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T H E

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 | VOL. 100, NO. 152 | THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF

MISSISSIPPI | SERVING OLE MISS

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OXFORD

Federal budget cuts lead to fewer scholarships for students BY MEGHAN LITTEN The Daily Mississippian

More than 200 Ole Miss students will have to find new ways to help pay for college. On April 14, the U.S. Congress passed legislation concerning the national budget. Several programs did not receive the funding they needed to continue operations, including the Robert C. Byrd Scholarship. The program awarded freshmen who plan on pursuing post-secondary education after high school graduation. The scholarship program is named after the Democratic U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the longest serving senator in U.S. history, who served in the U.S. Senate from 1959 to until his death in 2010. Robert C. Byrd Scholars are chosen from each of the 435 United States congressional districts. The merit-based scholarship began in 1985 as a one-time scholarship, but since 1993, the selected students receive $1,500 annually over four years. The program is funded by the federal government through the Department of Education. The department distributes funds to state education departments, who then administer the scholarships to the Byrd Scholars of the congressional districts of the state. In 2010, the Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Program awarded 28,000 scholarships totaling $42 milliom for college students in the U.S. One Ole

PETRE THOMAS | The Daily Mississippian

Incoming freshman Casey Hatley registers for financial aid on a computer during his orientation. Many students who don’t receive full scholarships sign up for financial aid to help pay for tuition.

Miss Byrd Scholar, Jarrod Hatton, a sophomore physics and philosophy double major from Walnut, was informed through an email this month that no more Byrd scholarships would be awarded to any students in the state. Hatton applied for the scholarship when he was a senior in high school and believed that he would continue to receive the scholarship for four years. “I thought it was about the reapplication process that you

do every summer,” Hatton said about the email. “I continued to read the message and found out that they had cut funding so I wasn’t getting any money at all.” Hatton and his fellow Byrd Scholars have been communicating through Facebook and brainstorming ideas of how to take action. “Other students I have met have a Facebook message going out about getting the scholarships reinstated,” he said.

Currently, students are considering calling, emailing and writing their senators and representatives in Washington, D.C., about how the unexpected loss of scholarship will affect how they will pay for college. “I will have to take out more dollars in loans,” Hatton said. “But luckily I have other scholarships so I won’t take that much of a hit.” See SCHOLARSHIP, PAGE 4

McEwen’s coming to the Square BY MATTHEW NEEB The Daily Mississippian

for their expansion of McEwen’s outside of Memphis. “There is a close enough tie with Memphis and Oxford, between alumni and just by the fact that people love to come down to Oxford, we thought it would be a good fit,” Smythe said. For daily operation of the new location, Littlefield and Smythe have called upon two Oxford natives. Lee Cauther, who formerly managed the Downtown Grill, will now join McEwen’s as the daily operating partner. As head chef, Smythe and Littlefield chose local Jeff Robinson, who will be leav-

A Memphis favorite has found a new home on the Square in Oxford. The well-established McEwen’s restaurant has made plans to take the spot of Waltz on the Sqaure, which was located at 1110 Van Buren, between Old Venice and Marchbanks real estate office. Described on its website as “classic Southern cuisine with South American, Asian and Creole elements,” McEwen’s looks to bring new flavor to the Square. Owners Bert Smythe and John Littlefield feel that Oxford is a promising location See MCEWENS, PAGE 4

PHOTO COURTESY MCEWENS

McEwen’s restaurant of Memphis plans to open another location on the Square in Oxford in late July where Waltz on the Square used to be.

SINCE

1911 |

THEDMONLINE.COM

OLE MISS SPORTS INFORMATION

Outstanding week for Randolph ends in semis at U.S. Am Public Links BANDON, Ore. - Former Ole Miss All-American Jonathan Randolph ended an outstanding week in the U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship Friday, falling 3 and 2 to UNLV’s Derek Ernst in the semifinals at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort. After winning his morning quarterfinal match 5 and 3 against Todd Baek of San Diego State, Randolph got off to a slow start in the semifinal match against Ernst, who put out Randolph’s teammate, Joe David, in the first round. The players made the turn with Randolph four down. Ernst held a 5-up lead through 11, but made triple-bogey, bogey on 12 and 13 to allow Randolph to get back to 3-down. Ernst closed it out on the par-4 16th with a par. “It was really tough out there today, especially later in the afternoon,” Randolph said. “The wind blew harder today than it did anytime we were here. You can’t make any mistakes in this type situation. He played exceptionally well. Every time I made a mistake, he capitalized on it. I hit it O.K., I just didn’t take advantage of the situations. I had a couple of birdie putts that just did not go in. The greens were pretty fast and they had so much slope, getting your speed right was tough. This was a good experience for me, and I’m taking a lot from it for the future.” Watching from Oxford was head coach Ernest Ross, who was excited for his former pupil to make it this far on a big stage. “Jonathan represented himself and Ole Miss very well,” Ross said. “ I know he is disappointed not to win and advance, but I have never seen golf conditions that extreme and tough. He made all Ole Miss Rebels proud.” Prior to the last match, Randolph had only played 58 holes to reach the semifinals in his first ever appearance here at the Public Links. The 2010 All-American, who left his name in the record book at Ole Miss, finished second in stroke play qualifying and then won his first match 4 and 3 before winning the next three 5 and 4, 5 and 4 and 5 and 3. David stuck around all week after his first round loss to Ernst, to support Randolph, his teammate for the last three years. See RANDOLPH, PAGE 4


OPINION O P IN I O N |

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AMELIA CAMURATI editor-in-chief

JACOB BATTE news editor

BY ROBERT NICHOLS

JON MOSBY opinion editor

Cartoonist

AUSTIN MILLER sports editor PETRE THOMAS photography editor NICK TOCE visuals editor KELSEY DOCKERY design editor LAUREN SMITH copy chief

JASMINE PHILLIPS business manager KEATON BREWER ALEX PENCE

account executives SARA LOWREY

creative assistant

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

Sure, he can run a country...but can he tweet?

BY ANGELA ROGALSKI Columnist

T H E

President Barack Obama is holding the first-ever town hall Q&A session with Americans via the social network Twitter on July 6. I for one, am very interested in the leader of our country’s attempt at intertwining social networking with government business. I don’t think I have any real problems with it; after all, the president held a Facebook town hall in April and successfully used the site during his 2008 campaign. His administration even created a new position, director of progressive media and online response, in May. So it seems to be working for him. According to an article in the Washington Post, President Obama will host the Twittering event at the White House. I suppose that’s convenient anyway. No motorcade to deal with; he won’t have to

faint at the pumps when his driver fills up Cadillac One; no fielding questions from people who are actually present (there will be a live audience, but they’re not allowed to ask him anything) so their possibly inverted brows at some of his responses will go unnoticed. Overall, it sounds like a win-win situation for the president. White House director of new media (which is apparently a different position than the impressive director of progressive media and online response) Macon Phillips said they are thinking about “other cool things that they can do at the White House.” While all of this sounds very “21st century,” very modernistic and certainly in step with the way things seem to be moving, I’m just the teeniest bit leery. The president said in 2009 that he was too clumsy

to tweet. But it seems even our commander-in-chief wants to try and get his ideas across in 140 characters or less. But can he? Can he make his point that, for lack of a better word, pointedly? I suppose it’s worth a try. I just hope it doesn’t escalate into total White House media relations. I love Twitter and Facebook, and while most of the people I know use both venues, I also know quite a few who don’t. I just don’t want those folks feeling out of the loop, especially when it comes to things related to “we the people.” I have to commend the president for his realistic outlook where the pulse of the public is concerned. Twitter and Facebook are increasingly helpful tools where careers and opinions on issues are concerned, and it’s a proven fact that they can and do make a difference by

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall Main Number: 662.915.5503 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year, and Tuesday through Friday during the summer. Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated. Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

giving many people one voice. I just don’t want tweeting and the like to replace good old fashioned, face-to-face human relations. Especially where matters of government — which is for all people — is concerned. And while aides assure everyone that the president will be giving verbal answers, the question remains, “Will he actually ‘tweet’ any of his responses?” We’ll see. And if he chooses to do so, let’s just hope he’s not as clumsy as he thinks he is. After all, we do have a reelection looming. Angela Rogalski is a senior print journalism major who lives in Abbeville, Miss. Follow her on Twitter @abbeangel.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

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OPINION O P IN I O N |

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New York takes step in the right direction BY JAY NOGAMI Columnist

New York became the sixth state to legalize same-sex marriage. It joins Connecticut, Iowa, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont in issuing same-sex licenses. Marriage is a right that should be given to all persons: straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual or otherwise. The vote was a historic moment for same-sex marriage, as New York is the most populous state by far to have passed such a measure. Yet, when most people view same-sex marriage, they view it as a party line issue: All Democrats are for same-sex marriage and all Republicans are against same-sex marriage. This is just not true. The New York State Senate is controlled by Republicans. As a supporter of same-sex marriage, I praise such a bold move by New York Republicans. They have broken the popular party line ideals, and voted with their hearts. But voting with their hearts is not all they did. According to the most recent Gallup poll, for the first time the majority of Americans support gay marriage. While

it is a slim margin, it is worth noting that 53 percent of Americans support gay marriage. Keep in mind that roughly 43 percent of registered voters in the United States are Democrats. Even within the Democratic Party, there is not universal support. President Obama has been known to be opposed to samesex marriage in the past, yet refused to take a stance on it when questioned at a recent press conference. He would only say that it was the job of the states to decide, not the federal government. Yet even in areas with great support, sometimes same-sex marriage rights are still hard to come by. In my home state of Colorado, a bill to allow civil unions was stopped before it could even reach a vote in the Republicancontrolled House. Despite the fact that 70 percent of Colorado supports same-sex civil unions, a Republican-controlled committee voted against the measure, refusing it to even go to a full vote. In Mississippi, gay marriage is banned. It was banned in Colorado as well. Yet these bans are from a different era. Just five years ago, the majority of Ameri-

cans were opposed to same-sex marriage. Times are changing. Many believe throughout the U.S., and I’m sure Mississippi as well, that same-sex marriage is a religious issue. Lee Jefferson, a professor of religion at Centre College in Kentucky, recently wrote an article about what the Bible says about same-sex marriage. Incredibly, there is no term, no cognate for homosexual in Greek or Hebrew. There was literally no concept of sexual orientation before the dawn of modern psychology. Using the Bible for a base point for belief on same-sex marriage is the same as using a book on leeching as a basis of modern medicine: it just doesn’t work. Furthermore, the Bible doesn’t endorse one form of marriage over another. There is never a specific statement made regarding any marriage whatsoever. Most cite the story of Adam and Eve as the basis of straight-only marriage, yet that story is a gender creation one, not a marriage creation one. Supporting same-sex marriage is not a party line issue. It is not a religious issue. It is however, a

civil issue. It is also an issue of doing what is right. The majority of Americans feel that same-sex marriage is right. They feel that the denial of such a basic right as marriage is outrageous. You should think about the same thing. Do you feel it is right to prohibit an action that does no harm? Do you feel it is right to allow one group of people the right to marriage, but arbitrarily disallow another? Do you have any concrete reasons to disallow same-sex marriage? If not, maybe it’s time to actually think. I urge everyone who supports same-sex marriage to write their state representative and their state senator to urge them to follow New York’s example. Those of us who live in Mississippi should always be looking for opportunities to be progressive. And being the first Southern state to allow same-sex marriage would be a great first step. Jay Nogami is a sophomore public policy leadership major from Denver, Colo. Follow him on Twitter @JayTNogami.

Correction In the Friday, July 1 edition of The Daily Mississippian, we stated that Johnny DuPree was against hunting because he is a member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns. DuPree is a gun-owner, carries a permit for all of his firearms and has hunted in the past.

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Oxford Shakespeare Festival TWELFTH NIGHT (or What You Will)

by William Shakespeare directed by Joe Turner Cantú June 11, 17 and July 1, 2, 8, 9 at 8 p.m. June 12, 25 and July 10 at 2 p.m. Meek Auditorium

HENRY IV, Part One

-Family Musical-

directed by Brian Evans

by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe

by William Shakespeare

June 18 and 24 at 8 p.m. June 19 at 2 p.m. Ford Center Main Hall

CAMELOT

directed by Julia Aubrey June 23 and 25 at 8 p.m. June 26 at 2 p.m. Ford Center Main Hall

UM Box Office • 301-B Student Union, University, MS 38677 • 662-915-7411

www.olemiss.edu/depts/tickets


NEWS NEWS |

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RANDOLPH, continued from page 1

“He really seems at home on this course,” David said, prior to the start of the semifinal match. “It just seems like he fits in with this type of weather. He’s got great imagination, a great feel with wedges and he doesn’t get it out of play. I know it’s kind of hard to do that out here, but you can find some of those pot bunkers and fairway bunkers that can just kill you on a hole. He really thinks his way around before he makes every swing.” Randolph, who still hopes to make a run at a spot on the 2011 Walker Cup Team, is looking at playing in the Southern Amateur, the Porter Cup and the Western Amateur. He also hopes to qualify for the U.S. Amateur at Erin Hills.

SCHOLARSHIP, continued from page 1

Tony Webster of the Mississippi Department of Education said that when parents and students call asking what they can do about the loss of the scholarship, he tells them that they can contact their representative or senators in Washington, D.C. Webster adds that the program has not been officially eliminated but without funding, thousands of students in the U.S. will not receive the Robert C. Byrd Scholarship for the upcoming academic year.

In Review: ‘Twelfth Night’

PHOTO COURTESY JORDAN BERGER

BY AMELIA CAMURATI Editor-in-Chief

The Oxford Shakespeare Festival is coming to a close, but the best production of the season is running three more times this weekend. Filled with intrigue and deception, “Twelfth Night” is a classic comedy, but probably a classic you haven’t seen like this. Each season, the festival chooses two Shakespearean shows. One is done in typical fashion, Old English and all, while the other is tweaked to be more modern and distinct. Contemporary Shakespeare is not an easy task. Taking a completed and perfectly constructed story and reworking every detail to make it fit a different setting can work beautifully or fail miserably. If the flow is off and the changes don’t further the story, the entire feel of the production can crumble. Joe Turner Cantu’s production of “Twelfth Night” is set in the

MCEWENS, continued from page 1

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ing the University Club and joining the new team at McEwen’s. Robinson is a native of Oxford and was chosen because of his experience working at several different restaurants around Oxford over a number of years. Smythe described the restaurant as “contemporary cuisine with a Southern influence.” While we shouldn’t expect to see too many changes from the Memphis location’s Southerninfluenced contemporary cuisine, Oxford’s own local influence is inevitable. “There will be elements of our menu we will bring down there,” Smythe said. “But we will also let Jeff Robinson have his own creative input.” Janie Williams, a junior ac-

port city of Illyria (which closely resembles New Orleans) in 1915. The romantic feel of the Old South coexisting with Shakespeare’s eloquent verse takes the production to a new plane. The sweet Southern drawl melds oddly well with iambic pentameter, making this show less of a hassle to understand and a beauty to hear. Taylor Ragan plays Viola, the shipwrecked maiden who has recently lost her twin brother. She disguises herself as a man named Cesario and begins working for Orsino, the Duke of Illyria. However, it’s a bit difficult to look like a man when feminine features like hips, breasts and makeup are clearly visible. Viola is the technical lead of the show, but Ragan’s performance leaves a lot to be desired. The male supporting cast is a sight to behold and easily the highlight of the production. Thanks to four key characters, comedic relief is never lacking. counting major, has visited the Tennessee location several times before. The Memphis native said she is excited for the arrival of McEwen’s to Oxford. “It has really great Southern food and a great environment,” she said. “I’m just glad they’re bringing a little of Memphis to Oxford.” McEwen’s is ranked the No. 12 restaurant in Memphis by TripAdvisor.ca, with a rating of 5.5 out of 6 stars. McEwen’s also has received a 91 percent recommendation by customers. Smythe and Littlefield plan to open their doors by the end of July with a firm date of July 25. Once up and running , McEwen’s will serve both lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday, though they do plan on being open on Sundays when they are more established.

Rory Ledbetter, Ole Miss assistant voice and speech professor, takes the lovesick Malvolio to an over-the-top man willing to do anything for the woman he loves. His expressive facial features and exaggerated gestures keep the audience laughing from start to finish. Ledbetter’s submersion into the character is obvious onstage. Despite his obviously insane character choices, he never breaks. Michael Ewing, recent New York transplant, stole the show, hands down, with his performance of Sir Toby Belch, a drunken mess. The slurs and stumbling were spot on, yet his line delivery and the integrity of the character never falters. Ewings’s happy-go-lucky demeanor lifts the emotional atmosphere of the surrounding actors and brought a much-needed energy to many scenes. Chris Young, graduate student at Ohio University, and Christopher Young, senior theater major at Ole Miss, took their smaller roles and

transformed them into something memorable. As the roles of Fabian and Feste, respectively, both brought amazing energy and a solid understanding to their character and the show. While still blending into the background, both men made their character visible but did not detract from the focal point of the scene. Overall, Young and Young are the perfect examples of strong supporting characters. The set glues the entire concept together with the rod iron and balconies native to New Orleans. Full of levels and multiple entrances, the set brings life and depth to the production. The simplicity makes for an easy transition from one room to another without being an empty stage. With only three more shows left, it would be a tragedy to miss such a well-done comedy. To catch one of the final performances of “Twelfth Night,” visit the UM box office or the festival’s website at shakespeare.olemiss.edu.

PHOTO COURTESY MCEWEN’S


S P O R TS |

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SPORTS S P O R TS |

The Daily Mississippian

Dedication and perseverance are what separate legendary athletes and coaches from the rest. The streaks are what we remember them by -- Michael Jordan’s three-peat, Mark McGwire’s 70-home-run season and McEnroe’s 42 straight wins in 1984. Johnny Vaught’s 23 seasons coaching the Ole Miss football team is what put his name next to Judge William Hemingway’s on the stadium. But there is another local legend who has made a name for himself, though he hasn’t wielded a clipboard for 20 years or rushed for 4,000 yards. This Rebel has attended every Ole Miss football game -- more than 400 consecutive match-ups -- since 1975, and watched every game from the announcer’s booth since 1998. Just as memorialized as Vaught or the Mannings, Glen Waddle is a vital piece of the Rebel football experience as the voice of Vaught-Hemingway Stadium. Waddle set his roots in Oxford as he completed his undergraduate and law degrees from Ole Miss. He started his own practice in Jackson after law school where his love for football would soon lead him into the announcer’s booth for Mississippi High School All-Star games. “As a member of the Touchdown Club in Jackson, sitting in the stands, I thought that I could do a better job than the P.A. announcer at Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium,” Waddle said. He was given that chance in 1982. Waddle’s voice led to numerous opportunities as an announcer on the high school and National Association of Intercol-

legiate Athletics (NAIA) levels. On Rebel Radio in 1984, he was hired as a statistician for thenplay-by-play announcer Tom Stocker on Rebel Radio in 1984. It wasn’t long before Waddle became the host of his own radio show on WSLI in Jackson. After gaining a strong local reputation, Waddle left for Los Angeles to attend Sportscaster Camps of America, where he graduated in 1988. He took a giant leap in the early 1990s and began announcing on the NCAA level at the MidAmerican Conference championships and for Mississippi College basketball. In 1998, Ole Miss’ athletic director John Schaefer called on Waddle to become the voice of Rebel football. “I am very honored and privileged to be a P.A. announcer of my alma mater in the greatest conference in the nation,” Waddle said. Once Mike Bianco was named head baseball coach, Waddle took over the microphone at Swayze Field, as well. The voice of the Vaught was named the National Association of Sports Public Address Announcers Announcer of the Year in 2011. Though Waddle hasn’t written off a professional career, he said colleges and high schools “are the place to be in terms of fan passion and great events.” Admitting he borrowed his now-famous game-day phrase, “FIRST DOWN! ... OLE MISS!” from an NFL referee, Waddle said there is no doubt it caught fire among Rebel faithfuls and across the Southeastern Conference. Pay attention the next time you’re in Vaught-Hemingway. That voice you’re hearing is of a true Ole Miss legend.

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

Former Ole Miss baseball player Cody Overbeck swings the bat for the Philadelphia Phillies’ Triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs. After being promoted from the Double-A Reading Phillies on June 16, Overbeck is batting .188 with two home runs and five runs batted through his first 16 games with the IronPigs.

BY DAVID COLLIER The Daily Mississippian

On June 16, former Ole Miss baseball player Cody Overbeck received the word that he was moving his way up to the Philadelphia Phillies’ Triple-A affiliate, the Lehigh Valley IronPigs. Overbeck, who began the season with Double-A Reading Phillies, got the call after he was batting .275 with 18 home runs and 46 RBI through the first 62 games of the season. “I guess it hasn’t really sunk in yet,” Overbeck said. “But there’s a huge difference in coming from Double-A to Triple-A. It’s great. It’s an honor to be up here. It seems like everyone on my team has big league time or was in the (Major Leagues) at some point in their career, and they’re back playing here. I just realized I’m so close being here.” While at Ole Miss, Overbeck was a vital role player in the Diamond Rebels’ run to their second super regional in school history, which they lost in a three-game series to Miami. In his sophomore campaign, Overbeck hit .288 with a team-

leading 14 home runs and 58 runs batted in to help lead the Rebels to their third consecutive super regional that ended in a 2-0 series sweep at Arizona State. His third and final season in Oxford saw Overbeck ignite the Rebel bats, leading the team in batting average (.356), home runs (17) and runs batted in (59) for the season as his career ended in the championship game of the Miami Regional. After his junior season was complete, the Philadelphia Phillies gave Overbeck the best wakeup call anyone could imagine when they drafted him in the ninth round of the 2008 Major League Baseball First Year Player’s Draft. “The draft started real early,” Overbeck said. “I was actually asleep when the Phillies’ scout called me and he was talking to me. He said ‘Congratulations’ and all this stuff and I had no idea what he was talking about because it was like 8:00 in the morning. Then he finally told me the Phillies picked me in the ninth round. But I guess that’s a pretty good way to wake up. I was excited and ready to start

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playing.” Once Overbeck got to his new ballclub, it wasn’t everything he expected. “When I first got drafted, it wasn’t really what I thought it would be: coming from a big time program like Ole Miss, then getting stuck in the middle of nowhere in Pennsylvania,” he said. “So even though I was a professional baseball player, it never really felt like it because I was coming from such a good program and we got more stuff there.” However, now that Overbeck is so close to his dream of playing in the big leagues, he’s enjoying his time in Triple-A. Unlike most collegiate baseball players, Overbeck’s power has not dropped off at all playing professionally. In fact, some can argue that it has gotten even better. “I guess it has (improved),” he said. “At the same time, you play a lot more games. You only play 60 games at Ole Miss, where now, we’re (about) 70 games in. So, it’s probably a little easier to hit the same amount of home runs, if not more, if you’re able to make the transitions to the bats. I was kind of surprised that it carried over as well as it did.” Predominantly a third baseman during his time at Ole Miss, Overbeck has since transitioned into a very good first baseman. Besides becoming a more consistent hitter, Overbeck’s main focus is to be able to play multiple positions. “I’ve played the majority of the games (in the minors) at first,” he said. “I played a couple of games in the outfield and a few games at third, so hopefully, that’s where my career goes – more of a utility guy. I think that would be the best thing for me.” Thus far in his professional baseball career, Overbeck has done a great job of transitioning from the college game. But for the guy whose career began with the wake-up call of a lifetime, nothing will surprise Cody Overbeck.

The Daily Mississippian - July 5, 2011  

The Daily Mississippian - July 5, 2011

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