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O L E M I S S S P O R T S I N F O R M AT I O N

OLE MISS TO ANNOUNCE CAPITAL CAMPAIGN OXFORD, Miss. -- A major announcement in the rise of the Ole Miss Rebels will take place on Tuesday, August 9, as the athletics department and UMAA Foundation will unveil

its landmark capital campaign. Released at that time will be renderings and digital tours of the facility initiatives as well as details for contributions. “Wrapping up a successful

T H E

feasibility study with AECOM, we are excited to release plans for a comprehensive capital campaign,” said Director of Athletics Pete Boone. “This campaign, which is the most

aggressive in our history, is critical to moving Ole Miss to the forefront of college athletics, and we are eager to share our vision with the Rebel Family.

“It’s time to bring championships back to the state’s flagship university.” The announcement will be streamed live on OleMissSports.com’s RebelVision.

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

FRIDAY, JULY 22, 2011 | VOL. 100, NO. 163 | THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

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THE UNIVERSITY

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MISSISSIPPI | SERVING OLE MISS

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OXFORD

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1911 |

THEDMONLINE.COM

WHY PASSING DEBT CEILING LEGISLATION IS IMPORTANT

GRAPHIC BY PETRE THOMAS & NICK TOCE| The Daily Mississippian

BY LEE HARRIS, CAIN MADDEN AND TAYLOR SMITH The Daily Mississippian

The U.S. government’s ability to borrow to pay its legal obligations could screech to a halt on Aug. 2, and many believe the world’s economy hangs in the balance. It could be even worse for Mississippi if the U.S. is unable to pay existing legal obligations due to not raising the debt ceiling, said U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS). “A state like Mississippi, which receives more money from the federal government than it sends it, would be disproportionately harmed by any failure of our financial system,” Thompson said. Raising the debt limit is par-

ticularly important to students, Thompson said. A significant percent, 18-19 percent, of Mississippi’s public school support comes from the federal government, including the meals program and the ability to purchase computers and other aides. “Public education is something that Mississippi can’t support on its own,” Thompson said. “That is why federal help is so important.” Higher education would also be impacted, as many students rely on FAFSA resources, including pell grants, subsidized loans and work-study. “Without it, I would not have finished college, probably, and there are many in the same situation,” Thompson said. “I used work-study and student loans throughout college.”

Problems in the U.S.A.

Not getting it done could also sink programs like Social Security, and President Obama has

A state like Mississippi, which receives more money from the federal government than it sends it, would be disproportionately harmed by any failure of our financial system. BENNIE THOMPSON , (D-MS)

come under fire recently for saying that Social Security checks may not go out. The budgeted expenditures for August total to $306.7 billion,

while the projected revenue is $172.4 billion This leaves a deficit of $134.3 billion that the federal government will be unable to pay. If the government used August revenues to pay for August expenses in Social Security benefits ($49.2B), Medicare/Medicaid ($50B), interest on debt ($29B), unemployment benefits ($12.8), active military salaries ($2.9B) and federal salaries ($14.2B), there would only be $14.3 Billion left to pay for the Department of Education ($20B), IRS Refunds ($3.9B), Veteran’s Affairs ($2.9B), Defense Vendors ($31.7B), not to mention the Justice department, FAA, FTA and other federal agencies totaling $89.9 billion. While the average college student faced with this situation might decide to eat out less or

cancel their Netflix subscription, the choice becomes much harder for the federal government. The U.S. has also recently come under attack by rating agencies in a recent release. The U.S.’s AAA rating is basically like having a perfect credit score, and Moody’s Investors Service is threatening to downgrade that if the U.S. isn’t able to pay its current bills and do something about the debt. Jon Moen, chair of the University of Mississippi’s economics department, said this would be quite the blow. “It will just, in effect, raise the rate of interest the U.S. government has to pay on borrowing,” he said “In other words, more of our taxation and revenue will go to paying interest (on our debt) See DEBT, PAGE 4


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AMELIA CAMURATI editor-in-chief

JACOB BATTE news editor

BY JOSH CLARK

JON MOSBY opinion editor

Senior Cartoonist

AUSTIN MILLER sports editor PETRE THOMAS photography editor KELSEY DOCKERY design editor NICK TOCE visuals editor LAUREN SMITH copy chief

JASMINE PHILLIPS business manager KEATON BREWER ALEX PENCE

account executives SARA LOWREY

creative assistant

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

NASA funding necessary for technological advances BY JAY NOGAMI Columnist

T H E

Today I am here to say one thing, and one thing only: Don’t cut NASA’s funding. Given that our current economic problem is threatening to elevate itself to crisis level due to the debt ceiling problem, it is prudent to look for places to curb our spending. Recently, a House committee recommended cutting funding from NASA’s current project, the James Webb Space Telescope, which is billed as the successor to the Hubble telescope. Now, it is easy to understand that the Hubble Space Telescope is outdated. The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990. I wasn’t even born in 1990, but I know that in just my lifetime, technology has grown exponentially. In fact, it is estimated that the telescope will no longer be functional in 2014. Some might think that having a space telescope is an unnecessary elegance, but the

Hubble Space Telescope placed the United States at the forefront of technology. Other countries are just sending their first telescopes into orbit. These telescopes all have better, newer technology than the Hubble telescope. The U.S. has always been seen as at the forerunner of technology. Recently, however, the U.S. has been lagging. This new space telescope would place the U.S. back at the forefront of technological innovation. The James Webb Space Telescope has the ability to see further into space than any telescope ever has. It helps us satiate our deepest instinct, that of an explorer. Using U.S. technology, the world has the ability to see completely new things. This is something that shouldn’t be overlooked. Being the leader in science and technology has kept the U.S economy booming. In these economic advances,

the government hires private U.S. sector businesses to build and optimize their ideas. Without the government to fund these projects, other countries will replace the U.S. as the leaders in technology and science. The cost they are trying to get rid of isn’t even very much. It is estimated that it will cost less than $4 billion to finish the project. Even so, the cost of finishing the James Webb Space Telescope will be about the price of the yearly operation of the Hubble telescope. As the American Astronomical Society puts it, “The proposal...to terminate the James Webb Space Telescope would waste more taxpayer dollars than it saves. Such a proposal threatens American leadership in the fields of astrophysics and advanced space technology while likely eliminating hundreds, if not thousands, of high-tech jobs.” This cut will hurt the U.S. immediately, and has long term

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall Main Number: 662.915.5503 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year, and Tuesday through Friday during the summer. Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated. Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

effects as well. It is a great idea to find places to cut our spending, but cutting something that could be immensely important is not the way to go. Especially when the U.S. spends more money on the war in Afghanistan every couple of days than the entire Space Telescope project. Imagine if the U.S. had cut funding for the Apollo program. Imagine if they had cut funding in development of the Internet. Imagine if they had cut funding in the space shuttle program. The world would not be the same without American leadership in the science and technology fields. We must maintain our leadership, lest we live in a lesser world. Jay Nogami is a sophomore public policy leadership major from Denver, Colo. Follow him on Twitter @JayTNogami.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser ARVINDER SINGH KANG manager of media technology DYLAN PARKER creative/technical supervisor DARREL JORDAN chief engineer MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager STEPHEN GOFORTH broadcast manager AMY SAXTON administrative assistant


OPINION O P IN I O N |

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Family meals more important than you think BY MEGAN MASSEY Columnist

I’ve recently rediscovered the beauty and value of a “family meal.” They’ve always been a part of my life. I grew up in the South, and my grandmother cooked supper every night for my mom and me for about 14 years. I’ve always enjoyed sitting down with other people to eat, but when I got to college, it became increasingly more difficult to regularly share a meal with other people, especially one sitting around a table. There are plenty of statistics on the importance of a family meal, especially for children. A Harvard study found it to

be more important than play and story time in developing the vocabulary of young children. Columbia University found that kids who eat with their parents are more likely to make good grades. And the University of Minnesota found that girls who have positive family meals are less likely to develop eating disorders. Many other studies have found that eating together as a family decreases the likelihood of future drug addiction and alcohol problems in children. It’s fascinating to me that just sitting down and talking with one’s family can have such an impact on a person’s life. Most of us now live too far

away to have a real family meal every night. We’re missing out on that quality time spent around a table with people we care about; however, having a meal with friends can have many of the same benefits and provide positive social interaction. This summer, a group of my friends and I created a rotating dinner schedule. We’ve started our own “family meal.” We each take turns cooking, and we sit down around the dinner table at my apartment every night and share a meal. It’s the best part of my day. There’s something so relaxing about sitting around with a group of people you like and being able to unwind from work

and class. Social interaction is important, and the increasing influence of social networks and text messaging is ironically decreasing this part of our lives. Families are having more and more difficulty getting everyone together at the same time to eat, and, even when they do, a meal without the television on is a rarity. In college, it’s equally, if not more challenging, to sit down during the week for a meal with other people, but being able to talk with other people about everyday problems can help a person better handle difficult situations. It’s easy to get wrapped up in stress.

Exam week is a nightmare, writing papers keeps us in the library for hours and class has the ability to wear a person out. But despite all this, it’s important to maintain healthy relationships with friends while we’re here. Whether it’s through a weekly meal or some other form of togetherness, positive social interaction is key to being less stressed and happier. When food is involved, it’s even better.

Megan Massey is a junior religious studies major from Mount Olive, Miss. Follow her on Twitter @megan_massey.

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA via UWIRE

The US doesn’t have to be best at everything BY LUKE MCCONNELL The Oklahoma Daily

For the longest time, the United States has been the best in a wide array of things — athletics, politics, military, you name it. But now times are changing. The US of A is no longer the sole great superpower in the world, and to be honest, many don’t even consider America to be No. 1 anymore. It didn’t help the public’s sentiment when the heavilyfavored U.S. women’s soccer team lost the World Cup final to Japan in penalty kicks on Sunday. There has been growing dis-

contentment about how America’s dominance in professional sports, particularly golf and tennis, is waning. On the men’s side, tennis is controlled by the big four of Rafael Nadal (Spain), Roger Federer (Switzerland), Novak Djokovic (Serbia) and Andy Murray (UK). The top U.S. player, Mardy Fish, checks in at No. 8 with Andy Roddick trailing at No. 10. A U.S. player has not won a Grand Slam tournament since 2003. Golf has been nothing short of a crapshoot, but in a very positive way. The past 11 majors have seen 11 different winners. All of these young players

are great for golf. However, the highest-ranked U.S. player is Steve Stricker at No. 5, and the U.S. has only won four of the past 14 major championships. Women’s golf is a little brighter. Cristie Kerr stands at No. 2 in the world, but the rest of the top 10 is pretty much dominated by those of Asian descent (six to be exact). The women’s tennis rankings are a disaster zone for the U.S. — the highest-ranked American player is No. 31. That’s never a good thing. Thank goodness for the Williams sisters, Venus and Serena, who have been the only U.S. players to win a Grand Slam since Jennifer Capriati at the

Australian Open in 2002. From some people’s reactions to all of this, you would think someone had planned to cancel Christmas. Two things here. One: it’s really not that bad. Sure, there isn’t an American ranked No. 1 in any of these sports but when they’re competing against the rest of the world, Americans in the top 10 are pretty special. Two: since when does the U.S. have to have the best player in every sport or be the best at everything it does? Golf, tennis and soccer aren’t even American sports. The modern game of golf originated in Scotland and tennis origi-

nally began in France, but the modern game ripened in Great Britain. In soccer, the U.S. struggles and just can’t seem to get over the hump to be an elite team on the global stage. So the country is bad at something. Whoop-de-doo. I’ll bet the same people who want the U.S. to be the best at everything are the same who think there is no other country that comes close to the U.S. in economic power or overall authority. If you want to be the best, you have to play the best and beat them. U.S. athletes just aren’t doing a whole lot of that right now.

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Blues Festival returns to Oxford BY LAURA FRALEY The Daily Mississippian

The second annual Oxford Blues Festival offers local families, Ole Miss students and blues lovers alike the chance to come out and enjoy the music and atmosphere that is Oxford. The festival, which debuted last year, is returning to Oxford on July 22-24 and is giving blues fans a reason to celebrate. The festival will bring over 20 blues bands hailing from seven states and will feature blues styles ranging from North Mississippi Hill-Country to Chicago-Blues. The Oxford Blues Festival executive director, James Darryl Parker, expects a great turn out at this year’s festival and has sold tickets to blues enthusiasts from states as far away as Montana, Texas, Idaho and Florida. “People love the blues,” Parker said. “People love coming to Oxford. It’s a beautiful town with a magnificent Square and there is a lot of history and culture here. I can imagine that there would be a lot of people coming not only just for the blues, but just to come back to Oxford.” The festival will kick off at 4 p.m. on Friday with a panel discussion at the University Museum that will include Dick Waterman, Shelly Ritter and Ben Peyton. The first music act will begin at 5:30 p.m. at businesses around the Square. Twelve of the shows will be free, while tickets will be sold for venues with big name bands. Headliner Magic Slim and the Teardrops will play at The Lyric Theatre at 7:50 p.m., and legendary blues artists Eddie C. Campbell, Nellie “Tiger” Travis, King Edward and Effie Burt will perform throughout the weekend. On Saturday, the event will reconvene at 11 a.m. on the lawn of the Walton-Young Historic House for blues and barbecue. The blues festival will conclude Sunday evening with the Nellie “Tiger” Travis show at Foxfire Ranch in Waterford, Miss. Weekend passes can be purchased for $45. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the Oxford Blues Festival website at oxfordbluesfestival.com.

DEBT,

continued from page 1

rested more on politics than economic sense. “I’ve seen very few people in Washington arguing intelligently about what we want to do,” Moen said. “They seem more interested in winning their battle rather than solving or at least coming up with a reasonable solution to the federal government’s fiscal situation.” Moen said with the election looming, neither side wants to be seen as the one giving something up. U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran (RMS) said raising the debt ceiling is something that Congress has to do, whatever it takes. “It is important and necessary to economic good health,” he said. Thompson said he has not SUSAN WALSH | Associated Press Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., speaks during a news conference on the debt ceiling on heard what those conditions Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C, on Thursday, July 21. would be, but he does know where he would draw the line. rather than on entitlements, ex- ership would like to use it as “I am one of those individuals penditures and things like that.” an opportunity to further their who said to the president that it agenda. would not be wise for him to tamWhat exactly is the debt “It has always been a straight per with Social Security, Mediceiling? up or down vote,” Thompson care and Medicaid,” Thompson According to the U.S. Depart- said. “The new leadership in the said. “I would vote to raise it, but ment of the Treasury, the debt House has decided that they want not on the expense of the neediest limit is the total amount of money to add some budget cuts or other people in my state.” that the U.S. is allowed to borrow considerations to this vote, beSocial Security does three key to meet existing legal obligations. cause that is their preference, and things that affect a lot of MisThe room made available to they are the leadership, so we are sissippians, Thompson said. It pay these obligations, such as in this quagmire.” benefits to survivors, if no life inMedicare and Social Security, will University of Mississippi Politi- surance was present. It is also the be gone by Aug. 2 unless the limit cal science chair Richard Forgette only option for many people who is raised. said the issue is political, in that are disabled It does not authorize any new the new members of the House As well, it is the only retirement spending commitments. ran, and won, on not incurring option for many in the state. Since 1960, the debt ceiling has more federal debt. Medicare and Medicaid are just been raised 78 times, with 49 of “Now they are as important those raises coming under Re- being faced with to a number of publican presidents. It has risen their own words,” Mississippians, from less than $1 trillion to ap- Forgette said. the U.S. repreI don’t like the idea. It’s an sentative said. proximately $14 trillion. “Are we going to If it isn’t raised, the U.S. will increase the debt old Washington approach to “Those probegin to default on its legal ob- ceiling? Not with- a serious problem. It doesn’t grams are baligations for the first time in his- out some other matter how or if a problem is sically operattory. significant deficit solved, it matters who gets the ing with bare reduction such blame. I don’t think that’s the bones budgets Why isn’t it getting done? that those mem- right approach. We need to as is,” ThompThompson, who has served in bers of Congress son said. “And the U.S. House since 1993, said can go back to ALAN NUNNELEE , so, if we started the issue went through Congress their constituen- (R-MS) cutting those with little fanfare. cies and say and programs, we This time around, however, explain why they will just add a it has been coupled with future voted for the debt ceiling in- lot more burden to individuals on Social Security and the health spending, and Thompson said crease.” many in the Republican leadMoen agreed that the issue care needs of many in our state.”

Thompson said the best course of action would be to up the debt limit, and then focus on attacking the deficit in the near future. Cochran said the debt limit wasn’t something that could be played with. “It is one of those situations where I don’t think we have any alternative but to approve the legislation that is necessary to put Congress in support of administrative actions that will permit us to carry out the financing of the national debt,” Cochran said. “We will continue to pay our bills — it is not that we are going to ignore obligations that we have.” U.S. Rep. Alan Nunnelee (RMS) said this short-term solution would only be passed with some provisions. “I’m not opposed to a shortterm solution,” he said. “As long as there are spending cuts to offset the raise in the debt ceiling.” The McConnell plan is one short-term solution being suggested by members of both parties. Under that plan Congress gives the president the power to raise the debt ceiling without requiring a majority vote in favor of the action for the next year or more. “I don’t like the idea,” Nunnelee said. “It’s an old Washington approach to a serious problem. It doesn’t matter how or if a problem is solved, it matters who gets the blamed. I don’t think that’s the right approach. We need to deal with the problem itself.” U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker (RMS) said passing the McConnell plan might be necessary to prevent a downgrade of U.S. debt. “As a last ditch effort to prevent a default and to prevent our country’s credit rating from being downgraded from AAA, I would consider such an approach,” Wicker responded. “I don’t think it’s anyone’s first choice.” Forgette said he expects a shortterm resolution to be passed before Aug. 2, but that nothing to address the longer-term issue of decreasing the deficit will be reached. Rather that will be a point for 2012, the presidential election year, Forgette said.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NFL LABOR: OWNERS OK DEAL, PLAYERS DON’T VOTE COLLEGE PARK, Ga. -- A person familiar with the negotiations tells The Associated Press that players didn’t vote Thursday night on a tentative agreement to end the NFL lockout because they had not

seen the full proposal approved by owners. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the process is supposed to be secret. Owners overwhelmingly

NEWSWATCH

voted for a tentative agreement earlier Thursday evening, pending an OK from the players, who later held a conference call to discuss the proposal. That call ended without a vote.

Before the call began, NFL Players Association head DeMaurice Smith wrote in an email to the 32 team representatives: “There is no agreement between the NFL and the players at this time.”

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RANKINGS,

continued from page 8 Junior Zack Stoudt, sophomore Barry Brunetti and junior Randall Mackey compete for the starting quarterback slot during spring practice. Brunetti and Mackey — both dual-threat quarterbacks — have a leg up on Stoudt, who missed the Grove Bowl due to academic issues.

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

bust player, but he will be helped by having the best receiver in the conference to throw to in Alshon Jeffrey. Backup Connor Shaw will likely see action as well. 5. Tennessee: Sophomore Tyler Bray started the last five games of the 2010 season and showed that he has one of the brightest futures of any quarterback in the conference. He finished the year with 1,849 yards through the air with 18 touchdowns and 10 interceptions. Bray has plenty of offensive weapons to work with, including receiver Justin Hunter. Senior Matt Sims and true freshman Justin Worley provide depth. 6. LSU: Tiger fans are hoping this is the year that senior Jordan Jefferson finally puts it all together. Jefferson split time last season with fellow Jarrett Lee and threw for 1,411 yards and seven touchdowns, but also 10 interceptions.

Lee returns as well for his senior season and sophomore Zach Mettenberger, a transfer from Georgia, looms as well. 7. Florida: Senior John Brantley struggled to fit into Urban Meyer’s spread offense last season, but seems to be a much better fit in new offensive coordinator Charlie Weis’s pro-style offense. Brantley threw for 2,061 yards and nine touchdowns a year ago, but also had 10 interceptions. Freshman Jeff Driskel was rated the No. 1 quarterback nationally according to Scout.com and Rivals.com, and has the chance to be an elite quarterback. 8. Alabama: Gone is the steady Greg McElroy and in his place are sophomore AJ McCarron and redshirt freshman Phillip Sims. McCarron looks to have a leg up in the competition at this point, but both players are unproven at this point. McCarron threw for 389

yards and three touchdowns in limited action in 2010. 9. Kentucky: Mike Hartline’s Kentucky career is finally over, although it seemed to last 10 years. In his place is junior Morgan Newton. Newton threw six touchdowns as a freshman in 2009, but struggled with consistency and was the backup to Hartline in 2010. Newton started the bowl game for the Wildcats in 2010, completing 21 of 36 passes for 211 yards in a 27-10 loss to Pittsburgh. 10. Ole Miss: With Jeremiah Masoli gone, Ole Miss turns to a trio of untested players to try and determine their starting quarterback. Sophomore Barry Brunetti, a transfer from West Virginia, is the leader at this point and is the only one who has taken a division one snap, completing 4 of 9 passes in mop-up duty last season. Redshirt junior Randall Mackey started spring practice on fire, but

GRAHAM,

David Lighty also participated in the three-day event that took place June 27-29. “The camp went really well,” Graham said. “I got a good feel for the coaches. I feel they got a good feel for me. I really just wanted to go into the camp, trying to get better every day, and I feel like I finished better than I started.” Shortly thereafter, but before the NBA’s labor deal expired at midnight on July 1 and the league locked out its players, Graham received another, more exciting, call from his hometown team. “A couple of days before the lockout, I actually got a call from the (Atlanta Hawks’) assistant general manager, who reached out to my agent and expressed interest in bringing me into their training camp, which would be with the team in a

couple of months.” With the Hawks’ training camp tentatively scheduled for October, the decision to stay or go overseas will come up fairly soon for Graham. Former Ole Miss teammate Chris Warren recently made his decision and signed with the Adelaide 36ers of Australia’s National Basketball League. “At first, the training camp thing sounded really, really good,” Graham said. “As I started to see a lot of these NBA players and a couple of my friends that played college basketball flocking overseas and signing, (it) makes it more real that this lockout can really be bad. “It kind of leans you toward the decision of having to go international because you just don’t know how bad this lockout can be. It can end tomorrow or it can end in January.”

continued from page 8

with the ball in his hands. “A couple of days after the draft, my agent got a call from the assistant (general manager) with the Atlanta Hawks,” he said. “They expressed their interest. They told my agent they were familiar with me from workouts and wanted to get a third look at me, so they brought me into their free agent minicamp.” At the minicamp for draft picks and free agents, Graham was reunited with former Ole Miss player Eniel Polynice, who transferred to Seton Hall for his senior season. The Hawks’ second round pick Keith Benson, 2008 lottery pick Joe Alexander and former Ohio State guard

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

cooled off considerably toward the end. Both are dual-threat quarterbacks, while junior college transfer Zack Stoudt is a pure pocket passer, but also missed the spring game due to academic issues. 11. Auburn: The Tigers must replace last year’s Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton, but have options waiting in the wings. Junior Barrett Trotter and sophomore Clint Mosley have been on campus the longest, but highly

touted true freshman Kiehl Frazier is a perfect fit for Auburn’s offense and could sneak in and earn the job this fall. 12. Vanderbilt: Senior Larry Smith returns after throwing for 1,262 yards and six touchdowns a year ago. He has battled inconsistency throughout his career, but has also had arguably the worst supporting cast of any quarterback in the conference.

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House for Rent TAYLOR MEADOWS 2 Bed/2 Bath brick houses for rent on Old Taylor Road. Starting June, July or August. (662)801-8255 or (662)801-3736 2BR/2B Adjacent Units - 6 Minutes from Campus. Nice & Quiet - Mature Students - $625 (662)234-9289 3 BDR/3 BA. Large Townhouse. Hardwood floors, fireplace, $1150/mo. South Pointe Townhomes. Contact Stan Hill: (662)202-6117

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($570 per person) Brick House for rent, only 1.5 miles from campus and just a half-mile from the square. Granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, fenced-in back yard, large closets. Available August 1st. (615) 497-6892 5 Bedroom, Close to Downtown, 304 Elm, $2000, Massey Prop Mgmt, (662)234-0311 3BD/2BA W/ Large Yard 3BD/2BA w/ large yard. (662)234-6736. (662)2346736 HOUSE FOR RENT Fully furnished, 1Bedroom, 1Bath house. 8 miles from Oxford City Limits. Borders U. S. Government Sardis Lake property at Coontown landing. $450 per month. Call (662)234-7070 Stone Cove 3 bedroom home ONLY $725- 2 baths, large bedrooms, vaulted ceilings, huge grilling wooden deck in trees. NO PETS. Avail. Aug 1. Only 2 miles from campus. (662)2346481

Condo for Rent condo Avail Aug 1st 3 BED/2.5BA GATED, INCLUDES FRIDGE, W/D, $1290/ mo. Call (901)833-2459 or 662895-4263

Weekend Rental MOVE IN DAY/Gameday Large 3 BR + bunkroom /2.5 bath house just 2.5 miles to campus. Room for entire family-sleeps 14. Also accepting reservations for 2011 football weekends. email valhartrph@aol.com (662)671-0532 ANY TIME Football, baseball, weddings, getaways. Your source for shortterm rentals in Oxford! www.oxfordtownhouse.com (662)801-6692 not just football rentals Weekends and more! Event weekend availability/ pricing online. Check with Kay for other dates. www.oxfordtownhouse.com (662)801-6692

Dixie Dance Company now taking registration for dance, gym, & cheer ages 3 & up. Email or call today! dixiedanceco@yahoo.com or www.dixiedancecompany.com (662)236-1032

CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION

Miscellaneous PREGNANCY TEST CENTER Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting, and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com. www.facebook.com/ pregnancytestcenter (662)234-4414

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 7

REBEL RADIO —92.1 fm —

Full-time BECOME A BARTENDER $300/ DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training Courses Available. Call 1-800-9656520 EXT155

Part-time IT Support Assistant (student worker) in the School of Business Administration: Great job for a hard-working technology-oriented student who wants good pay ($7.75/ hr to start), flexible hours, training, and valuable work experience for your resume. 20 hours/ week. Prefer someone who can work for two or more years including summers. Strong knowledge of computers is required, and experience in troubleshooting and repairing computer problems is preferred. Email shammoud@ bus.olemiss.edu or call 662-915-5544 to arrange an interview.

Miscellaneous for Sale Popular bar on Oxford Square. 10-year history. Turnkey. Great location and Lease. Excellent price. Qualified inquiries only, please. 662-801-9541.

Childcare/Daycare

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| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 8

HAWKS TRAINING CAMP OR PLAYING OVERSEAS? BY AUSTIN MILLER Sports Editor

These are the two options former Ole Miss guard Zach Graham is weighing during the NBA lockout. After pre-draft workouts, waiting through the NBA Draft and participating in a pre-lockout minicamp, the Atlanta Hawks expressed interest in inviting Graham to training camp. However, with the uncertainty surrounding the lockout, Graham is also considering the international route, where he said he also has offers on the table from overseas teams. “Where I am right now is, with my agent, in between decisions whether I’m going to take the international route or stick it out and wait for the lockout to end and try out for the (Hawks) in training camp,” Graham said. Before the NBA Draft, the Suwanee, Ga. native participated in pre-draft workouts with the Hawks, the Golden State Warriors and the Utah Jazz. Among the players, he competed against in the workouts were Klay Thompson (Warriors), Alec Burks (Jazz) and Markieff Morris (Phoenix Suns) — all lottery picks in June’s NBA Draft. Going into the draft, Graham

PHOTO BY PHILL SKINNER: ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

Former Ole Miss guard Zach Graham scores a layup for two of his 16 points in a 71-69 upset of No. 10 Kentucky last season. Graham averaged 14.2 points and 4.5 rebounds per game last season and finished 1,274 career points, 18th all-time in program history.

Former Ole Miss guard Zach Graham drives past former Morehead State guard Demonte Harper in the Atlanta Hawks’ pre-lockout minicamp. After two pre-draft workouts and the minicamp, the Hawks expressed interest in inviting Graham to training camp.

didn’t have any expectations and just prepared himself for any opportunity that came his way. “I really wasn’t getting my hopes up that high,” he said. “My agent and a lot of other

me there were other ways to be successful even if you don’t get drafted.” Unfortunately for Graham, the draft didn’t work out. He did, however, make an impres-

people were telling me to not get caught up in the draft because a lot of things happen after the draft. Unfortunately, with the lockout, it makes things tougher, but people were just telling

sion on his hometown team. In addition to his perimeter shooting and lock-down defense, he also showed the ability to handle ball screens and create things See GRAHAM, PAGE 5

SEC FOOTBALL RANKINGS: QUARTERBACKS Each Friday, The Daily Mississippian’s Bennett Hipp will rank the 12 SEC teams by position as part of an eight-week series. This is the last installment of the series. BY BENNETT HIPP The Daily Mississippian

1. Georgia: The group of Southeastern Conference quarterbacks is

down as a whole this season, but Georgia’s Aaron Murray is the best of the bunch. Murray impressed as a redshirt freshman, throwing for 3,049 yards and 24 touchdowns

compared to only eight interceptions. A.J. Green will be sorely missed this season and, with an unproven running back group, Murray will

have to make some adjustment this fall. However, he’s easily the top quarterback in the conference. 2. Arkansas: This could be a stretch, but in terms of poten-

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tial, Tyler Wilson has the highest among the starting quarterbacks in the conference. A redshirt junior, Wilson appeared in six games last season, completing 34 of 51 passes for 453 yards and four touchdowns with three interceptions. Wilson stepped in against Auburn in 2010 when Ryan Mallett was injured and threw for 332 yards and four touchdowns in a 65-43 loss. He’ll be helped out by a legitimate rushing threat in Knile Davis. 3. Mississippi State: Senior Chris Relf was one of the most improved quarterbacks in the conference in 2010, throwing for 1,776 yards and 12 touchdowns, while also rushing for 701 yards and five more touchdowns. He should excel after another season in Dan Mullen’s offense. 4. South Carolina: Assuming senior Stephen Garcia comes off yet another suspension, which he most likely will, the Gamecocks should be in good shape at the position. An extremely frustrating player, Garcia threw 20 touchdowns in 2010, but also had 14 interceptions, in addition to his off-thefield problems. He’s a true boom or See RANKINGS, PAGE 5

The Daily Mississippian - July 22, 2011  

The Daily Mississippian - July 22, 2011

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