Issuu on Google+

Criminals High and Low in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part I Shakespeare Symposium today at 4 p.m at The

Oxford Shakespeare Festival

Kennedy reacts to SEC spring meetings p. 8

Henry IV: Photos & Review p. 5

Depot, followed by a reception. The event is free and open to the public.

T H E

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011 | VOL. 100, NO. 146 | THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF

MISSISSIPPI | SERVING OLE MISS

AND

OXFORD

SINCE

1911 |

THEDMONLINE.COM

‘Gear Up’ gives kids confidence Ole Miss Grants

Exclusive Patent Rights to ChromaDex Corp. BY MATTHEW NEEB The Daily Mississippian

PETRE THOMAS | The Daily Mississippian

Gear Up director Ryan Whittington and counselor Kermit Tyler work with students from across Mississippi for one week in both math and English. Gear Up is a federally funded program for rising high school sophomores interested in higher education.

BY AMELIA CAMURATI Editor-in-chief

Education is at an all-time low in Mississippi, but some people are going out of their way to help students stay in school and believe they can go to college. Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs, more commonly known as Gear Up, is a federally funded program for rising high school sophomores with a goal to “promote a higher learning experience by showing students that it is attainable and a necessary part of their journeys to achieve their own personal goals,” said Ryan Whittington, director of Gear Up. Serving 41 schools in 20 districts across Mississippi, Gear Up has helped over 9,000 students statewide since enacted by Congress in 1998. Thanks to a grant from

the United States Department of Education, many scholarships are offered, giving more students the opportunity to experience a college setting despite their financial situation. The program is year-round and sponsors eight summer academies across the state at the University of Southern Mississippi, Alcorn State University and Mississippi Valley State University, among others. The University of Mississippi and the Division of Outreach are hosting three of the Gear Up summer academies in June, two in math and one in English. More than 130 students will reside in the Luckyday Residential College for one week while learning not just academics, but life lessons and self-confidence to help them far beyond the classroom. Whittington has seen the im-

pact the program has had on the students from beginning to end. “While they are only on campus for a week, it is very rewarding to see the changes that occur over that short period of time,” he said. “Not only are they more comfortable with the subject material, but they are more confident both socially and academically.” Students are on a rigorous schedule that includes a wake-up call at 6 a.m. every day and seven hours of classroom time. They also have a daily “exploring session,” where they learn about admissions, financial aid and other departments on campus. Etoshia Butler, senior biology and psychology major, attended summer programs in high school and understands the importance of getting a jump-start on college. See GEAR UP, PAGE 4

The University of Mississippi pharmacy department is continuing to make headlines this year. The department at UM Medical Center in Jackson is currently running a clinical study on the possible health benefits of Pterostilbene, a “potent antioxidant” that is found naturally in the skin of berries like grapes and blueberries. It is chemically related to resveratrol, a stilbenoid found in the skin of red grapes and is believed to be the cause for the health advantages found in drinking wine. Resveratrol is the basis of the French Paradox, which is the claim that the high cholesterol diets of the French is offset by their high consumption of wine. Pterostilbene has shown pre-clinical benefits in the areas of cardiovascular health, glucose levels, breast cancer, diabetes, LDL cholesterol and cognitive function. Dr. Agnes Rimando of the USDA research branch ARS first discovered the possible benefits of Pterostilbene through testing its effects on animals. She, in partnership with University of Mississippi

scientists, makes up the team that is currently running clinical studies in Jackson. These studies are the first human testings with the antioxidant, and it is concentrating specifically on Pterostilbene’s effect on lowering blood pressure, cholesterol and oxidative stress. The clinical study is a natural product research and is formatted to be a double-blinded, placebo, controlled, prospective study. Since Pterostilbene has shown great promise of producing positive results before even entering the clinical test, the study’s aim is to ultimately understand to what extent can Pterostilbene be beneficial to our health. Leading the clinical studies from the university is Dr. Daniel Riche, an assistant professor of pharmacy practice. “The thought process is that there is pleiotropic effects of the product,” he said. “And that can include possible metabolic benefits.” This research by the university about the benefits of Pterostilbene has not gone unnoticed. Last Monday, ChromaDex Coropration announced that it had come to an agreement with the university for the exclusive, worldwide patents See CHROMADEX, PAGE 4

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY PETRE THOMAS| The Daily Mississippian


OPINION O P IN I O N |

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 2

AMELIA CAMURATI editor-in-chief

JACOB BATTE news editor

BY JOSH CLARK

JON MOSBY opinion editor

Cartoonist

AUSTIN MILLER sports editor PETRE THOMAS photography editor NICK TOCE visuals editor KELSEY DOCKERY design editor LAUREN SMITH copy chief

JASMINE PHILLIPS business manager KEATON BREWER ALEX PENCE

account executives SARA LOWREY

creative assistant

S. GALE DENLEY STUDENT MEDIA CENTER:

PATRICIA THOMPSON director and faculty adviser UWIRE

Illegal immigrants should not be rewarded for ignoring laws BY GIOVANNI OSORIO Daily Trojan

T H E

Eric Balderas, an illegal immigrant studying at Harvard University, faced deportation one year ago. University of Texas at Brownsville alumnus José Arturo Guerra faced deportation last month while in his last year of school. In both cases, the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement decided not to pursue deportation. Rather than allowing ICE to selectively prosecute undocumented students, it’s time for the U.S. to implement legislation to resolve the country’s problem with illegal immigration and higher education. The Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors Act, which has been reintroduced to Congress after failing to pass in December, is not the answer. The DREAM Act would provide a pathway to certain qualified young undocumented individuals toward legal residency, and potentially citizenship, by either enlisting in the military or going to college.

Legislation like the DREAM Act encourages illegal immigration. Parents bring their children to the U.S. with the intention of taking advantage of the rights given to the country’s citizens and legal residents. Provisions provided by bills like the DREAM Act reward people for not following the law. Rewards aren’t usually given to those who choose to ignore laws. An increase in illegal immigration could occur after citizens of other countries see that illegal aliens are given privileges. Currently 12 states, including California, allow illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition. In terms of aiding those students in college, this is as far as the government should go. Undocumented students should not receive state and federal aid. According to USC’s financial aid website, international students at USC receive aid only through merit scholarships. If international students who go through legal pro-

cess to receive a student visa cannot receive federal aid, then certainly neither should people who do not go through legal channels. Still, to extend aid to undocumented immigrant students, AB 131 has been introduced to the California Senate Education Committee. If passed, it would allow those students to become eligible for state financial aid, like Cal Grants and University of California grants. Like parents of other college students, the parents of undocumented immigrant students should assume the responsibility of getting their children through college. Illegal immigrant parents knew it would not be easy to live in another country without going through legal means. These are the consequences of those actions. Even if the student graduates before being deported, he or she will face challenges in obtaining employment. They would be in a worse position than a gradu-

D A I L Y

MISSISSIPPIAN

The University of Mississippi S. Gale Denley Student Media Center 201 Bishop Hall Main Number: 662.915.5503 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The Daily Mississippian is published daily Monday through Friday during the academic year, and Tuesday through Friday during the summer. Contents do not represent the official opinions of the university or The Daily Mississippian unless specifically indicated. Letters are welcome, but may be edited for clarity, space or libel. ISSN 1077-8667

ated international student. Illegal immigration must stop being encouraged. Deportation needs to begin. But deporting top students, such as Balderas, might mean losing students who could benefit the U.S. To solve this, illegal immigrant students could be allowed to apply for a student visa without having first to go back to his or her country of citizenship. They would be granted the same status as other international students and receive the same benefits. These students are suffering because of the actions of their parents. But the DREAM Act, and legislation like it, is not the solution to the effects of illegal immigration on students. They should not receive state and federal aid unless it is also given to international students. They should not be rewarded for laws broken when others abide by the law. Thus, the best solution is for international students to be granted student visas.

The Daily Mississippian welcomes all comments. Please send a letter to the editor addressed to The Daily Mississippian, 201 Bishop Hall, University, MS, 38677 or send an e-mail to dmeditor@gmail.com. Letters should be typed, double-spaced and no longer than 300 words. Third party letters and those bearing pseudonyms, pen names or “name withheld” will not be published. Publication is limited to one letter per individual per calendar month. Student submissions must include grade classification and major. All submissions must be turned in at least three days in advance of date of desired publication.

ARVINDER SINGH KANG manager of media technology DYLAN PARKER creative/technical supervisor DARREL JORDAN chief engineer MELANIE WADKINS advertising manager STEPHEN GOFORTH broadcast manager AMY SAXTON administrative assistant


OPINION O P IN I O N |

Casey Anthony’s trial spectacle BY BRITTANY SHARKEY Columnist

The trial of Casey Anthony, the mother accused of murdering her 2-year-old daughter Caylee, is playing out like something one would see in the fictitious courtrooms of procedural TV shows. From the scientifically advanced testimony to the emotional outbursts, this trial is becoming an entertaining spectacle. The problem is that while it may keep viewers tuning in for updates, there are also many lives that hinge upon the outcome of this trial. If Anthony is found guilty, she could face the death penalty. Given recent theatrics in the courtroom, it seems as though Anthony’s legal team has forgotten this fact. When the opening statements were made, the prosecution predictably highlighted their largely circumstantial evidence with a day-by-day outline of Caylee’s disappearance. Then it was Anthony’s attorney Jose Baez’s turn to address the court. He then proceeded with the opening statement “heard ‘round the world.” Baez alleged that Caylee had drowned in the family pool and that Anthony and her parents disposed of the body. The other bombshell Baez dropped in that statement was that Anthony suffered abuse early in her life at the hands of her father and brother, which created longterm mental and emotional issues that explain her strange behavior in the months after Caylee’s disappearance. This opening statement makes me question if Baez is getting his legal strategy from those hotshot lawyers on “Law & Order” or one of its 17 spin-offs. In a case with no real smoking gun, what was Baez doing? The truth is, Baez himself may not even know what he’s doing. If one does some digging into Baez’s record, you will find that he was not the first attorney to represent Anthony. Two prior attorneys quit Anthony’s defense, citing prohibitively expensive travel costs. That excuse seems about as likely as Jeremy Piven’s mercury poisoning. Working on a case with this kind of exposure, especially if it was successfully defended, could skyrocket a lawyer’s career. Enter Jose Baez, a relatively unknown local criminal defense attorney. Baez graduated law school in 1997 but was denied entry to the Florida Bar until 2005 for failure to pay child support and alimony. In one of his few earlier high profile cases, his client was found guilty and attempted to appeal on the grounds that Baez was a deficient attorney. Given his lack of experience and dubious background, taking pointers from TV attorneys doesn’t seem so far off. What Baez has done is keep the world captivated. This trial continues as a circus that dominates the news every night and keeps the American public riveted. However, it seems as if he’s forgotten one small piece of the puzzle. His

job is not to entertain the American public, but to convince the 12 men and women of the jury that his client is innocent, or at the very minimum that she is not guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. The prosecution’s evidence hinges on diary entries from Anthony, Google searches she performed and a new emerging technique that measured the amount of decomposition in the air of her car. The last time I checked, that does not make an airtight prosecution. Had Baez stuck to trying to refute the evidence the prosecution had, he could have had a real chance at defending Anthony. As it stands, Baez needs to have some sort of trick up his sleeve when the defense continues to present its case this week for there to be any chance of finding Anthony not guilty. If Casey Anthony is in fact responsible for her daughter’s death, she should be punished for committing that crime. But in the process of determining whether or not she committed the crime, she is entitled to a competent defense. Instead, it seems as if she’s been saddled with an attorney who can make a spectacle but can’t adequately defend a client. While Anthony’s trial may be providing hours of morbid fascination, at the end of the day, it is her life that hangs in the balance. That is a burden her legal team would do well to remember. Brittany Sharkey is a second year law student from Oceanside, CA. She graduated from NYU in 2010 with a degree in politics. Follow her on Twitter @brittanysharkey.

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 3

Undergrads in the law library BY EMILY STEDMAN Columnist

Just one month ago, 197 1Ls (first year law students), or at least those of us who study in the “lawbrary,” were in a tizzy. The undergrads invaded. Law school is law school. It is not exactly what you see in the movies or hear about from your parents (or your friends’ parents). It is tough, stressful and stretches your mental capacity in ways you cannot even begin to imagine. The worst part? You have one grade. That is right: one. A final at the end of each semester. One hundred percent of your grade comes down to memorizing 15 weeks of material and pouring it out in three hours in December and May. Experiencing that kind of stress makes first year law students touchy, to say the least. Yes, we know, libraries on campus are public and open to everyone. Yes, we know, we have this amazing new library that deserves to be shared. This is our sanctuary, our place to feel like everyone around us is experiencing the same angst. So, when you cannot find a spot in J.D. Williams and you feel an urge to stroll on over to John Grisham, keep a few things in mind. First, try not to stick out. Calculators and textbooks with loads of pictures are a clear indicator that you are not one of us. Not only do we notice you, but we also instantly become jealous. We do not get a high-tech tool like a calculator to help us with

our homework or our finals, and our books do not have pictures. If they do, they are in black and white and are of some judge, usually Cardozo. Second, come in pairs not packs. Subtlety is key. As mentioned above, you are easy to spot. Most of us arrive by ourselves and maybe join one or two of our friends as the day progresses. So, plan ahead. Tell your friend you will meet them there or come by yourself. We won’t bite — well, we will be less likely to bite if it is just you and not your entire social circle. Third, if the building is locked, tough luck. This annoys us, too. The doors are not always unlocked when they are supposed to be and the ID scanners do not always work. But we call our friends to let us in or we wait patiently for someone to leave. Banging on the doors or trying to loudly yank them open is an instant invitation for a law student to come to the door, ask you if you belong here, and then shut the door in your face. Yeah, it happened, and it was justified. Fourth, study rooms are off limits. Nothing is more astonishing that watching two undergrads walk to a study room door, read the “for law students only” sign, consider it and walk into the study room anyway. You are in a law school, a building filled with Type A, overly ambitious

and rule-minded students. If you choose to ignore that sign, do not be surprised when the law student in the room next to you (the walls are glass windows) gets up and tracks down her outspoken classmate to kick you out. Fifth, do not eat our cookies (or at least do not eat all of them). During finals, various organizations provide law students with cookies, coffee and cider. This spring those cookies were gone long before the law students had a fair shot at taking our share. This led one student to post a note: “If you do not know what a tort is, you do not deserve a cookie.” Harsh? Perhaps. But again, when your entire grade is coming down to one three-hour exam, free cookies are one of the few positive things you experience. Ultimately, I think we can all admit that finals do not bring out the best in any student, law or undergrad. Typically we are a fun bunch. We go to football games, have parties, bar crawl and latenight after Funky’s kicks us out. But our lawbrary is a precious sanctuary during the last month of each semester. Respect our space and we will respect you in return. Emily Stedman is a second year law student from Marietta, Ga. Follow her on Twitter at @EmilyLStedman.

FREE Medium Pizza* Text “Dominos3030” to

90210

You will receive a text back for a Free Medium One Topping Pizza.

ApplicAtions Are Due by 5 p.m. on th FriDAy, June 24

Take this text message in your phone to Domino’s in Oxford, 1603 W. Jackson Ave and show it to the Customer Service Representative for your Free Pizza. 662-236-3030 * ONE PIZZA PER CELLPHONE NUMBER, MESSAGE AND DATA RATES MAY APPLY, NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER COUPONS/OFFERS, PICK UP ONLY


NEWS NEWS |

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 4

GEAR UP,

continued from page 1

“Although they’re not taking college classes, they get to be in the same setting with college students as well as hear from students who — I know like myself and a lot of others — have gone through summer programs and possibly came from the same background,” Butler said. “We just tell them, ‘Don’t give up, no matter what’s going on. You can make it to college. Money doesn’t have to be an issue. There are scholarships available if you’re keeping your grades up,’ and things like that.” The ultimate goal of the program is to give students the confidence that they can make it through high school and college regardless of their personal situation. “The main thing is they come here — or any of the colleges in Mississippi — to see what it’s like to be a college student,” said Molly Harris, junior public policy major and Gear Up counselor. “It’s that extra motivation to see that they can get here and that it’s possible for them to do this and make it this far. I guess it’s the motivation and the desire to get out.” Keeping the attention of teenagers isn’t an easy task, but the university professors and graduate students that teach the sessions

tailor their lesson plans to keep students engaged while still learning the crucial academic information. Classes use guessing games, logic puzzles and kite construction to put the principles of mathematics in a tangible form. “Every time I ask them if they’re getting it, they say that they are and that the professors really relate on their level,” Harris said. “One teacher, he makes catapults with them so they learn angles and math by catapulting marshmallows.” During Butler’s time in the summer programs, she got the chance to know professors and students before ever applying for the university. She understood what was expected from her once she got to college because of the preparation of programs like Gear Up and had a much smoother transition because of it. Whittington and Butler both agree that the highlight of their experiences with the students is knowing their work is making a difference for families all over Mississippi. “I understood that the program was great for not only the students and families we serve, but the entire state of Mississippi,” Whittington said. “Gear Up will always be a program with the best interests of its participants at its core.”

CHROMADEX,

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION For more coverage and photos of the weekend’s events, visit thedmonline.com.

continued from page 1

rights for any beneficial results that are solidified in the clinical study for Pterostilbene. “We have a long-standing relationship with the University of Mississippi that has lasted over several years,” said William Spengler, Chromadex president. “We have a high regard for the quality of work done, and we’re confident that our on-going relationship will continue to bear results for both parties.” ChromaDex, a natural products company based in California, originated as a company that sold reference standards for quality control testing of natural products. Its business plan is to create products and services “for the functional food, pharmaceutical, personal care and dietary supplement markets.” Its latest product development for the market is pTeroPure, which is an “ultra pure formulation” of Pterostilbene. ChromaDex licensed two patents from the university and also holds the rights to all manufacturing claims. ChromaDex’s decision to pursue patents from the university before the clinical study has yielded any official results speaks volume about the potential health advantages of Pterostilbene.

PHOTO BY PETRE THOMAS| The Daily Mississippian

PHOTO BY PETRE THOMAS | The Daily Mississippian

Adove: Former DM editor Jim Autry talks to recent editor Alex McDaniel and SMC director Pat Thompson at a reception in honor of The Mississippian’s centennial Saturday night. Below: Speaking about his job as an Associated Press writer for the Supreme Court, Jesse Holland addresses as part of a panal along with Julie Finley Copper and Bryan Doyle.

Oxford Shakespeare Festival TwelfTh NighT (or what You will)

by William Shakespeare directed by Joe Turner Cantú June 11, 17 and July 1, 2, 8, 9 at 8 p.m. June 12, 25 and July 10 at 2 p.m. Meek Auditorium

heNrY iV, Part One

-family Musical-

directed by Brian Evans

by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe

by William Shakespeare

June 18 and 24 at 8 p.m. June 19 at 2 p.m. Ford Center Main Hall

CaMelOT

directed by Julia Aubrey June 23 and 25 at 8 p.m. June 26 at 2 p.m. Ford Center Main Hall

UM Box Office • 301-B Student Union, University, MS 38677 • 662-915-7411

www.olemiss.edu/depts/tickets


LIFESTYLES L IF ES T Y L ES |

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 5

In review, Oxford Shakespeare Festival: Henry IV, part 1

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JORDAN BERGER

BY AMELIA CAMURATI Editor-in-Chief

Summer has always meant three things to me: humidity, watermelon and Oxford Shakespeare Festival. Shakespeare festivals are a popular summer commodity for starving artists to find employment for two to three months of fast rehearsals and long runs. Families across the country pack the outdoor theaters to listen to the melodic and poetic script and get a glimpse of what the theatrical world was like in Elizabethan times. Thankfully, men no longer have to play the female roles, so at least some things have been amended. This summer, the Oxford Shakespeare Festival is doing three shows: “Henry IV, part one,” “Twelfth Night” and “Camelot,” tying the season together loosely with the theme of intrigue. “Henry IV” is one of William Shakespeare’s history plays set across England in 1402. It’s long and it’s historic, but a few elements of this production make the show come to life. Since Shakespeare is an inter-

nationally-known author and his plays changed the way we look at theater, most of them are a hit or miss. To have a great production, you have to have a group of actors who not only deliver the lines well but have a true grasp of the language itself. Beyond the visuals and the direction, if the actors don’t understand what they’re saying, no one else will. When actors simply regurgitate the lines they have memorized, awkward pauses and the destruction of iambic pentameter muddle the delivery and the story gets buried. That isn’t the case for the entire cast, but a few stand-out performances bring everything together. Chris Young, graduate student at Ohio University, stole the show with his active and emotional portrayal of Prince Henry. His raw emotion and quick ability to jump from one feeling to another makes him one of the most fascinating characters onstage. From his undying desire to mock Falstaff every chance he gets to his rage against Hotspur, Young is all over the spectrum with a solid performance, including a few stellar battle

scenes at the end. Ryan Dusek, recent Ole Miss alum, came back to Oxford for the role of Henry Percy, also known as Hotspur. No stranger to the OSF stage, Dusek’s hostility for his enemies makes even the audience a bit scared of him. While his Southern drawl is still attached, he still comes across as one of the most believable characters in the production. Dusek’s skill with a sword outshines most in the end, and his battle sequence is not to be missed. Peter Pinnow, local resident and Oxford High School English teacher, knows Shakespeare better than most in today’s society. His grasp of the language and ability to convey Shakespeare so clearly is a true gift. After appearing in multiple OSF shows in the past few years (including his portrayal of Falstaff in the previous season), Pinnow is always one of the most entertaining aspects of the production. Pinnow’s reprise of Falstaff in “Henry IV” has some of the best comedic timing possible. Pinnow’s ability to not just perform a role but to become the character pays off, making him

RECYCLE

HALF PRICE SALES Every department included.

YOUR DM.

ALL SALES FINAL. ENTIRE STOCK IS NOT INCLUDED

the most valuable player in the company for many years and hopefully many more to come. The costumes were stunning, to say the least. The details of ribbon and lace on the women’s dresses showed off the hours of work behind the scenes beautifully. Not only that, but the accurate representation of history in the costumes is a must-have for any type of history-based play. From top to bottom, the costumes aid in bringing an accurate feeling to the stage. However, the set crew did not pay as much attention to detail as the Coat of Arms of Henry the IV on the map clearly does not match the one on the costumes, which happens to be correct. With the minimalist approach to the set, the smallest details cannot be over-

looked. Considering there are no more than 10 set pieces during the entire two-and-a-half hour run, the details need to be the focus. The lighting is dim, and squinting is necessary for such sparse lighting across a massive stage. Because of that, a lot of detail is lost, but since there isn’t much detail outside of the costumes, the squinting is the only major problem. Overall, it’s a performance worth seeing. It may not be the Royal Shakespeare Company, but it works. Just make sure to bring a jacket...and a snack. For more information about the remaining Oxford Shakespeare Festival performances, call the UM box office at 9157411 or check the website at www.shakespeare.olemiss.edu.


COM I C S |

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 6

Garfield

By Jim davis 236-3030

The fusco BroThers

By J.c. duffy

1 1 F buy

Get

dilBerT

R E E

By scoTT adams

Deep Dish extra

NoN sequiTur

orDer online

By Wiley

www.

Dominos .com

OPEN LATE

ADVERTISE HERE CALL 915-5503 TO SPEAK WITH AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

dooNesBury

By Garry Trudeau

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

SUDOKUŠ

Puzzles by Pappocom

HOW TO PLAY Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 with no repeats

DIFFICULTY LEVEL

MAZEMAZEMAZE


CLASSIFIEDS C L A S S IF I E D S |

ASPEN RIDGE- 3BD/2.5BA. Extras galore! $165,000. Lafayette Land Company. (662)513-0011.

CONDO FOR SALE SOLEIL CONDO 221 3 bedroom, 2 and 1/2 bath. Excellent condition! 662-5384840 or 662-316-0861.

APARTMENT FOR RENT 1 AND 2 BEDROOM APTS. available. Less than 1 mile from campus. On bus route. Pets welcome and all appliances included. Check us out www.liveatlexingtonpointeapts.com or call 662-2810402. RENTAL CENTRAL: Available now studio, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 BR apts. and houses near campus/ square, reasonable prices, hundreds to choose from www. oxfordmsapartments.com. (662)5954165.

HOUSE FOR RENT TAYLOR MEADOWS 2 Bed/2 Bath brick houses for rent on Old Taylor Road. Starting June, July or August. (662)801-8255 or (662)801-3736 1,2,3,4 Bed Houses, www.leaseoxford. com for pics and info, Massey Prop Mgmt, (662)816-8685 3BD/2.5BA SPLIT LEVEL HOUSE 3BD/2BA w/large yard. (662)234-6736. EAGLE POINTE 3 BR/2BA All appliances, covered patio front & back, large fenced yard $1,300/ mo Available in July (662)513-3374

3BR, 3BA, ALL appliances, pets allowed, covered carport, 10 minutes from Square, $900/ month, deposit required (662)832-3901 2BR/2B Adjacent Units - 6 Minutes from Campus. Nice & Quiet - Mature Students - $625 (662)234-9289 3 BR/2 BA SHILOH SUBDIVISION All appliances. Available Aug. 1st. $795/ month. (662)983-8678 LEASING 1,2,&3 bd. Call Charlotte Satcher, The real estate firm. (662)8015421

2BD 2BH CONDO @The Mark internet, cable, all appliances, W/ D included. $850/ mth. Call 901-734-9498 (901)591-1526

WEEKEND RENTAL ANY TIME Football, baseball, weddings, getaways. Your source for shortterm rentals in Oxford! www.oxfordtownhouse.com (662)801-6692

DOUBLE-WIDE TRAILER ON 67 acres of hunting property. 832Hwy30east. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. $700. Call 801-5849 or 832-6848.

CONDO FOR RENT

FULL-TIME

2BD 2BH CONDO @The Mark internet, cable, all appliances, W/ D included. $850/ mth. Call 901-734-9498 (901)591-1526

BECOME A BARTENDER $300/ DAY POTENTIAL No Experience Necessary, Training Courses Available. Call 1-800-9656520 EXT155

2BR, 1.5 Bath. Great Location. Newly renovated, walk to campus. 350/ per bedroom, per month, plus deposit. Call 662-816-3955

PART-TIME

CONDO FOR RENT

HIGH POINTE-FULLY FURNISHED

3BD/3BTH Great condition.. Gated w/ Pool--Available AUG 1st-$1290mo. (mcilravy4@gmail.com) (757)560-6281 TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT- 2BD/2.5BA close to Home Depot. Quiet and private. W/D hookup. Fridge included. $875/ mo./deposit. Call (601)214-9019.

To place your ad in The Daily Mississippian Classifieds section, visit: http://www.thedmonline. com/classifieds.

MISCELLANEOUS PREGNANCY TEST CENTER Pregnancy Test, Limited Ultrasound, Information on Abortion Effects, Parenting, and Adoption. All services are free and confidential. www.pregnancyoxford. com. www.facebook.com/ pregnancytestcenter (662)234-4414

MOBILE HOME FOR RENT

THERAPEUTIC BLISS, INC. Massage~Sauna~Steam Bath & Exercise Room. Personal Trainer Position Available. www. TherapeuticBliss.com (662)234-3400

ROOMMATE FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED

To share New 2BR 2BA Condo, quiet atmosphere, hardwood floors, new appliances, porch, 10ft ceilings, pet friendly, close to campus. $375 & Electric. Preferably Mature Student (580)744-1133

STUDENT JOBS

theDMonline.com

DM

non-condensed

0 grams Trans Fat!

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 7

CLASSIFIEDS INFORMATION

The DEADLINE to place, correct or cancel an ad is 12 p.m. one day in advance. The Daily Mississippian is published Monday through Friday year round, when school is in session.

Classified ads must be prepaid. All major credit cards accepted. RATES:

recycle your DM

HOMES FOR SALE

6 . 21 . 11

- $ . 25 per word per day - 15-word minimum - No minimum run Additional Features (Web & Print): Jumbo Headline - $3 Big Headline - $2 Bold Text - extra $ . 50 per word

To place your ad online: www.thedmonline.com/classifieds

The DM reserves the right to refuse ads that appear to offer unrealistic or questionable products or services.

201 BISHOP HALL 662.915.5503

The DM Online .COM


SPORTS S P O R TS |

6 . 21 . 11

| T H E DA ILY M I S S I S S IP P I A N | PAG E 8

Kennedy reacts to SEC spring meetings, looks ahead to 2011-12 BY DAVID HENSON The Daily Mississippian

Two weeks ago Southeastern Conference coaches, athletic directors and school presidents gathered in Destin, Fla., for their annual spring meetings. Perhaps the biggest news coming out of these meetings was the decision to drop divisions in basketball and become a 1-12 team league. “As coaches we want to be viewed as one league, “ Ole Miss head coach Andy Kennedy said. “Sometimes (the media) would talk about the league as East versus West as if it were two different leagues and we didn’t think that was healthy for the future of men’s basketball. This was step one as to having the league viewed as 1-12 under the same umbrella.” Before this decision, the SEC Contaminant

Violation Y/N Date Collected

Level Detected

Microbiological Contaminants 1. Total Coliform Bacteria

N

was the only “Big Six” conference that was still playing with two divisions in basketball. The next decision that must be made is how this change will affect future conference schedules. The dropping of the divisions will take place immediately; the conference schedules for this season, however, had already been made before the decision to drop divisions and will remain the same. The SEC and ACC are the only two leagues out of the “Big Six” conferences that will not play at least 18 league games this season. There has been some discussion of keeping league schedules at 16, adding two more games to make 18 or playing 22, where each team would be played twice. “I don’t know if 22 conference games would work logistically but TEST RESULTS

Range of Detects or # of Samples Exceeding MCL/ACL

Unit Measurement

0

Inorganic Contaminants

MCLG

MCL

if you really want a true champion, that’s the only way to have a true champion,” Kennedy said. “Going to 22 games would also cut down on non-league games, which is where you build RPI and you don’t want to limit those opportunities. I think 18 is very doable and then it is just a matter of figuring out how to do it. One way would be to look at the football format where you have a two year cycle of changing opponents but we just want to be as equitable as possible to get a true champion.” Nelson’s emergence, Holloway’s return Dundrecous Nelson will be entering his sophomore season in 2011-12. While sharing time with Chris Warren last season, Nelson averaged 7.2 points a game, which was fourth on the team. He also exploded for 30 points, a freshLikely source of Contamination

“I was surprised when Holloway left last spring,” he said. “We hated to lose a player of his caliber last year but was supportive because he based it on the right decisions of taking care of some personal responsibilities. When I got the call from South Carolina coach Darrin Horn I was equally as surprised. I then talked to Murphy about his desire to come back. His motives are pure and intentions are pure. South Carolina blessed the move and we welcome him back with open arms.” Murphy is on track to enroll at Ole Miss for the second summer term. Once he arrives on campus, compliance officials will begin the paperwork to submit to the NCAA in hopes of getting the one-year residency requirement waived, which would allow Murphy to play this season.

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

University of Mississippi PWS ID# 0360015 2010 We’re very pleased to provide you with this year’s Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been to provide you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.

0

Presence of coliform bacteria in 5% of monthly samples

Naturally present in the environment

Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants ;ceramics;electronics; Erosion of natural deposits;runoff from orchards;runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

The University of Mississippi water source is four on campus wells pumping from the Meridian-Upper Wilcox Aquifer. The Physical Plant routinely monitors our water source for constituents in your drinking water in accordance with Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st 2010. If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact David Adkisson at 662-915-5923, or Reid Russell at 662-915-7051. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.

7.Antimony

N

2009

< 0.0005

0

ppm

6

6

8Arsenic

N

2009

< 0.0005

0

ppm

n/a

50

10.Barium

N

2009

0.065427

0

ppm

2

2

Discharge of drilling waste; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

11.Beryllium

N

2009

< 0.0005

0

ppm

4

4

Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace, and defense industries

12.Cadmium

N

2009

< 0.0005

0

ppb

5

5

Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits;discharge from metal refineries;runoff from waste batteries and paints

13.Chromium

N

2009

0.06865

0

ppb

100

100

Discharge from steel and pulp mills;erosion of natural deposits

14.Copper

N

2010

0.9

0

ppm

1.3

AL=1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

15Cyanide

N

2009

< 0.015

0

ppm

200

200

Discharge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories

16Fluoride

N

2009

0.854

0

ppm

4

4

Erosion of natural deposits;water additive which promotes strong teeth;discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

17.Lead

N

2010

0.005

0

ppb

0

AL=15

18Mercury

N

2009

< 0.0002

0

ppb

2

2

19.Nitrate (as Nitrogen)

N

2010

1.3

No Range

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

20Nitrite(as Nitrogen)

N

2010

< 0.05

No range

ppm

1

1

Runoff from fertilizer use;leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

21Selenium

N

2009

< 0.0025

0

ppb

50

50

22Thallium

N

2009

< 0.0005

0

ppb

0.5

2

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines Leaching from ore-processing sites;discharge from electronics,glass, and drug factories

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

Erosion of natural deposits;discharge from refineries and factories;runoff from landfills;runoff from cropland

Disinfection By-Product

(There is convincing evidence that addition of disinfection is necessary for control of microbial contaminants) Chlorine (as C12) HAA5 (total haloacetic)

man school record, in a 76-73 loss at Auburn. Kennedy looks forward to what Nelson’s future holds as well as hoping he learned one thing from Chris Warren. “This biggest thing I hope that Dundrecous got from playing a year with Chris was seeing how consistent of a worker Chris was,” Kennedy said. “In order to be successful, you have to be consistent in your approach. He has shown he has the psychical ability, he showed that last year, and you normally see the greatest improvement from players between their first and second years. My hope is that Dundrecus understands that as well.” Kennedy doesn’t like surprises. However, the return of Murphy Holloway is one surprise he doesn’t mind.

N

2010

0.59-0.69

0

ppm

4

4

N

2007

1.6

0

ppb

0

0.8

Water additive used to control microbes By-product of drinking water chlorination

In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we’ve provided the following definitions. • Action Level-The concentration of a contaminant which if exceeded, triggers treat ment or other requirements which a water system must follow. • Treatment Technique (TT)-A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. • Maximum Contaminant Level-The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal-The ”Goal”(MCLG)is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Additional Information for Lead If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Physical Plant is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tab for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://epa.gov/safewater/lead. The Mississippi State Department of Health Public Laboratory offers lead testing for $10 per sample. Please contact 601.576.7582 if you wish to have your water tested. To comply with the “Regulation Governing Fluoridation of Community Water Supplies”, the UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI is required to report certain results pertaining to fluoridation of our water system. The number of months in the previous calendar year that average fluoride sample results were within the optimal range of 0.7-1.3 ppm was 4. The percentage of fluoride samples collected in the previous calendar year that was within the optimal range of 0.7-1.3 ppm was 31%. We at the University of Mississippi Physical Plant work hard to provide quality water at every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

As you can see by the table, our system had no violations. We are proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected, however they are not above the level considered unsafe. All sources of drinking water, even bottled water, are subject to potential contamination by substances that are natural or manmade. These substances can be microbes, inorganic or organic chemicals and radioactive substances. All drinking water including bottled water may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons, such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorder, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).Please call if you have questions. Our source water assessment has been completed. Our wells were ranked MODERATE in terms of susceptibility to contamination. For a copy of the report, please contact our office at 662.915.7051.


The Daily Mississippian - June 21, 2011