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Ole Miss food bank opens next week

news briefs D M S TA F F R E P O RT S

Students and faculty have joined to form the Ole Miss Food Bank to fight hunger on campus.

Driver identified in Saturday’s wreck

QUENTIN WINSTINE | The Daily Mississippian

Oxford Police Chief Mike Martin confirmed that John Howard Strickland was the driver of the vehicle that struck the vehicle that carried Ole Miss students Sarah and John Wheat on Saturday. The siblings both died as a result of the accident. Martin said the investigation is “still pending.”

He has put out a warrant to draw Strickland’s blood and for it to be sent to the state crime lab. Then necessary actions will be taken from there depending the results. Strickland, 21, business major from San Antonio, was treated for minor injuries at Baptist Memorial and released the same day.

HURRICANE SANDY ANGELINA MAZZANTI | The Daily Mississippian

The current food pantry building on Molly Barr road next to the police station. Next week a location will open in the old math lab location in Kinard Hall on campus

BY GRANT BEEBE ALEX BRANDON | AP Photos

The aftermath of Hurricane Sandy is still impacting the Northeast and East Coast, causing multiple problems in major U.S. cities. As of last night, the total U.S. death toll stood at more than 70. In New York City, the storm is responsible for the deaths of at least 30 New Yorkers,

the flooding of subways lines and an estimated $20 billion worth of damage. Heavy snowfall is still impacting parts of Ohio, West Virginia, Tennessee and North Carolina, with up to three feet of snow in some areas. Six million people were without power at one point.

CITY HALL

thedmnews@gmail.com

The University of Mississippi Food Bank will open

its doors next Thursday at 12:30 p.m. Established by a joint committee of students and faculty, the food bank will

be located in the old math lab in Kinard Hall. Dr. Robert Cummings, director of the university’s Center for Writing and Rhetoric, is the faculty sponsor of the project, and the student directors are Jessica Brouckaert and Mary Margaret Saulters. Brouckaert and Saulters are assisted by Margaret Ann Morgan, who serves as marketing chair. Cummings said that the university’s success in admitting students who traditionally may not have been able to afford college has revealed some students’ need for help with expenses. “They are struggling to cope with the expenses of some of the basics, such as food, and students have been showing up hungry and unable to learn,” he said. Operating under the sloSee FOOD, PAGE 4

OPD Chief Mike Martin to retire The Oxford Police Department will lose its top cop, Chief Mike Martin, on January 31 of next year, and plans are being made to find his replacement. BY ADAM GANUCHEAU thedmnews@gmail.com

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

A proposal has been sent to the Oxford Board of Aldermen to renovate Oxford City Hall. Architect Belinda Stewart of Eupora who specializes in renovating historic buildings submitted the proposal. If the board approves Stewart’s proposal, the project would need to receive funding. May-

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or Pat Patterson thinks that the renovations will cost between $5 million and $6 million. The building, which was built in 1885, has a third floor that needs the most work. While the first two floors would see a few upgrades, the third floor would be the main target of the renovation.

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Oxford Police Department Chief Mike Martin is retiring, effective Jan. 31, 2013. Martin has held the chief position for almost six years, after replacing previous Chief Steve Bramlett in September of 2007. Martin was Bramlett’s assistant chief until Bramlett retired in June 2007. “I decided to retire back See MARTIN, PAGE 4

FILE PHOTO ( STEPHAN QUINN/NEWSWATCH) | The Daily Mississippian

Oxford Police Chief Mike Martin

Nov. off all Merrell & Kavu 2 & 3


OPINION PAGE 2 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | 1 november 2012 | OPINION

THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN EDITORIAL STAFF: EMILY ROLAND editor-in-chief dmeditor@gmail.com austin Miller managing editor dmmanaging@gmail.com jennifer nassar campus news editor thedmnews@gmail.com adam ganucheau city news editor thedmnews@gmail.com granT beebe asst. news editor thedmnews@gmail.com PHIL MCCAUSLAND opinion editor thedmopinion@gmail.com david collier sports editor thedmsports@gmail.com madison featherston lifestyles editor thedmfeatures@gmail.com quentin winstine photography editor thedmphotos@gmail.com emily cegielski senior editor thedmrecruitment@gmail.com tisha coleman design editor ignacio murillo lifestyles design editor

COLUMN

Get by on the warm and fuzzy BY DANIEL PURDY dbpurdy@go.olemiss.edu

Do you remember the last time a warm, fuzzy feeling came over you? That moment when either a great kindness was received or given, and the feeling afterward just thawed out a cold soul. And by trying to revisit the kindness either through telling another or by thinking of it, you endangered the power of the moment. Simply put, one of those occurrences in life that are best enjoyed with no other aspiration than living in that moment. A special morsel drawn on during the long nights, a pleasant fine print testifying to the goodness in life. These moments come far too infrequently. During our daily fight, we often forget the warm, fuzzy times. We become consumed by our struggles, and then we see the people and

Michael Barnett Ryan Herget Meghan Jackson corey platt account executives Jamie Kendrick Kristen Saltzman creative staff JEFF HAMM marketing & digital strategy JON HAYWOOD senior multimedia editor S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager DEBRA NOVAK creative services manager AMY SAXTON administrative assistant DARREL JORDAN chief engineer

at friends and neglected responsibilities and ultimately seen only the wrong around me, never in myself. The great travesty of these experiences occurred when realizing the ease with which blaming the world came to me. It was so much harder to accept responsibility for my actions and believe in a gyrocompass, always finding true north. That truth exhibited in direction for a person relied on not only engaging in the daily struggles, but also remembering that the warm, fuzzy times will come again. That through realization of situation, we ultimately understand what situations can and can’t be controlled. Those situations beyond our individual power should never interfere with those situations under our control, like our responsibilities to our friends. As we enter into November territory, we must think,

during those long hours, why we are here. This goes beyond just material gains or future prospects, as a dollar only charms the soul so far. I’m saying to think of ourselves as products being crafted and made on campus, an organic machine heightened beyond shallowness and expected to someday perform well in the world. We go beyond just grades, into the territory of the far north where we achieve a rational and reliable view on the world around us. Despite all that will happen between now and the semester’s end, I’m asking everyone to think of the warm, fuzzy moments to help you get by. For right thought leads to right action, and a positive mind sees a friendly climb, not an impossible mountain. Daniel Purdy is an English senior from Oxford.

COLUMN

Media headed in a new direction

kimber lacour & sarah Parrish co-copy chiefs LEANNA YOUNG sales manager dmads@olemiss.edu

places around filled with only culpability and wrong. Inched forward by stress and fatigue, like a knife to the back, we react adversely to our habitual associations as if we are facing a ledge. Our words clipped, short, and a scowl drawn from corner to corner on our face, we forget the warm, fuzzy times when our eyes only see the worst in a situation. We’ve been fighting so hard for grades or points or success that we sometimes mistake a kind hand for a threatening fist. We even go as far to defend our behavior in a series of “buts” and “becauses”; the finger swings round at all locations on the wind rose like a compass needle bewitched by a magnet. I myself have fallen victim to this shortsightedness when the cold, dark hands of doubt and frustration have wrapped themselves around me. I’ve lashed out

BY ADAM BLACKWELL ablackwe@go.olemiss.edu

The media coverage of the 2012 presidential election is completely different from the media coverage of the 1960 presidential election. This year’s coverage is even markedly different from that of 2000. Our society is different, so it’s only natural that our media would follow suit. Our world is constantly changing and evolving, thus the role of the media is also changing. We have to ask ourselves: What role do we want the media to play? Where do we see the media in 20 years? The media today constantly has to keep up-to-date on what audiences and readers want. T H E D A I LY

MISSISSIPPIAN The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall Main Number: 662.915.5503 Email: dmeditor@gmail. com Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Newsweek, a long-standing weekly magazine, has decided to discontinue its print issue. Readers don’t want Newsweek in their hands; they want it in their phone, tablet or computer. As we know, readers get what they want, so Newsweek is now going digital. We’ve heard this for quite some time now – newspapers and magazines won’t last in print form. So far, they have done a good job of changing with the times. In fact, I think many magazines and newspapers will change to survive; however, the television news media will have to adapt even more. Last week, I had a great conversation with a friend of mine, an older, very conservative friend. She said that the news media’s job should be to simply report the facts and nothing else. Basically, she would want Anderson Cooper to come on television, list off a bunch of

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year. Contents do not represent the official opinions of The University of Mississippi or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated. Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

pure facts and then go off the air for the night. Now, tell me, how many people would really watch that? Personally, I would never watch the news if that was the case. But at the same time, I understand where my friend is coming from. Like many Americans, she’s tired of the intense bias in television news media and the spin involved in the media. Unfortunately, it’s become more difficult for Americans to trust the news media, especially broadcast media. It’s easier to see the bias in broadcast media, and it’s easier to find holes in reporting. And broadcast media is more concerned about viewership and ratings than reporting the story. I enjoy watching the news and seeing different guests debate and discuss issues. However, I would also prefer that my chosen news channels didn’t al-

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

ways spin the news, blow things out of proportion or only report a part of the story. The news media must learn to achieve greater balance between entertainment, ratings and reporting. Americans, while they enjoy sensationalism and being entertained, want the real story reported to them. The media is a strong force in the world. It can make or break an issue. It can sway public opinion more than any other source. Americans must continue to push the media to produce what and how they want. Americans should continue to question the media’s biases and accuracy. Just as the media claims freedom of the press, we can all claim freedom of speech. Adam Blackwell is a junior public policy leadership major from Natchez. Follow him on Twitter @ AdamBlackwell1.


opinion opinion | 1 november 2012 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | PAGE 3

Letter to Editor Dear Editor, Ms. Massey’s article, “Politics, rape, and God”, unfortunately appears to distort the meaning of Richard Mourdock’s recent comments by grouping him in with the inflammatory and ill-informed Todd Akin. Sadly, Ms. Massey is not

alone in her re-interpretation of Mr. Mourdock’s statement. I have already seen several circulating Facebook posts not to mention Democratic Party campaign literature either insinuating or outright stating that Mourdock somehow legitimized rape as a part of his God’s plan. A

fair reading of Mourdock’s comments however reveals that he did not in fact claim that rape is something God intends. All Mourdock said was that a human life – no matter how it is conceived – is a beautiful gift given by God. Obviously, many Americans would still disagree with that assertion,

but it is important not to turn Mourdock’s claim into something far more insensitive to victims of rape. As a follow up, I would urge people on both sides of the issue to consider the following series of questions: If the embryo conceived as the result of rape is actually a person, do the circum-

stances surrounding its conception really justify ending its life? If on the other hand the embryo is not a person, is any justification even necessary?

ing “At Ole Miss Everybody Speaks.” In the short time I was there I was spoken to on numerous occasions by the “older” college students. I was very impressed and it did not hurt that several of the greeters were exceptionally attractive co-eds!After

that day there was no other place that I was going to college and indeed I enrolled in the freshman class of 1962. Congratulations and thank you to the current students and faculty who have had the foresight and enthusiasm to re-establish this program.

Hopefully, it will remain a tradition of our University forever. I guarantee you it will make a difference to someone.

give, too. From the pragmatic point of view to which I subscribe, I am determined to behave as if our will is free because I find this position more useful for human interaction than its alternative on a regular basis. Even if free will is indeed an illusion, this notion is about as useful as “the devil made me do it” in the court of public opinion when explaining the causes of our actions; true or not, “it happened how it had to have happened” will register as a hollow excuse for most Americans when it is used to account for our actions. Determinism in its current form also fails to make useful predictions regarding the future of individual human behavior. While the determinist can claim that the results of next week’s election have been predetermined, he can-

not tell us who will win the election using this information. Determinism is a difficult proposition to refute; however, we live in an age and culture that puts most of the onus on the individual for perceived wrongs, so I recommend that readers presume that each person is in charge of his or her own life for the time being. Of course, this absurd notion — that our will might not be free even though we must continue to behave as if it were — is a massive headache waiting to happen. I would suggest forgetting it ASAP and finding a place to lie down and despise me for even bringing it up.

Sincerely, Isaac Lichlyter Senior International Studies

Letter to Editor Dear Editor, It was such a pleasure to read in the October 24th edition of The Daily Mississippian that Ole Miss revives ‘Everyone Speaks’ campaign. In 1961 I was a senior at Messick High School in

Memphis, Tennessee. Our debate team came to Ole Miss for a debate tournament. It was a cool rainy NOvember day, but during a break I was able to spend some time around the Student Union. There were several banners proudly display-

Sincerely, Pick Scruggs M.D. Oxford, Mississippi

COLUMN

How to approach the absurd

BY ANDREW DICKSON addickso@go.olemiss.edu

“There’s no need to stress over which candidate we’ll vote for next week,” a friend and fellow undecided voter named Isaac assured me as we sat down for drinks this past Tuesday. “The election was decided a long time ago.” “Polls are not conclusive,” I protested as we placed our orders. “With the number of undecided voters, the outcome of the election hangs in the balance.” “We’ve been over this before,” he replied. “There are conditions that must be satisfied for an event to occur. Given these conditions, nothing else could have happened.” “Go on,” I said, wanting him to connect this maxim with our conversation. “Each voter ‘chooses’ their candidate because, given the voter’s genetic makeup and past experiences, he or she

could not have chosen otherwise. “Each voter is ‘free’ to do what he or she desires, but it is nature who determines the desires that determine our behavior,” he said. (Isaac, a hard determinist, negates the notion that human actions are free, positing that all such actions are subject to the same law of cause and effect as the rest of the universe.) “Remind me how determinists do not become fatalistic,” I said as our waitress happened to stumble over to our table, spilling our drinks on Isaac and soaking his clothes. “For example,” he began, “Given the conditions that led to this waitress spilling these drinks, she had no choice but to spill them on me at this moment. All I can do is curse the laws of nature for putting her in such a position and ask that she be more attentive, causing her to be more alert in the future.” After a good, long, blank stare, the waitress apologized and moved on, but I continued: “How then should we view the actions of Ross Barnett and James Meredith? If

determinism holds true, the former had no choice but to show his haughtiness and the latter no choice but to show his courage.” “Though I’m committed to the notion that these events were determined to happen, the moment the universe was set in motion billions of years ago; from a personal standpoint I view events that represent the triumph of reason over a tradition of ignorance to be quite meaningful,” he said. When I pressed him about the implications of the deterministic worldview in light of a topic such as World War II, Isaac stuck to his guns and said that, as unfortunate as it might seem in retrospect, both the Axis and Allied Powers were powerless to act otherwise in the face of a determined universe. Our waitress had returned with new drinks and overheard our last exchange. “This kind of conversation is a causal factor for problems with the opposite sex,” she said. Now that I’ve staged this conversation to discuss determinism, I have an opinion to

NewsWatch 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Channel 99

Andrew Dickson is a religious studies senior from Terry. Follow him on Twitter @addoxfordms.

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NEWS PAGE 4 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | 1 november 2012 | NEWS

FOOD,

continued from page 1

gan of “Ending hunger. Building community,” the food bank will be open to all students of the university, and no records will be kept detailing who makes use of the bank. “It is intended for students; students will need to have a current ID,” Cummings said. “But there will not be any recording of the fact that students have used the service.” Brouckaert said that many parties have been helpful in establishing the resource.

“Aramark has been great about giving us food vouchers,” Brouckaert said. “We haven’t really gotten to the point where we are ending hunger yet, but there are a lot of student organizations who have been emailing me wanting to do food drives for us.” Among those organizations that have been helpful is the Sigma Nu fraternity. “Sigma Nu did a great job hosting Foodstock and collected 3,000 cans for us and wrote us a check for $2,500,” Brouckaert said. “They have even helped us stock the Food Bank and build awareness and community.”

UM School of Education receives $5.7 million to boost public education Grants from the Robert M. Hearin Support Foundation in Jackson will provide funding for the development of new early childhood education curriculum, expand existing UM programs.

AUSTIN MCAFEE | The Daily Mississippian

Oxford Police Chief Mike Martin

MARTIN

continued from page 1 in April of this year,” Martin said. “OPD has some really good folks working for them. It is very familyoriented, and we are all like a family here at OPD.” Martin made the decision to retire because he has 34 years of state work saved up for state retirement purposes, plus an additional three and a half years of accumulated leave. State employees can retire with full benefits at 30 years. “It will be hard to find someone else that can create the same type of positive atmosphere that he can,” OPD Lt. Wes Hatcher said. “He’s been a really good chief, and an even better cop.” The process to find a new police chief has begun. A citizens’ committee, including three aldermen, has been formed to find a new police chief. The committee

will narrow the field of candidates for the position, and the entire Oxford Board of Aldermen will make the final decision. Oxford Mayor Pat Patterson said the committee should name a new chief in December. In his retirement, Martin plans on doing something completely different from his law enforcement career. “I am going to work for Oxford Bicycle Company,” Martin said of his future plans. “It’s a great company, and bicycling is very popular in Oxford, so I look forward to doing something completely different than I have done for 34 years.” Martin is also excited about seeing the people he has met over the years and meeting new people at his new job. “(The new job) allows me to continue meeting and talking to folks, which I love to do,” Martin said. “Except now I am trying to sell them a bicycle instead of having to address some type of law enforcement issue.”

GRAPHIC BY WILL STROUTH | The Daily Mississippian

BY LANIE KING abking1@go.olemiss.edu

The University of Mississippi School of Education has received five grants that total more than $5.7 million from the Robert M. Hearin Support Foundation in Jackson to improve public education in the state. One grant for $1.1 million will allow the school to hire three new faculty members who will help develop a new master’s degree and undergraduate emphasis in pre-kindergarten education. David Rock, dean of the School of Education, said improving pre-K education was important, especially in literacy.

“The earlier we get to our children and the more effective our early education is, the better prepared they will be to read,” Rock said. “The better prepared they are to read, the better success they’ll have in schools.” Andrew Abernathy, communications specialist for the School of Education, said the Willie Price Lab School (WPLS) on campus will be instrumental in establishing this new early education curriculum. “We want to create a model pre-K classroom so that what we learn there, in that classroom, can be taken and applied in our outreach throughout the state,” Abernathy said. “That facility will play a big role in the development of our new pre-K

programs.” Angela Rutherford, associate professor of teacher education and director of the Center for Excellence in Literacy Instruction, said the preschool will also prepare the state’s future educators for careers in early childhood education. “WPLS will serve as a field experience site for early childhood teacher candidates,” she said. Other grants include funding for the School of Education’s Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CMSE) ($1.2 million), Center for Excellence in Literacy Instruction (CELI) ($1.5 million), Mississippi Teacher Corps ($525,000) and Principal Corps (1.5 million).


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Grove Edition

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The grove edition | page 1

Looking for record sales

PHILLIP WALLER | The Daily Mississippian


PAGE 2 | The grove edition THE GROVE EDITION EDITORIAL STAFF: EMILY ROLAND editor-in-chief dmeditor@gmail.com MADISON FEATHERSTON lifestyles editor thedmfeatures@gmail.com KIMBER LACOUR copy chief IGNACIO MURILLO design editor AUSTIN MILLER managing editor dmmanaging@gmail.com QUENTIN WINSTINE photography editor thedmphotos@gmail.com

ADVERTISING STAFF

What's Inside P.3

Student creates jewelry line

P.7

‘Cloud Atlas’ review

P.4-5

COVER STORY: Looking for record sales Comics and Games

P.8

Photo essay

P.6

Calendar NOvember

01 Thursday

LEANNA YOUNG sales manager MICHAEL BARNETT RYAN HERGET MEGHAN JACKSON account executives dmads@olemiss.edu

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager

02 Friday 03 Saturday

DEBRA NOVAK creative services manager

On campus: Learn the Basics of Bike Maintenance, Union Plaza, 1:00 - 2:00 2012 Chancellor’s Review of Troops, front of Lyceum, 3:00 - 4:00 Fall Choral Concert, North Oxford Baptist Church, 8:00 - 9:30 Malco Cinemas: Japanese Films from the 2000’s, 7:00 - 9:00 Proud Larry’s: The Ragbirds Rooster’s: Daddy Mac The Lyric: Square Toast For Scholarships (various locations) On campus: Department of Pharmacognsy Seminar, Natural Prod Room 2066, 10:00 - !1:00 Fulbright Workshop, Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College Room 308, 2:00 The Crucible - A Play by Arthur Miller, Ford Center, 7:30 Proud Larry’s: Gravity A with Tauk Rooster’s: Almost Famous

On campus: 14th Annual Jean Jones Walk/Run for Cancer, Union Plaza, 7:30 am Rifle: Ole Miss vs. Murray St./JSU, Patricia C. Lamar National Guard Readiness Center in Oxford The Lyric: Rubblebucket and Reptar Rooster’s: Brent Robb Ford Center, 2:00 - The Crucible Ford Center, 7:30 - The Crucible

AMY SAXTON administrative assistant

The events on the calendar are taken from the campus calendar at OleMiss. edu and advertising venues. If you would like an event to be featured on the calendar, email thedmfeatures@gmail.com, with the subject heading “Calendar.”

05 Monday 06 Tuesday 07 Wednesday

On campus: Goldwater Workshop, 4:00 Navy Commodores Jazz Band, Ford Center, 7:00 - 9:-00 Proud Larry’s: Billy Martin & Will Blades

On campus: MBA in a Year? MHA Online? Farley 121, 12:30 - 1:30 National Scholarships for Freshman, Ridge North 3rd Floor Lounge, 4:00 The Lyric: Bonnaroo365 Tour with White Denim, Maps & Alases, and Special Guests presented by Samsonite Rooster’s: ‘The Coaches’ Show,’ Karaoke, Open Mic Night

On campus: Southern Studies Brown Bag Lunch & Lecture Series, Barnard Observatory Room 105, 12:00 - 1:00 Seminar: Starting a Business - First Steps, Small Business Development Center, 1:00 - 3:00 The Lyric: Papadosio with Octopus Nebula Proud Larry’s: Rob Baird Rooster’s: Country Night with Brinly Addington


The grove edition | PAGE 3

UM student creates jewelry line BY CARA SPENCER ccspenc1@go.olemiss.edu

Uniqueness and originality are hard to come across these days with fashion constantly being recycled and changed. A truly fashionable individual knows how to take just about anything and turn it into a masterpiece; however, it takes a business-savvy fashionista to turn this talent into a profit. As I shopped on the Square a while ago, I came across a selection of handcrafted jewelry at one of the local boutiques. After speaking with the store owner, I sat down the with the designer herself, who happens to be one of our students. Meet Alexandria (Alex) Bowen, a biology major and native of Tupelo. She has been putting her creative flair to work for about three years now, and thus far she has successfully turned it into a profitable business outlet. “I just wanted something both cute and unique to go with my dress,” said Bowen. After continuing to create bits and pieces of jewelry here and there, requests for items started to increase. Sure enough, things began to take off and Alex started her own business, ABJewels. Designs include handcrafted earrings and bracelets made of wire and accented with beading. “It’s all about having uniqueness and variety in selection for the stores,” Bowen said. She doesn’t want any customer to “have the same piece on,” and this is what gives her an edge over other lines of jewelry. She also does custom orders upon request, which ensures a completely one-of-a-kind piece. ABJewels is already being sold in 15 stores spanning across Mississippi, Louisiana and Tennessee. As a biology major, Bowen plans to continue her studies here at the university, and then continue on to medical school. Lulu’s on the square currently carries ABJewels.

V

PHOTOS COURTESY ALEX BOWEN

Become a Global Ambassador!

olunteers to be paired with international exchange students for support, fun, and friendship this Spring. If you are a current University of Mississippi student who is interested in getting to know people from across the world and would like to learn about other cultures while helping visiting international students integrate into the Oxford and Ole Miss community, this program is right for you! Please follow this link to apply: http://www.outreach.olemiss.edu/exchange/student_activities.html

Deadline is Friday, N ovember 2, 2 0 1 2 ! CONTACT: • International Outreach Office • 662-915-3766 • 103 E.F.Yerby Conference Center • ecoveret@go.olemiss.edu


PAGE 4 | The grove edition

New Record Store Brings BY LANIE KING abkingl@go.olemiss.edu

Record sells in 2011 reflected a vinyl resurgence among music lovers just in time for the grand opening of Oxford’s new record store, The End of All Music. David Swider, a 2008 Ole Miss alumnus from Greenwood and general manager at The End of All Music, had the idea to open a record store during his time as marketing director at Square Books. He worked at the local bookstore five years and was also in charge of music buying at Off-Square Books. “I always felt that there should be a record store in Oxford because I think every town – especially a college town – needs a record store,” Swider said. As a freshman, he frequented Oxford’s old record store, Hot Dog Records, before it closed. “I had always kind of missed that experience when Hot Dog closed,” he said. Word reached Bruce Watson, general manager of Fat Possum Records in Oxford and owner of The End of All Music, that Swider wanted to open a record store in town. Watson owned a vintage clothing and furniture store called Blue Heaven in Water Valley six years ago. He also sold records there, and Swider said he believed Watson had been itching do to something else with records. Watson and Swider got together about the idea, and Watson provided the funds for The End of All Music, which opened on March 1 of this year. “I think he knew that Oxford needed a record store, but we couldn’t just open a record store,” Swider said. “We had to do it right so we put a lot of time into it, and here we are almost a year later.” In order to “do it right,”

PHILLIP WALLER | The Daily Mississippian

Record on display at The End of All Music.

Swider said he and Watson felt that The End of All Music needed both a good selection and a knowledgeable staff working there. “You don’t want to walk in there and feel like you’re at Best Buy where we’ve just got everything. It’s definitely curated to a certain taste,” Swider said. “I feel like you can come into our record store and easily find something that will interest you and be able to ask questions about it.” Lance Ingram, a senior marketing communications major and frequent customer of the record store, gave the positive feedback that Swider and Watson desired from their customers. “Everybody in there is really nice,” Ingram said. “Every time I’ve gone in there it’s been pleasant, and they always have something good to listen to while you’re searching.” The record store has a large selection of new and used vinyl ranging from blues and

international music to gospel and jazz. Customers find that records are not only separated by artist but by the record label as well. The store’s independent record labels include Oxford’s Fat Possum Records and others from across the country like Mississippi Records of Portland, Oregon, that produces obscure blues and international music. “I like to have a lot of different independent record labels in there,” Swider said. “What you have is a label in Portland, picking out certain artists and certain records to release, and you have a store like mine in Oxford, who is trusting that label so much that I want to represent them in my store.” A similar trust and unity exists between independent record stores. Swider explained that record stores want other independent stores and labels to succeed. “You’ll find that independent record stores are really similar to the independent-

bookstore-type scene where “It’s good, especially for they’re all kind of in this to- a college town, to have a gether,” Swider said. record store that’s offering One specific effort to bring good records at a decent record stores together is Re- price,” he said. “You’re also cord Store Day, which falls in helping out your own local late April every year. economy.” “It’s kind of like an indeCollege students are not pendent record store coali- the only fans of The End tion where we all get together of All Music. High school and have this one holiday,” students looking for eclecSwider said. “I want them to tic pieces and middle-aged do just as well as I’m doing, adults with high hopes to find so we’ll all have a good repu- records they had when they tation of being independent were teenagers also shop in record stores.” the store. As for The End of All Mu“I’ve been really surprised sic’s success, business has to see the dynamic of the exceeded Swider’s expecta- customers and clientele that tions. shop there because it’s all “The enthusiasm for the over the place so that’s really store has been really high,” fun,” Swider said. he said. “People come in, The End of All Music also and they know right off the compliments Oxford’s rich bat that they’re dealing with past and present music scene. a real record store.” Swider said that good bands Swider and Watson knew have always originated in that Ole Miss’ rapidly in- Oxford and traveled through creasing enrollment would the city. provide ample customers. “The best place for that Ingram said he believes it type of music scene to grow was a great move on their and foster is through a record part. See RECORD, PAGE 5

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The grove edition | PAGE 5

Vinyl ‘Treasures’ to Oxford RECORD,

continued from page 4 store or through some type of outlet, so I didn’t think it would be a bad idea playing a part in that,” he said. According to Nielsen SoundScan, record sales increased 37 percent in 2011, and Swider attributes the jump to several factors. Many records now come with a free downloadable mp3 card so that people can carry their music on their mp3 players and iPhones. “I think that was genius on the music industry’s part to make that bundle,” Swider said. He also said he believes that people use the Internet as a new form of radio and want something more tangible when they discover new music they enjoy. He said that there is nothing better than a 12” LP record. “It’s big, and you can hold it. A record is something you have to take care of,” Swider said. “You listen to one side, and you flip it and listen to the other side. “The sound is better. There’s just a full experience other than clicking, ‘Yes,

download,’ and waiting 10 minutes.” Swider said he believes people are realizing the excitement in looking for a record in the store as opposed to online, and Ingram said he agrees. “It’s just kind of cool to go into an actual store, dig through all these records, and find something that you’ve been looking for a really long time,” Ingram said. “It’s kind of like treasure hunting.” Ingram said that Ole Miss students should check out the classic rock selection at The End of All Music. Swider said he recommended some “treasures” in his store for college students, including any of the Fat Possum records, especially Sweet Heart Sweet Light by Spiritualized. “It’s an amazing record, and I think anybody that listens to it will just be blown away,” Swider said. “I think you’ll see that record at the top of a lot of year-end lists.” For more of Swider’s picks and information about the store’s special events, go to The End of All Music’s website at http://theendofallmusic.com/ or visit the store on North Lamar Blvd.

PHILLIP WALLER| The Daily Mississippian

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The grove edition | PAGE 7 Column

Hey, you, get off of my ‘Cloud Atlas’ BY JOSH PRESLEY joshpresley551@go.olemiss.edu

“Cloud Atlas� is a nightmare for a reviewer, or at least a relatively inexperienced one such as myself. To even begin to describe it in specifics would only be confusing for both of us. The official synopsis reads: “An exploration of how the actions of individual lives impact one another in the past, present and future, as one soul is shaped from a killer into a hero, and an act of kindness ripples across centuries to inspire a revolution.� But even that is too simplistic a view on this film. So sit a spell with me as I try to describe something that is, by its very nature, indescribable. Will I fail miserably? We’ll find out momentarily. “Cloud Atlas� is based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell, and it is the only movie I’m aware of that is directed by three people who each receive full credit. The movie is comprised of six stories, which are divided up between German director Tom Tykwer, and Andy and Lana Wachowski. The six stories span from the late 1800s to a distant post-apocalyptic future and feature a small group of actors playing a wide variety of different characters. Some of the actors even play characters who are a different age, race or even sex from themselves. For instance, Halle Berry plays a young Jewish woman in one story and an elderly Asian scientist in another. The plot of the movie is fragmented and jumps around to each story as it sees fit, yet the stories rarely connect with each other in obvious ways, so depending on the viewer, that could be frustrating. What I found to be so brilliant about “Cloud Atlas� was how engaging

each of the stories was even when I had no idea what was going on. The actors are uniformly stellar, particularly since they play such a wide variety of different characters. Tom Hanks is more or less the anchor of the film, though he is not the main character of every story and only briefly appears in one or two of them. Jim Sturgess is right behind him, being the everyman of some of the earlier stories (by “earlier,� I mean chronologically. The movie doesn’t tell each story individually. I told you I’d confuse you). Hugo Weaving, as he is wont to do, pops up as some sort of villainous character in each story, including a dastardly female nurse in one. Berry plays probably the most wide variety of characters, though that may be to make up for the fact that, dramatically speaking, she has the least to do. James D’Arcy is the only actor to play the same character in two stories, and although this is the first movie I can recall seeing him in, I hope it isn’t the last. He can tell a thousand stories with his face. Korean actress Bae Doona plays something of a messianic figure in the futuristic parts of the film, but also plays a Mexican and white lady at other points. Hugh Grant is the actor that disappears the most. He’s in each of the six stories but only once is he immediately recognizable as Hugh Grant. The most fun part of the movie is during the end credits where they actually show you each character that every actor played, which elicited some great reactions from the crowd seated in the theater. The special effects in this movie are some of the best

I’ve ever seen (the makeup effects will also be taking home a little gold statue, I predict) and the set designs and computer effects are astounding. This is without a doubt the best looking movie of the year, so far. If I had one major problem with “Cloud Atlas,� it was the run time. At a smidge under three hours, it had me squirming in my seat at times. So, if I’ve been very vague about this movie, I apologize. It’s not a movie you can simply describe. It’s not even a movie that you simply watch. “Cloud Atlas� is an experience. Whether or not it is a rewarding experience depends on the viewer. For this reviewer though, it was richly rewarding.

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PAGE 8 | The grove edition

SOUTHEASTERN COMEDY ART Last weekend the Powerhouse Community Arts Center hosted the Southeastern Comedy Art Festival. The festival included performances by comedy troupes from the area and featured art work from a variety of area artists

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NEWS NEWS | 1 november 2012 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | PAGE 5

HALLOWEEN IN THE GROVE

PHOTOS BY THOMAS GRANING | The Daily Mississippian

TOP LEFT: MiAerial Harris, 10, plays a game during the fall carnival in the Grove last night. TOP RIGHT: Olivia Edwards, 7, gets her face painted by Kaitlyn Jarell, a sophmore pharmacy major, during the fall carnival. MIDDLE TOP LEFT: Anijah Hairston, 2, receives help from his mother Ashley Hairston while playing a fishing for candy game in the Grove last night. BOTTOM LEFT: Kyla Malone helps her cousin Phillip Ryan Jones, Jr., 1, play a game. BOTTOM RIGHT: Samona Flores, 8, plays a game as her family watches on during the fall carnival in the Grove last night.


sports PAGE 6 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | 1 november 2012 | sports

SEC Football Power Poll: Week 10 In this week’s installment, The Daily Mississippian’s sports editor David Collier will rank the 14 Southeastern Conference teams. Opponents, game times and television networks are also included for each team.

By David Collier | thedmsports@gmail.com 1. Alabama

2. LSU

3. Georgia

4. Florida

5. South Carolina

(8-0, 5-0 SEC, 1st last week)

(7-1, 3-1 SEC, 3rd last week)

(7-1, 5-1 SEC, 5th last week)

(7-1, 6-1 SEC, 2nd last week)

(7-2, 5-2 SEC, 4th last week)

The Crimson Tide didn’t fall into the trap as they handled Mississippi State 38-7. Now, Alabama will get their real first test of the season when they head into Death Valley Saturday. This week: at LSU (7-1, 3-1 SEC), 7 p.m., CBS

The Tigers had a week off, and it couldn’t have come at a better time. LSU will be fresh and ready to go in hopes of pulling off the upset Saturday in part three of this mega defensive battle. This week: Alabama (8-0, 5-0 SEC), 7 p.m., CBS

After falling to South Carolina earlier this season, the Bulldogs came out totally different this past Saturday and claimed a 17-9 win over Florida to put themselves in the driver’s seat in the East. This week: Ole Miss (5-3, 2-2 SEC), 2:30 p.m., CBS

The Gators showed their first sign of weakness against Georgia in this past Saturday’s 17-9 loss. Now, Florida will be looking for some help to get them to Atlanta for a shot at the SEC Championship. This week: Missouri (4-4, 1-4 SEC), 11 a.m., ESPN2

The Gamecocks got back in the win column this week, with a 38-35 win over Tennessee. South Carolina also suffered a huge loss in running back Marcus Lattimore for the rest of the season. This week: OPEN

6. Texas A&M

7. Mississippi State

8. Ole Miss

9. Arkansas

10. Vanderbilt

(6-2, 3-2 SEC, 7th last week)

(7-1, 3-1 SEC, 6th last week)

(5-3, 2-2 SEC, 8th last week)

(3-5, 2-3 SEC, 9th last week)

(4-4, 2-3 SEC, 10th last week)

The Aggie offense was in full swing this past Saturday in their 63-21 win at Auburn. Now, Kevin Sumlin’s squad will have a big test when they head to Starkville for a top-20 showdown.   This week: at Mississippi State (7-1, 3-1 SEC), 11 a.m., ESPN

The Bulldogs hyped up their contest with No. 1 Alabama, but Mississippi State laid an egg on their way to a 38-7 loss. They will have to get it going again if they are to beat the Aggies. This week: Texas A&M (6-2, 3-2 SEC), 11 a.m., ESPN

The Rebels continue to gain confidence as they posted a 3027 win over Arkansas in Little Rock. Hugh Freeze and his team look to keep that momentum going into a tough test against Georgia. This week: at Georgia (7-1, 5-1 SEC), 2:30 p.m., CBS

The Razorbacks are still scrambling trying to find more wins after suffering a last second 30-27 loss to Ole Miss over the weekend. Things don’t get any easier for the Hogs this weekend. This week: Tulsa (7-1), 11:21 a.m., SEC Network

The Commodores continued their momentum with a 49-7 blowout of Massachusetts this past weekend and have an opportunity to keep that confidence going into a road contest at Kentucky. This week: at Kentucky (1-8, 0-6 SEC), 11:00a.m., ESPNU

11. Tennessee

(3-5, 0-5 SEC, 11th last week)

The Volunteers played yet another close game and yet again came out on the losing end of things dropping a contest 38-35 to South Carolina, but getting bowl eligible is still very much in play. This week: Troy (4-4), 11:00 a.m., FSN

12. Missouri

(4-4, 1-4 SEC, 12th last week)

After a rough start in the SEC, the Tigers finally got the first win in their new conference defeating Kentucky 33-10 this past Saturday. Things don’t get easier for Missouri this weekend. This week: at Florida (7-1, 6-1 SEC), 11:00 a.m., ESPN2

13. Auburn

(1-7, 0-6 SEC, 13th last week)

The Tigers received a beating from Texas A&M, 63-21, this past Saturday, but the good news is that a struggling New Mexico State team awaits them this week for a battle between two 1-7 squads. This week: New Mexico State (1-7), 11:30 a.m., CSS

14. Kentucky

(1-8, 0-6 SEC, 14th last week)

The Wildcats got handed a 33-10 win at Missouri this past weekend, but if they play hard the way they have all year, they might have a shot at pulling the upset over Vanderbilt Saturday. This week: Vanderbilt (4-4, 2-3 SEC), 11:00 a.m., ESPNU

. M D e h t . M D Re ad e h t Sh a re Re cyc le the DM . CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline.com/classifieds. The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday when school is in session except during the summer session which is Tuesday through Thursday. Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted. RATES: - $0.25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run

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SPORTS SPORTS | 1 november 2012 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | PAGE 7

Burton seeing improvement in offensive line Ole Miss junior tackle Pierce Burton joined the Rebel football team in January after playing at both City College of San Francisco and San Jose State. On the year, Burton has played in all eight games and will now face arguably his hardest test in Georgia linebacker Jarvis Jones, who leads the SEC in sacks.

AUSTIN MCAFEE | The Daily Mississippian

Junior offensive lineman Pierce Burton (71) blocks for Bo Wallace against Arkansas.

BY MATT SIGLER mcsigler@go.olemiss.edu

The Ole Miss offensive line has come a long way since firstyear head coach Hugh Freeze and his staff have installed their new offense. In fact, many of

the Rebel players have been surprised by the success on offense so far this season. “At the beginning of the season, some guys were almost surprised to be winning,” junior offensive tackle Pierce Burton said. “We were up against (Tex-

as) A&M, and you could kind of sense on the sideline that guys were like, ‘Wow we are actually winning this game.’ I didn’t think they were really used to it, but now it is almost expected.” A lot has been said already about the job that head coach

Volleyball hits road for two matches The Lady Rebels look to bounce back from a disappointing match and put themselves into position to become eligible for the NCAA tournament. The team must have a record of .500 or better. BY CAMAL PETRO cppetro@go.olemiss.edu

The Ole Miss Lady Rebels (10-11, 4-8 SEC) will hit the road for the first time in three weeks this weekend when they take on the Kentucky Wildcats and the LSU Tigers. The Lady Rebels are coming off a straight-set loss to Auburn on Sunday after wins against Missouri and South Carolina the weekend before. The past two weekends are a tale of two different Lady Rebel teams. Two weeks ago, in a weekend sweep over Missouri and South Carolina, Ole Miss averaged almost 60 kills and 62 digs. On Sunday, Ole Miss only killed 31 balls, half of its average from the previous weekend, and tallied 38 digs. “I just don’t think we did a good job of mentally preparing ourselves to take on a really good team,” head coach Joe Getzin said. “When the whistle blows, it’s still volleyball, and you have to play.” The Wildcats (15-8, 9-4) enter Friday night’s matchup second in the Southeastern Conference’s Eastern Division, three

and a half games behind undefeated Florida. Four players with more than 200 kills lead Kentucky, while Ole Miss only has one in junior outside hitter Kara Morgan. Junior outside hitter Whitney Billings and senior outside hitter Ashley Frazier lead the group of four with 257 and 255 kills, respectively. Senior setter Christine Hartmann was honored as this week’s SEC Offensive Player of the Week; it was the second time in three weeks she has won the award. Hartmann recorded nine kills, 52 assists and 11 digs in the match with Tennessee last Friday, and then on Sunday, she had 58 assists and 19 digs. She averages 10.75 assists per set, third in the SEC. “When Kentucky was here, I thought they played a really good match,” he said. “I don’t think we matched up well against them, so I think we’ll try to match things up a little bit differently. We have to respond to what they bring.” LSU (10-13, 6-8) has a middle blocker and an outside hitter with more than 300 kills. Junior Desiree Elliott leads the Tigers

with 304 kills, and senior Madie Jones is second on the team with 303. Led by senior defensive specialist Meghan Mannari’s 285 digs, LSU ranks first in the conference in that category. Senior defensive specialist Sam Delahoussaye is second on the team with 274, and sophomore outside hitter Helen Boyle’s 216 digs place her third on the team. The Tigers are solid on defense, with two other players having recorded at least 190 digs. “It’s always a good match between the two of us,” he said. “I think they’ll bring it from the beginning. I think physically we match okay with them, it’s just a matter of us being able to hang in there long enough to have a game plan work for us.” Ole Miss travels to Kentucky Friday night at 7 p.m. CT, and then will take on LSU at 3 p.m. in Baton Rouge. CST will broadcast the match against the Tigers. For continuing coverage of Ole Miss volleyball, follow @thedm_ sports and @CamalPetro on Twitter.

Hugh Freeze has done in his short time at the helm, and Freeze was one of the main reasons Burton chose to come to Ole Miss after stints at San Jose State and City College of San Francisco. “I’ve kind of always really respected Coach Freeze,” he said. “That is part of the reason I came here.” Burton said he believes that the success Freeze has had this year is due to the high expectations he has for his team, despite the previous attitude that surrounded the team. “I think it is because (of) how hard he pushes us,” he said. “If you expect great things out of someone, that’s what’s going to happen, and I think he expects us all to perform and do our best.” Burton will be tasked with blocking Georgia outside linebacker Jarvis Jones, who leads the SEC with seven sacks and is tied for 12th in the conference with 41 tackles. This past season, after transferring from Southern Cal, he earned First Team All-American honors as he recorded 13.5 sacks and 70 tackles. “He’s a great player, give credit to him,” he said. “He is really fast. It looks like he has add-

SOCCER,

continued from page 8

minute as Jo Dragotta took a pass in the box from Tessa Andujar and put it in the net to give the Gators the 1-0 lead. Despite surrendering the early goal, the Rebel defense played well in the first half, turning back several Gator attacks to limit the damage and keep the game to a one goal margin at the break. Ole Miss turned the tables to start the second half, possessing the ball on the Florida side of the field for much of the early stages of the second period and knocking the Gators back on their heels for several possessions. The Rebels pressed Florida offensively, getting a great opportunity with backto-back shots from Olivia Harrison and Mandy Mc-

ed some muscle from last year, and their defensive scheme really allows him to get loose, and I think the coaches are giving us a really good game plan on how to deal with him.” The game plan will be a tough one, but Burton said he feels he knows how he will have success against Jones. “I think I have to be patient and not lunge at him and kind of just sit back in my stance,” he said. “If I’m patient, I think I have pretty good feet to stay with him. My problem is when I lunge at him or something like that and really let him get me off balance.” The Ole Miss offensive line has improved from week to week, and Burton credits some of that to the Rebels’ preseason ranking. “I think we really took it personal, as far as us being ranked last in the SEC preseason,” Burton said. “Coaches showed us that. I took it as disrespect, and a lot of other guys did. We’re really working to be recognized as one of the better offensive lines.” For continuing coverage of Ole Miss football, follow @thedm_ sports and @SigNewton_2 on Twitter. Calla, but both attempts just missed as the Florida keeper made a nice save on both plays. The Rebels got another chance following a Florida hand ball that set up a free kick, but Souza’s shot was gathered up by Florida’s keeper yet again to keep Ole Miss looking for the shot that would put the Rebels on the board. Emerson finally delivered that shot in the 81st minute to tie the match, but Florida reclaimed the lead and grabbed the win off the free kick just eight minutes later to advance and send the Rebels home from the tournament. The Rebels will now wait for the announcement of the NCAA Tournament bracket on Monday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. CT to find out if the season will continue for Ole Miss.

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sports PAGE 8 | THE DAILY MISSISSIPPIAN | 1 november 2012 | sports

Rebel offense prepares for talented Georgia defense

O l e M i s s S P O RT S I N F O R M AT I O N

Rebels fall to Florida on late goal

The Ole Miss offense will get a big test on Saturday as they face one of the most talented defenses in the country in Georgia, and co-offensive Dan Werner knows they will be in for a battle.

AUSTIN MCAFEE | The Daily Mississippian

Sophomore quarterback Bo Wallace

BY BENNETT HIPP jbhipp@go.olemiss.edu

After Saturday’s game against Arkansas, the Georgia-Florida football game was playing on the TV in the bus on the way back to Oxford. It’s safe to say that Ole Miss co-offensive coordinator Dave Werner didn’t like what he saw. “Let me put it to you this way: After about 15 minutes of watching it, I pulled out the laptop and decided to start grading our film,” Werner said. “I just did not want to watch any more of that because they were shutting down the No. 2 or 3 team in the country at that time. They’re obviously pretty good.” In fact, Werner said that it may have been the best he’s seen the Georgia defense play so far this season. “Last week, they probably played their best game of the season defensively,” he said. “They look like they’re clicking on all cylinders right now.

They run a lot of different schemes that give you problems, and they’re going to mess with your protections.” Injury update The Rebels have yet another defensive player who isn’t healthy at the moment, as senior linebacker Aaron Garbutt was hospitalized with flu-like symptoms. “We had an issue with Aaron Garbutt and his health,” head coach Hugh Freeze said. “It’s just sickness; he’s dehydrated, and we put him in the hospital today, so not sure of his status.” Sophomore defensive back Senquez Golson still has not been cleared to practice and continues to undergo concussion tests. “Senquez hasn’t been released yet, so it’s getting late in the week,” he said. “We’re going to have to play a lot of young kids; we’ll throw them in the fire and see how they do.” Freshman defensive tackle Issac Gross was limited with a sore groin, but “he’ll be ready

to go,” according to Freeze. Freeze talks “30 for 30” The ESPN documentary “Ghosts of Ole Miss,” part of the “30 for 30” series, aired Tuesday night. The subject was the integration of Ole Miss in 1962 by James Meredith and the undefeated Ole Miss football season during that time. “It was a powerful display of what really happened 50 years ago, and thank God that we’ve moved way beyond that, and we can be one family here at The University of Mississippi,” he said. “I’ve coached here three years, going on four, and not one time has a single kid come to me with any issue that they’ve had in that regard on our campus. “It’s part of the history of not just North Mississippi, but also the South. It’s not a time that anyone is proud of, and we’re glad we’ve moved past that.”

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. – Erin Emerson notched her first goal of the season in the 81st minute to pull the Rebels into a tie with top-seeded Florida at the SEC Tournament on Wednesday, but a Gator goal with 91 seconds left on the clock proved to be the difference. Ole Miss (13-9) fell to Florida (15-4-1) by a score of 2-1 in the second round of the 2012 SEC Tournament. Ole Miss’ Sara Coleman took a corner kick after a flurry of Rebel shots and sent it into the box where it was headed by Mandy McCalla over to Emerson on the far side. Emerson drilled the shot to tie the match for the Rebels in the 81st minute of play. It was the first goal of the season for Emerson. But the Gators responded in the 89th minute when Ole Miss was called for a foul at

the top of the penalty box, setting up a free kick for the Gators. Erika Tymrak lined up the shot and sent it over the wall and into the net to put the top-seeded Gators on top for good. “We just tried to play as hard as we could,” said Ole Miss head coach Matthew Mott. “It was a great finish by Florida on the second goal. Our kids came out and battled like crazy in the second half and I’m really proud of them.” The Rebels weathered an early attack from the Florida offense as the Gators got off two quick shots before the Ole Miss defense would settle in and turn the stop into an attack by sending the ball quickly the other way. Florida got on the board early with a goal in the 12th See SOCCER, PAGE 7

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The Daily Mississippian — 11-1-12