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Tailgating Policies Subject to Change... Again BY KRISTIE WARINO The Daily Mississippian

The University gameday committee has instituted new rules and policies to make tailgating a better experience for Rebel fans. “The rules are subject to change,” said Andy Mullins, chief of staff to the Chancellor. “If there is violation of this policy, yes, you will see a change. We are doing what it takes to take back control of campus.” Due to disruption of the academic day, tailgaters will no longer be able to set up tents in the Grove at 6 p.m. on Friday nights before gameday. “We pushed it back so people can go to class or work and get off work and go home without the disruption,” Mullins said. Tailgaters can now set up tents at 10 p.m. the night before a game. Tents that are set up earlier than 10 p.m. on Fridays will be confiscated. “We’re not going to let trucks full of tailgating supplies on campus Friday,” said Chief Sellers of UPD. “They won’t be allowed in until 9 p.m. and can start erecting tents at 10 p.m.” Campus officially opens for parking at 6 a.m. Saturday. Overnight violators on Friday

are subject to having their automobile towed at the owner’s expense. Parking on the Circle is restricted to the right-hand side only. The left side surrounding the Circle has been designated as a 15-minute loading zone. “There’s no permanent parallel parking around the circle; they (tailgaters) can unload there but not park there because it blocks emergency vehicles,” Mullins said. There is also no longer parking on Library Loop during games. A new text messaging system will start on Saturday in the Vaught-Hemingway stadium during the game. “The system is designed so fans can text-in stadium issues right from their seats,” said Brian Russell, assistant director of event management operations. The text message system is in place to help provide an enjoyable and safe experience for fans. “This system provides fans a way to report fan disturbances anonymously,” Russell said. “It will help address fans needs in a simple and effective way. Not only can fans report unruly fans, but they can report medical issues as well as stadium issues.” Fans should text in the keyword

MITCHELL WRIGHT: THE RECONSTRUCTION Contemplating notions of reminiscence and mortality while engaging the cultural influences of southern letters and music, artist Mitchell Wright offers a window into the ghosts of the southern past and their impact on contemporary life and artistic creation.

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FREE FRIDAYS: REBEL CHALLENGE COURSE Check out the Rebel Challenge Course every Friday from 2-4pm for FREE FRIDAYS. The RCC is open to students, faculty and staff and consists of high elements. We are located on campus near the intramural fields off Hathorn Road. 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. Rebel Challenge Course

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

People crowd the Grove last year. This year there will be new rules regarding tailgating in the Grove.

“REBS” with the issue and location including section, row and seat number to 69050. The message is received by stadium dispatch at a central command station located in the stadium. Once the proper information is received, the dispatcher will forward it on to the appropriate personnel whether it is security,

BY JACOB FULLER The Daily Mississippian

Oxford Lawyer Tom Freeland speaks in favor of Sunday alcohol sales at Thursday night’s public hearing. The meeting was held to determine public opinion on Sunday alcohol sales.

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM

11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

medical or stadium maintenance staff. If the issue is security-related, the incident will be investigated and appropriate action, such as a simple warning or possible arrest will be taken by stadium security or UPD. For more information about the new rules and regulations, visit www.olemiss.edu/gameday.

Alcohol Task Force Holds Public Hearing

JACOB FULLER | The Daily Mississippian

this week

Oxford residents voiced their opinions on the dispute over Sunday alcohol sales Thursday night in a forum with the Oxford Alcohol Task Force. The task force was created to advise the Board of Alderman on the possibility of allowing Sunday sales and what regulations may be put in place if the Sunday prohibition is repealed. Citizens both in favor of Sunday sales and those opposed were allowed two minutes to voice their opinions to the committee. Most of the opposed mentioned the dangers and alcohol-related arrests that occur on Thursday through Saturday nights and problems with vendors selling to underage patrons. First Baptist Church pastor Eric Hankins was one of the first to take the microphone. He said he does not believe the issue is just over one day of the week. “I believe a culture of alcohol is destructive,” Hankins said. “And so the issue for me is not so much a Sabbath-day issue. The issue for me is why should we allow there to be more of something we already have way too much of.” Advocates focused on the economic effects Sunday sales would have on a city that relies strongly on its hospitality industry, especially restaurants. Tom Freeland of law firm Freeland and Freeland, which is located on Jackson Ave. across the alley from Taylor’s Pub, said the issue of Thursday- and Friday-night alcohol abuse is irrelevant to the discussion of Sunday sales.

“First, you need to understand that there is not one thing you can do in making a decision about Sunday sales that is going to have an impact on the problems that the (opposing) speakers have been talking about: about underage sales, about the bar scene at 11 o’clock on a Thursday night,” Freeland said. “That’s not the problem you’re being asked to address. This isn’t a committee about the culture of alcohol. This is a committee about whether Oxford should move forward to having Sunday sales.” Duke Goza, another lawyer and Oxford resident, said the town is not just comprised of the college students who crowd the bars late at night. He agreed with Freeland that enforcement of age laws is not the job of the committee. “That is a factor of the law enforcement and doing what the law says has to be done,” Goza said. Jim Pryor, of the Oxford Courthouse Square Preservation Commission, said the discussion is not over what is permissible, but what is best for the community. “I have no doubt that Sunday sales of alcohol would be somewhat beneficial to the tax collectors and to the bottom line of some of our businesses,” Pryor said. “But I contend here tonight that the most important question is whether Sunday sales of alcohol is beneficial or detrimental to the lives of young people.” The committee will meet and discuss their recommendations before giving them to Mayor Pat Patterson and the Board of Alderman for consideration. The aldermen voted 6-1 against Sunday restaurants sales in the spring.

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The increase in numbers has caused a more crowded atmosphere in places like the Student Union, Smith said. It is great news for the school.”

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BY JOSH CLARK

CAROLINE LEE editor-in-chief

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LANCE INGRAM city news editor AMANDA WARD campus news editor MIA CAMURATI opinion editor EMILY ROLAND lifestyles editor PAUL KATOOL sports editor KATIE RIDGEWAY visual editor ALIX ZACHOW copy chief ADDISON DENT photography editor The mission of The Daily Mississippian is to consistently produce a bold and accurate daily news source by fulfilling our obligation to the truth and maintaining our loyalty to the public we serve.

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THE GROVE: THE HOLY GRAIL OF TAILGATING BY ANDREW DICKSON Columnist

T H E

While opinions vary from person to person, there are some instances where the general consensus is so strong that to go against it is to go against universal acclaim. The universe is much bigger than you are, so while you’re entitled to your opinion of the Grove and its festivities, you’re going to have trouble convincing anyone that has experienced it that the hype isn’t warranted. Referred to as “the Holy Grail of tailgating sites” by the Sporting News, The Grove has also received critical acclaim for its atmosphere from sources like ESPN, Sports Illustrated and The New York Times. It frequently appears near the top of tailgate reviews from across the country. The Columbia Missourian named the Grove “the Mecca of tailgating in college sports.” “Mecca” – now that’s a description this religion minor can get behind. Every year, tens of thousands of alumni make the pilgrimage back to Oxford to blissfully congregate with students and opposing fans in a circus of red, white, and blue tents. It’s like the unadulterated version of Thanksgiving we teach our

children in grade school. While the Grove’s history doesn’t go all the way back to Abraham or even Columbus, the party has been going on for at least half a century. Cars were prohibited after a 1990 rainstorm left the Grove a terrible mess. They were replaced instead with the tents we know today. What began as a picnic has evolved into a full course dinner party; silver platters lined with finger foods and desserts abound, and a variety of drinks are served from early in the morning until late at night. It’s like Santa Claus and world peace – except it’s real. Now, I feel it necessary to outline a few things for those of you that have never experienced the Grove, because you don’t want to be “that” bug-eyed, slack-jawed freshman come Saturday in Wonderland. First and foremost, chairs simply will not be provided. Those that know bring their own seat, and everyone else is relegated to laps and coolers (which should remain locked unless open). There isn’t a dress code per se, but there is a way to dress. Khaki anything is pretty much accept-

able, but some will go above and beyond. High heels are a good idea, but bringing flip flops for the second half is a better one. Try your best to avoid being arrested. It takes a lot to stick out in a crowd of more than 25,000 people, so avoid activities such as vomiting and public indecency and you should be fine. Remember that pace is the trick. The Grove itself could be looked at as a drinking game, but the other drinking games you’ll play simply don’t last eight to twelve hours. Also, remember that the phrase “drugs and alcohol” is utter propaganda – alcohol is a drug and should be respected as such. Don’t forget anything important – such as your cell phone (although you’ll be fighting everyone else for service), your ticket, or the fact that you actually have to walk to the stadium. God isn’t going to miracle you into your seat, and students have farther to walk than anyone else from the Grove. Saying Hotty Toddy is cool; saying it before you know all of the words or before you know how to say it in rhythm is not. You’ll have plenty of chances to learn it during the Walk of Champions, so

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pay attention to the wonder and take plenty of notes. Lastly, enjoy a true Ole Miss tradition. For decades, people have been pushing “traditions” on this University with ulterior motives, but this 10-acre party screams of pure intention. It’s southern hospitality at its best – treating complete strangers like they were members of your own family. There are a variety of degrees one can graduate from Ole Miss with, but everyone that comes and stays for four years leaves with something arguably just as important – a social education. I’ve learned plenty in my classes the first couple of years, but the things I’ve learned outside of them – how to meet new people, how to carry on a good conversation and how to be charismatic around complete strangers – are going to benefit me just as much once I get into the real world and begin dealing with other people. The lessons learned outside of the traditional learning environment are still lessons learned. Class gets back in session this Saturday at 4 a.m. in the middle of campus. Don’t be late; attendance will be taken.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

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The Most Wonderful Time of the Year BY JACOB FULLER Columnist

As I walked around campus today, I noticed a sweet smell that brought back memories of jubilation and despair, victory and defeat. It was the smell of whiskey and home cooking, perfume and sweat, giant oaks and green grass, chicken strips and pig skin. It was the smell of football season at Ole Miss. For a lifelong Rebels fan who has spent thousands of hours watching college football, eating others’ food in the Grove, playing EA Sports “NCAA Football” series and covering Nutt’s boys for a couple of publications, there is no better time of year than the first weekend of football season. And now that we have entered September, that scent of tailgating and gridiron is so close I can almost taste it. Saturday, our little hamlet will be flooded with tourists that call themselves Rebels, and I cannot wait. The media excitement around the Rebels has been almost nonexistent compared to last season. Gone is the No.4 ranking, the experienced quarterback and the

only 1,000-yard rusher/500yard receiver in SEC history. In their places we have a team picked by many to finish last in the SEC West. We have two inexperienced underclassmen and a former Pac-10 star who, it now seems, won’t be eligible until 2011, battling at quarterback and a host of youngsters trying to make up the offense Mr. McCluster produced last season. While ’09 started in a blaze and fizzled into a snore-worthy Cotton Bowl victory, watch for this season to be the antithesis of the last for the Rebels. The opening

five games are as easy a start to the season as the Rebels have had in decades. With SEC East perennial bottom-dwellers Vanderbilt and Kentucky being the toughest competition of the stretch, the Rebels could start the season 5-0. Though I’ve falsely predicted that Ole Miss could start the season with five or six wins straight many times, I once again find myself convinced. After the easy stretch that should see Ole Miss make a run into the top 25, the Rebels will likely be favored at home

against Auburn, University of Louisiana at Lafayette and Mississippi State. Of the four SEC road games, only Alabama looks like an unlikely stretch for the Rebels. So, despite the scarce national media coverage and low predictions by the “experts,” my excitement level for this season has not diminished even in the slightest for this football season. So as the Rebels prepare to take on FCS Jacksonville State Saturday, I will rise early and head to my favorite patch of grass and trees on Earth. I’ll enjoy time with friends,

family and maybe even some friends-to-be eating home cooked food, drinking my favorite cerveza (don’t tell the campus police that means beer) and talking, at a gradually rising volume as the drinks poor, about how this could be the year the Rebels really do something special. Fortunately, we may have more than six weeks until we find out if the Rebels are a real SEC West contender. And in that time, they might just become one. Regardless, it should be a hell of a lot of fun for all of us. Hotty Toddy!

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9. Appointed by the Mississippi State Bar to the Mississippi Commission on Attorney Ethics and Attorney Violations of the Canon of Ethics and All Mandatory Rules Concerning the Practice of Law. Occupied the Positions of Vice Chairman and Chairman 10. Member and Past Officer of the Lafayette Bar Association; Mississippi State Bar Association, American Bar Association, National Trial Lawyers, etc. Listing of these previously mentioned areas of practice does not indicate any certification of expertise therein


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University of Mississippi welcomes largest freshman Class in its history BY AMANDA WARD Campus News Editor

The University of Mississippi has experienced a record-breaking increase in incoming freshman students this year. Officially, numbers will not be available until after Friday, the last day to add and drop classes. However, an unofficial tally of the freshmen that make up the class of 2014 was released yesterday. This year, the university welcomed 3,089 new freshmen on campus. This number is a 19.9 percent increase from last fall. “I don’t think anybody anticipated this type of dramatic growth,” Whitman Smith, director of enrollment services, said. Although the increase in enrollment has caused more crowded places, especially in places like the Student Union, Smith said it is great news for the school. “I think mostly it means a lot of positive in an era of terrible state of support declining, in an era where op-

erating expenses are going down every year in terms of what we get from our stat,e and a terrible economy,” Smith said. “You make that up in one of several ways– more students who pay tuition, more contracts and grants and more donations from alumni. We are fortunate that all three have gone up at the same time.” Smith said that just as important as new enrollment is retention. He said that there has been an increase in students who have chosen to remain at the University of Mississippi after their freshman year. Unofficially, 83.1 percent of freshmen from last year chose to continue their education at the University. Two years ago that number was only 78.3 percent. On all campuses, the preliminary enrollment numbers total at 19,536. This is yet another record for the University. It comes to a 6.5 percent increase. The Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College enrolled

288 freshmen. A new program, Provost Scholars, began this year with an inaugural class of more than 350 students. “The thing about enrollment is that one year’s worth of growth doesn’t mean much,” Smith said. “Two years mean something; three or four or five straight years means obviously you have a good product, people like it and they want to come here.” This is evident in the recent release of Forbes’ annual list of America’s Best Colleges. The University of Mississippi ranked 24 on this list, between State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and University of California at Berkeley. This list is compiled by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in conjunction with Forbes. The University has hired new faculty to help deal with the numbers, Smith said. The University of Mississippi is still working to facilitate the increase in students on campus.

NOTICE OF ENACTMENT OF UNIVERSITY PARKING RULES & REGULATIONS The University of Mississippi Police Department [UPD] in Oxford, Mississippi hereby gives notice of enactment of the University’s Traffic and Parking Regulations for the 2010 - 2011 academic year. These rules and regulations are enacted by the Board of Trustees of the State Institutions of Higher Learning, State of Mississippi, and are effective from and after August 15, 2010. The full text of such rules and regulations are available at www.olemiss.edu/depts/u_police and on the campus map/parking guide distributed by UPD in Kinard Hall.

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CAIN MADDEN | The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss offensive lineman Josh Tatum hugs sophomore biology major Rebecca King at Thursday evening’s pep rally. The pep rally featured Ole Miss football players, games and giveaways.


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Employee Benefits: Fear of the Future BY BLAKE JOHNSON The Daily Mississippian

ELIZABETH BEAVER | The Daily Mississippian

Hattie Alton sells raffle tickets and sits with her dog, Ledges, at Parrish Baker Pub on the Square. The raffle ticket sale benefited Oxford-Lafayette Humane Society.

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With the arrival of the new health care bill earlier this year Mississippi, Universities prepare for changes to employee benefits packages. The University of Mississippi has not been affected as directly as Mississippi State or the University of Southern Mississippi, but it has not been ruled out that job cuts or reduced benefits could happen in the years to come for the university’s faculty. Robert Robinson, professor of management, said that Ole Miss is “self-insured through Blue Cross Blue Shield, though we are a state institution we have more private money coming in to help us weather these times.” Mississippi State and Southern Miss have been receiving money from the state of Mississippi alone and because of this both schools have been planning job cuts, and program reductions. The introduction of President Barack Obama’s new health-

care plan has made many changes to the way employee benefits work, but most of the major changes will not take effect until January 1, 2014. Because the bill will not be taking effect for a couple of years most businesses will not make any major changes to the way things work, it has become a waiting game. Some effects that will take place very soon though, such as the ability for employers to provide coverage for employees families including children up to the age of 26. Sophomore biology major, James Evans said he believes this part of the bill could be good because most students take more than four years to get their degree and it would be a better help to those students if their parents still held them as dependents. Employers are technically not required by law to provide insurance, but if they have more than 50 employees they could be fined $2,000 for each employee not covered. If an employer has less than

50 employees however, the bill does not as severely affect them; but if a firm has over 200 employees the employer is required to have them signed to a plan. Although they will not be required to pay the fines for not covering an employee, it is still possible for an employee to reject the employers coverage if they think it is taking too much of a percentage of their paycheck according to Robinson. “Hard economic times force all organizations, public and private, to get more efficient, and to use their resources better,” Robinson said. If an employee chooses to not have the employer chosen health insurance then that employee would need to find a provider on the open market. Robinson said that because of penalties like these it would be more cost efficient to pay employees overtime than to hire new workers with the risk of adding new costs or health plans.


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University Makes Effort for a Greener Campus BY KATE NICOLE COOPER The Daily Mississippian

In April of 2008, former chancellor Khayat signed the American College and University President Climate Commitment, which formalized the efforts of the school to make a more environmentally-friendly campus. This ultimately began the Green Initiative. In its two years, the Green Initiative has encouraged students to become more conscious of daily activities that are potentially harmful to the environment. It has influenced positive means of benefiting the environment, as well as the campus, by promoting recycling and more efficient use of energy by installing new motion-sensor lighting in several buildings on campus, to name a few. The newly formed Bike GiveBack program, as well as Rebel Pedals, are two programs that have been added to these efforts. While Rebel Pedals gives students increased access to affordable bikes, Bike Give-Back will distribute bikes through-

out the semester to worthy students with no current means of transportation. “Our goal has been and will always be to change the culture of our campus from a driving campus to a bike and pedestrian friendly campus,” Cory Washington, a member of the Associated Student Body said in a previous interview. The Oxford University Transit system (O.U.T.), is another way the University is promoting a less car-centric, more bike- and walking-friendly campus. “The buses now cover more areas on and off campus and are convenient and safe,” Anne McCauley, project coordinator for the Office of Campus Sustainability said. “It gives students the freedom to leave their cars at home without the worry of not being able to get around to where they want to go.” O.U.T is free for all Ole Miss students with their student I.D. “The campus is trying to facilitate other ways of transportation,” McCauley said. Offering reduced parking permits for the south parking lot

along Old Taylor Road is another way the Office of Sustainability has opted for a greener, more efficient campus. This lot was designated for students to ease the congestion on campus and make it a more pleasant place to walk and bike by parking in a less central area of campus. Not only is this parking area less crowded, but students only pay ten dollars for the South Lot parking decal, McCauley said. “While UM’s ratio of parking spaces to cars remains favorable in comparison to our peers, the proximity of parking spaces, the traffic congestion within the core of campus, and the limited alternative transportation options are important issues for UM to address.” In response to this need, the University is moving forward with several important initiatives to promote a more pedestrian friendly campus, including the OUT bus, new bike racks, rebel pedals bike-share program, pathways initiative, bike-give back program, etc. The University is also exploring programs such as park-ride

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he said. All these initiatives are evidence of the University’s efforts to become more sustainable and greener. “However, what is best for students is really at the heart of all these initiatives,” McCauley said. “I think we would all agree that having less cars on campus creates a more pleasant atmosphere, promotes better air quality, and encourages walking and biking, which are more active lifestyles. We do not want to “go green” just for the sake of doing it but because we feel these efforts have everyone’s best interest at heart, other groups, as well as ASB, want to see this happen. Our office brings this vision to life.”

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lots, bike lockers and an online carpool program. An enhanced campus transit program would not only address the traffic congestion from recent enrollment growth, but it would also support a more active and sustainable lifestyle on campus.” said Jim Morrison, Director of Strategic Planning. “The Office of Campus Sustainability, along with the Office of Strategic Planning, has been working diligently to change the culture of our campus,” Washington said. He added that another new means of going green that the University has supplied is the ‘green meal plan.’ “Instead of using foam to-go plates, students get a plastic reusable and washable plate,”

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What to do, and really, what not to do on the Square BY EMILY CEGIELSKI Columnist

rebel radio

A night out on the Square is the epitome of the Ole Miss stereotype. Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night everyone gets super-dressed up, “pre-games” in their dorm and ends up hopping from bar to bar sloppy drunk until the wee hours of the morning. First of all, this a lie. The bars don’t stay open until the wee hours of the morning. They close at midnight. And another thing––a lot of Ole Miss students never go to the Square. House parties, frat houses and apartment gatherings typically offer all of the fun without the expensive drinks and claustrophobic atmosphere. Not to mention the risk of being arrested for public drunkenness or underage drinking is all too common on the Square. To keep you from getting into trouble or from just looking plain stupid, here is a list of “dos and don’ts” for your night out to Oxford’s most beloved bar scene. 1. Do dress up. The number one rule of the Square is to make sure you look nice. In my personal opinion, a cute dress and a pair of heels are all you need to make an impression at any venue you choose. This does not mean keep that amazing pair of skinny jeans in the closet. A great fitting pair of jeans with a slinky top also works, but don’t forget the skyhigh heels to top off the outfit. And for you guys, Polos are always a nice fall back, but mix it up with a button-up shirt and

nice jeans every once in a while. Just remember, the Square is a classy place. If you don’t dress up, you are not likely to get kicked out of the bars, but your image will be tarnished in the minds of many. Looking your best is definitely the way to go. 2. Don’t look like a skank. That being said, no one wants to see your booty. If your dress is so short that I can see your undies (or not), I tend to be grossed out. Short, short dresses with high, high heels are inappropriate for every place in the world except street corners. There are ways to wear a micro miniskirt or a plunging top without screaming “slut!” Keep your bare skin to a minimum. Show off your legs or neck, but not both. 3. Do eat dinner. The Square is home to some of Oxford’s best restaurants. If you are already planning on spending the money on exorbitantly priced drinks, then why not shell out

the extra cash for a nice meal? Another plus of eating on the Square is that the places that turn into “21 bars” later in the evening, will not kick you out if you stay in your seat after eating. That’s the only way to see some of the bands that end up in places that are meant to exclude the younger Ole Miss population. 4. Don’t drink too much. Of course with dinner under your belt, the next logical step is to go drinking. I cannot reiterate this enough: Don’t over-drink. Having a nice time is one thing, but blacking out, throwing up and being a general nuisance to those around you is completely different. No friend enjoys taking care of you during one of your all-night drinking binges, and not to mention, it is not safe. Safety being the obvious reason for not overindulging, the cops will come find you on the Square. If you start a bar fight (really drunk people do this), if you are acting belligerent (really

drunk people also do this) or if you get behind the wheel (ditto), most likely a cop will find you. There’s no need to get arrested on the square. Just watch the amount of alcohol you consume, and everything will be great. 5. Do dance. The only reason I like going to the Square is to dance. If it’s not your thing, what lies before you is an awkward night of standing at the bar and not really knowing what to do. Dancing gives you something to do and a way to connect with that hot guy or girl from across the room. Even if you aren’t interested in meeting people, a group of friends jumping to the beat is way more fun than sitting at a table trying to talk over the loud music.

6. Don’t prance. Now that your night is over, and you are walking back to your designated driver’s car or waiting for Rebel Ride, the way you conduct yourself on the streets is of dire importance. No one wants to see you going crazy. No one wants to see you yelling and screaming. No one wants to see you prancing like a gazelle down the sidewalk. This goes for night time protocol as well as during the early morning. It does not matter how late (or early in the morning) it is or how intoxicated you are, do not degrade the Square by acting juvenile. Not only do you create that stereotype we talked about at the beginning, but you make yourself and your fellow Ole Miss students look stupid.


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The Boss is Back BY MATTHEW BISHOP Automotive Columnist

If you are old enough to remember the original Mustang Boss 302, you’ll remember its wild paint jobs, unique graphics and amazing track performance, so good in fact that Parnelli Jones won the 1970 TransAm Championship in one. However, if you’re not old enough to remember the original, never fear––the Mustang Boss 302 is returning as a 2012 model and is better than ever. The Boss 302 is returning in two distinct sub-models. The regular Boss 302 and a hardcore, trackoriented Boss 302 Laguna Seca, named after the famed race track

in California where Parnelli Jones won in the original Boss 302. The regular Boss 302 is by no means “regular.” Ford made sure that the Boss 302 package would be by no means just an appearance package. In order to accomplish this, Ford improved many of the GT’s characteristics, concentrating especially on the engine and suspension. The Boss 302’s 5.0L engine has been thoroughly revised to inch as much horsepower as possible, and it achieves 440 HP, up from the GT’s already impressive 412. It does this through more performance oriented engine controls, a more aggressive camshaft and

CONTRIBUTED BY FORD MOTOR COMPANY

forged pistons, to name a few. All that new found power is pretty much useless unless you have an upgraded drive train to go with it. So Ford is using a short throw sixspeed manual transmission with a new clutch to harness the extra power. The rear end gets a 3.73:1 axle ratio and a limited slip differential, and a Torsen unit is available as an option. One of the coolest things about the new Boss 302 is its new quad exhaust system. This system has the basic two pipes that exit the rear through a muffler, but it also has two extra pipes that exit at the

side of the car just ahead of the rear wheels. This provides the Boss with a very unique sounding exhaust, but if you ask me, I believe this is just a way for Ford to get away with noise regulations while leaving owners an easy option to just take off the two pipes in the rear for a true race sounding exhaust. Ford has also made sure to make the Boss 302 distinct from the outside with paint colors as wild as the original’s and a c-stripe graphic on the car with the iconic “Boss 302” on the side. Other distinguishable features of the Boss include blocked up holes where the fog lights on a

Mustang usually reside and a new spoiler on the trunk lid. As great as these upgrades are, it’s what you don’t see that makes the biggest difference in the interior and the fact that Ford shaved off ten pounds of sound deadening material to let you hear all of the wonderful sounds from the American muscle sitting in front of you. Ford calls the new Boss 302 the “quickest, best handling, straightproduction Mustang ever offered by Ford.” I don’t doubt their predictions, and I personally cannot wait to get my hands on one to test that statement out.

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THE OXFORD MUSIC FESTIVAL IS HERE AGAIN

Courtesy of Oxford Music Festival | The Daily Mississippian

BY STU KELLY The Daily Mississippian

The much-anticipated Oxford Music Festival is finally here. The festival is an annual event designed to showcase the amazing musical talent in our area. The event features local musicians and tons of original music. The overall goal of Oxford Music Festival is to promote the expanding local music scene as well as aid talented acts in gaining exposure. Music began last night when the festival kicked off at Proud Larry’s. Jimmy Phillips started things off, getting the crowd in the right mood for the rest of the music ensembles to grace the stage with their presence. Other musicians that performed last night were Chauncey and the Beast, Pineross, Tate Moore, The Minor Adjustments, the Eric Deaton Trio and Kenny Brown. George McConnell and the Nonchalants headlined Thursday night, wrapping everything up around 1:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday night the musical festivities will bounce over to The Lyric, where a variety of sponsors will provide food and further entertainment. Music kicks off at 8 p.m. tonight with Good Paper. Other artists to look forward to in-

clude Cadilac Funk, Jay Lang and the Devil’s Due, Shannon McNally and Hot Sauce, Mayhem 88 (Mayhen String Band + Rocket 88) and Jimbo Mathus & The Tri-State Coalition. “I’m looking forward to catching Jimbo Mathus, Mayhem 88 and Young Buffalo,” senior journalism major and Oxford native Hillary Houston said.

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Music Saturday night will also begin at 8 p.m. with beloved bar act Gonzo and the Clean Sneak. More bands to come include The Reviews, Stork and Nick B, Shooting Out The Lights, Tyler Keith and The Apostles, Young Buffalo and Blue Mountain. “I’m really looking forward to seeing Young Buffalo,” said Tim

(just east of the Square)

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Burkhead, head of productions at The Lyric Theater. “They have grown up a lot in a year, done some recording and they are playing a later time slot than last year.” Oxonians are getting excited about the music festival because the local music scene is expanding and branching out to more diverse target audiences.

“It’s a great event.” senior RJ Malenfant said. “We are so fortunate to have a thriving local music scene and the festival is a great way to support that and see a lot of talented artists under one roof.” Tickets for each day can be purchased for $10 each either at the door or online at www. thelyricoxford.com.


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CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline.com/ classifieds. The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday year round, when school is in session.

Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted. RATES: - $ . 25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run Additional Features (Web & Print): Jumbo Headline - $3 Big Headline - $2 Bold Text - extra $ . 50 per word Online-exclusive features also available

3 bedroom/2bath home Like new; lawn service included. $1100 mo. Mature only. 662-329-1442 (662)574-0066 Eagle Pointe: 3BR/2BA. Garage. Fenced-in Yard. All Appliances. Great Neighborhood and great location to town. Perfect for families or Grad Students. $1050/ month deposit. danboyk@gmail.com (662)801-1448 House for Rent Oxford House on Football Weekends. Very Close to Campus. Cape Code style home surrounded by an acre of woods on a hill. Large screened-in porch. $1200 - SEC wkends. $800-nonconf. Max 9. Photos: CapeCodOxford.blogspot.com. More info: shg@hotmail.com 2 bd/1ba House for Rent Lovejoy Road, on Enid Backwaters. Concrete Block house. $400/ month plus deposit. 662-233-4176

NOLA CONDO/Tulane 2-story 2br/1ba amazing condo on Bourbon with private courtyard. French Quarter at its best. $2000/ weekend (601)5400951 Ballgame weekends 3 Bedroom apt. for rent $500.00. 662-202-5020 Walk to the Game Newly remodeled townhouse Sleeps 5. Wireless internet, large porch, private parking. (662)801-1504 are you ready?? Football weekends and more! Check out our availability list online. www.oxfordtownhouse. com (662)801-6692 Perfect Location & Price Charming condo steps from the Square. Sleeps 5. Prefect football getaway! $975/ weekend. (601)540-0951 FOOTBALL WEEKEND RENTAL First time offered! 3 BR 3 BA one-story historic home located 250 yards from Square. Completely remodeled in 2010. HDTV, wireless internet. Large deck and front porch. Private parking. $2500 per weekend or Call 662-801-6878 or email olemissrental@gmail.com

Room for Rent

Miscellaneous

Walking Distance 2 Square Mature Female Room mate wanted to share a three bedroom, 2 and a half bath house 1 block from square. Rent for the room is $600 including all utilities plus $600 initial deposit. Call for more info (601)397-9929 Roommate Needed Immediately Preferably male to share 2bd/2ba apartment at Lexington Pointe. Call (601)954-2777 or (601)-750-9384

Pregnancy Test Center: Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com (662)234-4414 Pregnancy Test Center Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com. (662)234-4414 GROVE TENT SET-UP - Tent, table, & chairs. 10 years of experience! Competitive rates. WE WILL GET YOU A GREAT SPOT! (662)801-1448 Grove Tent setup- Set up chairs, tables, tents. Tent storage, Tent rental also available Call (662)607-5992 Need a photographer? Oxford photographer offering fall specials on family, bridal, engagement, headshots, events. emphotographyoxford@gmail. com (662)380-1888

3BDR/3BA August 1st. $900/ mo. 1006 Creekside Drive. Also, 3BDR/1BA $700/ mo. 2214 Anderson Road. Agent Owned. (662)513-0011

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3BED HIGH PT 3Br/3Ba-$1100MO/ HARDWOOD FLOORS/ STAINLESS APPL/ GATED/ POOL CALL MATT@ KESSINGER (662)801-5170

The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

201 BISHOP HALL 662.915.5503 Commercial Realty MUST SEE! Office space available ñ beautiful building! Includes ALL utilities, internet and telephone services, answering service, fax/copier, receptionist, conference room and kitchen. Great location -Netvoice Building 501 Heritage Drive. 1-5 Available Now! Call 662-234-4224 and ask for Rikki.

Homes for Sale $99,000. 3BDR/2BA. 2207 Academy Cove, Aspen Ridge starting at $159,000. Call James at (662)513-0011 Deer Run - 4 Bed,4Bath Home on 3 Acres, Oxford City Schools, $226,000. Roselle Page, Coldwell Banker (662)380-3393 SHILOH PLACE 2 bedroom,2 bath home. Less than a mile to campus Great Rental Investment, $91,500. Roselle Page, Coldwell Banker (662)3803393

Weekend Rental Magnolia House B&B. Wine & Cheese at Night, Breakfast in mornings. Rooms available for football weekends. Each Room w/ Private Baths. (662)2024505 www.magnoliahouse06.com Walk to the Game Turnberry Condo. 3 BR 2 BA. Sleeps 8. 662 457-4240 or (662)281-1161

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Video & Editing Specialists Let us video your: - Fraternity/ Sorority Events - Parties - Weddings - School Plays - Musical Recitals - Web Commercials - Mock Interviews/ Auditions - Much More!! We create awesome highlight DVDs! We can create slideshows, edit your home videos, and can transfer you VHS tapes to DVDs! Quality video production you can afford! diamondprovideo@gmail.com www.diamondprovideo.com www.youtube.com/ diamondprovideo 601-347-1575

Part-time BARTENDING $300/DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training Provided Call 1-800-965-6520 EXT155 Earn $1000-$3200 a month to drive our brand new cars with ads placed on them. www. AdCarDriver.com studentpayouts.com Paid Survey Takers Needed In Oxford. 100% FREE To Join! Click On Surveys. UM Football gameday workers needed. $8/ hr. Through by end of 1st quarter. Call/ text. (662)816-0971 Looking for Partime Help To work behind the counter and to make deliveries. Apply in person at Magnolia Rental. 397 Hwy 6 West. Bar Tender Postion Available At local restaurant. Please turn in resume to Dinner.oxford@gmail.com. For more information. (662)234-3735 Domino’s Pizza now hiring ALL Positions. Good Attitude and Image required! Pleasant phone voice and ability to handle fast paced workplace! Must be 18 years old, able to work late nights and football weekends. Experience preferred, but will train. Delivery Drivers must have own vehicle, proof of insurance, safe driving record. Apply in Person, 1603 W. Jackson Avenue. Uniform provided.

Seeking dependable part-time female to assist in home day-care. Call Karen after 5pm at (662)832-3107. Good GRE Test Scores? The Princeton Review is looking for individuals who are bright, dynamic and energetic to teach our GRE Test Prep courses. Good test scores are a must. Pay starts @ $18/ hour. Email TeachLA@ review.com for info. (225)767-1304

Roommate

Female Christian Roomate Newly renovated. 3bd/2ba. $350 per month. With $200 deposit. Call (662)614-0537 Roomate Wanted Looking for roommate preferably female. Close to campus, 2bd/1ba. $240/ month plus utilities. Call (662) 588-1735 or haleyferretti@ yahoo.com if interested.

Miscellaneous for Sale

For Sale Heavy Duty GE washer and dryer. Almond color match set. $400 for pair. Call (662)816-7777 or (901)5501651 REBEL FANS! 2008 Golf Cart Club Car/ Precedent with c-chip, upgraded wheels. Custom paint with REBEL decals $4000 (901)502-6070 Buy/Sale New&Used Creations North Lamar/ Molly Barr. Furniture, clothes/ shoes, miscellaneous. Donations Accepted/ Pickup Available. (662)8324301

Pets for Sale

Lab puppies AKC, 9wks old yellow pups, 2nd shots/ wormed, $150.00, call 662-274-4904.

Pets for Adoption

Save 9 LIVES! Adopt a rescued cat or kitten. www.9livescatrescue.org. For adoption: rescued lab/ pit mix, female, friendly, spayed, housebroken, 8 months old. $100 rehoming fee. Please call (901) 833-9585 or (901) 833-9582.

Student Jobs

Driver needed to travel to Biloxi. Will pay $50 for both ways. (662)473-5001.

% 20 Student Discount with your Ole Miss ID Wash & Wax • Engine Steam Clean Carpet Care • Chrome Cleaning Exterior and Interior Detailing

Condo for Sale OXFORD CONDO for sale 1/2 mile from Ole Miss Campus. 2 BR - 2.5 Bath w/ all appliances. Newly remodeled & Move in ready Gated Community with Pool Patio with Privacy Fence $118,000 - Call Joe @ 601-906-3131

Apartment for Rent One bedroom apartments starting $330, stove, ref., water, sewer provided. NO PETS, great location, close to campus, no calls after 6:00pm, (662)801-1499, (662)234-7135. 1 BD apt off Old Taylor for rent. Brand new in Aug. 09’. Granite countertops, wood floors, washer/ dryer. Pets allowed, $600/ mo (901)605-9255 1,2,3 bedroom apts. 1 mile from campus, Pets welcome. 662-281-0402 Available now 1&2 bd apartment The Cove Apartments. Ask about our specials. (662)234-1422

House for Rent 4bd/3ba gumtree subdivision All appliances. $1000/ month. $1000 deposit, available August now. (662)2363100

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GARFIELD

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BY JIM DAVIS

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SPORTS S P O R TS |

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REBELS HOST JACKSONVILLE STATE IN OPENER BY JOHN HOLT The Daily Mississippian

Even without Jeremiah Masoli, the show must go on as Ole Miss opens its season at home against the Jacksonville State Gamecocks on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. “We’re very excited about Jacksonville State,” Ole Miss coach Houston

Nutt said. “We are very respectful of (Jacksonville State coach) Jack Crowe and the job that he has done there. They have some good players and are a talented group. They did an excellent job in that Florida State game last year and have won some OVC Championships.” Though Jacksonville State is from

Football Championship Subdivision, formerly Division I-AA, the team finished with a strong 8-3 record (best in the Ohio Valley Conference) and didn’t back away from competition. In 2009, the Gamecocks fought Florida State hard, before falling by a score of 19-9 in Tallahassee.

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“We’re taking them seriously,” quarterback Nathan Stanley said. “We plan to go out there and execute what we’ve been working on the past two weeks.” For Nutt, Saturday’s game is significant because of his relationship with Crowe. In 1990, Crowe, then head coach at Arkansas, hired Nutt to become his wide receivers coach. “I have an awesome respect for Jack Crowe,” Nutt said. Stanley and redshirt sophomore wide receiver Melvin Harris both had terrific preseason camps and hope to impress Saturday. Both will be making their first collegiate starts. “(Nathan) knows our playbook,” Nutt said. “He’s had a spring under his belt, played in the Cotton Bowl. He’s going to be alright.” Harris added, “I’m not going to lie, I’m going to be a little bit nervous, but that’s all part of the game. I feel like after the first couple of plays I’ll be set in and do what I do best– play football.”

After being predicted to finish last in the SEC West media preseason poll, senior defensive tackle and captain Jerrell Powe discussed how he and his teammates are on a mission to prove people wrong. “It’s definitely a statement game to show people how good we are on offense and that we have a lot of talent,” Powe said. “We’ve got a lot of names that a lot of people haven’t heard of. We’re looking forward to seeing how (Nathan) Stanley steps up and takes the leadership role on offense.” After catching only one pass last year, Harris is expected to be one of Stanley’s top targets. It’s a role that the 6-foot-7 wide receiver relishes. “This has been my dream to play football my whole life,” he said. “It’s going to be exciting. I’m so ready to see how the community comes out to support us cause I want us to be one of the loudest stadiums in the country. I get a high off that; off hearing the fans get into it and on third downs them being really loud.”


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JSU’S CROWE MENTORED NUTT BY CAIN MADDEN The Daily Mississippian

Jacksonville State University football coach Jack Crowe said playing Ole Miss on Saturday could make for an unusual experience. Crowe said when he signed a contract to play Ole Miss, Houston Nutt was not the coach. “When I was the head coach at Arkansas, Houston was on my

staff,” Crowe said. “Playing Ole Miss makes for an unusual scenario for myself.” From 1990 to 1992, Crowe was the head coach at the University of Arkansas and Nutt was an assistant coach. “He could have probably said at one time that he was a pupil of mine,” Crowe said. “But I think he has far ascended me as a BCS-level

head coach.” Since 1990, Crowe said he has been following Nutt’s career with interest. “I’ve kept up with him, and over time, I have grown more and more in respect for him,” Crowe said. “I saw glimpses of a special coach when he was on my staff. There are good football coaches and greats, and I think Houston is one of the really special coaches.” Crowe is from Birmingham, Ala. He graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and began his career as a high school coach. “From there, I went on to coach Division II football at Livingston,” Crowe said. “I coached at Auburn and Clemson before going to Arkansas as the head coach.” In 1991, the Razorbacks tied for second in the conference, but in 1992, Crowe was fired after the first game, an upset loss to a Division I-AA team. “I left from there and coached at Baylor for a few years, and then I got out of coaching,” Crowe said. “I spent four years trying to live without it.” Ultimately, he couldn’t live without it and took the head-coaching job at JSU, a Division I Football Championship Subdivision team

in Northern Alabama, in 2000. “I ended up coming here because it was a place I knew very well, and to a certain degree, it was like coming home to coach, “ Crowe said. Since taking over as head coach, Crowe has led the Gamecocks to a 65–45 overall record. “We have had winning seasons, but have had a degree of inconsistency in winning the championship,” Crowe said. “But we have the highest winning percentage in our league since I have been in it.” Last season, Jacksonville State went 8–3, 6–1 in conference, and was second in the Ohio Valley Conference. “I think we are emerging,” Crowe said. “We have talented players, and I think we are ambitious. We are trying to position ourselves for a national championship.” The Ohio Valley Conference is competitive, but Crowe said he believes the Gamecocks have a chance to win it. “I think if we win the close games, we have a really good chance of winning it,” Crowe said. Crowe said he was really impressed with his defense. “We are showing signs of evolving into a really good defensive team at the FCS level,” Crowe said. “We are pretty mobile, and we have the

type of tackling style where we are not afraid to come after people. (UM defensive coordinator) Tyrone Nix runs a defense that is a lot like ours.” Crowe said in the opener against Ole Miss, he will be playing a different style than he normally does. “We do have some matchups that don’t favor us,” Crowe said. “If we are predictable, the mismatches will get us, so we have to play unpredictably.” The Gamecocks have played in these types of games before, so Crowe said his team knows what to expect. “Some of these types of games have been closer than others,” Crowe said. “I think we have to have a solid game out of our kicking, and we can’t give up the big plays.” Crowe said the Rebels have people who can make big plays. “They are a new crop of playmakers, but the Rebels do have playmakers,” Crowe said. Generating points against the Ole Miss defense was something Crowe said he was concerned with. “The Ole Miss D — I don’t know who is better,” Crowe said. “I am getting more and more impressed the more I read and see out of them.”

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The Daily Mississippian Online - September 3, 2010