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Barkett vows to inspire, serve and transform. p. 4

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“Head”ing to the mound p. 8

weather 06/22/2011 thunderstorms high: 86 low: 68 06/23/2011 thunderstorms high: 90 low: 69

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011 | VOL. 100, NO. 147 | THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

OLE MISS SPORTS INFORMATION

Cliff Godwin Joins Ole Miss Baseball Coaching Staff Cliff Godwin has joined the Ole Miss baseball coaching staff as the program’s new hitting coach, head coach Mike Bianco announced on Tuesday. Godwin comes to the Rebels after spending the last three seasons as the associate head coach at the University of Central Florida, where he ran the Knights’ offense and also served as the recruiting coordinator. In his time as an assistant coach on the Division I level, Godwin has worked with 39 players who have gone on to the professional ranks. “I’m very excited to have Cliff on board,” Bianco said. “There was so much interest in the position, but it was obvious that Cliff was the best person for the job. He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in the Southeastern Conference with him to the position. We can’t wait for the players to get back in town and start fall practice with him working with our offense.” “I’d like to thank Coach Bianco and Ole Miss for giving me the opportunity to join the staff and be the hitting coach here,” Godwin said of joining the Rebels. “I’m excited about helping Ole Miss get back to Omaha and bring a national title home to Oxford. That’s always been my goal as a player and as a coach, and I’m looking forward to the opportunity to be a part of taking the Rebels back to the College World Series.” In his three years at UCF, Godwin helped put the Knights on the map with the fourth-ranked recruiting class in the country in 2010 and a top-20 class in 2011. Godwin helped lead the Knights back to the NCAA Tournament this past season for the first time since 2004. His offense led C-USA in home runs, slugging percentage, hits, runs, RBI and doubles. UCF was paced by a pair of sluggers in All-C-USA first team selection Jonathan Griffin and AllAmerica selection D.J. Hicks. Hicks was also a semifinalist for the Dick Howser Trophy, awarded annually to the nation’s top player. He also helped coach catcher Beau Taylor, who was named to the Johnny Bench Award Watch list, the award given annually to the nation’s top catcher. In 2010, Godwin was named the C-USA Assistant Coach of the Year by SEBaseball.com, as he helped the See COACH, PAGE 5

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THE UNIVERSITY

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MISSISSIPPI | SERVING OLE MISS

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OXFORD

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THEDMONLINE.COM

SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCES Pierce returns CONTINUES SEARCH FOR DEAN to Oxford for book signing BY JACOB BATTE News Editor

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

Former associate dean of the School of Applied Sciences Linda Chitwood shows students how to use equipment during class. The search for a new dean for the school is still ongoing.

BY MEGAN MASSEY The Daily Mississippian

The University of Mississippi’s School of Applied Sciences is the third largest school on campus and growing quickly. In the spring it was announced that the current dean, Linda Chitwood, would be returning to teaching full-time. Chitwood, who held the position of dean for 10 years, is returning to teaching effective July 1. In April, the search for a new

applied sciences dean had been narrowed to four candidates, and the university played host to the candidates through a series of interviews and luncheons. The candidates were Jack Wall, a retiree from Loyola University in Chicago; David Barlow, who is at Fayetteville State University; Loretta Prater, currently at Southeast Missouri State University; and Damon Andrew, a dean at Troy University. However, none of the four candidates were

chosen for the position, missing the deadline set to appoint a new dean which was set as June 1. While the university continues its search for a new dean, it has appointed Carol Boyd, chair of the university’s social work department, to be interim dean. Morris Stocks, Provost for academic affairs, recently released a statement about the ongoing search. See SCIENCE, PAGE 5

O L E M I S S S P O R T S I N F O R M AT I O N

MOORE, KIRUI NAMED CAPITAL ONE ACADEMIC ALL-AMERICANS

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

Ole Miss’ Lee Ellis Moore and Barnabas Kirui have been selected as 2011 Capital One Academic All-Americans in men’s track & field/cross country, the College Sports Information Directors of

America (CoSIDA) announced Tuesday. Moore was named to the Academic All-America first team for the second straight year. He was also a third-team honoree

in 2009. Kirui was tabbed to the second team this year after getting first-team honors in 2007. A native of Cordova, Tenn., See ALL-AMERICAN, PAGE 5

More than a decade ago, Randy Pierce sat down to write a legal thriller. He churned out four pages before his professional career took off serving the state of Mississippi in the state House of Representatives, later as a Chancery Court Judge and now an associate justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court. Nearly 13 years after starting to write Pierce is returning to Oxford, where he received his Juris Doctorate from the Ole Miss Law School in 1997, to have a book signing for his first novel, “Pain Unforgiven.” The book signing will take place at 5 p.m. today at Square Books. When Pierce made it to the Supreme Court he decided to finish what he had started. “I don’t have a lot of hobbies. I don’t hunt, fish, play golf or anything like that,” Pierce said. “I decided that instead of working all of the time to get up in the mornings and pick those four pages up and go from there.” The story is about an Atlanta lawyer, Grant Hicks, going back to his home in Greene county, where Pierce grew up and having to face things that troubled him when he was growing up. “The book takes on issues that we deal with everyday that cause us strife,” Pierce said. “Grant ultimately has to face his past when he comes home.” Pierce said that he got most of his inspiration from his time working as a judge. “Over the years I have seen family strife, whether it be in the court room or families that have difficulty with the relationship of the mother and the dauhgter or the father and the son,” Pierce said. “I’ve seen those play out and often times those are the toughest relationships to repair. So this book kind of takes that on a bit.” Pierce said that he used to envision himself opening up the first box of books and having “euphoric feeling” but that it was such a slow process that he feels that the book has always See BOOK, PAGE 5


OPINION O P IN I O N |

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AMELIA CAMURATI editor-in-chief

JACOB BATTE news editor

BY JOSH CLARK

JON MOSBY opinion editor

Senior Cartoonist

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JASMINE PHILLIPS business manager KEATON BREWER ALEX PENCE

account executives SARA LOWREY

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S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser

A WORLD OF DIVERSITY BY ADHAM HAGAG Columnist

T H E

One of the things that interested me since I joined Ole Miss was the number of diverse cultures you can see in one place. When you walk around campus, you can take a glimpse of nearly every place in the world, and you will meet people from countries you barely know anything about. I have always liked to know more about different cultures. I always dreamt of visiting places like China or India. When I came to Oxford I didn’t know that my dream would – almost – come true. One thing that excited me was that I became best friends with one of those people, an Indian

student. It excites me when I think that when we talk to each other, neither of us is speaking in his native language. But still we are able to communicate perfectly. We are adherents of two different religions, but each of us respects the other’s beliefs and traditions. We come from two very different worlds, but still we became very good friends. Now, although he has left to work in California, we still nearly every day. Through a year in Ole Miss, I have met people form India, China, Russia, Europe and Africa. People different in color, religion and who speak different languag-

es. What I found out is that although we may be different in how we look or what we believe, we still have many things in common. You just have to look inside people to see how similar we could be. And if you think you will gain nothing from knowing other cultures or hanging around with people from different countries, then I am sad to tell you that you are missing a lot. You will never know yourself without really knowing what the world you live in is like. To build a correct view of the world, you should know how others see it. To build this world

view, it’s not just necessary for you to find people who share the same background as you, but also those who hold different cultural heritage. So, I would say that anytime you get the chance to be around people from other cultures, you should make the best out of it. Talk with them about different topics. Discuss issues that you are interested in. Listen carefully to what they say and what their opinions are. Of course, many of them will have opinions that are different from yours. That is because they are looking at the same issue from a different perspective.

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall Main Number: 662.915.5503 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year, and Tuesday through Friday during the summer. Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated. Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

Their different views can further enhance your opinions on issues you had partial knowledge about. Always keep in mind that God created us equal. We may differ on the outside but we are so similar on the inside. When you laugh at someone’s joke, you do not ask about his or her religion first. And when you mourn a dear person, you do not think of whether he or she was black or white.

Adham Hagag is a PhD student in electrical engineering from Egypt. Follow him on Twitter @AdhamHagag.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

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HI, I’M A (MUSIC) ADDICT BY LANCE INGRAM Columnist

Hi, my name is Lance and I’m an addict. I bought my first CD when I was 8 years old and it’s only gotten worse since then. One year my New Year’s resolution was to double my music collection. I bought over 200 CDs in a 12-month period. The addiction hasn’t stopped since then either. I’ve begun collecting vinyl records after a friend gave me a box full of records that his family didn’t use anymore and that started my collection, or should I say addiction. It’s safe to say I’m addicted to purchasing music and am show no signs of slowing

down. Yes, I’m fully aware of illegal downloading and even more aware of how terrible the sound quality is. Since moving to Oxford though, I’ve been having some dry spells. There is nowhere in this town to purchase good music! I either have to go home, drive to Memphis or (dare I say) order it from the Internet. Oxford is a college town and college students are some of the most musically inclined people on the planet, yet this town is depriving them of that one thing that they love. I remember when I first moved here there was one place to buy music but it

closed down about four months after I got here. Since then, I’ve had to resort to buying music from the Internet. I love the Internet because you can find anything you want but that’s taking away half the fun! Browsing through a music store for hours looking for that one album you’ve been seeking for weeks then finally discovering it in the bottom of a pile of used albums is the best feeling in the world. The captain finally discovers his treasure! There is no fun in that on the Internet. You type in the name of the artist you’re looking for then, bam,

Creating Creativity

BY ADAM GANUCHEAU Columnist

In the United States today, it seems that we are being inhibited from being creative. In President Obama’s State of the Union address in January, he addressed the fact that we have slacked off in the creativity department. Maybe it is the culture of today, maybe it is the backseat approach that Americans are so used to taking or maybe it is sheer laziness. Whatever the problem is, we need to find a solution. In order to find the solution, we must address the problem. What inhibits our creativity? Limitations. It is natural to be creative because we are inhibited every single day. Limitations produce creativity — if there are rules that prevent us from doing something we enjoy, we become creative and address the issue by thinking creatively. We live in a world of limitations — rules and guidelines are inevitably what we must deal with wherever we go. While limitations inhibit our creativity, they produce creativity as well. Governmental regulation is a major topic of interest with the American people today. We blame our leaders for not caring

about our livelihoods and we bash leaders for trying to run the country into the ground. Instead of whining about things we cannot control, maybe we should think outside the box; use our intelligence to counter the government’s “stupidity.” Recently, I have thought about creativity in a unique way. There is a pothole in my road that could easily damage cars that drive over it. I called my councilman and he informed me that there was not enough in the budget to fix every pothole in the county. I told a neighbor about the problem and we decided to ask people that drive around the pothole on a daily basis to chip in for the repair. The problem will be solved because of our creativity. Instead of writing a harshly-worded letter to a higher governmental agency, we put our brains together and solved the problem. We need more of this sort of creativity in our country today. If you have a disorderly neighbor and you do not want to involve police, do not let limitations get in your way. I am not condoning any rule-breaking, but

maybe some rule-bending. It’s our job to figure out ways to solve problems creatively. There are creativity seminars designed to help us think outside the box. At Ole Miss, we have many courses that are designed to influence creativity. Artistic creativity is used as a stress reliever for many people. Take a basic art course and learn how to use a brush to express you creativity. Take a music course to enhance your musical creativity. Take a dance or exercise course. All these are easy ways to become creatively-minded people. My generation has become lazy and worthless. Thinking creatively is a good first step to take to avoid driving our country into the ground. Maybe our simple creative thinking will become more complex creative thinking, and it will lead to something monumental. Creativity is the key to the success of our country and our generation. Let’s find the solution to our problems. Adam Ganucheau is a journalism major from Hazlehurst, Miss. Follow him on Twitter @GanucheauAdam.

you’re done. Some people may say that the tangible album is a dying thing; heck, my favorite record store in Jackson closed just two weeks ago. However, during its final week, every time I’d go patrons were telling the owners how much the store meant to them and it got deep. There will always be a group of music nerds who are willing to go out of their way to obtain their favorite releases. Music enthusiasts will never die out, like the dinosaurs or hippies did. As of right now, I only have a few weeks left in this wonderful town and I want nothing more than

to be able to invest countless dollars into my growing collection of albums before I leave. I know deep in my heart there is an entrepreneur out there who wants to change this and steal all of my money; I’ll gladly give it to them if they’ll just open a music store. Hopefully, one day when I’m visiting my kid at Ole Miss I’ll be able to stop by a flourishing record store and pick-up a classic album on vinyl. Lance Ingram is a undergraduate student from Brandon, Miss. E-mail him


NEWS NEWS |

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MISS UNIVERSITY PREPS FOR MISS MISSISSIPPI BY KELSEY DOCKERY

Inspire. Serve. Transform. It’s funny how three simple words can mean so much to one person. As current Miss University Katherine Barkett prepares for the Miss Mississippi pageant on June 29, these are not only the words she lives by — they are the words that have shaped her pageant career. For Barkett, inspire, serve and transform are not just words, they are a part of who she is. She is dedicated to serving the community and promoting volunteerism to others. Through countless volunteer efforts and with much dedication, after the fourth time competing, Barkett was named Miss University. “The fourth time is the charm ... not the third,” Barkett said. Her goal is to promote a spirit of service throughout the state of Mississippi, and not only through fundraising. Her purpose is to further educate students and the community about the importance of giving back and the many volunteer opportunities that exist within the city of Oxford and Lafayette County.

To further instill the importance of service in young children, she organized a bandage drive with the Willie Price Nursery School at Ole Miss, where the children brought boxes of bandages with their favorite cartoons, Disney characters, colors and shapes on them. The bandages were donated to the Blair E. Batson Children’s hospital in Jackson, the only hospital in Mississippi supported by the Children’s Miracle Network. “I thought it was a great way to teach the children there that they can volunteer even though they’re so young because I think that’s a part of community service,” Barkett said. “I wanted to explain to them that their service and their gifts were going to be given to other children their age in need.” Barkett was also on the steering committee for The Big Event held in March. She was appointed registration and media coordinator. “Never in a million years did I think that all these college students would sign up and give their time on a Saturday in the pouring rain to serve our community,” Barkett said. Other volunteer work Barkett

has been involved with throughout the year includes the Greg Smith Memorial Golf Tournament, honoring an Ole Miss football fan who was killed in a hit-and-run accident during the Ole Miss vs. Alabama football game in Tuscaloosa, Ala., in 2010. She coordinated the silent auction and collected donations by driving around in a golf cart during the tournament. Barkett also coordinated a silent auction to benefit the Blair E. Batson Children’s Hospital at her trunk show Tuesday. Donations came from Ole Miss Catering, the Gertrude C. Ford Center, University Florist, the Ole Miss bookstore, the Ole Miss Golf Course and several businesses around Oxford. During the trunk show, Barkett previewed her many wardrobe changes and her talent selection. Her swimsuit is coral with gold trim and was custom made by Tricia Copeland. Her talent ensemble is a strapless velvet pantsuit adorned with a leopard train and accented by peacock feathers, a perfect compliment to her song choice, “The Circle of Life.”

She also previewed many evening gowns, but the most stunning was her competition gown. The corset bodice is embellished with Swarovski crystals. It has a sweetheart neckline, shoulder details and a silk buttercream skirt. As former Miss University, Tara Tutor said, “It takes a village to raise a child but it takes 10 villages to raise a pageant girl.” As the date of the Miss Mississippi pageant draws near, Barkett is thankful for all the support she has been given from her family and friends. “It takes a lot or work, a lot of hard work and a lot of dedication and a lot of perseverance,” Barkett said. “I am so thankful that someone told me to come back and try it one more time and that was Jennifer Taylor; I would not be here without her encouraging me to do it.” Her last words of encouragement came from her the chorus of her talent song, “‘Til we find our place on the path unwinding in the circle of life,’” Barkett said. “I honestly hope every one of you finds happiness and joy in all life’s journeys.”

next season. “We all want to get some time on the mound and do what we can to help out next season,” Laxer said. “We’re all excited to come up there and use our talents to help Ole Miss.” Buchanan, a 6’8,” 240-pound right-hander from Biloxi, went in the 19th round to the Washington Nationals. He is the highest-ranked pitcher in the incoming class at No. 137, according to Baseball America. “Anything can happen but more than likely, (Oxford’s) where I’m going to be,” Buchanan said. He posted a 2.04 ERA with a 7-3 record and 77 strikeouts in 55 in-

nings. He also led Biloxi to a 20-8 record and the 6A state playoffs. A two-sport standout, Buchanan also played quarterback and threw for 1,485 yards and 10 touchdowns for Biloxi last season. “I know a lot of guys that are coming in,” Buchanan said. “They’re really talented. We’re all really excited about getting to Oxford. And doing all we can to get Ole Miss to Omaha.” The Nationals then selected another Ole Miss signee, Laxer, in the 20th round. Laxer, a 6-foot, 180-pound right-hander from Madison, had an undefeated 11-0 record with a 2.06 ERA and 110 strikeouts in 68 innings. Behind

Laxer’s arm, Madison Central reached back-to-back 6A state semifinals the past two seasons. “My plans, as of right now, remains the same,” Laxer said. “I’m coming to Ole Miss this summer. And I can’t explain my excitement about coming up here. When it comes to the Nationals, I have talked to them very briefly. I get calls, maybe once a week from the Nationals.” Chavez, a junior-college transfer from Sacramento, Calif., was the first signee taken on day three of the draft, coming off the board in the 32nd round to the Minnesota Twins. Chavez, a 6’3,” 190-pound left-hander, said not a lot has hap-

pened with the Twins since being drafted and he continues to weigh his options. “My thought process (is that) school is always a safer bet,” Chavez said. “You know what you’re getting when you go to school; you’re getting an education and a chance to play in the Southeastern Conference. I’m leaning toward school.” As a freshman at St. Mary’s (Calif.) College in 2010, Chavez appeared in only 18 games – two games started – and went 1-1 with a 6.45 ERA and 20 strikeouts in 26 and one-third innings. Last season, at American River (Calif.) Junior College, he started seven games and went 1-4 with 28 strikeouts in 42 innings. “As far as the decision, it’s tough to say,” Chavez said. “I’ve been planning on going to Ole Miss. You never know how things are going to work out with the draft. Right now, my plans are to step in and be a Rebel.” Ellis, a 6’5,” 195-pound righthander from Birmingham, Ala., was drafted in the 50th and final round to the Los Angeles Dodgers. He went 4-3 with a 2.97 ERA and 50 strikeouts in 37 and two-thirds innings and led Spain Park High School to a 37-14 record, an area title and the 6A state quarterfinals last season. Mulholland, an undrafted signee from IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., is the wildcard of the group. Mulholland, a 6’4,” 200-pound right-hander, is more than a year removed from Tommy John surgery and missed all of 2010 rehabbing and recovering from a right elbow injury. Because of the injury, his signing was also pushed back to be included in this year’s recruiting class.

Design Editor

PETRE THOMAS| The Daily Mississippian

PITCHING,

continued from page 8

expected to be weekend starters, while Huber will likely resume his closing duties next season. The lack of experience and returning pitchers leaves holes in the rotation and bullpen wide open for next season, particularly for pitchers from this year’s heralded incoming recruiting class. Four pitching signees — Hawtin Buchanan, Josh Laxer, Dylan Chavez and Chris Ellis — were also selected in the MLB draft earlier this month, while another, Casey Mulholland, will also be in the mix

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NEWS S P O R TS |

COACH,

continued from page 1

Knights hit a school record and CUSA record .343 clip. The squad also posted 78 home runs and a .538 slugging percentage, both school records. That season, Godwin also coached Chris Duffy to a .447 average (up from a career average of .283 in the previous three seasons) as the outfielder turned in an .850 slugging percentage with 21 home runs and 81 RBI to set UCF records in both categories. Duffy was named a finalist for the Golden Spikes Award and was named an All-America selection while claiming first team All-C-USA honors. Godwin also coached Chris Taladay to C-USA Freshman of the Year honors. Taladay also earned Freshman All-America honors along with Ryan Breen. Godwin played at East Carolina from 1997-2001 and helped the Pirates claim a pair of CAA Tournament titles as he served three years as the team captain. He helped lead East Carolina to three NCAA Regionals and a 2001 NCAA Super Regional berth. His senior season, he claimed first team All-Conference and All-East Region honors while being selected as a two-time Academic All-American. After finishing his collegiate career, Godwin spent two seasons

BOOK,

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been with him. “I didn’t have the moment where I popped a cork of champagne and thought this was it,” Pierce said. “But I was very happy with the fact that these characters were essentially born and people were getting to meet them. I have been so pleased with the readers that have sent me emails or have called me or have made comments on the book’s Facebook page. It’s been really cool.” Pierce can remember going to Square Books when he was a law student at Ole Miss. “John Grisham has been there

playing professionally with the Gateway Grizzlies in the Frontier League before getting back into the coaching ranks as an assistant coach at Kinston High School in 2003. Since then, he has continued to climb the coaching ranks with stops at UNC-Wilmington, Vanderbilt, Notre Dame, LSU and most recently his three years at Central Florida. Godwin made a splash immediately in the coaching ranks, helping lead UNC-Wilmington to the program’s first Colonial Athletic Association Championship and an appearance in the 2004 NCAA Regional Championship. From there, Godwin moved to Vanderbilt where he served as the Commodores’ Director of Baseball Operations for two seasons before moving to Notre Dame as an assistant coach under then head coach Paul Manieri for the 2006 season. As a part of the Notre Dame coaching staff, Godwin helped the Fighting Irish hit at a .313 clip and claim the Big East Tournament Title to go along with a berth in the NCAA Lexington Regional. He coached Craig Cooper to All-America and Big East Player of the Year honors on the way to becoming a seventh-round draft pick. Prior to coming to UCF, Godwin helped the LSU offense hit .306 in 2008 with 100 homers and 95 stolen bases. The squad recorded at least 10 runs in a game 20 times and

posted a .509 slugging percentage. Towards the end of the season and including the NCAA Tournament, LSU posted a 23-game winning streak en route to a trip to Omaha and the College World Series. The Tigers were paced by Baseball America First Team All-American Blake Dean, who batted .353 and had 73 RBI. The sophomore was the NCAA Baton Rouge Regional Most Outstanding Player and the SEC Tournament Most Valuable Player. Meanwhile, first baseman Matt Clark, who led the nation with 28 dingers, went in the 12th round of the 2008 MLB Draft. Godwin was also responsible for developing LSU catcher Micah Gibbs into a 2008 Freshman All-American for the Tigers. Gibbs eventually served as the starting catcher for the United States National Team that went undefeated and took gold at the 2008 World Championships, and he later was drafted in the third round of the 2010 MLB Draft. Godwin also mentored a pair of LSU hitters who were selected in the top two rounds of the 2009 draft, as Jared Mitchell was taken in the first round and DJ LeMahieu heard his name called in the second round. Godwin helped build the top ranked recruiting class in the nation in 2007 for LSU, according to Collegiate Baseball magazine. That class featured nine signees selected in that season’s MLB Draft.

and so many noted writers, it’s a special place,” Pierce said. Pierce said that having a book signing at Square Books is “pretty cool,” saying that being there will represent the finished product. “I must admit the only time I’ve stopped and thought, ‘You know what? I’ve published a novel,’ is when I realized that I was going to have a book signing at Square Books,” Pierce said. “Not only is there a novel out there, but this guy from Greene county is going to have a book signing at Square Books.” Pierce said that he has plans set for two books. One is going to be a “Mississippi political thriller, comedy, drama all tied

up in one.” Because of the positive feedback that Pierce has received about his first novel, he also plans to bring back Grant Hicks in another novel. While Pierce acknowledges that “Pain Unforgiven” did not end up like the legal thriller that he had in mind when he first began writing, he does want the next Grant Hicks book to be more of a legal thriller. “My goal all along was to tell the story that is best told in ‘Pain Unforgiven,’ but then to continue on and have him with another story line,” Pierce said. “I have had enough positive feedback to know that I do plan on bringing him back in another novel.”

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SCIENCE,

ALL-AMERICAN,

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“Several months ago, I appointed a search committee to lead our efforts to identify the next dean of the School of Applied Sciences,” Stocks said in a statement. “The committee worked carefully to identify four candidates for the position. Each of these four candidates visited our campus and participated in a comprehensive interview process. At the conclusion of these interviews, the search committee recommended to me the name of one candidate for the dean position. After a second round of interviews with the recommended candidate, it was clear that the candidate possessed many strengths and was not an appropriate match for the School and our institution at this point in time. “It is critically important that we identify, recruit and hire an outstanding dean for the School of Applied Sciences. The School is one of fastest growing academic units on our campus with a demonstrated, strong commitment to the multi-faceted mission of our university. I am pleased that Dr. Carol Boyd, a qualified leader with a successful track record, has agreed to serve the school in an interim capacity while we conduct a search for the new dean,” Stocks said. Dr. Boyd said that she has “no clue” whether or not she will be considered for the dean position. When asked whether or not she would be interested in the job if offered, Boyd laughed and answered, “I won’t know until I do my year.” She went on to explain that she would need to “get her feet wet first” and then determine whether or not the position would be a good fit for her. The Provost did not comment on how the search is going now or whether or not Dr. Boyd is being considered for the position.

Moore graduated in May after compiling a 3.94 GPA as a biology major with a chemistry minor. He was voted the 2011 SEC Men’s Track & Field Scholar-Athlete of the Year by the league coaches and plans to attend medical school with the help of several different prestigious scholarships. The Cordova, Tenn., native received the Taylor Medal, which is the highest academic honor a student can receive at the University of Mississippi, and he was recently awarded a prestigious NCAA postgraduate scholarship for his future studies. On the track this year, Moore was the SEC champion in the 400 meter hurdles and placed sixth in the event at the NCAA Outdoor Championships to earn All-America first team honors. He helped the Rebel men to a No. 19 final national ranking. Kirui, a native of Litein, Kenya, earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting last year with a 3.40 cumulative GPA. He began working toward a master’s in accounting in the fall of 2010 while competing in his final cross country season and boasts a 3.33 GPA in graduate school. He was also awarded a prestigious NCAA postgraduate scholarship this year. Kirui capped off his Rebel career with his third SEC Cross Country Championship in 2010. His career accomplishments also include an NCAA outdoor track and field title in the 3,000-meter steeplechase, four SEC track and field individual titles, two SEC Outdoor Runner of the Year awards and three SEC Cross Country Athlete of the Year awards. He was a two-time AllAmerican and holds the majority of Ole Miss’ record times for longdistance events.


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STEPHEN HEAD MAKES A MOVE TO THE MOUND

PHOTO COURTESY OLE MISS SPORTS INFORMATION

Stephen Head, a two-way baseball standout from Ole Miss, makes a return to professional baseball as pitcher. After reaching Triple-A as a hitter, he moved to the mound and currently plays for the Tri-City Dust Devils, an affiliate of the Colorado Rockies.

BY DAVID COLLIER The Daily Mississippian

Over his collegiate career at Ole Miss, former baseball standout Stephen Head helped lead the Rebels, both at the plate and on the mound, but after spending six years in the minor league system as a position player, Head decided it was time for a change. This season, he started from scratch as he now focuses solely on pitching. “With my career as a hitter, I was kind of stuck in a gray area in

Triple-A (with the Columbus Clippers, a Cleveland Indians affiliate) being a guy who wasn’t really a prospect anymore because of my age and not having any big league time,” Head said. “I realized I was going to be the first one out the door. I knew I could pitch. Obviously, I did in college (at Ole Miss), so I was like, ‘I’m just going to get after it and dedicate this whole past offseason to pitching.’” Throughout his years in the minors, Head saw guys make it to the major leagues that he knew he could pitch just as well as if not bet-

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ter than. “I saw a ton of guys go the big leagues, (especially) left-handed pitchers that had similar stuff (as myself),” Head said. “So, I dedicated myself, and a guy who scouted Ole Miss games all the time and signed Seth Smith knew I could pitch. So he got me a shot with the Rockies and they signed me.” Head is currently on the roster for the Tri-City Dust Devils, the Class A Short-Season affiliate of the Colorado Rockies, and although he has proven his ability on the baseball diamond time and time again, Head isn’t worried about the actual pitching as much as he is about how to pitch correctly. “Pitching was always really natural to me, so getting back on the

mound and becoming a pitcher wasn’t all that difficult,” he said. But learning all the little things and actually learning how to pitch with the mechanics and those kinds of things are the things that I am really learning now.” Another aspect of being a professional pitcher Head had to get accustomed to was throwing nearly every day in the offseason. “It is a completely different world (for a pitcher) in pro ball than in college,” he said. “College gets three or four days a week where you don’t play. (In) pro ball, you get (basically) four days a year. So the adjustment to being able to throw every day is the most difficult thing.” The season for Head and the Dust Devils began Sunday, and it was not long before Head was called upon to see if his hard work in the offseason had paid off. In his first outing, Head gave up no runs on one hit with five strikeouts in three innings pitched. He used his experiences of pitching in the Southeastern Conference to get him ready for his first appearance as a professional pitcher. “That was my first legitimate professional game experience (as a pitcher),” he said. “It went well. I was effective with just my fastball and changeup. Those were the only two pitches I threw, and I threw them for strikes. “Pitching (in the SEC) has given me the opportunity to be more successful right out of the gates (this season). I really wasn’t that nervous because I had pitched so much in the past. So my nerves weren’t really an issue. I just focused on throwing strikes, and I was able to get

through those three innings.” Head hopes to rekindle the success he had while wearing the red and blue of Ole Miss and make it to the major leagues. During his tenure at Ole Miss, Head set numerous school records on his way to being named an AllAmerican three different times, the most for anyone in school history. After batting a team high .337 and recording a school-record 13 saves on the mound in his freshman season, Head was named National Freshman of the Year by Collegiate Baseball. In 2005, Head helped the Rebels to a 48-20 record and reach their first ever appearance in a Super Regional, which they lost in a heartpounding three-game series to eventual national champion, Texas. In 2006, Head’s final season in Oxford, he batted .331 with 18 home runs and 68 RBI and had a record of 7-3 with eight saves and an ERA of 2.54. He also led Ole Miss back to the Super Regionals, which they lost in three games to Miami (FL). Although Head and the Rebels came up just short in 2005 and 2006, he believes there is a bright future for Ole Miss baseball despite the lackluster 2011 season. “It’s just a matter of time before (Ole Miss) turns it around,” Head said. “It could be as early as next year. Coach Bianco does a great job. I have a lot of respect for him and what he did for me and my career. I wish them the best. They could come out next year and win 48 games.” As for the timetable for Head to make it as a big-time professional pitcher, he said it best. “It’s just a matter of time.”

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AN EARLY LOOK AT NEXT YEAR’S PITCHING STAFF

featuring

Josh Laxer, a 6-foot, 180-pound right-hander from Madison Central, is one heralded signee in the incoming recruiting. He posted an undefeated 11-0 record with a 2.06 ERA and led his team to back-toback 6A state semifinals the past two seasons.

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BY AUSTIN MILLER Sports Editor

Earlier this month, six Ole Miss players were selected in the Major League Baseball First Year Player draft, including the entire weekend rotation. Friday night starter Matt Crouse, a 24th-round pick of the Detroit Tigers, and Sunday night starter Austin Wright, an eighth round pick of the Philadelphia Phillies,

now pitch in the New York — son. Penn League (Short-Season A). SatWahl finished with four saves, a urday night starter David Goforth, 4.80 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 30 taken in the seventh round by the innings, while Mayers, mostly in Milwaukee Brewers, has not yet middle relief, posted a 5.10 ERA signed a professional contract, but with 27 strikeouts in 30 innings is expected to do so before the Aug. last season. Huber had a 3.54 and 15 deadline. 3.60 ERA the past two seasons, Among the returning pitchers, respectively, including a team-high rising sophomores Bobby Wahl, 10 saves as a freshman. Mike Mayers and rising junior Wahl and maybe Mayers are Brett Huber saw the most significant time on the mound last sea- See PITCHING, PAGE 4

The Daily Mississippian - June 22, 2011  

The Daily Mississippian - June 22, 2011