communities!

Saturday, March 26th, 2011 Visit www.olemiss.edu/thebigevent to find out more information.

To volunteer log on to your myolemiss account and click “Big Event Volunteer Registration.”


The Daily Mississippian - January 24, 2011  

The Daily Mississippian - January 24, 2011

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