Page 1

F

r i d a y

, O

c t o b e r

29, 2010

|

V

o l

. 99, N

o

. 48

It’s a different type of feeling, playing this game, because you know the spotlight is on you.” Jeremiah Masoli, quarterback

EMILY ADAMS | The Auburn Plainsman

ADDISON DENT | The Daily Mississippian

REBELS FACE HEISMAN FRONTRUNNER IN NO. 1 AUBURN BY JOHN HOLT

In six chances, the Ole Miss football team has yet to defeat the nation’s No. 1 team. On Saturday, the Rebels (34, 1-3 SEC) get chance seven as they welcome Auburn, the Bowl Championship Series’ top-ranked team, in a nationally televised game at VaughtHemingway Stadium. “This place is going to be rocking Saturday night,” Ole

Miss coach Houston Nutt said. “There’s nothing like this opportunity. Each week, it’s the best of the best.” The Tigers (8-0, 5-0 SEC) are led by Heisman Trophy frontrunner quarterback Cam Newton. The 6-foot-5, 250-pound junior leads the SEC in rushing with 1,077 yards and 14 touchdowns on the ground. “I knew (Auburn was) going to be much improved but I don’t think anyone knew the

impact of Cam Newton at this point,” Nutt said. “(Cam is) so much different than he was the first three or four games if you look at it. I don’t even think they (Auburn) probably really knew all the things he could do. But the last three or four (games) you see he’s being used a lot.” Meanwhile, Ole Miss defensive coordinator Tyrone Nix classified Newton as a true dual-threat quarterback. Nix

said the Rebels’ biggest challenge will be bringing Newton down, a difficult task considering the quarterback weighs more than most linebackers. “It’s going to be fun watching us try to tackle him,” Nix said. “I think we have an opportunity to upset them,” freshman running back Jeff Scott said. “We’ve been working real hard in practice, watching film on them. We just have to play

OVERBY CENTER

T H E I N N AT O L E M I S S

OPINION

LIFESTYLES

SPORTS

DISCUSSION: THE SCRUGGS CASE

BRIDGING THE GAP: UM PAST AND PRESENT

BUT AREN’T THEY ENDANGERED?

MGMT COMES TO THE LYRIC OXFORD TONIGHT

MEET THE QUARTERBACK: CAMERON NEWTON

Curtis Wilkie and Peter Boyer, staff reporter for The New Yorker, will discuss Wilkie’s new book, “The Fall of the House of Zeus” and the Scruggs case.

Ole Miss students will have the opportunity to network with panelists Jimmy Brown, Charles Cascio, Peggy Davis, Jan Farrington, Michael Glenn and George Hilliard.

Today Overby Center 5 p.m. Free

Today The Inn at Ole Miss 3:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Free

The Daily Mississippian

with heart. It’s up to us.” Ole Miss senior quarterback Jeremiah Masoli, who played in plenty of high-profile contests while leading Oregon the past two seasons, hopes to build on last week’s game against Arkansas. Masoli threw for 327 yards, rushed for 98 more and threw for three touchdowns during the Rebels’ 38-24 loss to the Razorbacks. Masoli said Auburn, the See AUBURN, PAGE 24


OPINION O P IN I O N |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2

CAROLINE LEE editor-in-chief

LANCE INGRAM city news editor

BY JOSH CLARK Cartoonist

EMILY ROLAND campus news editor VICTORIA BOATMAN enterprise editor MIA CAMURATI opinion editor EMILY CEGIELSKI lifestyles editor PAUL KATOOL sports editor KATIE RIDGEWAY design editor ADDISON DENT photography editor ALIX ZACHOW copy chief

PATRICK HOUSE business manager KEATON BREWER GEORGE WILBUR BORDELON DUSTIN MAUFFRAY ALEX PENCE

account executives

T H E D A I LY M I S S I S S I P P I A N E D I T O R I A L B O A R D

We recommend Childers to continue to represent District 1 Travis Childers attended the University of Mississippi. Alan Nunnelee earned his degree at Mississippi State University. The choice is clear as to which candidate should become the Congressman that represents Mississippi’s District 1. Once we looked beyond the candidates’ respective alma maters, we discovered that the candidates share many of their views. Emily Le Coz at the Daily Journal in Tupelo compiled a list of eerie similarities: the same birth year, wives with simliar names, owners of small businesses, succeeded Roger Wicker in office– the list goes on. Aside from their party affiliation, the two have strikingly similar views on many topics that usually split down the party line. This makes this election a particularly difficult decision. Both of the candidates have previous political experience and a fairly consistent history concerning their views. Both are pro-gun. Both are anti-abortion. Both oppose privatizing Social Security. To better discern which candidate

T H E

to choose, we narrowed our view for judgement. The editorial board at The Daily Mississippian has surveyed the issues we find to be of the most concern: health care, jobs and economy and education. Neither of the candidates were supportive what they call “Obamacare.” While Nunnelee wants to repeal the health care bill in its entirety, Childers insists we not “throw the baby out with the bath water.” As college students that benefit from various parts of the health care bill, and as citizens close to going out into the job market, there are parts of the health care bill that benefit us. We had mixed thoughts about the health care bill itself, but agreed that the parts that affect us as a demographic, such as the reform of student loans and the ability to stay on the family insurance up until age 26. The economy is still bleak for those entering the job market for the first time. With the uncertainty that many students face, we like the idea of staying on family insurance. With an uncertain future salary, we are especially fond of

paying student loans back a little at a time. Whether or not Childers supports these specific parts, in voting for Nunnelee, we know that we have a scarcer chance to be included in the parts that could benefit us most. Each candidate deeply vested in ensuring more jobs for more Americans. Childers voted on a host of pro-jobs legislation that earned him the Spirit of Enterprise award from the US Chamber of Commerce. To get more jobs, we must improve the economy, and with that, the country must take care of its debt. Nunnelee seems to want to get out of debt by cutting “pork” and earmarks, but wants to extend Bush tax cuts indefinitely. Childers wants to extend the Bush tax cuts as well, but only for a year– for now. While we like tax cuts just as much as the rest, we liked the idea of testing the waters first. It is deep-seated in how as a college student one must maintain money: Usually, there’s not much of it, and if and when we overdraft, we have to take care of it immediately. The idea of working with larger sums of money is distant for most of us, so we are infi-

nitely more comfortable with the idea of pay-as-you-go and trying to get rid of the debt the country has already accumulated. Perhaps most importantly is the need to take care of education. Mississippi has consistently fallen to the bottom of education, and even those of us that aren’t from the Magnolia State want the best for its schools. Because we attend a public university, this is also important. We would like to see more improvement, and without any kind of federal money, we aren’t sure whether the poorest areas of Mississippi can make it. Local money helps greatly, but when you start with a small budget, there is little to work with. Nunnelee has said that he wants to improve it, but leave it on a local level as much as possible. In an ideal world, that would work, but when there is little money to provide, that theory is just that– a theory. It is through studying these three areas that we have concluded that Childers meets the needs of students better than Nunnelee. Even if we forget, for a moment, our shared school spirit.

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year.

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall

Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated.

Main Number: 662.915.5503

Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

ISSN 1077-8667

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

ROBBIE CARLISLE KELSEY DOCKERY LIBBI HUFF SARA LOWREY

creative assistants

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser ARVINDER SINGH KANG manager of media technology DYLAN PARKER creative/technical supervisor DARREL JORDAN chief engineer MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager STEPHEN GOFORTH broadcast manager DARCY DAVIS administrative assistant


O P IN I O N |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 3

TIME TO PACK VAUGHT-HEMINGWAY Early kickoffs, mediocre opponents and high ticket prices in the midst of a recession make it understandable that Vaught-Hemingway Stadium has not been filled to capacity yet this season. But Saturday’s matchup with the Auburn Tigers has everything a football fan could want to see. Saturday, the Rebels have BCS No.1 Auburn coming to Oxford. Remember the last time the Rebels beat a No. 1-ranked team? I don’t either. I know it hasn’t happened in my lifetime. If a chance to watch the Rebels beat the top-ranked team in the nation isn’t enough to get you excited for this game, how about desperation? With a losing record after two hard-fought losses on the road, Rebels fans should be more ready for a big win than we have been in a long time.

Trivia question: what was Ole Miss’ record after seven games in 2008? Ding, ding, ding — that’s right! They were 3-4, in the same position as the current Rebels. That season ended with the Rebels on a six-game winning streak, capped off by a win over then No. 7-ranked Texas Tech in the Cotton Bowl. This team needs a win Saturday. With two more SEC road games and the best team Miss. State has fielded in a decade on the schedule, six wins will be a very difficult task if the Rebels don’t pull off the upset over Auburn. A win Saturday could set the Rebels on a course to a traditional New Year’s Day bowl. A loss could have the team sitting at home over the holidays. If desperately needing a win over the best team in the country isn’t enough to get the seats of Vaught-

Hemingway filled, this game has serious star power and two highflying offenses that promise to excite. Leading the top-ranked Tigers is quarterback Cam Newton, the newest, most electric superstar in the world of college football The junior college transfer has burst onto the SEC football scene with 1,077 yards rushing, 1,364 passing and 27 total touchdowns through eight games. The latest vote by the “experts” at ESPN.com had Newton a unanimous frontrunner for the Heisman after eight weeks. Let’s face it, offense sells tickets. And there will certainly be no lack of scoring Saturday. The Rebels and Tigers are ranked sixth and first in scoring offense in the SEC, respectively, and fifth and first in total offense, each averaging over 400 yards and 30 points

per game. If all of that doesn’t make this game attractive enough, head to the Grove about lunchtime tomorrow. The game doesn’t start until 5 p.m., so unlike those damned 11:20 a.m. kickoffs, you’ll have plenty of time to put on a potent pair of bourbon goggles to watch the game through. So when the Rebels take down the top-ranked Tigers tomorrow night, let’s have a rowdy crowd of 60,000-plus Rebels there to handle the celebration the way it should be handled when a team with a losing record knocks off No. 1 at home. Remember the 2002 win over then-No. 8 Florida? I do. And so does the crew that has to put up new goalposts when they come down.

BY JACOB FULLER Columnist

Getting in the Halloween spirit Halloween is the only day when it is perfect acceptable to take candy from strangers. I remember a time when I would dress up in cute little costumes and beg my parents to take me to the best neighborhoods in town. Everyone knew that they were the ones who handed out the best candy. Once my bag was full of the treats (that were no doubt responsible for the many cavities I have had), I would return home. My parents would then dump out the contents of my and my sister’s bags and inspect them before we could enjoy them. The only reason why our candy lasted so long was because our parents put it on the top shelf in the kitchen. Even with a chair, I could not reach. I have never been the tallest person in the world. get your morning fix

When my grandmother went into the nursing home, we paid a visit to her every Halloween. The ladies who lived with her would give us candy and hugs, and they showed us love. This was the best candy. No, it was not expensive or different than the candy from the houses in the neighborhood. What made this candy so great, other than the fact that it was free, was that it had meaning. I cannot remember the exact reason why I stopped. I could say it is because my parents stopped asking me to go, but the truth is, it came to a point when I no longer wanted to go. The idea of dressing up just to get candy did not appeal to me anymore. My parents then started buying can-

dy for us to hand out to the kids who came to the door in costume, and some for us to eat ourselves. I enjoyed this more. I have always been the kind of person who wanted to be behind the scenes. The writer of a newspaper, the photographer behind the lens, and the one controlling the candy bowl. Sometimes I wish I could go back to those days. The days in the past when everything was so simple and others did my worrying for me. But dwelling in the past does not change the present. Speaking of the present, I still enjoy the spirit of Halloween. Every year, I come up with a costume idea; whether I go through with it or not is a different story. It is the thought that counts.

Bangkok Thai

10% off for students with id

Authentic Thai Food

Mon-fri: dinner 5:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. fri-sun: dinner 5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Restaurant 662-513-0085

delivery within 3 miles

Mon-fri: Lunch 11:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

1101 frontage rd - next to days inn

The Daily Mississippian

The STudenT newSpaper

of

The univerSiTy

of

MiSSiSSippi

Hereafter

4:05, 7:05, 9:50 Pg-13

Jackass 3-D

4:35, 7:20, 9:45 r

Life as We knoW it

4:15, 7:15, 9:50 Pg-13

n-secure

4:45, 7:30, 9:55 r

ParanormaL activity 2 4:40, 7:25, 9:35 r reD

4:10, 7:00, 9:30 Pg-13

secretariat

4:00, 7:00, 9:40 Pg

tHe sociaL netWork

4:15, 7:05, 9:45 Pg-13

Please Drink Responsibly

Costumes are no longer just for little ones. They now make adult costumes, which are slightly more provocative then those you would find on a toddler. Trick-or-treating may not be as popular for the older generation as it is for the younger, but there are other ways to celebrate this holiday. A few ways are by attending a costume party, carving a pumpkin, or even something as small as indulging yourself in a bowl of candy corn. Haunted castles and houses are also very common around this time. Or you can stay at home and watch scary movies all night with your friends, complete with ghost shaped cookies and ‘bloody’ fruit punch. Whatever you decide to do, just remember, you are never too old for Halloween.

THE

BY STEPHANIE THOMAS Columnist

BIG $4.99

DEAL

LARG E PEPPERONI READY TO GO UNTIL 10 PM PICK UP ONLY

662-236-3030

1603 W. JACKSON AVE.


OPINION O P IN I O N | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 4

BY DREW HYATT

Letter to the Editor

Cartoonist

To the Editor, I would like to ask letter writers such as Arthur Randallson who feel strongly about the mascot issue not to call those with whom they disagree “Marxists,” “traitors” and “insane.” The issue is not simply “majority rule,” but (a) whether university officials committed to recruiting a more diverse community have a right to ban as their official mascot a figure that some find offensive and (b) whether those who claim to support athletics at UM should support the unanimous request of our coaches for a new mascot. These are interesting questions. They deserve to be debated according to the university’s standards of intelligent, rational discourse. So enough already with the name calling. We are already too polarized! Peter Frost Visiting Professor of International Studies

Today’s Internet BY ADAM GANUCHEAU Columnist

It’s 8 a.m. You wake up and go to class. You sit down for a lecture and all the students have their laptops out. Chances are, no one is really taking notes or following the PowerPoint slides—they are surfing the web. Just because the lecture is that boring. It is just a given in today’s society: Everyone uses the Internet. We are in college. We have a lot of time on our hands. Among many other reasons, we use the Internet for social networking, entertainment, and music. Social networking is clearly one of the most successful inventions since sliced bread. Everyone and their (insert any immediate family member here) is on Facebook. Many widely known celebrities are on Twitter. MySpace has become more of a dying art, but many people still use it.

Millions of people use social networking, and it has truly proven to be what people want. The movie The Social Network, portraying the true story about how Facebook was created, took the movie industry by storm this month, earning billions of dollars. I would bet any student on campus $5 that I know something about your Internet habits. Your homepage on your computer is Facebook. I will take that even farther to guess that you use Facebook or Twitter at least three times a day. My wallet is about $500,000 thicker now. “Yeah, yeah,” you say. Social networking is something we all use; that’s old news. What is becoming more and more popular these days are entertainment Web sites: FML (F My Life), TFLN (Texts From Last Night), TFM (Total Frat

DWIGHT N. BALL AT TOR N E Y AT L AW SINCE 1970

104 Courthouse Square (the Downtown Square) Oxford, Mississippi 38655

662-234-7777

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: includes DUI,

PUBLIC DRUNK, FAKE ID, MIP, AND ALL OTHER ALCOHOL OFFENSES; SPEEDING, RECKLESS DRIVING, FAKE DRIVER’S LICENSE, AND ALL OTHER TRAFFIC OFFENSES; EXPIRED TAG, NO DRIVER’S LICENSE, AND ALL OTHER MOTOR VEHICLE RELATED OFFENSES; POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA, PARAPHERNALIA, AND POSSESSION OR SALE OF ALL OTHER ILLEGAL DRUGS; DISTURBING THE PEACE, DISORDERLY CONDUCT, SHOPLIFTING, AGGRAVATED ASSAULT, SIMPLE ASSAULT, AND ALL OTHER CRIMES.

Move, because this IS Ole Miss), MLIA (My Life is Average), and the list goes on and on. You know what these sites are. They are hilarious, time-wasting sites that are taking up more and more of our time spent while surfing the Internet. They are knee-slapping, real-life occurrences that allow us to get away from everything and laugh. Let it be known that these sites are addicting and can cause bad, bad grades in the test you have tomorrow. Ah, who cares, I’m going to read TFM. College is a time of independence, studying (ha), partying and gaining an awesome taste in music. Naturally, we want to be a step ahead in finding great new music. We attend all concerts that happen to come through Oxford. On the Internet, we use sites like iTunes, Napster, and Windows Me-

dia Center to buy music. We use sites like Limewire, BearShare, and iMesh to download music (shh, that’s illegal). Like social networking and entertainment sites, these music sites are something that takes up the majority of our time spent on the Internet. The Internet is truly a wonderful thing. It allows us to have the social skills, the entertainment, and the access to music that previous generations to ours never had. What we need to do, though, is not take for granted what we have. We have basically whatever we could ask for in the Internet. We should appreciate just how fortunate we are to have such an innovative tool at our disposal. Wait, what am I doing? I am going to check my Facebook and read FML while listening to digital music that is much better than Nickelback.

It’s time again for GRΣΣK NIGHT!

Ole Miss Volleyball vs. #1 Florida

TONIGHT OCTOBER 29TH AT 7PM Ole Miss Greek Organizations compete for the “Spirit Award” and $500 to be donated to winner’s favorite charity

Tailgating area open at 4PM

Gillom Sports Center


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 5

Susie Haskins Bash to be held tonight BY DANA MATHEWS The Daily Mississippian

The Susie Haskins Bash will take place tonight benefiting The Susan Christena Haskins Memorial Scholarship Endowment. “We wanted to do something fun for Susan; and having a band play music and eat food

Thank you Oxford & Ole Miss s for voting u

would be something Susan would have wanted to do,” sorority sister and event co-planner Hannah Micheli said. Micheli, who was Susan’s “little sis” at the Kappa Delta sorority said just knowing people were there having fun would make Susan happy. All proceeds will be going to The Susan Haskins Scholar-

ship, which is awarded to a junior hospitality management major at Ole Miss. Last year they raised $10,000 and over 600 people attended the event according to Haley Huerta, Susan’s former roommate and event co-planner. “We met junior year in high school,” said Huerta. “She was See BASH, PAGE 9

NEW Fine Chinese & Southern Home Cooking Buffet & Grill

Oxford’s Best Buffet

STEAK • SEAFOOD • SALAD • DESSERT

ANNIVERSARY

SPECIAL! ED WRIGHT | The Daily Mississippian

Freshman International Studies major Gracie Boland (left) and freshman Psychology major Lindsey Barrilleaux (right) raise support for the 2nd annual Susie Haskins Bash in front of the union on Thursday afternoon. The Susie Haskins Bash is tonight from 6-9 p.m. at The Powerhouse. Tickets are $10 at the door.

LUNCH - $5.97 DINNER - $7.30 (662) 281-8681 • 2580 Jackson Avenue (Next to Wal-Mart)


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 6

JUDGING HIGHER EDUCATION WITH CLAUDIA DREIFUS BY MALLORY SIMERVILLE The Daily Mississippian

On Monday Nov. 1, author Claudia Dreifus will be visiting the University to speak about her book “Higher Education?: How colleges are wasting our money and failing our kids and what we can do about it.” Dreifus and co-author Andrew Hacker have traveled from coast to coast visiting various universities and colleges prior to writing the book in order to better understand how these institutions run. “They recommend a number of reforms of higher education, things that they believe will make colleges and universities stronger,” associate professor of higher education Amy Wells Dolan said. Although the book exemplifies a more negative aspect on most universities, they have compiled a list of eleven that stood out above the rest. Ole Miss took the number one spot.

“The great thing about her book is that the University of Mississippi is identified as a positive institution,” Dolan said. “She’s not critical of Ole Miss in any way.” Dolan will lead the discussion with Dreifus on Monday. “My job is to promote a conversation with Claudia Dreifus, so that some of the themes and ideas of her book with Andrew Hacker are brought into discussion,” Dolan said. According to Dreifus, a college education is the second most expensive thing a family will purchase, behind a mortgage. To her, it’s worth the tuition at Ole Miss. “One of the things we liked was that it’s a public university and the tuition is comparatively reasonable compared to a private university, but it seems to me it’s as good as any of the more expensive liberal arts colleges,” Dreifus said. By having the medical school in a different location, she be-

lieves that the university has the feel of a small liberal arts college while still offering the benefits of a large institution. Dreifus feels that the Ivy League schools do not focus on their undergraduate programs enough but instead place a higher value on graduate school. “I felt at Ole Miss, it was different,” Dreifus said. “People who were there were teaching, cared about teaching, cared about their students. Those of you who are attending, have a very fortunate bargain and I think educationally you should consider yourself lucky because you could be paying two or three times that and you wouldn’t get a better education.” Dreifus and Hacker believe that undergraduate programs should be simple and uncluttered, and they feel the arts should play a vital role in both community and institution. Most universities have gotten caught up in academic fads that tend to be cost-consuming, but lack in

nurturing their students. “Somehow that never got to Mississippi, and that’s actually a good thing,” Dreufus said. Prior to visiting Oxford, she had never attended a football game. “I wanted to see what it was like, and the role it plays in peoples lives,” she said. Driefus believes that football should be abolished at most universities, especially because it is a major reason for tuition prices to rise, but an Oxford game day weekend changed her mind. “I felt that it was really a part of the culture,” Dreifus said. “I went around the Grove before and after the game, and I just sort of casually talked to a lot of people, they weren’t brought to me to testify how great Ole Miss was, they just loved Ole Miss. Most people say that college years are supposed to be the best years of your life, well a lot of people at Ole Miss seem to be having a worthwhile experience, and that’s what it should be.”

One of the biggest reasons, the University topped the list is its history. “The University of Mississippi has a really troubling, sad and difficult racial history,” Driefus said. “I was very moved to see the statue of James Merideth on campus. It really says that this is a history that is not hidden, that is not painted over, that people are trying to deal with.” Driefus will be revisiting a number of stops on her book tour and has already been featured on the C-SPAN network. According to Dolan, her book has received a tremendous amount of attention from the public. “I think she will be welcomed back by students, faculty and staff because of the praise that she gave,” Dolan said. “It might feel like a pat on the back.” Dreifus will be speaking in the Overby Center at 4 p.m. on Monday Nov. 1, and will have a book signing at Square Books following the discussion.

County seeks stiffer charges for drug dealers BY CAIN MADDEN The Daily Mississippian

Metro Narcotics Captain Keith Davis said Oxonians are tired of drug dealers selling near schools and churches. “The community is tired of it, and law enforcement is tired of it,” Davis said. “We are going to prosecute these sort of crimes to their fullest extent.”

While enhancement charges are not anything new, Davis said the district attorney’s office wants to put the enhancements on the front end. “In the past, we would just recommend they be charged with sale of whatever substance,” Davis said. “And the enhancements would come up as leverage when making an offer.” Enhancement charges enable

judges to double a fine or jail time of someone convicted of the crime, and it becomes a felony charge. If a dealer sold less than one ounce of marijuana in a school or church zone, which is 1500 feet from the structures, the dealer can be fined up to $6,000 and faces up to six years in jail. Selling drugs with a minor present is considered contrib-

uting to the delinquency of a minor, and also doubles any penalty. “This is not something new we are doing,” Davis said. “This is just a technique.” The technique starts with the officer, who reports the information on the suspect and presents it to the district attorney. The DA then prepares an indictment, which goes to the

grand jury. The grand jury decides if the crime was committed, and whether it should go to circuit court, of if it is bound back to justice court. The Daily Mississippian could not reach District Attorney Benjamin Creekmore for comment Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

Friendship. Sisterhood. LuLu’s. TONIGHT 5:30 & 10 CHANNEL 99 NEWSWATCH

NIGHT SPECIALS of of

Lime Margaritas Domestic Beer Margarita 10oz. Domestic Beer

$11.99 $4.99 $3.99 99¢

Lunch & Dinner Specials Every Day! 1908 West Jackson Ave.

Oxford, MS

(662) 236 - 3855

responsibly

Pitcher Pitcher Flavored 12oz.

drink

Located Between Boure’ and High Point Coffee

FRIDAY AND SATUDARY please

Shoes and accessories for all your Rush week needs

Must be 21 with a valid I.D. to order drinks

University employees get 10% discount for lunch!


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 7

3-D video to be viewed at halftime Saturday BY MOLLY HUTTER The Daily Mississippian

According to University Brand Services, Ole Miss fans are in for a college football first during halftime of Saturday’s game against Auburn. A 90-second 3-D video will be shown on Vaught-Hemingway Stadium’s Jumbotron Saturday night, and more than 60,000 3-D glasses will be distributed to fans. Matthew Graves, leader of the project and Media and Documentary Projects filmmaker, said that although 3-D technology certainly isn’t new, it has never been used before in a college football environment. Jim Ebel, chief marketing officer for University Brand Services, said that as the first of its kind, the video will “dem-

onstrate the capabilities and creativeness of the University.” “One of the most amazing experiences is being the first at doing something,” Ebel said. Graves said that each year the University has a new national commercial that is premiered during the football season. This video is the University’s 2010 national commercial. Last year’s video featured Ole Miss basketball players as giants, dwarfing the Lyceum and stomping through campus. He said that this year’s commercial is an amplified version of the same idea with, of course, a 3-D twist. Graves said that innovation was one of the driving factors behind the project. “It’s neat for the University to be on the forefront of this reemerging technology,” he said.

Hannah Foreman, a senior from Jackson, said that she’s excited to see the video Saturday and that she is impressed by the University’s technological progressiveness. “Everything’s going 3-D now—movies, video games, everything,” she said. Innovation does, however, come with a cost. The 60,000 glasses and extra technology needed to create the 3-D product have made this year’s national commercial substantially more expensive than usual, said those behind the project. The video was funded by the University Brand Services and Ole Miss Media and Documentary Projects. Ebel said that he thinks the benefits will be well worth the investment and that the video

fits in with the university’s “experience amazing” marketing theme. “The video brings the experience amazing position to the sports arena,” Ebel said. Some students, however, feel the money could be better spent elsewhere. Scott King, a business student from Jackson, said that he doesn’t understand why the school is spending money to advertise so elaborately to its own fans. “If Ole Miss has enough money for 60,000 3-D glasses and a 3-D video, why aren’t they putting that money into building more classrooms, hiring more teachers or lowering tuition?” King said. “They’re going to spend this much extra money for a 90-second promotional video directed to our

As part of the Fall 2010 Visiting Speaker Series the Croft Institute presents

respect mother earth, recycle your dm WATCH NEWS HAPPEN

CAR GENIE Mobile Car Wash & Detail

1-877-607-0523

The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and Prospects for Peace on the Korean Peninsula Scott Snyder The Asia Foundation Monday, November 1 – 7:00 PM – Croft 107

% 20 Student Discount with your Ole Miss ID Wash & Wax • Engine Steam Clean Carpet Care • Chrome Cleaning Exterior and Interior Detailing

Scott Snyder is Director of the Center for U.S.-Korea Policy at The Asia Foundation and a Senior Associate at Pacific Forum CSIS. He is also the Adjunct Senior Fellow for Korean Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and is based in Washington, DC. He lived in Seoul, South Korea as Korea Representative of The Asia Foundation during 2000-2004. Previously, he served as a Program Officer in the Research and Studies Program of the U.S. Institute of Peace, and as Acting Director of The Asia Society’s Contemporary Affairs Program.

Looking to relocate your business or start a new business?

Call Leshia and let her show you The Ice House, Oxford’s premier business address.

NewsWatch Ch. 99 Streams a Live Broadcast

COMMERCIAL • PROFFESIONAL OFFICE • RETAIL

Call Leshia Martin 234-8882 or 801-3865

at 5:30 to 6:00 P.M. Monday through Friday.

email: lmartin@trefirm.com

Go to theDMonline.com

own fans? It just doesn’t make sense.” Graves, however, is excited about the impact the video may have on the game day atmosphere. “I hope it literally adds another dimension to the experience this weekend,” he said. Along with the video, several other unique factors have been planned for this weekend’s game against number-oneranked Auburn. These factors include a new defensive chant for the audience to participate in, an invitation to wear Halloween costumes to the game and a celebration of the 50th anniversary of Ole Miss’ 1960 national title team. The official color for the game is blue. Kickoff is set for 5 p.m. CST, and the game will be aired on ESPN 2.

Croft lectures are free and open to the public.

For more information or if you require assistance relating to a disability, please contact Brooke Worthy at 662-915-1500 or HYPERLINK “mailto:bworthy@olemiss.edu” bworthy@olemiss.edu.

and click ‘NEWSWATCH LIVE’

www.croft.olemiss.edu

Habits

662-236-6651

2030 E University Ave. Oxford, MS

Discount Tobacco and Beverage

EVERYDAY

PBR 30 packs $14.99

American Spirits $4.93/pack Best Price in Town 4 Loco 24 oz. $1.99

Cheapest Im p o rt s in To w n

Your One Stop Shop for all your Tobacco, Tobacco Accessories and Beer

DEEPER DISCOUNT ON 100 CASES OR MORE PURCHASE. CALL AHEAD!

Please drink responsibly.

ti o n W id e S e le c n R o ll Y o u r O w Tobacco

Natural LT & Keystone 30 packs $14.99


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 8

Ole Miss alumni to be honored at homecoming game The Alumni Association will award and induct seven Ole Miss alumni into the Hall of Fame for their contributions and services to Mississippi, the University and the country. The seven recipients are:

JACK GEARY

JENNIFER GILLIOM

TRENT LOTT

RAY MABUS

Vicksburg

Abbeville

Pascagoula

Ackerman

A graduate of Ole Miss School of Business in 1952, Geary was student body president as well as president of the Kappa Alpha Order. After serving in the United States Air Force, he began working for Mississippi Power and Light Company in Jackson. Geary then moved on to many other business organizations throughout the state as both officer and director. He was the founding president of the Catholic Foundation of the Diocese of Jackson and has also served as a member of the executive committee and chairman of the investment committee. Geary is a former president of the Alumni Association and director of the UM Foundation and the Business School Advisory Board.

Gillom is a Hall of Fame WNBA player and is now the head coach of the Los Angeles Sparks. She played in the inaugural season for the WNBA from 1997 to 2003. After her record setting career as a player at Ole Miss, Gillom played on professional teams in other countries while waiting for the WNBA to get its start. After retiring, she became head coach at Xavier College Preparatory, and in the 2008 WNBA season, Gillom was assistant coach for the Sparks. She was inducted into the Hall of Fame on her 45th birthday in 2009. The Gillom Sports Center at Ole Miss is named after Jennifer and her sister Peggie.

Trent Lott is a graduate of Ole Miss Law School and founder of the Lott Leadership Institute on campus. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1972 where he served for 16 years. In 1998, Lott was elected to the U.S. Senate where he held the position of majority leader, and in 1996 and was elected to be the Republican Whip in the Senate, a position he held for eight years. Lott is the only person to hold the Whip position in both houses of Congress. Lott spent a grand total of 35 years representing Mississippi in Congress. Though now retired, he continues to serve through the Breaux Lott Leadership Group, a consulting firm he co-founded with former Senator John Breaux of Louisiana. While at Ole Miss, Lott was president of the Sigma Nu fraternity and a cheerleader for the Rebels.

Mabus graduated Ole Miss as Summa Cum Laude before moving on to receive his master’s degree in political science at John Hopkins University and a law degree from Harvard Law School. In 1988, he became the governor of Mississippi, during which time he passed B.E.S.T (Better Education for Success Tomorrow). Before he was governor Mabus was the state auditor of Mississippi. He also served as Surface War Officer aboard the USS Little Rock in the Navy. During his time as governor, Forbes Magazine named him as one of the top 10 education governors, and in 1994, President Clinton appointed him ambassador to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Today Mabus is the 75th United States Secretary of the Navy.

DEBRA STARNES Beaumont, Texas

Starnes graduated from Ole Miss in 1975 with a Bachelor of Science Chemical Engineering degree. She earned an MBA from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville. From there she became the Aromatics Business Manager for Lyondell Petrochemical Company in Houston. Starnes served as the chemical representative on the MTBE Blue Ribbon Panel, and in 2001 she was awarded the Upward Mobility Award from the Society of Women Engineers. She is a past member of the Ole Miss Engineering Advisory Board, and she is also on the boards of directors for Parker Hannifin Corporation and Envera.

KAPPA welcomes ALPHAallTHETA our new kites!

Acuff,Brittani Bax,Julia Boatman,Victoria Bonsignore,Danielle Borgmeyer,Katie Bowen,Alex Boyles,Jessica Brandt,Emily Breunig,Bridget Brunson,Amelia Bzoch,Cali Callicutt,Caitlin Chenier,Kristiana Childress,Haley Collier,Morgan DeSaussure,Rachael Devan,Taylor Drennen,Cecilia Dudley,Sallianne Dutt,Elizabeth Feldman,Hannah Gandy,Meredith Geddie,Ginny Green,Jennifer

Guirola,Melissa Gwilliam,Margot Harris,Bracey Harrison,Holley Herbert,Kelly Holland,Kitty Howard,Sara Hubbs,Hillary Huling,Tabby Irvine,Katie Jernigan,Rachel Kaur,Raman Keatley,Katie Klibert,Nicole Kniepkamp,Alison LaVoy,Jori Leshe,Emily Lydia,Jasmine Mack,Maggie Maloney,Meagan Marchetto,Kristin Massey,Kayla Mathes,Brandi McHugh,Danielle

Morris,Cari Moses,Jamie Mullins,Camille Murphy,Wight Newbold,Tricia Nichols,Amanda Omar,Amber Owen,Kelly Paddock,Bess Patel,Sejal Poe,Sherry Rawson,Reagan Roelofs,Brittany Rolquin,Megan Rowley,Sarah Sahrmann,Liz Scott,Ashli Shows,Katie Simerville,Mallory Sims,Alex Smith,Madison Spriggs,Mackenzie Stenger,Anna Taft,Jenna

Taggart,Jacqueline Terry,Katie Thames,Farrah Thornton,Olivia Todd,Mary Tucker,Susie Turner,Alex Vinals,Kimberly Walker,Trish Walsh,Elizabeth Warnock,Tori Wasserman,Stephanie Watkins,Olivia Welsh,Stephanie Whittaker,Shannon Whitten,Hannah Wilson,Mayme Wirick,Becca Wiseman,Patricia Wright,Anika Caroline Bartley Carolyn Isham Christina Spicher


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

on November 6

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 9

Oxford Halloween Events Ghostly Tales and Songs Friday, October 29 L.Q.C. Lamar Museum 6 p.m. Hallow-Him Carnival Friday, October 29 North Oxford Baptist Church’s Family Life Center 5:30 p.m. -7:00 p.m. and 10 p.m. to midnight for youth grades 7 through 12

SHELDON MORRIS

WILLIAM FREEMAN JR.

Jacksonville, Fla.

Newton

Morris played wide receiver for the Rebels for three years while serving in the ROTC; he was also a member of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity. After graduating, Morris was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Infantry. He has served multiple tours in Iraq and has been stationed in various locations such as Fort Benning in Ga., and Fort Hood in Texas. Morris has been decorated with various medals including the Bronze Star Medal with four oak leaf clusters, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Valorous Unit Award and the Army Achievement Medal with three oak leaf clusters, to name a few. Morris is currently stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. for schooling and will return to Fort Hood to prepare for a deployment to Afghanistan.

Freeman has served in the military for more than 35 years. He is a Hall of Fame member of the Mississippi Military Academy’s Officer Candidate School and is an honorary member of the Ole Miss Army R.O.T.C. Alumni Board. Freeman is a former president of the East Mississippi Ole Miss Alumni Association and has served in the banking industry for over 40 years. Freeman was chosen by governor Haley Barbour to be the adjutant general for Mississippi and serves as commanding general for the Mississippi Army and Air National Guard.

Spooky Physics Demonstrations Friday, October 29 Lewis Hall 7 p.m. -9 p.m.

Yocona Harvest Festival Saturday, October 30 Yocona Community Center 6 p.m. -9 p.m. Haunted Hay Ride Saturday, October 30 Northwest Side Civic Club (Harmontown Community Center) 6 p.m. -8 p.m. Cossar State Park Halloween Festival Saturday, October 30 Cossar State Park 6:30 p.m.-10 p.m.

H2: Healthy Halloween on the Square Sunday. October 31 Powerhouse Community Arts Center 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Hermitage Trick-or-Treat Sunday, October 31 Hermitage Gardens on Belk Boulevard 5:30 p.m. -7 p.m. Halloween Spooktacular Safestop Sunday, October 31 Lafayette County Courthouse 4 p.m. -6 p.m.

BASH,

continued from page 5

by far my best friend and words can not even describe her. The event will have live music by Good Paper and food donated by local Oxford Restaurants. There will also be raffle tickets for sale for one dollar. There are over thirty raffle prizes including gift cards and baskets from My Favorite Shoes, Indi-

gos, and Miss Behavin’. “This event is something that most students feel are close to their hearts,” said Micheli. “Susan was a friend to all and always welcomed friends everywhere she went. Many of the students at Ole Miss, especially myself, were truly affected by Susan’s death.” Micheli said she encourages

people to come with a smile. Haskins died on August 11, 2009 in a car accident in Amite County, Mississippi. Admission ticket will cost ten dollars at the door and will include the live show and food. Shirts will be on sale for $15. The Bash will take place at The Powerhouse from 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

CLASSPORTRAITS LOCATION:

Student Union Lobby

BEGINNING: Monday, October 25th November 5th 9am - 4pm

Enter for a chance to win one of the following: • iPad • Nikon Coolpix Camera • Various gift cards

Seniors: To schedule an appointment, please log on to www.ouryear.com. School code: 88003, or call 1-800-OUR-YEAR(1-800-687-9327).


NEWS N E W S | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 10

ELIZABETH BEAVER | The Daily Mississippian

EMMA WILLOUGHBY | The Daily Mississippian

LEFT: Junior psychology major Taylor Smith and senior psychology majors Jasmine Barnes and AC Rodriguez prepare the Psi Chi bake sale table Thursday afternoon outside of the Union. Psi Chi raised donations for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The club will hold a community walk on Nov. 7 at 1 p.m. RIGHT: Dancer Reid Bartelme and other members dance in Lar Lubovitch Dance Company’s show. The top-ranked modern dance company performed in the Ford Center on Tuesday night.

Phi Mu

would like to welco welcome me our new members Gabby Alonzo Alexa Anderson Mary Alan Bailey Kelly Barnett Ashley Bennett Julia Berger Courtney Beville-Mattina Stephanie Brennan Anna Blair Brown Courtney Byrd Samantha Cantrell Elise Carroll Caroline Cheatham Addie Clark Rachael Clark Kenna Collums Kate-Nicole Cooper Charli Costa Megan Covey Kim Dandridge Kate Davis Sydney Devers Paige Dineen Paige Dominick

Nola Douglas Jackie Dowler Witney Drummond Emory Dukes Katie Evans Taylor Evans Alexa Ferris Kristen Garcia Jackie Gledhill Caroline Hendershot Shelby Herron Kim Hobgood Emma Holman Bridgett Howell Emily Hungerpiller Campbell Hunt Brittan Johnson Micah Johnson Rianne Jones Kayla Keefe Kathryn Keel Erin Keller Grace Langenfelder Tamy Le

Leslie Anne Leach Karmen Linn Elizabeth LoCoco Kathryn Loughrige Katie Luna Carlye Mangum Erin Mattox Megan McBeth Ali McGee Barbara McMillin Sara Beth Michael Zoie Mitchell Allison Moody Stephanie Neely Carson Newby Ciara Oakley Brooke Parker Piper Pecanty Erin Pierce Kim Price Meagan Ramage Nicole Ray Mallorie Raybon KayLynn Rehberger

Brea Rich Kelly Ridenour Brittany Rose Susanna Rychlak Blake Schrouf Julia Simons Jordan Smith Morgan Smith Taylor Sockwell Caroline Spencer Sydnee Stafford Lauren Sun Lundy Switzer Jory Tally Mary Beth Tate Andrea Teran Haleigh Treutel Kayla Tynes Maura Wakefield Anna Kathryn Ward Samra Ward Morgan Wilcox Elizabeth Yelverton Briann Zink


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES | 10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 11

A day in the life of a Resident Assistant BY EMILY CEGIELSKI The Daily Mississippian

LEXI THOMAN | The Daily Mississippian

recycle your DM

The RAs at the Residential College South learn to love each other during RA training, which takes place three weeks before school starts. Left to right: Lexi Thoman, Katie Williamson, RHD Rachel Jones, Geoff Sinning, Adam Olson, Clinton Simon, Trey Warnock, Darius Watkins.

Meet Darius Watkins, a junior psychology major from Southaven. He is also in the middle of his second year as an RA at the Residential College. “I chose to become an RA because they have great benefits, and I wanted to get to know people,” Watkins said. “I had great RAs, and I wanted to continue the trend of good RAs at Ole Miss.” With all of his good intentions, Watkins had to go through a lot of work even before getting the job. According to him, the first step in becoming a resident advisor is attending an interest meeting, followed by “Super Saturday,” a five-hour long day of teambuilding exercises. A week later, interviews are scheduled, and applicants have to wait about two weeks before finding out if they have gotten the job. Once he landed the job, Watkins found

himself back at Ole Miss three weeks before school started. He took part in a lot of seminars. He learned all the rules. He participated in more team-building exercises to help him get acquainted with the job. So, what exactly is the job? “My job description is to be a counselor, advisor and anything else my residents need,” Watkins said. In addition to these responsibilities, RAs also work the desk (typically two hours a day) and put on programs for residents. All of this is time consuming, and Watkins admits that time management is one of the hardest parts of the job. According to Watkins, “trying to get to know your residents and trying to keep a good GPA and maintain your own personal life” are daily struggles. But while some RAs follow strict schedules to keep their lives in perspective, Watkins makes it clear that he does not follow that route. “I don’t like schedules; I don’t like to seem

like a robot,” Watkins said. “I just take it one day at a time.” Although Watkins’ life is hectic, he does not have it as bad as some of the RAs in other dormitories. According to Watkins the Residential College has no huge problems compared to other buildings. “The only real problems we have in the RC is that it’s got a whole lot of entrances, so it is really easy to sneak people in,” Watkins said. Noise violation and visitation are the biggest problems Watkins deals with on a regular basis. Occasionally, he has to deal with alcohol. But according to Watkins, the majority of calls he gets are just lock-outs, which is not enough to stop Watkins from enjoying his job. “The best part of being an RA is getting to know your residents and getting to know yourself,” Watkins said. “You begin to find out more about yourself as you’re stretched.”


H A P PY H A L LO W E E N |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 12


H A P PY H A L LO W E E N |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 13

El Mariachi Authentic Mexican Restaurant

Saturday Night

Thursday Night LIVE

KARAOKE

Y P P A H OWEEN

HALL

from

MUSIC

CATDADDRYS

GET YOU EB R L E N O L CO RE E H S T R I TSH TE O LA O T S ’ T I BEFORE

NEW SHIPMENT OF TANKS! SEVERA

L STYLES AND COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM!

304 S. LAMAR BLVD. OXFORD, 38655

OLE MISS VS. AUBURN AFTER PARTY

(662) 236-2639

Cotten Tutoring 119 Old Taylor Road (Before The Mark)

Accounting Group Rates Available Come to Cotten Tutoring for all your Tutoring Needs.

Cotten is always looking for qualified tutors in any subject

ACCOUNTING Economics Business Finance Management

234-2232

$500 Off Coupon Original coupon must be presented in order to obtain offer.


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 14

A SHOUT OUT TO THE PUMPKIN-MONTH SLACKERS leeway in terms of make, creativity and pure and unadulterated genius. All in all, there is still hope out there, even in these most dismal of times. Just do not expect to win any contests. By God, this is college, not a four-year vacation with tragically dressed youths! My first suggestion incorporates the average college student’s need, and the quintessential, if not cutely cliche, version of the classic costume portrayed in storybooks and television shows alike. Friends, followers, I present – the bed sheet. Hear me out. This is a mix of functionality and simplicity. Ever wonder what to do with those two-month old dirty bed sheets that just keep getting forgotten on laundry day? Here’s the answer. Take those things off the bed (if they even made it on in the first place), cut out two eyeholes, and voila! It’s a

BY MARY B SELLERS The Daily Mississippian

Those on campus who are not as enamored with Halloween as I am are probably beginning to fret over what to wear for the many Hallow’s Eve celebrations this weekend. I feel for them, I really do. Despite the great sadness in my soul that apathetic attitudes inspire, I’ll forgive slackers this one time. It is hard enough to plan out a (excuse my lack of proper description and lapse into modern slang) ballin’ costume, let alone a sloppy, second best one that will just “have to do”. It requires at least five minutes of utmost attention to details, logistics, and uh, other stuff, too. But I did this for everyone because, well, I rock. However, these second-rate ensembles meet a certain set of criteria too, my friends. Slackers are not completely off the hook, but are at least allowed a small percentage of

very own custom-made costume, tailored and sullied by Y-O-U. It will even save a couple of quarters, for those lazy freshmen. Just do not tell the Martin and Stockard laundry service I suggested this. Remember to say the obligatory ‘boo’ for me, or I will completely write off silent ghosts as a lost cause. Here is where I am indebted to pay due respect to a helpful hand that just happened to have a fantastic last-minute idea in its metaphorical palm. Sorry if that was confusing, but the point is: thanks girl in my English class for this next idea. Although I won’t drop any names, I will never forget this small kindness I am about to filch. With that being said, I am now claiming all rights to this idea (and no, a shout out will not be enough). This brings me to my second suggestion: Let us say we have a girl who

is extremely busy with the many activities that she is involved in on campus. Said girl simply cannot find the time for pondering over the more critical things in her life, like, who she will be for Halloween. Though as shameful and downright disappointing as I find this situation to be, I am here to help. All said girl needs to do is find a balloon, blow it up, place it under her shirt, and there you have it—she’s Juno. This might not be the Halloween pictures she will want to send home to Mom and Dad (at least, not without a caption explaining that it is all just a silly misunderstanding), but it will work and maybe even engender a few appreciative laughs. My last suggestion (sorry kids, I am not great at this either) is aimed specifically for those lucky few of you who are rail thin, unnaturally (no, unfairly) petite, and so cute it makes me sick. Yes—blessed

ones—I’m about to unfold my secret. This can also be found at Walmart, specifically in the costume section. Gasp! Yes, I know this was supposed to be a “last minute” how-to, so to speak, but really guys, if going to Walmart for a costume was really a plan, I would say that is pretty last minute. Ladies, browse through the selection of kid’s princess costumes. I’ve seen Snow White, Cinderella, even an Ariel or two. Pros? They are cheap—dirt cheap, cheaper than the adult ones, which is really good for college students. Secondly, these child’s costumes surpass the adult Disney costumes available today that are frumpy enough even to appeal to Grandma. These kids costumes certainly go with the general understanding that on Halloween, less is always, frighteningly more.

The DM Online .COM

11/4: Robert Earl Keen with Randy Rogers Band and Reckless Kelly

11/5: Of Montreal with Janelle Monae

11/13: Wolf Parade

12/2: Old 97’s

with Hayes Carll

GREAT LOCATION AT OLD TAYLOR ROAD AND HIGHWAY 6

Turnberry Condominiums A GATED COMMUNITY

FOR INFORMATION

CALL JAMEY (662) 832-7620

ONLY 6 NEW

FOR SALE AT BEST PRICE EVER!

UNITS LEFT

(662) 234-5555


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 15

IN REVIEW: 2011 FORD MUSTANG GT 5.0 BY MATTHEW BISHOP The Daily Mississippian

rience multiple G’s as they are propelled backwards into their seat. Despite this power, it is easy to notice how quiet the engine is at highway speeds. Our test car came with an actual three-pedaled manual as well. This transmission now has six gears, which puts it on par with both the Camaro and the Challenger. I was actually surprised at how crisp and short the shifting was on the six-speed. It feels like it came straight out of a Japanese sports car rather than an American muscle car. With the new 5.0L V8, sixspeed manual transmission and our car’s optional 3.73 rear axle ratio, the Mustang puts up some quite impressive performance numbers. It reaches 60 mph in just 4.6 seconds, the same as the Camaro. But it is faster in the real world acceleration test of 5070 mph at 8.1 seconds, which is almost two seconds faster than the Camaro. However, the new mustang is not just about going fast in a straight line, as it also handles and stops quite well. Our test car came with the optional Brembo brake package, with four piston calipers up front and two in the rear. The package also includes very unique looking 19-inch wheels. The Brembos are quite docile in just regular use, but when braking more “sportingly,” it will propel the occupants forward just as hard as the gas pedal will propel them back-

Ford has always been king of the pony cars. Ever since Ford first introduced the Mustang in 1964, Chevrolet and Dodge have always been trying to catch up. Then in 2009, Dodge came back with the Challenger R/T with 376 horsepower, and Chevrolet soon followed suit in 2010 with the Camaro SS which had 426 horsepower. Well, both of these made the 2010 Mustang GT with 300 horsepower look slow and weak. Because of this the 2010 Camaro has so far outsold the 2010 Mustang GT. Of course, Ford would not put up with this for long, so they brought back the venerable 5.0L V8 to get some revenge. Obviously, the main difference between the 2010 Mustang GT and 2011 Mustang is the 5.0L V8. This engine is by no means new to the Mustang. Ford fans may remember the 5.0L Mustangs of the late ‘80s which have now become drag strip kings. Others may know it by its size, 302 cubic inches, which put the original Mustang ahead of the competition back in the late ‘60s. But let us get back to the current 5.0. It has 412 horsepower with 390 lb-ft of torque. This now puts the Mustang right up there with its competition. The torque comes so suddenly and with such ferocity that when in second gear, it feels like the occupmants expe- See MUSTANG, PAGE 17

ELIZABETH BEAVER | The Daily Mississippian


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 16

MGMT TO PLAY AT THE LYRIC BY JOSH BREEDEN The Daily Mississippian

CONTRIBUTED

Oxford Dental

Walker Swaney D.D.S, Marc Mercier D.M.D., Mike Huggins, D.M.D.

Let us be your “Home Away from Home” Dentist.

Andrew VanWyngarden and Ben Goldwasser of MGMT have spent the last two years erasing their niche within the record industry. “Oracular Spectacular,” the duo’s 2007 debut, established them as synth-pop prodigies, eroding the barrier between mainstream and indie with bubbly club beats, exuberant lyrics and road cases full of tiedye tunics. However, by the end of their breakout year, the quirky Brooklynites felt burnt out and, most of all, misunderstood. “We were almost sort of associated with bands like Black Eyed Peas and Lady Gaga,” VanWyngarden told Knoxville. com when asked about the success of MGMT’s hit single “Kids.” “I think a lot of people who come to our shows just want to hear that song and get out.” In response, they released last April’s “Congratulations,” a psychedelic odyssey devoid of standout singles and stripped of the poppy frills that saturate “Oracular Spectacular.” Critics and fans alike spoke out against the record, criticizing the band’s detour into the organic sounds of the 60s. The Washington Post called the record “an endurance test that gets tougher as it goes. A psych/60’s pop/electro/retrodisco freak out with frequently unrecognizable song structures.” Distracted by the sprawling “reels of rhyme” present in “Siberian Breaks” and the brood-

ing gloom of “Lady Dada’s Nightmare,” reviewers missed the entire point of the album – artistic redefinition. “I was expecting it to get an overall better reception than it did,” explained VanWyngarden in an interview with Tampabay.com. “Some people for whatever reason, just jumped on it and decided to dismiss it because it didn’t sound like the first album.” “People thought of us as this electro-pop act,” VanWyngarden told NME. “And that’s not really who we are.” Their more recent live performances are indicative of this decisive self-acceptance as the band stands on stage unassumingly and, set aglow by sparse lighting, proceeds to navigate the ebbs and flows of each of their “Surrealistic Pillow”- era sets. MGMT is serious, focused and yet still manages to exude the youthfulness they exhibited during the “Oracular Spectacular” tour. Concentrating on energizing the crowd with their sound as opposed to outlandish stage antics, their only concern is making art, and that is refreshing. As of late, MGMT has been bogged down by a multitude of false allegations stemming from the mediocre sales and varied reception of “Congratulations.” One of these fabrications involves an alleged fan attack on drummer Will Berman, while another is centered around reports that Columbia might

keep the experimental 5-piece on a leash the next time they enter the studio. VanWyngarden responded colorfully to these rumors in an e-mail to Pitchfork calling the English reporters who first published these “facts,” “gobshot writers for s----- British tabloids [who] make up whatever the f--- they want about whomever they choose.” He addressed the situation with Columbia as well, saying, “we aren’t even close to starting the process of making a new album, label-relations are currently quite friendly, we are very proud of ‘Congratulations’.” Once pop darlings, MGMT now stands in opposition to the fickle listening base that propelled them to the heights of the industry. They never wanted to be famous and the sonic wanderings of “Congratulations” confirm this, turning their trademark coy reluctance towards stardom into an outright resistance against all things normal. “We don’t really care about mainstream acceptance, but in some ways we’re still trying to make pop music,” VanWyngarden told Pitchfork. “Maybe we’re just stupid and don’t realize you can’t make music that sounds like a chase scene from a “Scooby Doo” cartoon and have people take you seriously.” MGMT will be hitting the stage at The Lyric tomorrow night for a sold-out show. For those lucky folks who manage to gain entry, the doors open at 8 p.m.. The show begins at 9 p.m..

New Patients &

Emergencies Welcome Call Today

662-234-5222

Free Whitening Consults! www.oxforddental.com 2155 South Lamar Blvd. • Oxford MS

Women’s Apparel & Accessories

107 N. Lamar Oxford, MS • 662-513-4177 • Hours: 10-6


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 17

MUSTANG,

continued from page 15

wards. The handling of the Mustang is much more responsive than its heftier brethren. The steering is also light and responsive. In fact, “Car and Driver” managed to pull .95g on their skidpad, and it accomplishes all of this with a live rear axle. The Mustang was restyled for the 2010 model year, so there are very little changes outside of the “5.0” badge on the side of the car, but the design looks much more aggressive than 2004-2009 models. It manages to get a few looks

around but not as much as the Camaro, which could be a good thing or a bad thing. The only part that I do not like about the exterior design is how they have styled the taillights. They look like they are slanted upwards, which is something I would have a hard time handling. The retro design of the exterior carries over to the interior of the car. The gauges are very retro-looking yet very easily read, something I cannot say for the Camaro’s retro gauges. Our test car’s leather seats were

also quite comfortable, but I thought they could probably use a little more bolstering for support. The plastic in the car also looked quite nice thanks to the darker colors and textures that were used. But what truly sets the new Mustang apart from its rivals is that it is actually fun and enjoyable to drive. As soon as I got done with the test, I had a great urge to go back and drive it again. Because with the new Mustang GT 5.0, it is fun to take the long way home. The test car was provided courtesy of Belk Ford in Oxford.

∏ΒΦ

ELIZABETH BEAVER | The Daily Mississippian

,

Casey Lynn Alexander Phoebe Churchman Anderson Katherine Renee Antoun Hannah Elizabeth Arnold Madison Nicole Barron Madeline Grace Bell Katherine Bieger Mary Pollack Boyd Paige Boyer Sarah Katherine Brown Patricia Lurline Bush Anna Caitlin Carmichael Jessica Michelle Carpenter Leah Elizabeth Cayson Katelyn Nicole Collier Danni Craddock Margaret Elizabeth Curtis Taylor Elizabeth Darnell Leslie Elizabeth Davis Margaret Ellen Davis Allison Caley Dawson Alexandra Yvonne Donaldson Emmie Downs Megan Fahrmeier Alyssa Leigh Fassero Yesenia Garcia Jessica Nicole Haney Jessica Lynn Harris Lindsey Marie Harry

o S baur beautifu l by ang els! Madison Paige Harvey Emily Kathryne Hopkins Ann Reese Hunter Natalie Brooke Jackson Hayley Johnson Kirsten Renea Jordan Alexandra Kelly Kelly Elizabeth Kennedy Meghan Waters Kenny Ariel Rene Ladner Taylor Lightner Alexis Littman Christian Angela Lovett Noelle Elizabeth Ludlum Avery Karen MacArthur Kendal Malone Kayla Ann Maxwell Anna Rachel Mayer Claudia Mayfield Morgan Leigh McComb Lauren McLean

K Nicole Miller Natalie Anne Miller Mallori Brooke Mixon Robbie Young Murphey Brianna Murphy Meridith Jordan Myrick Dana Renee Neeper Mary Kaitlyn Oates Molly Gray O’Brien Camille Elizabeth Olson MacKenzie Grace Paul Sarah Elizabeth Pearcy Claudia Kaitlyn Penkert Natalie Grace Pickle Mary Margaret Pittman Caroline Purcell Abaigeal Duffy Quinn Margaret Emily Ragen Susan Ragsdale Robin Ann Riggle Colleen Riley Liz Rousseau

Congrats to

Renee Ruminski Kimberly Russell Katherine Ann Sacharuk Avery Lynne Salitsky Heather Sansone Eleanor C Schmerler Lindsey Ann Scoggins Jennifer Marie Shore Mary Margaret Simmons Melody Katherine Skipper Danielle Sterling Smith Mallory Ann Smith Ryan Elizabeth Smith Sadi Smith Allison McKeithen Stewart Gabrielle Elizabeth Thames Molly Kathleen Thrush Olivia Leigh Turner Molly Von Doersten Kathleen Margaret Waddell Anna Gray Young Ashley Kate Young

e on a fabulo veryone us rush!


C L A S S IF I E D S |

CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline. com/classifieds. The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday year round, when school is in session.

Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted. RATES: - $ . 25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run Additional Features (Web & Print): Jumbo Headline - $3 Big Headline - $2 Bold Text - extra $ . 50 per word

To place your ad online: www.thedmonline.com/classifieds

The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

201 BISHOP HALL 662.915.5503

Homes for Sale FSBO: 3BR each w/ private bath. 1800 SqFt., Great Storage, Large Fenced Yard, Close to Everything! $119,500. Call (228)217-0278 New home for sale or rent. 3BD/2BA. Oxford school district. Hwy 334. (662)236-3614

Apartment for Rent 1 & 2 BR Apartments- On Orange Bus Route!! Unfurnished Starting at $545 or We Will Make Moving Easy and Furnish Your Apartment for $50/mo (2BR) or $25/mo (1BR)! Free Golf and other Amenities! Call The Links today at 662-513-4949. 1,2,3 bedroom apts available. Spacious floor plans that feature all appliances. Cable and internet included. Less than 1 mile from campus and pets are welcome. 662-281-0402 Lafayette Place 1BR Fully furnished, Utilities included, near campus full kitchen, tanning beds and more, 770/ month available mid-Dec 2010 (228)238-7277 (228)238-7277 1BR Apartments $495, 2BR $585. The Cove Apartments. (662)234-1422. 2 Lofts for rent above 208 Restaurant. Call (662)234-0005.

House for Rent FURNISHED

3 bedroom/2bath home Like new; lawn service included. $1100 mo. Mature only. 662-329-1442 (662)574-0066 3 BR/ 3 Ω Bath House- $1200/ month. Vaulted ceilings, granite, patio w/ fan, stainless steel appl. Very nice house. Available January. Call Summit Management. (662) 513-999 1, 2, 3, and 4 BD Houses/Duplexes near Square. Many with hardwood floors and porches. (662)234-3208. Authentic log cabin 2BR/1Bath Only 15 minutes from campus. Peaceful 3 acre Lafayette County farmstead, surrounded by CORP land. Ideal for grad student, young couple, or instructors/ professors. (662)801-1701 (662)8011701

3BR/2 Full Bath House for Rent Completely renovated. $750/ mo. located in Water Valley. 18 minutes to Ole Miss campus. www.fischerproperties. net, 105 Simmons Street. (662)4736009

FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK! Lowest price in America! $24.99/month for OVER 120 channels! PLUS $500 bonus! 1-888-702-8582

Educational

Condo for Rent

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *ParaleTURNBERRY CONDOS, 3br. 2ba. Old gal, *AlliedHealth. Job placement asTaylor Rd. Near Campus. All applianc- sistance. Computer available. Financial es. Available Immediately. (901)239- aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 2267 (901)239-2267 888-210-5162. www. Centura.us.com

Weekend Rental

Full-time

House for Rent near campus for Auburn/ Ole Miss game this weekend. $400. (662)236-3614 Furnished 3 Bedroom apt. near hospital fully furnished $1000.00 per month. 662-202-5020 are you ready?? Football weekends and more! Check out our availability list online. www.oxfordtownhouse. com (662)801-6692

YaYa’s Frozen Yogurt is currently looking for an experienced, full-time manager. Oxford, Mississippi resident is preferred. If interested please contact Scott Winslow at (904) 813-3181 or come into the store to inquire about the position. LOOKING FOR UTILITY HANDS to work in the Oil/Gas Industry. Entry level positions start at $680-$780 per week. Sign up for training today. Call 850-2435379

Childcare/Daycare

Affordable home daycare- 5 Part-time years experience as teachers’ aide. First aid/CPR certified. Breakfast, lunch, and BARTENDING $300/DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training snacks provided. (662)816-6037. Provided Call 1-800-965-6520 EXT155 Miscellaneous studentpayouts.com Paid Survey Takers Needed In Oxford. 100% Pregnancy Test Center PregFREE To Join! Click On Surveys. nancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting Miscellaneous for Sale and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. 3500 Adult Rental Costumes. com. (662)234-4414 Open 9-3, Jo’s Auto Clean-Up and Costume Shop. 2524 University Avenue.

Business

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 18

$1 sales New&Used Creations North Lamar/Molly Barr. Furniture, clothes/ shoes, miscellaneous. Donations Accepted/ Pickup Available. (662)6074256

Pets for Adoption Save 9 LIVES! Adopt a rescued cat or kitten. www.9livescatrescue.org.

REBEL RADIO —92.1 fm —


COM I C S |

Garfield GARFIELD

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 19

By Jim davis BY JIM DAVIS

D DO OM MI IN NA AT TO OR LARGE R LARGE LARGE LARGE 4 4

11•20•2009

® ®

THE BIG DEAL THE BIG DEAL ® ®

The fusco BroThers THE FUSCO BROTHERS

dilBerT DILBERT

By J.c. duffy BY J.C. DUFFY

By scoTT adams BY SCOTT ADAMS

By Wiley BY WILEY

1603Jackson Jacksonave. ave.WW• •oxford oxford 1603

$$ 99 99 $$ 99 99 EAch EAch

pIck-up pIck-up ONLy ONLy pIck-up pIck-up ONLy ONLy 1603Jackson Jacksonave. ave.WW• •oxford oxford 1603

NoN sequiTur NON SEQUITUR

pEppERONI pEppERONI pIzzA pIzzA pEppERONI pEppERONI pIzzA EAch pIzzA EAch

OpEN OpEN LATE LATE OpEN OpEN LATE LATE

dooNesBury DOONESBURY

By Garry Trudeau BY GARRY TRUDEAU

zing! Experience a MAZE WORDSEARCH

Mississippi River

Solution, tipstips andand computer program at www.sudoku.com Solution, computer program at www.sudoku.com

© © SUDOKU Puzzles by by Pappocom SUDOKU Puzzles Pappocom

HOW TO PLAY

HOW PLAY Complete theTO grid so that everythe row,grid column Complete so and every 3x3 box contains that row, columnthe numbers 1 through 9 with and 3x3 box contains the no repeats numbers 1 through 9 with no repeats DIFFICULTY LEVEL DIFFICULTY LEVEL

10.28.10 7/22/2010

M D R u o y e l c y c Re

Bluejack Fish Fragile Future Grass Gulf history

. theDMonline Industrial Mighty Mississippi Native Quality Ranch Resource

com

Riverboat Sediment Tugboat Value Water Wetland


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2 0

MEET CAM

EMILY ADAMS | The Auburn Plainsman

BY PAUL KATOOL Sports Editor

Cam Who? Cameron “Cam” Jerrell Newton, frontrunner for the Heisman Trophy Classification: redshirt junior Vitals: 6-foot-6, 250 pounds

What’s the skinny? After two uneventful years at the University of Florida, Newton transferred to Blinn College where he put up video game-like numbers en route to becoming the top-ranked quarterback prospect in the country for 2010. All he’s done at Auburn is lead the Tigers to the No. 1 spot in the Bowl

Welcome Football Fans

Championship Series in a year when in-state rival Alabama was supposed to again be the top team in the nation. Newton’s been efficient as a passer, but he’s most known for his awe-inspiring running style – Newton doesn’t run around opponents, he runs through them. What’s the big deal? There are plenty of dualthreat quarterbacks out there, but very few that weigh 250 pounds and can run like the wind. There’s not a single linebacker on the Ole Miss roster that comes within 10 pounds of Newton,

meaning the Rebels – like every other team that Auburn has faced – will have a tough time bringing the signal caller down. Numbers game: Passing yards: 1,364 Completion percentage: 65.2 (No. 3 in the nation in pass efficiency) Touchdowns: 13 Interceptions: 5 Rushing Yards: 1,077 (leads the SEC) Rushing TDs: 14 (leads the SEC) Tebow who? On Mondays, Auburn’s off day, Newton volunteers his time with underprivi-

Walk

leged children. Skootin’: Newton’s primary form of transportation to and from Auburn’s camps is a scooter. Big kid: At the age of 8, the future quarterback was 4-foot8 and weighed 100 pounds, which put him in the 97th percentile in both height and weight. That means he was bigger than 97 percent of 8-year-olds. Wise choice: After junior college, Newton chose Auburn over Mississippi State.

to

the

Square 103 Hickory Street Reduced to $349,500! Appraised at $600,000!

Come see us this Weekend old toWn square

OPEN HOME FOOTBALL WEEKENDS: SUN. 12PM-4PM

1919 University Avenue • 234-6330

Beautiful 4 BR/2.5 BA home right off the Square. Approximately 2,650 SF with finished, walk-out basement. Backyard great for entertaining. Lots of charm & character. Call Tom Pitts (662) 392 - 4777 or Na-Ann 816 -7458 for appointment. (Agent Owned)


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 21

Volleyball hosts No. 1 Florida BY KIRBY BARKLEY The Daily Mississippian

AUSTIN MCAFEE | The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss volleyball setter Amanda Philpot, the SEC player of the week, and the rest of the Rebels face No. 1 Florida tonight.

N e w s w a tc h Channel 99

m on -f ri 5: 30 pm & 10 pm

REBEL RADIO —92.1 fm —

After a weekend sweep over Southeastern Conference West Division opponents Mississippi State and Alabama, the Ole Miss volleyball team hosts the No.1 team in the nation, Florida, tonight at 7 p.m. at the Gillom Center. The Rebels (16-5, 10-2 SEC) currently hold first place in the West and find themselves in the middle of a seven-match winning streak. Sophomore setter Amanda Philpot won SEC Player of the Week honors last week for her triple-double performance

against Alabama on Sunday. Junior middle blocker Regina Thomas enters Friday’s match leading the SEC in hitting percentage with .417 and ranks ninth nationally in that category. Thomas is second in conference in blocks with 1.2 per frame. Fellow middle blocker senior Miranda Kitts averages 2.33 kills per set and hits .301, second only to Thomas. Kitts also averages 1.05 blocks per set. Sophomore outside hitter Whitney Craven leads the team in kills with 241 and 3.17 per set on the year. Junior libero Morgan Spring-

er paces the Ole Miss back row and ranks second in the SEC with 4.81 digs per set. The Gators (19-1, 12-0 SEC) come into Oxford after taking down South Carolina by a score of 3-0 Wednesday night. “They’re a lot more comfortable at home than a small environment like this, so we’re looking forward to seeing what we can do against the number one team,” Ole Miss coach Joe Getzin said. Friday will be Greek Night at the Gillom Center. Greek Organizations will compete for the “Spirit Award“ and $500 will be donated to the winner’s charity.


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2 2

Hipp’s tips for winning against Auburn BY BENNETT HIPP The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss heads into its biggest game of the year on Saturday as No. 1 Auburn comes to Oxford to take on the Rebels. The Rebels appear to have gone all out for this game as extra seating has been brought in, a special “3-D” video will play at halftime and Kentrell Lockett will introduce a new defensive cheer via YouTube. Here’s what Ole Miss needs to do to have a shot at making sure the No. 1 team falls.

ADDISON DENT | The Daily Mississippian

The Rebels will need a strong performance out of playmakers like wide receiver Markeith Summer if Ole Miss hopes to keep up with Auburn’s high-octane offense.

Contain Cam Newton I say contain because looking at this season so far, there is no evidence Cam Newton can be completely stopped – he’s too good. Newton, the leading candidate for the Heisman Trophy, is coming off of a 200yard rushing performance against a very good LSU defense. Newton is also efficient through the air as he is third in the country in passer rating. The key to slowing down Newton will be using a spy of sorts on him to attempt to cut off any running lanes he finds. While Newton is decent enough through the air, he isn’t Ryan Mallet by any means. If Ole Miss can get an early lead and force Newton to lead them back through

the air, the Rebels’ chances at an upset go way up. Keep opening up the offense After a dreadful performance offensively in the first half against Arkansas, the Rebels found success in the second half. That success coincided with Ole Miss throwing the ball downfield more and opening up the offense in general. Auburn has talent on the defensive side of the ball, starting with defensive tackle Nick Fairley, but they are by no means a dominant defense. The Tigers can be scored on, and Ole Miss must do that as I expect this game to be a shootout. Look for the Rebels to rely on Masoli to try and repeat his breakout performance last week against Arkansas. Ole Miss will need big games from wide receivers Melvin Harris and Markeith Summers as well as running backs Brandon Bolden and Jeff Scott. Don’t commit turnovers, capitalize on mistakes Ole Miss kicked itself in the foot multiple times last week against Arkansas and the week before against Alabama that cost them chances to win both games. The fact that gets lost is that Ole Miss really did have

a chance to win both games, which shows the talent this Ole Miss team has. A Brandon Bolden fumble on the goal line ended the Rebels’ comeback hopes against the Hogs last Saturday. Ole Miss can ill afford to make mistakes like that against Auburn on Saturday, as the Tigers have done a great job of making opponents pay for mistakes. On the same note, Ole Miss must capitalize on the mistakes that Auburn makes. DT Shackleford returned a fumble to the Arkansas Five last week only to have Ole Miss end up kicking a field goal. The Rebels must punch those in for touchdowns this weekend. Create a home field advantage This will be a big part of how Saturday’s game turns out. With the extra seating and late starting time of the game, it should be a big, raucous crowd that will be loud the entire game. There is a buzz of excitement going around with the premiere of the “3-D video” at halftime on the Jumbotron that will be the first of its kind in college football history. Players and coaches alike are clamoring for fans to show up early and be loud for what will be the biggest game and recruiting weekend for prospects Ole Miss has this season.

Halloween Costume Contest $1000 Prize for the Best Costume

Featuring DJ Mario, DJ Casey, and the Kudzu Kings

Beat Auburn Go Rebels!


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2 3

Soccer faces Mississippi State with SEC Tourney berth at stake BY AUSTIN MILLER The Daily Mississippian

ADDISON DENT | The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss soccer coach Matt Mott leads the Rebels against Mississippi State tonight with a spot in the SEC Tournament on the line.

theDMonline.com

DM

non-condensed

The Ole Miss soccer team has a Southeastern Conference Tournament berth at stake when they travel to Starkville on Friday night in their regular-season finale against Mississippi State. If Ole Miss wins, they’re in the SEC Tournament and can still finish as high as fifth in the conference standings, depending on other results from Friday night. “It’s a big game for us,” Ole Miss soccer coach Matt Mott said. “With a rivalry game, you throw everything out the window and you go play the game. I think we’re going to play a good team, so we have to be focused, sharp and ready to play.” The Rebels lead the all-time series 9-4-3 and have not lost since a 1-0 loss in 2004. Last year, in a game played in the rain at VaughtHemingway Stadium, junior Dylan Jordan scored one of the Rebels’ two goals in a 2-0 victory

Amenities

28 one bedroom apartments with private balcony. 650 Square Feet. Covered Secure Parking. Fitness Center.

able to battle through adversity and tough times to score some really good goals to get back in games and then finish them off.” On senior night against Kentucky, Hildal tied the game on a close range shot and senior Taylor Cunningham scored the gamewinner off a cross from freshman Erin Emerson, who beat two defenders inside the box to set up the goal. Trailing at Vanderbilt 2-0 after only five minutes of play on Sunday afternoon, Hildal recorded her first career hat trick, converting two penalty kicks, to lead Ole Miss to the 3-2 victory. For her efforts, Hildal was named SEC Offensive Player of the Week. “She’s a great player,” Mott said. “And she’s a player that’s dangerous when she goes forward. And when she’s playing in the midfield, she connects passes and does a lot of really good things for us. Girls are putting her in good positions and she’s finishing when she has the opportunity.”

Location

Located on University Avenue next to Sneed’s Hardware and Across from Newk’s. A Short Walk to the historic Oxford Square and Ole Miss Campus.

0 grams Trans Fat!

Phone: 1-662-832-8887

S O L O

Website: www.soloapartments.com

Try our New York Style Pizza! 662-259-2881

Y A D R U T SA

Please Drink Responsibly.

Y A D J I D R F

over MSU. This year, the Rebels enter Starkville with a 7-8-4 (3-43 SEC) record while Mississippi State stands 7-12 (0-10 SEC) on the year. “We can’t underestimate them because they’re going to come out,” sophomore defender Alix Hildal said. “It’s their last game, it’s their senior night and they’re at home so they’re going to have a lot of motivation.” Ole Miss started their postseason push by drawing with SEC West rival LSU and then rallied from a 3-0 first-half deficit to draw Arkansas 4-4 in double-overtime two weekends ago. Then, last week, the Rebels posted back-toback come-from-behind victories, knocking off Kentucky 2-1 and Vanderbilt 3-2 to move into a tie for seventh place with LSU heading into Friday night’s game. “They never quit,” Mott said. “They never die. Even if our backs are against the wall, we keep fighting and when teams do that, good things happen. I think we’ve been

e m u t s o tc s e b r fo B A me T a g R e A h B rt e 0 t f 0 a Open at 11! 2 c $ Live musi Happy Hour Starts at 3


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 2 9 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 24

AUBURN,

continued from page 1

third ranked team the Rebels have played in as many weeks, presents a unique opportunity for Ole Miss. “It’s a different type of feeling playing in games like this because the spotlight is on you,” Masoli said. “It’s just a little bit more added pressure. It makes some guys nervous, some guys are shook out there, but it’s fun for me. I love it.” After losing two straight

games and with only five games remaining on the Rebels’ schedule, an upset over Auburn would go a long way in regard to Ole Miss reaching a bowl game. “This game has a lot of implications on it and we’re perfectly capable of pulling this one out so there shouldn’t be any reason why anybody on our side thinks we should not win,” Masoli said.

The Daily Mississippian - October 29, 2010  

The Daily Mississippian - October 29, 2010

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you