Page 1

M

o n d a y

, O

11, 2010 | V

c t o b e r

T H E

o l

. 99, N

o

.34

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

this week

IS THREE FEET BE ENOUGH? NEW STATE LAW REQUIRES MOTORIST TO LEAVE ROOM FOR BIKERS

Claudia Dreifus, co-author of “Higher Education? How Colleges Are Wasting Our Money and Failing Our Kids – and What We Can Do About It,” will describe why her new book faults some big name schools while finding programs to admire at Ole Miss and other places. 4 p.m., Overby Center Auditorium

The Student Newspaper

of

The University

BY VIRGINIA DRAGO The Daily Mississippian

of

M i ss i ss i p p i | S e r v i n g O l e M i ss

and

Oxford

since

1911 |

www.thedmonline.com

But for some cyclists, such as Andy Billmeyer, senior journalism major at the University of Mississippi from Cape Girardeau, the fines are not enough. “The violation fine for the first offense should be much more severe,” he said. “The act will have a small impact until someone gets hurt again or there’s a fight between a cyclist and a motorist.” Billmeyer is a trip leader and bike mechanic for Ole Miss Outdoors, and rides his bike to class every day. He said he has almost been hit multiple times. “I have ridden out on country roads where there are farmers who are nice and wave, but you also have people who fly by with their rearview mirror a foot from your head on purpose. It’s ridiculous.”

T O D AY

JUDGING HIGHER EDUCATION

T O D AY

On July 1, the state of Mississippi joined 14 other states and the District of Colombia in requiring motorists to keep at least three feet between bicycles when passing cyclists on the road. “The law is no more than what should be common courtesy,” Oxford Police Chief Mike Martin said. “Motorists and bicyclists share the road and should respect each other.” According to Senate Bill No. 3014, the act also forbids harassment of cyclists as well as throwing objects at the riders. An infraction of this section of the act will result in a fine of $100 for the first offense, $500 for the second offense and $2,500 for the third offense, as well as imprisonment for seven days in the county jail. See BIKERS, PAGE 5

CROFT VISITING SPEAKER SERIES The final speaker in the 2010 Fall Speaker Series is Scott Snyder. Snyder is Director of the Center for U.S.-Korea Policy at The Asia Foundation. He is also the Adjunct Senior Fellow for Korean Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and is based in Washington, DC. The title of his lecture is “The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and Prospects for Peace on the Korean Peninsula” . 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Croft Institute

inside OPINION

MIDTERM TERRORS

QUENTIN WINSTINE | The Daily Mississippian

Cousin of Emmett Till to speak at Overby Center BY HILLARY GOODFELLOW The Daily Mississippian

Simeon Wright was among the last people to see Emmett Till alive. Wright will be on campus this Wednesday to discuss the events of the night Till was abducted. Wright had been sleeping in the same bed with Till when he was taken away. Till’s body was pulled from a nearby river shortly afterward. Till’s mother chose to display her son’s disfigured body in an open coffin. This, along with the two white men responsible for Till’s murder being quickly acquitted, created outrage across America. Till’s murder was an important moment in American history. Will Norton, dean of the Meek School of Journalism and New Media called it “the spark that lit the civil rights movement.” Curtis Wilkie, Overby Center fellow, added to Norton’s comments. “The murder was an early incident that mobilized people

across this country to enlist in the civil rights movement,” Wilkie said. Many students said that they recognized the importance of Wright’s visit. “I think it’s really important for us to listen to Mr. Wright because he was a firsthand witness to a moment that shaped American history,” Jess Waltman, a sophomore from Quitman, said. Wright, Till’s cousin, has written a book concerning the 1955 murder. In the book, called “Simeon’s Story,” Wright offers his own narrative of the night his cousin was taken. “In my half-conscious state, I had no idea what was going on. Was I dreaming? Or was it a nightmare? Why were these white men in our bedroom at this hour,” Wright wrote. “I rubbed my eyes and then shielded them, trying to see beyond the glare of the flashlight. The balding man ordered me to go back to sleep. Dad had to shake Bobo (Till’s nickname) for quite a while to wake him up…” Joining Wright will be Dub

Shoemaker and Bill Rose. Shoemaker is a veteran Mississippi journalist who covered the trial for the Jackson Daily News (later assimilated into The Clarion-Ledger). Rose grew up in the same period in the Mississippi Delta and currently teaches journalism at Ole Miss. Norton and Wilkie said that the lecture will provide a unique opportunity for students and the community as a whole. “I certainly think that any student with interest in history or the state of Mississippi or in the concept of racial reconciliation in the South would find the program rewarding,” Wilkie said. “We believe Mr. Wright is a significant guest with a special message, and we hope there will be a good turnout.” Wright will speak October 13 at 11 a.m. in the Overby Center Auditorium. Later that day, he will attend a book signing for his book “Simeon’s Story: An Eyewitness Account of the Kidnapping of Emmett Till” at 5 p.m. at OffSquare Books.

TEA Party to host judges’ forum BY CAIN MADDEN The Daily Mississippian

To inform voters on the county judges, the Oxford TEA Party is hosting a judges’ forum, featuring all nine judges who are seeking election Nov. 2, at 7 p.m. tonight at the Oxford Convention Center. Oxford TEA Party Chairperson Kay Cobb, a former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice, said she felt judges’ races are often the most difficult for voters because of the lack of opportunity to get to know the judges. “Making a decision based on personal knowledge is much better than voting for the first name on the ballot,” Cobb said. “Unless you are a lawyer who has been in a judge’s court, you typically don’t know much about him or her. This forum will put a face with a name, and you will get to know where the candidate stands on matters pertinent to the courtroom.” Cobb said the moderator,

NEWS

OXFORD MAKES PLANS FOR FLOODS

SPORTS

VOLLEYBALL WINS OVER WEEKEND


OPINION O P IN I O N |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2

CAROLINE LEE editor-in-chief LANCE INGRAM city news editor RACHEL CLARK campus news editor

BY ROBERT NICHOLS Cartoonist

MIA CAMURATI opinion editor EMILY ROLAND lifestyles editor PAUL KATOOL sports editor KATIE RIDGEWAY visual editor ALIX ZACHOW copy chief ADDISON DENT photography editor The mission of The Daily Mississippian is to consistently produce a bold and accurate daily news source by fulfilling our obligation to the truth and maintaining our loyalty to the public we serve.

PATRICK HOUSE business manager JORDAN ARMENDINGER KEATON BREWER GEORGE BORDELON DUSTIN MAUFFRAY ALEX PENCE

account executives

Letters to the Editor

First, I should state that I am a proud member of the University of Mississippi Marching Band, but I do not represent its views.  I am speaking on my own behalf as a student who was personally hurt by the views expressed by Jacob Fuller in his article from the Friday edition of the Daily Mississippian. I am distressed that Mr. Fuller feels this way about the Pride of the South. But I believe that his opinion is based solely on ignorance of the effort, talent, and sacrifice it takes to be a member of this fine tradition.  I would love to welcome Mr. Fuller to spend his game days with us in the Grove, the stands, and on the field.  I am positive that spending 7-8 hours in a polyester suit, carrying a sousaphone upon his shoulders, with a plastic bucket as a hat, while watching his friends and family comfortably enjoying the football atmosphere would surely change his views.  All this, of course, would come after he came to the University two weeks early in order to learn the sets and music under the lovely Mississippi summer sun. Mr. Fuller, you call to mind the University of Oregon in your article. I agree with you, it is one of the most difficult places for opposing

T H E

MISSISSIPPIAN

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year.

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall

Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

creative assistants

teams to play; however, it is not because of the band. While they have a very strong marching band, the reason opposing teams find it difficult to perform is because the fans stay the entire time.  The Oregon fans also support their band, staying in the stands during halftime and applauding their efforts. Perhaps if the Ole Miss faithful were faithful to the band (and even the team) instead of bolting to the bathrooms, concessions, and the Grove, their talents could also be appreciated.  Maybe someday the University of Mississippi will be a difficult place to play.  It would require a significant change in culture that I fear many like Mr. Fuller would be hesitant to facilitate. I am deeply sorry you do not enjoy the music we play. I would suggest that if you would like specific songs to be played, you should make a donation to the Pride of the South.  That would be greatly appreciated, I assure you. Many of us perform for absolutely nothing at all. This is a volunteer organization in which the members sacrifice their time and energy performing for the sheer love of performing.   I can promise you, we really like it when our work ethic is called into question.

D A I L Y

Main Number: 662.915.5503

ROBBIE CARLISLE KELSEY DOCKERY LIBBI HUFF SARA LOWREY

Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

So thank you, Mr. Fuller.  I am happy you were able to convey to us your opinions, however misguided they were.   If I could request something of you, it would be that you approach us in person.  Please, drop by rehearsal some time.  We will be on that practice field, rain or shine, every day. James Buchanan Senior, International Studies/French Jacob Fuller, You were correct in saying “there is far more to [band] than musical talent.”  But that seems to be the only informed thought in your article.  How about checking out the band during the two-hour practices every weekday after classes?  How about learning new sets shortly after finishing an entire show?  HOW ABOUT playing an instrument while marching to multiple assigned spots on a field while keeping temp and being aware of your surroundings.  How about learning choreography and twirling a flag to add visual aesthetics to a show?  You could EVEN TRY leaving the comfort of your parents’ home weeks before the semester starts in order to preSee LETTERS, PAGE 4

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser ARVINDER SINGH KANG manager of media technology DYLAN PARKER creative/technical supervisor DARREL JORDAN chief engineer MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager STEPHEN GOFORTH broadcast manager DARCY DAVIS administrative assistant


O P IN I O N |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 3

Crawling out of the rabbit hole BY JONECE DUNIGAN The Daily Mississippian

I regard downtown Oxford as Little Wonderland. There, our studying habits are put to rest and we become junkies caught in the ecstasy of hypnotic beats and colorful, bouncing lights. Smokers converse in shadows of the alleyways with Mr. Caterpillar, unaware of their choking black halos. Herds of people parade in the street as we congregate at our courthouses and constantly get called on the witness stand for committing the crime of overloading the brain with information. Once declared guilty, the Mad Hatters start pouring

liquid fire by the dozens and off we go to become crazier than the Cheshire Cat on acid. I love the Square and how it gives Oxford its own unique touch. Yet, it’s when I came back to my dorm and heard someone groan “I hate being this girl” while kneeling by a toilet that I started to worry. I am aware that alcohol makes a person’s thoughts stumble on itself. Thus, the random combination of words that come out should pose little value. Yet, my heart still twisted at the statement when I remember a fact that a friend once told me. When you are drunk, sometimes the truth trickles out. The thing that perplexes me is that if she did not like the

state was in, why did she keep free-falling into the rabbit hole again and again? Just because the bottle has an attractive way of saying “drink me” does not mean you have to accept. The response I usually get is that it is the main venue for fun. I don’t know about you, but college life has always been illustrated to me as one of the most enjoyable times in life. I’m sure I don’t want to spend it frolicking in a black void in my mind. For, in the words of Alice, “What is a use of a book without pictures or conversations?” My family tree of best friends has taught me that the most valuable things in life, such as

love and happiness, are actually very simple and easy to attain. I do not have the taste for alcohol because their laughter and smiles are more intoxicating than any vodka. Memories with them allow me to bask in the beauty of life and figure out the valuable parts of me. We can have a party with strobe lights, music, coke, and pizza and have an awesome time being random. No alcohol required. Now, drinking is a good social thing to do. Yet, if you abso-

lutely believe that you need it to have fun, then you have a problem. I’m not writing this to judge anyone fitting this criterion. I would be a hypocrite if I did because I was once an Alice, too. Yet, notice that there isn’t a sequel to this wonderful story. That’s because Alice did not like where she was, she woke up, and never went back to Wonderland. Maybe we need to take that same route to claim our true happiness.

Rush is almost here, so drive over to Nail-Thology and get your nails in gear! The Study of Nails by Chris Le & Steve Le GOT SOLAR NAILS! 234-9911 1535 University Ave.

spa manicure/pedicure 9:30 am - 7:00 pm Monday - Saturday

IT’S TIME...TO BE HEARD

Don’t forget to participate in the mascot poll before 5PM on Tuesday, October 12th at mascot.olemiss.edu!

Now Registering Soccer Intramurals.

Men, Women, and CoRec Teams.

662-236-3030

Dominos.com 1603 W. JACKSON AVE.

Go to www.inleagues.com/ schools/olemiss to register


OPINION O P IN I O N |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 4

! S B O J ! T S A B E R O J G ! T S A B E O R J ! G T S A B E O R J G T A E R G *New* RMI Fall Career Day *New* Claims Adjuster, Underwriter, Financial Planner, Insurance Broker, Independent Agent, Sales Marketing

When? Tues., 10/12, 2:00-4:15 p.m., with reception to follow Where? The Inn at Ole Miss, Ballroom D. Business Attire.

Bring your resumes! Companies Scheduled to Attend All Risks, Ltd American National Insurance Co. Arthur J. Gallagher Bancorp South Insurance Services, Inc. Brown & Riding Insurance Services, Inc. Burns & Wilcox IIA of Mississippi Lipscomb & Pitts Mass Mutual

Mutual of Omaha Nationwide Insurance Northwestern Mutual Financial New York Life Insurance State Farm Insurance Strategic Financial Partners The Bottrell Insurance Agency, Inc. Travelers Unum Willis

You also can sign up for individual interviews at the Career Center now! Sponsored by the Risk Management and Insurance Society

LETTERS,

continued from page 2

pare for the first home football game.  Until you’ve done those things, you have absolutely NO place to judge THE PRIDE OF THE SOUTH.  You should really try it out next time before you put your foot in your mouth. A truly disgusted reader,  Misty White Junior, Art

See what it’s like playing an instrument in uniform for six hours or more, as opposed to lounging in the student section and complaining.  If you would rather continue to willfully spew ignorance as opposed to making the  effort to acquirethe knowledge required for thoughtful, insightful, and correct commentary, transfer to Oregon. JT Kuntz

I am thankful for all the hard work and dedication you and the staff of The Daily Mississippian put into striving for excellence in journalism, but I just wanted to voice my discontent with the re- my fellow band members and I were appalled by the cently published article regarding the band. It was article in the October 8th edition titled “A Request written in ignorance of what it takes to perform in for the Pride of the South.” Columnist Jacob Fuller used your opinion seca marching band, and I also take offense that sometion as a pedestal on which to blatantly bad mouth a one would be allowed to publically mock such a fine hard-working organization at the University of Misprogram.  I wonder if I wrote an article that talked sissippi. about how terrible the history teachers are, would I understand the concept of an opinion section, that be published?  What about an article that blames but I also understand that journalism is based on Coach Nutt for poor education funding at MS inthe idea of drawing conclusions from both sides of stitutions?  No they wouldn’t, because they make no a story. sense.  Henceforth, I am boycotting the DM as well Mr. Fuller might view the Pride of the South as as starting a group on Facebook to recruit supporters a lazy organization with no care for improving the until some sort of apology is issued.  I enjoy reading game day experience, but I promise you and every your paper, but I cannot allow such belittling stateother student at the U of M that that is not the ments to go unnoticed. case. Thomas Chandler The band does not simply show up on game days Senior and put on a show. History, Religious Studies Preparing for game day begins weeks before the first game of the season. Practicing in the grueling heat two hours a day for Jacob Fuller:  five days a week. From your comments, I must assume your experiAnd that’s just during the school year. ence and knowledge of marching bands is minimal.  A week before school even begins, the band enLet me educate you.  dures a week of 10-hour-a-day practices in order 1. From the student section, it is acoustically imto be ready to perform for Jacob Fuller and the rest possible for the band to sound loud or clear.  of the crowd. The band is dedicated to improving The sound can only be focused in one direction, game day for all involved.  usually towards  the sidelines where the majority of “Band Handbook’s Purpose of the Band:  The people sit.  primary objective of the University of Mississippi The band played from the field towards the student Band is to be the center of school spirit at athletic section during one halftime show last year and, surand other University related events, while giving the prisingly, it was mostly empty.  student an opportunity to participate in a large and 2. The guard exists for visual effect.  important activity on campus. Whether or not it’s distracting is up to your attenOur goal is to enjoy our involvement with the U tion span.  of M Band through striving for excellence with oth3. Let me again emphasize that I do not know the er fine people while representing the University.” extent of your musical education, but it appears to be We are proud of the work that we do, we are marginal if existent.  proud of what we bring to this University, and we Preparing and performing music takes a GREAT are proud to be the Pride of the South. As the largdeal of talent and work, as does preparing any kind of est organization on this campus, we deserve a fair routine dancing or twirling.  chance to have our voices heard.   Before you call for the band to “cut members,” why don’t drop by a few rehearsals and learn what it takes Thank you,  to rehearse two hours a day, four days a week leading Tanner Kuntz up to games?   Member of the Pride of the South

Are you interested in community service? Applications are out for the Big Event Planning Committee. Visit the ASB Office in the Student Union for details and an application. Applications are due back in the ASB Office on October 25th by 5 PM.


N E W S | 10 . 8 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 5

BIKERS,

continued from page 1

The new safety act also requires cyclists to use hand gestures to indicate direction when turning and to remain as close as possible to the street curb on the right hand side of the road. “Bicyclists need to obey the traffic laws also in order to gain the respect of the motorist,” said Chief Martin. Kevin Stuart, local cyclist and owner of Oxford Bike Company, believes the act is a step in the right direction, but he still doesn’t feel 100 percent safe on the road. “Theoretically, the act will make the road a little safer for cyclists, but not all motorists know about it,” he said. “We still have people that blaze past us at 50 mph without giving us any room.” Billmeyer shared the same mentality as Stuart about the efficacy of the new act. “I believe the act will have some effect, but it will take a lot more than those few laws. It would be tough to convict someone of those things.” The act was created following the death of 18-year-old cyclist and award-winning triathlete, John Paul Frerer of Tupelo, Miss. who was killed in a collision on Highway 6 in August

of 2009. Frerer placed third in his age group, and 42nd overall in the Race of Grace Triathlon in Philadelphia that June, according to an online article by Danza Johnson of NEMS360.com. When the accident occurred, he was training for a race he planned to compete in that weekend. Frerer was to start his senior year of high school the next day. According to Chief Martin, the death of Frerer in 2009 is the only recent incident involving a motorist/cyclist collision within the city limits that he can recall. Despite a lack of large numbers of fatalities, many groups in the state believe bicycle safety is still a major concern. There are many organizations throughout the state of Mississippi who are advocating increased bicycle safety, and who are using the new three feet act to further education about bicycle safety in the state. BikeWalk Mississippi is one such advocate of bicycle safety in the state. BikeWalk is working to spread the word about the John Paul Frerer Bicycle Safety Act through education and safety programs throughout the state for both motorists

and cyclists. The group also hopes to work with police on law enforcement of the new act and decreasing harassment of cyclists on the road. “Even though getting the law passed was a huge accomplishment, now our goal is to spread the message and make sure that people are aware of the law statewide,” said executive direc-

tor, Melody Moody. “We need more people on bikes and more education for drivers. We need a mentality shift when it comes to ownership of the road, and we need to work together to build Mississippi up.” While some cyclists are wary of the effectiveness of the act, Moody remains confident. “I absolutely believe that the

passage of the John Paul Frerer Bicycle Safety Act will change the way motorists and cyclists interact. After all, if we can get more bicycles on the road we will be well on our way to a much healthier and safer state. And, if we can get motorists and cyclists to respect one another and build community, we are on our way to a better community.”

DWIGHT N. BALL AT TOR N E Y AT L AW SINCE 1970

104 Courthouse Square (the Downtown Square) Oxford, Mississippi 38655

662-234-7777

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: includes DUI,

PUBLIC DRUNK, FAKE ID, MIP, AND ALL OTHER ALCOHOL OFFENSES; SPEEDING, RECKLESS DRIVING, FAKE DRIVER’S LICENSE, AND ALL OTHER TRAFFIC OFFENSES; EXPIRED TAG, NO DRIVER’S LICENSE, AND ALL OTHER MOTOR VEHICLE RELATED OFFENSES; POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA, PARAPHERNALIA, AND POSSESSION OR SALE OF ALL OTHER ILLEGAL DRUGS; DISTURBING THE PEACE, DISORDERLY CONDUCT, SHOPLIFTING, AGGRAVATED ASSAULT, SIMPLE ASSAULT, AND ALL OTHER CRIMES.

loves our lo

Sophomore Homecoming Maid!


NEWS NEWS |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 6

TEA PARTY,

continued from page 1

First District Circuit Court Judge James L. Roberts of Pontotoc, at the event will first ask the nine judges to explain their professional experiences, why he or she would be a better candidate and their community involvement. “I would pay attention to how they think on their feet and what they say,” Cobb said. “Also, if they have given any thought about improving access to justice

: ) M P 7 3 ( R o n APPY HOU rolls rH

T TION ON ELL SELEC

cove

E!” HE SQUAR

. c , p i d n i p s , x i st • 1/2 off moz z er mar tinis

Please Drink Responsibly

“BEST W

yet.” Among other questions, the moderator will also ask if there is anything they feel should be undertaken to improve their court. “For example, I don’t know if there are any major problems in backlogged cases here,” Cobb said. “But it is certainly a problem around the state.” Judgeships from four courts are up this year — District 18 Chan-

b m u c u c f f o 2 e • 1/ s l e g n i h t y r e • $1.00 off ev

y a d n o M

7PM-CLOkSaE:

•1/2 off Vod s k c e n g n o L 0 .5 1 •$

1112 VAN BUREN • 236-6872 • WWW.OVPC.COM

cery Court, Place 2 and 3 District 3 Circuit Court and District 1 Mississippi Court of Appeals. Voters in Benton, Calhoun, Lafayette, Marshall and Tippah counties will vote in the District 18 election. The candidates are incumbent Edwin H. Roberts, Jr., and Helen Kennedy Robinson, both of Oxford. Incumbent Robert W. Elliott of Ripley and Shirley C. Byers

of Holly Springs are running for the judgeship of District 3 Place 2 Circuit Court, which will be on the ballot in Benton, Calhoun, Chickasaw, Lafayette, Marshall, Tippah and Union counties. District 3 Place 3 Circuit Court Judge Henry Lackey is retiring. John A. Gregory of Okolona, Thomas L. Levidiotis of Oxford and David E. Rozier of Oxford are seeking the position, which will be on the ballot in Benton,

Calhoun, Chickasaw, Lafayette, Marshall, Tippah and Union counties. Donna Barnes and Kelly L. Mims, both of Tupelo, are running for the District 1 Mississippi Court of Appeals, which will be voted on by all 23 counties in the northern third of the state. The Oxford Convention Center is located at 102 Ed Perry Blvd., which can be accessed at the Sisk Avenue exit of Highway 7.

Oxford applies for flood control grant BY ASHLEIGH DAVIS The Daily Mississippian

A request for permission to apply for the Hazard Mitigation Flood Control Grant was approved at the September 21 Board of Aldermen meeting. The grant was requested by Oxford’s emergency management coordinator Jimmy Allgood, and is a flood and drain project of Chandler, Sisk, and Avent streets to prevent flooding of the streets and homeowners’ property. Residents say they have seen a few inches to two feet of water in their homes in those areas. This is affecting private property as well as public property. Any time a state has a presidentially declared disaster, money is given to the state and is designated specifically to help people with certain projects within the state. “You can do a lot with these grants; We’ve done this before for tornado sirens, generators

and, in the past, community tornado shelters,” Allgood said. To help prevent future flooding, two grants in Oxford have been given permission to apply for grants from the state. The first grant is the Chandler Avenue project, and the second grant is the Avent drainage system. Everyone within the state and county can apply for these grants, thus making it a selective process. The grant had an initial estimate of $380,000 to $385,000. After careful consideration of the material and construction costs, they dropped the cost down to $200,000. Allgood said that this has been an issue for almost eight years, and during that time he has been trying to find means of funding for the project. To start, $100,000 has been spent on temporary repairs. He also said that they have invested $40,000 to $50,000 over

the past years in manpower and cleaning drains, bringing the total to $300,000 to $350,000. The Chandler Avenue grant will allow for the local streets of Chandler Avenue, Sisk Avenue, and Avent Street to drain more efficiently during heavy rains. Allgood said the grant would provide a more efficient drainage system. “We are updating the drainage system, which will allow the water to be channeled off into the larger drainage areas,“ Allgood said. Once the state determines if it fits hazard mitigation, the next step is to submit a complete form. The process takes 60 to 90 days to go through the state and the federal government. If after this period of time the grants are approved by the federal government, then Oxford will receive the funding to begin the project.

n o i t a t n e i r O l a i t n e t o P l l a g n i ! l 1 l 1 a 0 C 2 f o r e m m u S e h t r o f s r e Lead Applications Available on October 11th in 145 Martindale Applications due Wednesday, October 27th by 5:00 p.m. Information Sessions on October 25th and 26th Monday October 25th, 2010 - 5:00 p.m. @ Union 404 A & B Tuesday October 26th, 2010 - 5:00 p.m @ Farley 202 Group Interviews Monday, November 1st and Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010 Individual Interviews Thursday, November 11th and Friday, November 12th, 2010 New Leaders announced November 15th, 2010


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 7

SPOTLIGHT: OLE MISS CRICKET CLUB BY ANNA MALONE The Daily Mississippian

recycle your DM

Bowlers, wickets, wicket keepers, batsmen and fieldsmen are just a few of the elements that make up the game of cricket. The Ole Miss Cricket Club, OMCC, is composed of 30 members. Many of them are of Indian and Sri Lankan descent, and “college football is equal to college cricket over there [in India],” Satya Gavirneni, president of the OMCC and engineering major said. Gavirneni has been playing cricket with family and friends since he was 6 years old. Winner of the best batsman award, which is his key position. “I mean, cricket is a major sport in India, so everybody plays it,” Gavirneni said. A few of the other players have been playing since they were kids, as well.

Chandra Sekhar Kaipa, who has been playing since he was 8, has been on the team since 2006. He was a captain from 2007 to 2008, playing batsman as well as bowler. Phani Kiran Alluri joined the OMCC in 2006 also. He has been playing since he was four years old. “My favorite part is bowling and fielding,” Alluri said in an e-mail. “I can also swing a little bit of bat.” The organization was founded in 2006 with the help of Pramod Patlolla, Amar Chittiboyina and Herath Bandara, according to the OMCC website. The team’s season starts in the summer and lasts until winter. They play in several tournaments throughout the year, two of which are played in Oxford. This past weekend they trav-

eled to Auburn where they lost in the semi-final round of the competition to Auburn, Gavirneni said. The team has won many other tournaments in the past. The team is progressing, but as a club they have challenges to face. They are unable to use cricket balls when they practice because their field is not flat enough. For now, they use hard tennis balls, Gavirneni said. Making the field flatter is one of the goals they have for their team. The team practices on the intramural fields on Fridays and Saturdays from 6:30 p.m. to 10:15 p.m, according to the OMCC website. For more information on the OMCC, visit www.olemiss. edu/orgs/omcc or contact Gavirneni at sgavirne@olemiss. edu.

PRATEEK KUMAR | The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss Cricket Club player goes to bat at the June 2010 tournament in Oxford.


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 8

MATT & KIM TO PERFORM AT THE LYRIC TONIGHT BY JOSH BREEDEN

The Daily Mississippian

For many artists, describing album development is an arduous task, involving lengthy sonic metaphors and mentions of “phases” or “artistic maturity.”

For Matt Johnson and Kim Schifino, the process is adequately characterized using less than a sentence: “When we started, it just came out.” Spontaneity has always been the driving force behind the Brooklyn

based, dance/punk duo, responsible for both the youthful sound they emit and the colorful nature of their career. In 2004, Johnson and Schifino decided they wanted to make music. Having met two years prior at The Pratt Institute in New York, he pursuing a degree in filmmaking and she studying illustration, the couple dove into their new pursuit. They progressed quickly, evolving from an amateurish art project into a mainstay on the New York DIY scene in little over a year, playing self-booked shows in lofts, galleries and clubs around the city. The duo released their self-titled debut in 2006 under indie dance label Iheartcomix. The record featured “Matt and Kim” in raw form, banging out two and a half minute barrages of fizzling keys and punchy drums, Johnson’s drawn out, pop punk vocals fluctuating amongst the pronounced instrumentals. Their songs, which are constructed using random sentences written by Schifino and synthesized by Johnson, expressed the energetic zeal of youth, as well as more melancholic themes centered around their own reluctant maturation. Lauded by critics and listeners alike, “Matt and Kim” forged the band’s unique musical point of view, while providing them a niche within the recording industry. 2009 proved to be the duo’s breakout year. Their record “Grand”, released under Fader Label, bought them to the forefront of the indie scene while simultaneously introducing them to the pop arena. The single “Daylight” reached number 95 on the Billboard Hot 100 and they made their national television debut, appearing on the Jimmy Kimmel Show that August. At the MTV Video Music Awards in September, the duo won Breakthrough Video of the Year, receiving a moon-man for their not-so-legal “Lessons Learned” video.

“Sidewalks”, their upcoming record set to drop November 2, stems from “Grand” as Johnson and Schifino continue to expand from their minimalist foundations. “The album itself is pretty diverse,” Johnson said. “A lot of crashy stuff, or it can get quite slow, but you know we come back to the same style.” “Cameras,” the first single off of the new record, has a distinct hiphop feel and employs extensive use of sampling, something hinted at on “Grand.” “We probably listen to more hiphop than any other genre,” Johnson said. “And in ‘Cameras”’ it’s apparent.” According to Johnson, hip-hop is only one of the several styles explored in “Sidewalks.” He attributes this, in part, to famed Gnarls Barkley producer, Ben Allen, who collaborated with the duo in his Atlanta studio where the album was recorded. “The different stuff he’s done, the different sounds, especially the Gnarls Barkley stuff – we just wanted to record an album that covers more than one genre,” Johnson said. “It was nice having another outside opinion other than Kim and I even though it was pretty tough. Kim and I were so used to working together on different things really for the past 8 years and then to bring another creative opinion in. There was a little head-butting but in the end I think we made a great album.” While promoting “Sidewalks” via their ongoing fall tour, “Matt and Kim” are also holding pre-show listening parties where fans, especially those in cities on the schedule before the November 2 release date, can come hear the album in it’s entirety. “We decided the people that’ve come out and supported us and been there for us should get a chance to hear this album before anyone else hears it, which we thought was really cool,” Johnson said. “And also, we feel like we have nothing to

Hosted by the Panhellenic Council

hide. We’re totally proud that you can listen to the entire thing and we’re ready for people to hear it.” While Johnson and Schifino make terrific studio albums that aptly represent who they are as musicians, live shows are the ideal place to not just hear their music but experience it. An indescribable energy permeates these shows as the duo skillfully connects to the crowd through interesting banter while tearing through intense sets. Unpredictable stage antics are also a key feature of these shows, Schifino standing on her kit hyping up the crowd during breaks, and Johnson climbing on anything from scaffolding to the audience. It’s not an exhibition though, it’s part of their charm. They genuinely love playing music, and it shows. “In the end we just want to make music thats fun,” Johnson said. “And the music we’re inspired by is just music we want to dance to.” Their energy is so palpable it seems never ending, a sentiment reinforced by Johnson’s description of their tour manager’s initial encounter with Schifino’s, unique, pre-show routine. “I have to do stretches basically because I hurt my back on tour a year ago,” Johnson said. “Kim’s warmup is the funnier thing. I remember the first time she told our tour manager: she’s like ‘yeah, I got to go warmup for 10 or 15 minutes’. He was like, ‘okay,’ and you expect to walk into the trailer where we were and her to have her drumsticks out and be warming up like that. But Kim’s ‘warming up’ is jamming her headphones on and dancing for like 10 to 15 minutes.” Matt and Kim will be hitting the stage at The Lyric tonight. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the show is at 9 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance. All ticket holders are invited to the “Sidewalks” listening party which will begin when the doors open.

WATCH NEWS HAPPEN

NewsWatch Ch. 99 Streams a Live Broadcast at 5:30 to 6:00 P.M. Monday through Friday.

Go to theDMonline.com

and click ‘NEWSWATCH LIVE’


C L A S S IF I E D S |

CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline. com/classifieds. The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday year round, when school is in session.

Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted. RATES: - $ . 25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run Additional Features (Web & Print): Jumbo Headline - $3 Big Headline - $2 Bold Text - extra $ . 50 per word

To place your ad online: www.thedmonline.com/classifieds

The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

TAYLOR MEADOWS 2 Bed/2 Bath brick houses for rent on Old Taylor Road. Available now. (662)801-8255 3 BR/ 3 Ω Bath House- $1200/ month. Vaulted ceilings, granite, patio w/ fan, stainless steel appl. Very nice house. Available January. Call Summit Management. (662) 513-999 Available Immediately 2BR/2BA Home with Sunroom and Fireplace $850/ month. Free Recorded Message Ph.641-7153900 Ext.3149718#

Position Available Customer Service/ Technical Support End2End Public Safety has openings for part-time customer service and technical support positions. Seeking individuals with strong IT background or wanting to gain experience in IT. Responsibilities: Technical support via phone and email for software applications, Installation of applications, trouble shooting applications errors. Great opportunity to learn all aspects of software development, support, working with Microsoft SQL Server and. NET. Flexible hours. Send resume and letter of interest to employment@ Weekend Rental end2endpublicsafety.com. (662)513Furnished 3 Bedroom apt. near hos- 0999 pital fully furnished $1000.00 per month. University DD wants 662-202-5020

Miscellaneous Pregnancy Test Center Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com. (662)234-4414 RLW Upholstery Designs over 35 years experience in furniture, auto, boats & aircraft. Call Randy 662-8321556 Google us

Part-time BARTENDING $300/DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training Provided Call 1-800-965-6520 EXT155 studentpayouts.com Paid Survey Takers Needed In Oxford. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys. RESEARCH AND WRITING OF TOPICS FOR BOOKS. WORK AT YOUR PACE AND AT YOUR LOCATION. OVER 50 TOPICS TO WRITE ABOUT. $100 PER TOPIC. FOR COMPLETE INFO CALL OR E-MAIL. OPFORLIFE@ YAHOO. COM 0R (662)614-9487 Make 50 cents to $2.50 on every cup of coffee someone else drinks. Would you be interested? Call 901-605-5236 for more information.

YOU!

Want extra money working part-time? University DD seeks nighttime designated drivers, receptionists, and promoters. Email job@UniversityDD.com and visit UniversityDD.com Bartenders needed earn $250 per shift, no experience required, will train, FT/ PT call now! 877.405.1078 ext. 2401 3 piece roll-top desk needs ride in large pickup to Jackson asap. $50. langleyphd@comcast.net or (601)9563061

Automobiles 2006 Hummer H2 SUV original price $62, 225, mint condition, asking $22,500, luxury packaged. GPS System included, also has Bose speaker system. Call (662)234-9492

Miscellaneous for Sale 3500 Adult Rental Costumes. Open 9-3, Jo’s Auto Clean-Up and Costume Shop. 2524 University Avenue. 1/2Off Items New&Used Creations North Lamar/Molly Barr. Furniture, clothes/ shoes, miscellaneous. Donations Accepted/Pickup Available. (662)832-4301.

201 BISHOP HALL 662.915.5503

Apartment for Rent 1 & 2 BR Apartments- On Orange Bus Route!! Unfurnished Starting at $545 or We Will Make Moving Easy and Furnish Your Apartment for $50/mo (2BR) or $25/mo (1BR)! Free Golf and other Amenities! Call The Links today at 662-513-4949.

House for Rent 4bd/3ba gumtree subdivision All appliances. $1000/ month. $1000 deposit, available August now. (662)2363100

FURNISHED

3 bedroom/2bath home Like new; lawn service included. $1100 mo. Mature only. 662-329-1442 (662)574-0066

Anniversary Special!

Lunch: $5.97 Dinner: $7.30

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 9

LSAT Test Prep Books Set includes: Lesson Book, Mastery Practice, Pacing Practice, and Endurance Practice. Also included: Conquering LSAT Logic Games and LSAT Comprehensive Program. $200. Compare to $1300, the price of an LSAT prep course. If interested, call (843) 337-6451. If no answer, leave message. (843)337-6451

theDMonline.com

DM

non-condensed

Pets for Sale HAVANESE PUPPY FOR SALE. Male, 14 weeks old, $500. AKC Registered, all shots. Please call Chelsea at (980) 322-6990

Pets for Adoption

0 grams Trans Fat!

Save 9 LIVES! Adopt a rescued cat or kitten. www.9livescatrescue.org.

Bangkok Thai

10% off for students with id

Authentic Thai Food

Mon-fri: dinner 5:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. fri-sun: dinner 5:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Restaurant 662-513-0085

Mon-fri: Lunch 11:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

delivery within 3 miles

1101 frontage rd - next to days inn

GARRETT, FRIDAY & GARNER, PLLC

Preston Ray Garrett

DUI DEFENSE Let our legal team work for you. (662) 281-0438

1205 Office Park Drive, Oxford, MS 38655

The above listing of these areas does not indicate certification of expetise herein.


COM I C S |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 10

GARFIELD arfield G

By Jim davis BY JIM DAVIS 236-3030 monDay

M a d D n O e M s Is N1

11•20•2009

® ®

THE BIG DEAL

THE he fusco BroThers T FUSCO BROTHERS

By J.c. duffy BY J.C. DUFFY

A 4 T O1 R 5 LARGE

MediuM 1-topping

dILBERT ilBerT D

$

By scoTT adams BY SCOTT ADAMS

99

delivery or pick up

large 1-topping

$

99

Deep Dish extra LARGE pEppERONI

4

$$ orDer 99 99 EAch EAch

By Wiley BY WILEY

online 1603Jackson Jacksonave. ave.WW• •oxford oxford 1603

NON oN sequiTur N SEQUITUR

pEppERONI pIzzA pIzzA

www.

pIck-up Dominos pIck-up ONLy .com ONLy OPEN LATE

OpEN OpEN LATE LATE

dOONESBURY ooNesBury D

By Garry Trudeau BY GARRY TRUDEAU

Experience a MAZE WORDSEARCH

zing!

Mississippi River

Solution, tipstips andand computer program at www.sudoku.com Solution, computer program at www.sudoku.com

©© SUDOKU Puzzles byby Pappocom SUDOKU Puzzles Pappocom

HOW TO PLAY

HOW PLAY Complete theTO grid so Complete so that every the row,grid column that row, columnthe and every 3x3 box contains and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 with numbers 1 through 9 with no repeats no repeats DIFFICULTY LEVEL DIFFICULTY LEVEL

10.08.10 7/22/2010

M D R u o y e l c y c Re

Bluejack Fish Fragile Future Grass Gulf history

. theDMonline Industrial Mighty Mississippi Native Quality Ranch Resource

com

Riverboat Sediment Tugboat Value Water Wetland


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 11

OLE MISS SPORTS INFORMATION

SOCCER SPLITS WEEKEND PAIR Behind a school record of 17 saves from freshman Sarah Story, Ole Miss played former coach Steve Holeman and nationally ranked No. 18 Georgia to a scoreless double-overtime draw on Friday night. “It was a really gutty performance from our team tonight,” Ole Miss coach Mott said. “They battled tooth and nail with Georgia for 110 minutes. We certainly had a lot of the play in the first half. And I felt like, in the second half, we came out and took it to them for a big part of the game.” In minute 36, Georgia had one of its best chances of the game with a shot that was first deflected and then just hit of the crossbar. Story also knocked a pair of shots over the crossbar in the closing minutes of the first half. At halftime, the Bulldogs held a decisive advantage in both shots (15-2) and corner kicks (6-1), but Story’s then career-high nine saves kept the game scoreless. “She was fantastic,” Mott said. “She was excited about it and worked so hard the entire game. She was in good positions, saw the ball and reacted well all night.” Ole Miss had its first scoring chance in minute 62, but fresh-

man Mandy McCalla’s bending shot was saved by the diving Georgia keeper. After another attacking flurry from Georgia, sophomore Alix Hildal came on the counterattack and beat the keeper with a left-footed shot, but was denied by the crossbar in minute 87. In the first overtime period, senior Taylor Cunningham crossed a ball into the box, but McCalla’s header missed just wide. Then, with just over three minutes left in the game, freshman Erin Emerson played a through ball to McCalla, but Georgia’s keeper came out of the box to clear the ball away. In the closing seconds of the game, on another counter-attack, Hildal took a pass from Emerson and found junior Dylan Jordan, whose shot and rebound shot were both saved by the Georgia keeper as time expired. Tennessee 3, Ole Miss 1 Freshman Mandy McCalla scored her third goal of the season for Ole Miss early in the first half, but Tennessee answered back with two goals in quick succession and then added a late insurance goal for the 3-1 victory Sunday afternoon. “Tennessee came out and worked harder than we did,” Ole Miss coach Matt Mott said. “We

have to find a way to play two games in a weekend. We got the first goal and weren’t able to get the game settled back down, so they were able to get those two goals in the first half and that was difficult for us to come back from. We had to chase the game and just couldn’t get an equalizer.” Ole Miss opened the scoring in minute 13, when freshman Erin Emerson found McCalla in the box, who beat the Tennessee keeper with a sliding, close range shot to the far post. After tying the game on an own goal in minute 19, Tennessee scored the decisive go-ahead goal when they played a through ball and then beat a diving Sarah Story. McCalla nearly found an equalizer toward the end of the half, but her shot was deflected wide of goal by the Tennessee keeper. In minute 58, Emerson used a give-and-go with McCalla to get in behind the Tennessee defense, but her shot was saved by the keeper. Finally, in minute 88, on a counter-attack, Tennessee added a third and final goal. “It’s disappointing to lose,” McCalla said. “We just have to work harder in the next game. I don’t think the work rate was there and our passing wasn’t as good today. We have a lot to work on this week in practice.”

recorded seven kills. Sophomore setter Amanda Philpot had a game-high 28 assists, the same number as the entire Bulldog team and added six kills and five digs. Junior libero Morgan Springer recorded a team-high 12 digs. The Rebels out-blocked the Bulldogs 13.0 to 3.0. The Bulldogs did not record a block until the third set. Ole Miss out-hit Georgia .318 to .077. The Bulldogs (10-9, 2-6 SEC) extended their losing streak to three matches after Sunday’s loss to the

Rebels. Junior libero Carla Tietz led the Georgia defense with a game-high 18 digs while junior setter Kathleen Gates added 10 digs and 22 assists. Getzin said he is encouraged with the growth of his team. “I like the way our team is performing on our side of the net,” Getzin said. Ole Miss returns to action next Friday when they take on the Southeastern Conference West Division leader No. 15 LSU at 6:30 p.m. in the Gillom Center.

VOLLEYBALL,

continued from page 12

the hitters’ options so much less,” Ole Miss coach Joe Getzin said. “I know we are frustrating some teams with that, so we just have to continue to be steady with that.” Sunday’s match was the third shut out in a row for Ole Miss. Middle blocker Regina Thomas was coming off a six kill performance against Auburn where she hit .667. Against Georgia she had six kills and hit a game high .556, while senior middle blocker Miranda Kitts, who had seven kills and hit .462 against the Tigers, hit .467 in this match and

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL PREGAME STARTS AT 5

VS.

VIKINGS TM

JETS

ALL YOU CAN EAT BBQ RIBS • PORK • BAKED BEANS • POTATO SALAD • ALL YOU CAN EAT $10

TM


SPORTS S P O R TS |

10 . 11 . 10

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 12

Volleyball downs Georgia and Auburn BY KIRBY BARKLEY

The Daily Mississippian

Coming off a double-double performance with 10 kills and 11 digs, sophomore outside hitter Whitney Craven recorded a near double-double, putting down 16 kills and eight digs as the Ole Miss volleyball team shut out Georgia yesterday afternoon by score of 3-0 (25-13, 25-14, 2519).

See VOLLEYBALL, PAGE 11

35¢

Win

gs please drink responsibly

s r e h c iser t i P $2 udwe oors B nd C a

The Rebels (12-5, 6-2 SEC) have already passed their 2009 record (1020, 4-16 SEC) in wins. Ole Miss entered the second match of their home stand coming off a 3-0 (25-22, 25-22, 25-19) sweep of Auburn Friday night in which Ole Miss out-blocked Auburn 7 to 2. “When our block is there, we put up a pretty big block, and it makes

Happy Hour 3-7 p.m. Monday - Friday 2 for 1 Domestics & Wells

Π Θ Bpresents...

QUENTIN WINSTINE | The Daily Mississippian

Setter Amanda Philpot sets up middle blocker Regina Thomas. Philpot had a game-high 28 assists as Ole Miss swept Georgia 3-0.

TREY LYONS at

Taylor’s Pub R E V O C NO


The Daily Mississippian - October 11, 2010  

The Daily Mississippian - October 11, 2010

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you