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Miami Introducing! A New Creative Collaboration with Sebastian Faena

Starring Natasha Poly In Costumes by Juan Gatti

DECEMBER 2016

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EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION TO BUY A UNIT. SUCH AN OFFERING SHALL ONLY BE MADE PURSUANT TO THE PROSPECTUS AND NO STATEMENTS SHOULD BE RELIED UPON UNLESS MADE IN THE PROSPECTUS OR IN THE APPLICABLE PURCHASE AGREEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL ANY SOLICITATION, OFFER OR SALE OF A UNIT IN THE CONDOMINIUM BE MADE IN, OR TO RESIDENTS OF, ANY STATE OR COUNTRY IN WHICH SUCH ACTIVITY WOULD BE UNLAWFUL. BRANDING & ADVERTISING: AND PARTNERS, NY


EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION TO BUY A UNIT. SUCH AN OFFERING SHALL ONLY BE MADE PURSUANT TO THE PROSPECTUS AND NO STATEMENTS SHOULD BE RELIED UPON UNLESS MADE IN THE PROSPECTUS OR IN THE APPLICABLE PURCHASE AGREEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL ANY SOLICITATION, OFFER OR SALE OF A UNIT IN THE CONDOMINIUM BE MADE IN, OR TO RESIDENTS OF, ANY STATE OR COUNTRY IN WHICH SUCH ACTIVITY WOULD BE UNLAWFUL. BRANDING & ADVERTISING: AND PARTNERS, NY

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20 Greene Street, PHB $15,995,000 Listing ID: 492019 20 Greene Street whispers spectacular from the moment you step from your key locked elevator and enter this sprawling 2-bedroom mansion in the sky. This unique and magical duplex penthouse condo features abundant green on Greene Street, and the extraordinary opportunity to dwell in a remarkable home with both stunning interiors and noteworthy exteriors. Set in the heart of Manhattan’s fabled SoHo landmarked historic district, its lucky occupants are free to meander between four private outdoor oases on two floors encompassing 2,000 square feet (185 square meters) of greenery and luminescence, located in an exclusive cast iron building from 1915, gut renovated for the twenty-first century. The lavish interior includes 4,189 square feet (390 square meters) of inimitable living space.

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TOWN Residential LLC (“TOWN”) is a licensed real estate broker located at 33 Irving Place, New York, NY 10003. All property listing information, including, but not limited to, square footage, room count, and number of bedrooms are from sources deemed reliable, but are subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal and should be verified by your own attorney, architect, engineer or zoning expert. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. TOWN Commercial LLC (“TCL”) and TOWN FlatironLLC are licensed real estate brokers and subsidiaries of TOWN. Lori Shabtai is a licensed associate real estate broker with TCL. O:212.557.6500. Steven Gold is a licensed associate real estate broker with TOWN Flatiron LLC. O:212.633.1000.

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Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen

SCENE

ACT 1:

A CREATIVE COLLABORATION

To kick off its debut at Art Basel Miami Beach, The Daily teamed up with photographer and creative director Sebastian Faena on Act 1, a pop-up magazine (that appears in this very issue!) starring the sublime Natasha Poly. In the editorial, she wears several costumes by Juan Gatti—the artist whose illustrations grace much of the Faena Hotel (along with our cover!)— and appears alongside performers from C’est Rouge, a cabaret show currently running at the Faena Hotel on Friday and Saturday nights. Enjoy!

It’s all about the eye candy, non? In addition to gorgeousness from more than 4,000 artists in 29 countries, Art Basel has the A-list on lockdown. Who’s en route? Leonardo DiCaprio, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, Jerry Bruckheimer, Larry Gagosian, Julianne Moore, Giovanna Battaglia, and more than we dare to count. • Meanwhile, on the designer front, JEREMY SCOTT (more on him later!), JOnathan Anderson, Anthony Vaccarello, and other chicsters are headed to these shores—to check out the art, of course, and also to host events. • Adrien Brody, is that you? The Oscar winner-slash-painter is showing his new work at New York’s Benrimon Projects’ booth at Art Miami. • Brooklyn’s Bishop Gallery is featuring a range of never-before-seen-work by Jean-Michel Basquiat at X Contemporary. One of the artist’s friends, Al Diaz, is curating the show, which will run at Nobu Hotel. • A$AP Rocky and Robert AA Lowe will perform at Purple’s annual ABMB event in the Design District, which will feature an exhibition curated by Michele Lamy and Caecilia Tripp. • And on a food note, Kehinde Wiley will host his usual fish fry BBQ with Top Chef winner Jeremy Ford, who is head chef at Matador Room. • Half Gallery and 303 Gallery are bringing Kim Gordon to the Edition for a book signing on November 30. • KATIA PRICE is bringing DanceBody, her new dance-inspired fitness program, at Anatomy at 1220 on Miami Beach. Expect VIP hosts, an intense sweat sesh, and very toned abs.

—ANSEL ELGORT, who will not be gracing us with his presence this week

Carole Tessier, a renowned interior designer and founder of Preciously Paris, has created an ultra-luxe clutch that will be sold exclusively at The Webster during ABMB. It features the retailer’s signature wallpaper—embroidered with Tessier’s unique hand, naturellement.

Q: If you could own any piece of art, what would it be?

“An Andy Warhol!” —Sara Sampaio

“I’d want the giant hanging red heart-shaped Jeff Koons!” —Adriana Lima “I’d have to go with a Michelangelo. Might as well go for high art!”—Simon Doonan

Leonardo DiCaprio

A$AP Rocky

bag du moment!

HEARD

“I’m STAYING where it’s cold— I can’t wear all my new canada goose jackets in Miami!”

Giovanna Battaglia

“Definitely a Matisse. I love Henry Morgan too, but definitely a Matisse!” —Tory Burch

Larry Gagosian

TAKE A SEAT! During Design Miami/, Louis Vuitton’s Design District store will display two new furnishings from the Objets Noades collection—the Campana Brothers’ Fur Cocoon and the Blossom Stool designed by Tokujin Yoshioka.

p o ly : s e b a s t i a n f ae n a ; g e t t y i m a g e s ( 2 ) ; i l l u s t rat i o n s : j u a n g at t i ; a l l o t her s c o u r t e s y

Natasha Poly in Alexander McQueen

Julianne Moore

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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Chris Rock

HEARD

heard

GILLES BENSIMON is exhibiting a new drawing during a group show at Totah Gallery in New York. • Patricia Field, Lorenzo Martone, Shantell Martin, Olivier Pechou, and Natalie Kates are among those who will speak at Gilt’s Art House morning panels at SCOPE Miami Beach. Tickets, sold on Gilt City, also include brunch and early admission to the SCOPE fair. The Gilt Lounge is the place to be, thanks to a morning beachside yoga class, chair massages, and art-inspired photo booth. (Not to mention a gratis cocktail hour from 6–8 p.m.) Get the deets at gilt.com/scope. • Mixed-media artist HEBRu brantley explores modern folklore in his new show, “Theories From the Low End,” at 2450 NW Second Ave.

with henri (née Henrietta Tiefenthaler) A DJ, producer, and author who will be providing the jams at The Daily + Faena party on November 29. What’s your background? My parents are Austrian. I was brought up in London and have lived in L.A. for the past 12 years. I got into DJing through an obsession with Krautrock. I hosted a party in L.A. where I only played Can, Neu!, Kraftwerk, and lots of bands inspired by them, like Joy Division and Sonic Youth. People responded so well that they gave me a residency. I also had a Krautrock band called Thrillionaire with a ridiculously talented musician called Jen Turner, but then I started DJing more and making electronic music and the band fizzled out. Let’s just say it’s still on hiatus. What’s typically on your playlist? Anything that will either make people dance or take them on an emotional journey. I love playing this song called “Veridis Quo” by Daft Punk at the beginning of my sets. It’s cosmic and moving, and definitely cleanses the palate for whatever comes next.

MADONNA FOR THE WIN!

FAUNA WE LOVE Gaetano Pesce is debuting work from his Tree Vase Series with a cocktail party hosted by Jeanne Greenberg ROHATYN and Paul Johnson at the setai.

DJ Henri

musical moment!

the divine SEAN PENN, who was married to madonna in the 1980s, is expected to attend his ex’s raising malawi benefit.

Leave it to her Madgesty to take over Basel in the biggest way possible: with “an evening of music, art, mischief, and performance” on December 2 at Faena Forum to benefit Raising Malawi. The event will be hosted by James Corden, and Ariana Grande, Chris Rock, and even more stars have vowed to attend. Tickets range from $5,000 for a single ticket to a $150,000 “Philanthropist Package,” which includes 10 seats, a VIP cocktail reception, and a photo op with Madonna herself. Only 400 tickets are available, natch.

Ariana Grande

ARTISTIC INCLINATIONS! Zadig & VolTaire has long

believed in the intersection of fashion and art. The brand’s founder, Thierry Gillier, is a serious collector of contemporary masters like Basquiat, Twombly, and Judd, and its creative director, Cécilia Bönström, has infused this passion throughout the collection. She explains what’s up next: What’s the story behind the new collection? It’s purist in its reflection of the codes of Zadig & Voltaire—Glastonbury meets Iggy Pop and David Bowie; a rock chic attitude met with contemporary art influences. Urs Fischer–esque fruit patches are featured on T-shirts, and I developed a circus-inspired print with Brooklyn-based tattoo artist Virginia Elwood. There is also a white tux inspired by Mick Jagger’s wedding to Bianca Jagger—light and white, perfect for Miami. Why do art and fashion work so well together? Today, art reaches out to so many people. It pushes me further, either in choosing my colors or creating a print or graphic. In the studio, we are lucky to have sculptures and paintings everywhere. Zadig & Voltaire is an exploration of personal style and a way of living; art is an important dimension in our universe.

HAVING A FASHION EMERGENCY? Ultra-luxe fashion rental service Armarium is popping up at the Raleigh Hotel this week—and bringing a slew of ready-to-wear and accessories from brands like Missoni and Christopher Kane. Needless to say, if you find yourself with nothing to wear to The Daily’s party at the Faena, for example, they’re here to help. armarium.com

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Chris Martin’s version of the Lady Dior Jeremy Scott

Brandusa Niro

Editor in Chief, CEO

A pouch by Matthew Porter

DIOR HEAVEN!

Dior has enlisted seven top artists to create their own interpretations of the brand’s Lady Dior bag and small accessories, and the results are pretty damn epic. The gorgeous goods will be on display at Dior’s Miami boutique all week long, and they will be sold at a temporary boutique in Los Angeles through the end of March 2017. dior.com

A bag by Ian Davenport

SCENE

Would it really be ABMB without JEremy scott? He’s here for an intimate Moschino dinner followed by a blowout bash at the Delano Hotel. • W editor Stefano Tonchi will toast “Desire,” an exhibition curated by Diana Widmaier Picasso and presented by Larry Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch. • Storied club Rockwell has teamed up with 1OAK for a series of parties from December 1–3. Get the scoop at rockwellmiami.com. • Up&Down is popping up at the Nautilus Hotel. • And! The Surf Lodge hits the W South Beach for classes from Taryn Toomey, dinner with A$AP Rocky and Rosario Dawson, and a screening of DSquared2’s Tom Ford’s new film, Nocturnal Animals. new Ski Collection • Plus! If you’re jonesing for some cold weather after all this beach time, check out DSquared2’s 2017 Ski Collection. These high-performance bomber jackets, hooded parkas, and high-waisted pants will ensure that you’ll be the best-looking chicster on the slopes.

CHIC RESIDENCES

New York–based real estate impresario Lori Shabtai has been attending Art Basel Miami Beach since its salad days in the early aughts—and she has witnessed the event’s evolution firsthand. Lori, how have you watched ABMB evolve? It began as a very exclusive group of collectors, but in the same way that really great collectors and galleries now have everything from well-known fine artists to emerging artists to completely unknown artists, Art Basel has also evolved to become a global event that brings together people from all walks of life. It’s become a center of art, music, fashion, and philanthropy, with a big focus on giving back, which is so spectacular. What’s so powerful about Art Basel is that it brings together all these worlds in a singular manner that is both peaceful and magnificent. Especially today, there aren’t a lot of events with the ability to do that in a way that’s so empowering and transporting. What’s your background? I’ve been in real estate for 15 years. Before that, I worked in jewelry, publishing, fashion, and luxury brands, and I also spent many years in not-for-profit. Besides that, I’m a writer and a neon artist. There isn’t anything about Art Basel that doesn’t speak to me. Almost two years ago, I joined Town, a boutique firm. My friend Andrew Heiberger, the visionary founder, invited me to help open the commercial division. Today, I do everything from a confidential sale of a more than $1 billion trophy building to leasing offices and retail. Right now, one of my most exciting projects is a $16 million one-of-a-kind triplex penthouse (left) at 20 Greene Street in Soho. For more information, contact lorishabtai@towncommercial.com.

DAILY 411!

Want more “Daily” in your lives, dear Basel goers? Fret not—our flagship magazine, The Daily Front Row, publishes seven issues during New York Fashion Week in February and September, and our Hamptons glossy, The Daily Summer, has you covered from Memorial Day to Labor Day. In March, we venture to Hollywood for our Los Angeles edition, and now, we’ll be seeing you each December in Miami! Find us 24/7 at fashionweekdaily.com.

To advertise, call (646) 768-8102 Or e-mail: publisher@dailyfrontrow.com

Mark Tevis Publisher

Executive Sales Director Stephen Savage Account Manager Cristina Graham Director of Marketing & Special Events Alex Dickerson Digital Director Daniel Chivu Publishing Manager Carey Cassidy Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito, Amy Taylor

getty images the official photo agency of The daily front row

The Daily Front Row Miami is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 250 West 57th Street, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10107.

On the cover: Natasha Poly photographed by Sebastian Faena. Costume by Juan Gatti. Styling by Sofia Achaval de Montaigu, hair by Steven Hoeppner, makeup by Paola Orlando, and set design by Cristina Forestieri.

g e t t y i ma g e s ( 3 ) ; all o t h e r s c o u r t e s y

A frog motif from Chris Martin

Deputy Editor Eddie Roche Executive Editor Ashley Baker Managing Editor Tangie Silva Design Director Jill Serra Wilde Fashion Editor Paige Reddinger Senior Editor Kristen Heinzinger Associate Editor Sydney Sadick Art Director Magdalena Long Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialist RJ Hamilton Contributing Researcher Harrison Turner

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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CHICMusts

PERFORMANCE

PIECES The world is your theater! Take center stage with these bold accessories and elevate your look to the next level.

Photography by GREGORY REID FASHION EDITOR PAIGE REDDINGER

MARC JACOBS snakeskin platforms, price upon request, marcjacobs.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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T H E E P I C E N T E R O F C U LT U R E .

M I A M I D E S I G N D I S T R I C T. N E T

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Act 1: alive to all living things, including fire

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Act 1 is a random combination of pictures the link between them is the act itself the thirst for performance above all things, the search for something beautiful as someone i love once said, “beauty is the higher form of genius, for it needs no explanation� dancers, beauty queens, and princes, contortionists, fortune-tellers, donkeys, clowns, chickens, human babies, jugglers come together an act in defense of those shamelessly seeking attention to show what you do best, to be both singular and plural a celebration of characters struggling to be good —Sebastian Faena

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someone who’s struggling to be good

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All costumes by JUAN GATTI except the following: Page 5: (From left) On Paul, clown: Costume his own. On child Diego: BONPOINT black velvet jacket, $420, bonpoint.com; PAUL SMITH junior black pants, $180, paulsmith.co.uk. On Natasha: PRADA velvet cape, $2,490, net-a-porter.com. On Vlada: BONPOINT black velvet dress, $475, bonpoint.com. Page 6: On Charlie: BONPOINT black velvet dress, $475, bonpoint.com. Page 7–8: On Natasha: DIESEL Black Gold Paudis jumper, $395, diesel.com. Page 10: On Marizel, fortune-teller: Costume her own. Page 11: On Jordan: Costume courtesy Paul Anderson. Page 15–16: On Natasha and Jordan: Costumes from La Sastreria de Buenos Aires. Page 18: On Natasha: GUCCI black and ivory silk charmeuse “Grand Pois” dress, $5,100, gucci.com or select Gucci stores nationwide; tulle skirt from La Sastreria de Buenos Aires. Page 19: On Natasha: PRADA velvet cape, $2,490, net-a-porter.com. On Vlada: BONPOINT black velvet dress, $475, bonpoint.com. On baby Francis: BONPOINT angel wings, $325, bonpoint. com. Page 20: On Charlie: BONPOINT black velvet dress, $475, bonpoint. com. Page 22: On Jordan: TOMMY HILFIGER Hilfiger Collection basketball shorts, $230, tommy.com. Page 23–24: On Jordan: MIU MIU pink jacket, price upon request, miumiu.com. Page 25–26: On Natasha: Re/Done classic T-shirt, $85, shopredone.com; tulle skirt from La Sastreria de Buenos Aires. Page 28: On Natasha: LA PERLA Summer Energy bikini top, $310, laperla.com. Page 29: On Roman: BONPOINT red velvet cape, $395, bonpoint.com. Page 30: On Jordan: BURBERRY canvas blue cashmere poncho with silver cording, price upon request, burberry.com. Page 31: On Natasha: PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI sequin dress, similar styles available at preenbythorntonbregazzi.com. On Jordan: DSQUARED2 sequin jacket, price upon request, DSquared2 Miami, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., (305) 866-7880. Page 34: On Natasha: MARC JACOBS turquoise brocade floral sequin dress, $5,900, marcjacobs.com. Page 37: On Natasha: DIOR floral silk twill shantung printed dress with leaves and pheasant, $7,700, available at Dior boutiques nationwide, (800) 929-3467. On Roman: TOMMY HILFIGER Hilfiger Collection bomber jacket, $490, tommy. com; top hat courtesy Paul Anderson. Page 42: On Natasha: RE/DONE Levi’s jeans, $266, shopredone.com. Page 44: On Natasha: ERES Romy swimsuit in Magnetique, $570, net-a-porter.com or Eres boutiques. On Charlie: BONPOINT gold lamé taffeta blouse, $295, and powder pink dance skirt, $275, bonpoint.com. On Paul, clown: Costume his own. Page 45: On Vlada: BONPOINT gold lamé taffeta dress, $695, bonpoint.com. On Jordan: PERSOL Calligrapher Edition sunglasses in tortoise/brown, $370, sunglasshut.com. Page 46: On Natasha: ERES Romy swimsuit in Magnetique, $570, net-a-porter.com or Eres boutiques. Back cover: EX INFINITAS surf hoodie, $630, exinfinitas.com.

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the thirst for performance

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for it needs no explanation

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in defense of those shamelessly seeking attention

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end scene

Photography & Words Sebastian Faena Starring Natasha Poly & Jordan Barrett Costumes and Illustrations Juan Gatti Fashion Sofia Achaval de Montaigu

Co-starring children Roman, Vlada, Charlie, Diego and baby Francis; clown Paul Anderson; fortune-teller Marizel Almirall; and performers Keraly Hernandez, Rony Gomez, Irina Kazakova, and Dayanis Mondeja Producers Helena Martel Seward & Marcos Fecchino Fashion Editor Paige Reddinger Design Director Jill Serra Wilde Hair Steven Hoeppner Makeup Paola Orlando Set Design Cristina Forestieri Retouching Justine Foord for Silhouette Studio Shot on location at the Faena Hotel Miami Beach ACT 1: 43

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exit music

Act 1 is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 250 West 57th Street, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10107

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who’s showing

Mark anthony green As GQ’s Style Guy, Mark Anthony Green spends much of his days fully immersed in the world of high fashion. But he’s equally turned on by his after-hours occupation as a fine artist. Meet the friendliest provocateur you’ll hang with all week. Have you always been a fashion guy? Yeah. I was super weird as a kid, but I always cared way too much about what I was wearing. When my mother took me to the Salvation Army, it changed my life—I could buy a suit for $4. You do a lot of different kinds of work for the magazine—Style Guy, profile writing—what’s your favorite kind of thing to do? I don’t know. This is why the art thing has been so important to me. There’s like a little kid inside of me. There’s no consistent way to pacify a child: Some days, the pacifier works, and then sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes I’m completely satisfied writing about fashion and clothes, because it’s exactly what

I love, and sometimes there are other things I want to talk about. It’s been great at GQ, because I work with empowering editors, and they’re like, “You want to write an essay about your relationship with food? Let’s put you with Daniel Boulud.” I couldn’t work for a place that puts me in a corner. Have you always been making art? For the most part. I never showed it, and I damn sure wasn’t selling it. I grew up in a big basketball household, so when I wasn’t playing basketball, I’d go and make a bow and arrow out of hangers. Some days, I was learning how to sew. I’ve always tinkered with things, and I always wanted them to look a certain way. A couple years ago, when I kind of started to feel fidgety, I had this idea. [GQ Style editor] Will Welch was getting married, and I was freaking about a wedding gift. Will had a ratty little Post-it note that said “luminous beings,” and I asked him about it one day. It meant something to Will and

his wife, Heidi, so I wanted to re-create it. It needed to be simple, but something you stare at for a long time. I thought, “Why don’t you play with texture, and make it three-dimensional, but all one color?” I’ve gotten a lot better since that first piece. It was a raw deal—Will got the s**ttiest one, in theory. What was your first solo show like? It was at Dame Dash’s [now-closed] gallery on the Lower East Side. I was afraid to invite people, so I did it on my birthday. No one knew that all of Dipset was going to show up. People just came because I asked them to, and I’ve never taken that for granted. What did you do at Art Basel last year? Can I say one thing and then do that? At GQ and with the art, I only work with people that I actually love. On the art side, my brother, Warren [Chancellor], does everything—he’s the business mind behind it, he does the logistics. And we work with an amazing team—those guys at Team Epiphany, and Coltrane Curtis, are creative ninjas, and we would be lost without them. For last year’s Art Basel, I woke up one day and told Warren I wanted to take over a hotel. He started laughing at me—in a good way. The Dream in South Beach was super kind and let us do whatever we wanted to do. We could have changed the name of it, if we wanted to. We had art in the lobby, and we did a thing with hay bales and these arrows I paint. What’s the backstory with the arrows? Saint Sebastian was this cool-ass saint who was killed by arrows, and my favorite magazine cover of all time is Muhammad Ali on the cover of Esquire. I always felt like, as a black man in America, you’re a weird kind of target. On one hand, you could be the coolest person on the planet—your culture, your music, the way you dress, talk, look, and smell, your hair texture, everything—is imitated, and that’s cool. But it could also be super threatening to certain people. To me, it’s not just a bullet, it’s not just an arrow, it’s a beautiful bullet, or a beautiful arrow. What are you doing this year? On Friday, we’re having a rager with YesJulz at a warehouse in Wynwood. I’ll be doing an interactive installation where people can contribute to a mural. I'm showing my new film, Fair Use, at my exhibition at Bungalow 1 in the W Hotel on Saturday and Sunday. It's also up on my website, markanthonygreen. com. Gucci Mane and I are doing a limited-edition print, and he’s doing rare merch the first day in our ice cream truck—we’re going to hop in the truck periodically and go to the kids and sell them a $1 bomb pop and a super dope rare T-shirt. So you’re going to be selling bomb pops? Of course! And remember the one of Michelangelo, the Ninja Turtle, with bubblegum eyes? The eyes were always mint flavored, and that bothered me—you put mint gum with a cherry or lime popsicle? We’re going to have properly flavored bubblegum eyes in ours. I’m really solving the world’s problems here.—ASHLEY BAKER style & substance (Clockwise from left) Mark Anthony Green photographed by Matt Martin; some of the work Green showed at the Dream Hotel during Art Basel Miami Beach in 2015.

g e t t y i m a g e s ; pat r i c k m c m u l l a n . c o m ; a l l ot h e r s c o u r t e s y

From living legends to emerging stars, the artists who descend on Art Basel Miami Beach have one thing in common—the desire to unveil their latest, greatest “big idea” to a global audience. These three are especially newsworthy.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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alex katz The 89-year-old painter has been the subject of more than 200 solo exhibitions worldwide, and his work shines in institutions such as MoMA, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Tate Gallery. This week, he unveils his foray into wearable art with a capsule collection for H&M. What triggered this collaboration with H&M? They pretty much proposed it to me and adapted my art to the clothes. I had the right of refusal, but I thought they did a fantastic job. They’re such a fantastic team—a smart group of people—and the stuff is creative and stylish. I’m really surprised by how good things look and how stylish they are. Did you help them transfer your artistic style into the collection? They really figured it all out by looking at a big book of my work. They first came to me with a lot of different people, and I thought that was terrific. They wanted releases from the people, even though I own the copyright, because they were doing this to make money and didn’t want to get sued, so they picked 10 pictures and made a campaign out of 10 images. It was terrific. Were you an H&M customer before the partnership? I actually was. I love their bright-colored polo shirts—I wear them all the time—and I think I’ve bought white T-shirts there, too. Jeff Koons is the only other artist to collaborate with H&M. Yeah, I know Koons. We see each other in the art

world occasionally. I think we both engage big publics—that’s one of the common characteristics. My work seems to be popular with people who aren’t necessarily highly educated in the arts. The work is made so that anyone can understand it on their level, but my friends have to look at it twice—they can’t figure it all out at once, but I think a lot of people get it right away. Have you been approached by other fashion brands to collaborate in the past? Not like this. I did a big project with Barneys [New York] last year. I did their windows and designed objects for them, but not with clothing. Have you gotten your hands on the collection yet? Yeah, they sent me pieces and they’re absolutely terrific. The jackets and hoodies for men are fabulous.

When did you get into graffiti? When I was Shaping the graffiti movement since the ’80s, John “Crash” Matos continues about 13. I to make a splash in the art world with his abstract, colorful, and typically grew up in the massive works d’art. The artist is creating a live-mural event in partnership projects in with American Express at the W South Beach on December 3, where guests South Bronx will be able to meet the pioneer and witness the creation of a new work. and met some of the older guys who were doing it and picked it up from them. What was the reputation of graffiti art when you began your career? It was considered vandalism for a long time. I would paint in the subways around 1975, and it wasn’t looked at as a positive by everyone. Some people did, but it was a little rough at the beginning. How did you get your nickname? It’s a computer term. I was attending high school in Manhattan and my major at the time was computer programing. One day, they were teaching us how to turn on the computer and I inserted the disc wrong to start it up, so the system crashed, and that’s how it happened. Where do you look for inspiration for your art? GO BIG OR GO HOME John I grew up in the ’60s, so I was really into early comic “Crash” Matos’s books and Japanese animation. Today, I sometimes large-scale work is go back in time—now with the Internet you can really known for its bold colors, graphic letdo that—and am still interested in the whole pop tering, and overall scene with comics, but I’m also into music. Whenever positive energy. I paint I always have music around me. Left: the artist. What genres of music do you like? I’m into everything except for country music. [Laughs] It doesn’t do anything for me. I’m also not a huge Taylor Swift fan.

g e t t y i m a g e s ; pat r i c k m c m u l l a n . c o m ; a l l ot h e r s c o u r t e s y

JOHN “CRASH” MATOS

There are also these gowns and great bathing suits and pocketbooks for women. From where I’m sitting, the whole thing is very successful. Why do you like working with fashion brands? I think fashion reflects the culture of our time—fashion is ephemeral, and it’s sort of the same with paintings. What are your plans at Art Basel this year? I’m going to the opening party, which will be fun. I’m also having a black and white show at Washington University in D.C. right after the show in Miami. I’m also working on a lot of paintings. Is there a piece you’re most looking forward to people seeing at Basel? I have one of [my son] Vincent that my wife likes a lot, so I can’t sell it. There are so many paintings I like; basically I’m very happy with them.—SYDNEY SADICK

bEST FACES FORWARD (From left) Alex Katz with “Black Sweater,” (1998). Pieces from the Alex Katz X H&M collection, which are available at hm.com.

How has graffiti evolved over the years? It’s gotten more technical and advanced. There’s so much going on in the world and so much imagery that can give you ideas. In the beginning it was just lettering, but it’s grown so much. How do you keep it fresh? To me, you have to keep an open mind. Most people say they’re just going to do what they want to do, and that’s it. But that defeats the purpose of being creative. You have to be open to whatever’s out there. It’s a great challenge, and there’s always a sense of risk that you take. You have to be able to just go for it and not be afraid. Mistakes happen, but to me mistakes are not mistakes. What’s one of your proudest moments? I thought what I just did at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami was really cool. To make a mural that big [almost 300 feet by 20 feet] that’s so bold is pretty cool. It was abstract-meets-pop with different pop imagery and abstract colors. You’ll be live-painting a mural at the W South Beach during Art Basel. What sparked this? Initially I was asked to design Christmas trees for all of the W Hotels around the world, and then they asked if I’d be interested in doing something at one of their hotels [during Art Basel]. I could use some time away from the city! It’s going to involve music—DJ Ali Shaheed Muhammad will be playing while I paint. Do you typically live-paint? It’s rare for me. I’m private about how I work, so normally, I paint in a studio. Even your Instagram account is private! Yeah, if anyone wants to contact me, they have to go through one of my friends. Once you reach me, I’m easy to catch.—SYDNEY SADICK FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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INSIDER Guide

Rodman Primack

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To discover the best spots in town, we’ve gone straight to the most informed local: Rodman Primack, chief creative officer of Design Miami, who has the dining and cultural scenes on lockdown. Take his advice! By EDDIE ROCHE photography by andrew meredith

WHERE TO EAT

“I’m thrilled when stone crab season begins again in the fall, and I totally love Joe’s Stone Crab [11 Washington Ave.]. Everything is delicious and just as it should be, and the service is the best in town. I am also addicted to the perfect pizza from the Brooklyn transplant Lucali [1930 Bay Rd.]. I cannot start my day without a smoothie from JugoFresh [1935 West Ave.]. For dinner, my local spots are Sardinia Enoteca Ristorante [1801 Purdy Ave.] and Barceloneta [1400 20th St.]. Of course, Mandolin Aegean Bistro in the Design District [4312 NE Second Ave.] is a constant. And then there are the delicious pastries from True Loaf [1894 Bay Rd.]!”

WHERE TO INDULGE

“I love our local ice cream company, The Frieze [1626 Michigan Ave.] so much that the owner even created a flavor for me: mango sorbet and vanilla ice cream swirled together. Dean & Deluca

is doing our café at the fair, and they’re collaborating with The Frieze to have an ice cream bar within the Entry Plaza designed by SHoP Architects, the 2016 Panerai Design Miami/Visionary.”

6 Primack’s world 1. The scene at Soho Beach House. 2. An irresistible treat from The Frieze. 3. An exhibition at Nina Johnson. 4. The signature dish at Joe’s Stone Crab. 5. The terrace at Mandolin Aegean Bistro. 6. Rendering of the new ICA building.

shops in North Miami, on 86th Street and 125th Street and Biscayne, and then farther up on Old Dixie Highway in Fort Lauderdale, where you can find treasures.”

MUSEUM MUSTS

“My office? Actually I love going to the Soho Beach HouSE [4385 Collins Ave.] on weekend mornings to hang out at the beach until about lunchtime.”

“Miami is lucky to have such an expanding museum culture, which we can all thank Art Basel Miami Beach for igniting. In Miami proper, PAMM [1103 Biscayne Blvd.] is a beautiful Herzog & de Meuron structure that is proving to be a real public space and a great platform under the leadership of its new director, Franklin Sirmans. Soon, the doors will open at the new ICA in the Miami Design District [4040 NE Second Ave.], and we are all eagerly anticipating the expansion and reopening of The Bass Museum [2100 Collins Ave.] next year. And we can’t forget private initiatives like the de la Cruz Collection [delacruzcollection.org] and the Rubell Family Collection [rfc.museum].”

WHERE TO SHOP

LOCAL LIVING

WHERE TO BROWSE “I’m a big fan of Nina Johnson’s eponymous gallery [6315 NW Second Ave.]. She takes risks and has built a program that is interesting and worthwhile while not trying to be anything but what it is.”

WHERE TO HANG

“At the Miami Design District, I like 4141 Design [4141 NE Second Ave.], which sells Vitra-produced furniture by contemporary designers like Konstantin Grcic, Hella Jongerius, and Jasper Morrison. I also like the funky vintage

“I live on the Venetian Causeway, a string of small islands that connect Miami with Miami Beach on a toll road. Over the past few years, Sunset Harbor and Lincoln Road have become the center of my life outside the office.”

FASHION HAUNTS

“I’m obsessed with the Loewe boutique in the Miami Design District [110 NE 39th St.]. It’s a beautiful space, and Jonathan Anderson is reviving the brand, one that I have loved since my first trip to Spain at 15, in such a great way. The recently opened store MRKT DEUX [3824 NE Second Ave.] is also promising—they carry brands like Vetements, Public School, and Jil Sander. I also like Alchemist [1109 Lincoln Rd.] in the iconic 1111 Parking Garage, another great Herzog & de Meuron project.”

WHERE TO SWEAT

“I like loud music and being told what to do, so I love Barry’s Bootcamp, Flywheel, and JetSet Pilates. Also, like many people who split time between Miami and New York, I go to Equinox and Green Monkey yoga.”

PUBLIC ART PIT STOP “The six-block pedestrian mall Lincoln Road was designed by architect Morris Lapidus and opened in the early 1960s. I love the shade canopies, fountains, and gardens he planned and that the viability of his design has been proven by the revitalization of the strip in the ’90s.” ß

G e t t y i m a g e s ; a ll o t h e r s c o u r t e s y

WHEN IN MIAMI…

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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11/15/16 2:05 PM


chicShrine

Loewe Luxe (Clockwise from left) An 18th-century granary building imported from Portugal is the centerpiece of the Loewe store in Miami’s design district; the house’s designer, Jonathan Anderson; two paintings by William McKeown: Untitled, (2009–20011) and Hope, (2007).

Art House Jonathan Anderson has successfully given what was once an under-theradar Spanish luxury label some serious cachet. Now that he’s turned Loewe into a main attraction at Paris Fashion Week, he’s intent on making his retail stores equally compelling. As he unveils the latest art installation at Loewe’s Design District store, Anderson explains how his inspiration and designs go hand-in-hand. BY PAIGE REDDINGER

It’s your second year curating an exhibition at your Miami store with the Loewe Foundation. How do you select the artist? It’s a gut reaction to people I really admire. This year, I’ve chosen William McKeown, the late abstractionist Irish painter. He worked using squares and made emotional paintings about what he felt through an abstract form. We’re also showing work from the British ceramicist John Ward. I felt he was not recognized, and his contribution to contemporary ceramics is huge. This was a really good platform to do something with him. For the past two years, you’ve chosen to exhibit ceramicists at ABMB. Are you a collector? Yes, for about 10 years now. I started with Lucie Rie, and I have also been collecting John Ward, Hans Coper, and some more modern ceramicists. It’s good that people are starting to see ceramics as an important art form— that perception has changed in the past five years.

You’ve stuck with U.K.-based artists— was there any pressure to focus on Spanish ones? No! It’s all about what feels right in that moment; there’s no set agenda to it. Each year, it’ll be different. McKeown and Ward share common themes in their work—freedom versus containment, for example. Do you relate? Anyone I’ve worked with or used has always been some sort of reaction to what I’m doing. For example, John Ward has been very influential for me, especially in the way he uses these ideas of sediment and natural forms. Which artists have directly influenced your work? Howard Hodgkin. He’s incredibly influential for me, especially in his use of color. He’s one of the best living British painters at the moment. We acquired one of his paintings for a new Loewe store. How long have you been coming to Art Basel? Since we opened the store, I’ve been coming out here. I wanted to be able to give the store a cultural element, and we do it in a very noncommercial way during Art Basel. What am I looking forward to? The problem with Art Basel is that it’s too much delight. [Laughs] What are some of your local Miami haunts? I usually stay at The Standard—I feel like it’s a sort of ’70s refuge [Laughs]. Every time I go to Miami, I always eat something different. I’ve experienced many different types of amazing Mexican food there—like really, really, really good. Usually, I’m not there for very long, so it usually ends up being some sort of retreat at The Standard. Any artists on your mind for next year? Many. Always! At some point, we’ll probably do some large collaboration with artists. ß

Examples of vessels by British potter John Ward that will be on display in Miami. His work is inspired by ancient ceramics from China, Persia, and Egypt.

White mottled square pot (1931–1946)

Horseshoe vase (1931–1946)

Black and White vase (2015)

Sand Mottled Lip pot (1931–1946)

courtesy

Four faves

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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visionQuest

play on words For those convinced the written word is a lost art, meet Paul Antonio. The London-based scribe, famous for his large glass installations, partnered with Persol for a range of eyewear that celebrates the handmade called—what else?—The Calligrapher Edition. BY KRISTEN HEINZINGER Paul, what are the first words or phrases that you remember writing? In calligraphy, usually the first thing people try is a little bit of decorative flourishing, so it’s not usually a word. The first thing I would’ve written with a broad edge pen would have been zigzag patterns; the first word I would’ve written would have been one of the suggested words in books on calligraphy: “minimum,” “minimal,” or “minium.” They’re called minimum height letters. When did you realize that you had a gift for calligraphy? I grew up in Trinidad, and as a child I would always drag my mother around to the beach. We would look for a clean patch of sand, and I would kneel there and write in the sand for hours, which sort of drove her a little bit crazy. [Laughs] I’ve always loved writing. Then a friend gave me a calligraphy set. He said, “My mom bought me this set, but it’s really difficult to write with it. You like writing, so do you want it?” I spent the whole weekend practicing and I just fell in love with it. You’re latest collaboration is with Persol. Why do your sensibilities align with those of the brand? [Persol] has [about] 30 processes to produce the

frames; a lot of it is hand-finished and hand-crafted. That level of craftsmanship and artistry aligns quite nicely with the work I do. I cut my quills and I make my own ink, if the client is up for that. I prepare the paper myself. When you’re using vellum [parchment], you have to prepare it with cuttlefish bone and pumice and gently sand it. Sanding is a very important process in producing frames and lenses, too. What’s the campaign concept? How did you choose the particular phrases written on the glass? Persol wanted something that was contemporary but had a traditional nod. For the past 15 years, I’ve been toying with a manual for 18th-century script. I started to see how stripping down 18th-century round hand to its bare minimum could allow for the development of a more contemporary script. And one of the things I’m quite well-known for is being able to write really big on glass. We came up with this concept of working on large sheets of glass, which would be akin to writing on the lens. Persol asked me about some of the words I think of when I’m writing, and I came up with “integrity,” “line,” “movement,” “shape,” “rhythm,” and “life.” We came up with this amazing line; it needed to look like it was dancing. I needed to be able to write it in reverse, because you’re looking at glass. [We also] engraved this 18th-century script in copper. In order to [do that], we needed to cut it in reverse. So the script lent itself naturally to being executed in reverse. What’s your take on the special power of things made by hand in a digital era? When computers started to take off, everyone said, “The computer is brilliant—you won’t need to do any handwriting anymore.” Most people thought it would change everything. And for a while, it did. But recently, a lot of people have been realizing that

hollywood heavyweight From film legends to It girls, the chic set relies on Persol frames for time-tested quality and unabashed good looks.

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jaiMe king

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STEVE McQUEEN

getty i mages ( 3 ) ; everett collect i on ; all ot h ers courtesy

fashion flourish Sleek styles from Persol’s Calligrapher Edition juxtaposed with the work of Paul Antonio.

the computer is just a tool. It’s good at what it does only if the person behind it can guide it. That led to a really interesting revolution. How do you source your talent? That’s not easy. [Laughs] I got in touch with 10 different calligraphy teachers and said, “I’m looking for an apprentice, but the person needs to be as crazy as I am.” You really do need some severe OCD to do calligraphy. You need to keep your hands clean, otherwise the envelopes get dirty; you need to keep the nib sharpened; you need to produce the same shape consistently. Finding people who are willing to commit is a little bit difficult. There’s a great tradition starting called modern calligraphy—a lot of people are starting to jump into it, but my hope is that it will [be used as a] stepping stone to jump into the traditional forms of calligraphy. That would then give us a nice pool of people to choose from. What are some of your favorite Persol styles? It’s always the blue-tinted lenses I go for—it’s like looking at the world through rose-tinted glasses. The Persol 649 I quite like as well. But after wearing the Calligrapher Edition on the shoot, I was sort of hooked. What are your upcoming projects? I’m working on the manual on 18th-century round hand. I’m starting to do a lot more teaching—I did an Asian tour, and I’ve just come back from a U.S. tour. I have a few projects coming up with some of our suppliers, and I’m demonstrating their products at the Paperworld Show in Frankfurt. And then, of course, managing all this crazy social media, which takes so much time! ß

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Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Collectible Design

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Abyss Round Table/ Christopher Duffy, 2016/ Wood, Resin, Glass and Acrylic/ 110 × 110 × 42cm/ Courtesy of the artist and Sarah Myerscough Gallery

November 30–December 4/ Meridian Avenue & 19th Street Miami Beach, USA/ designmiami.com @DesignMiami #DesignMiami

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PLAYTime on the news, and it just made me think about Sarah and about how maybe she was this girl from the Midwest and she had these ambitions and desires. But the musical isn’t a narrative—there’s no dialogue. It was just these strong images I was responding to, and that’s how it formed. Where are you from, Todd? Almond: A small town in Nebraska. How long did it take this project to come together? Almond: I wrote the music pretty quickly and then sat on it for a while. Kevin and I had been talking about it for a couple of years, and it truly needed to fall into the right hands. I’m grateful that it took a while. I didn’t know it would burst into such life. We hear you based one scene on a Fleetwood Mac video from the ’80s. How so? Love: I’m a huge Fleetwood Mac fan, and my favorite song of theirs is “The Chain.” There’s a very operatic YouTube video of Stevie [Nicks] and Lindsey [Buckingham] where they’re coked out of their minds and they hate each other’s guts. You know, this is all public information, but it’s Kabuki opera in a lot of ways. It’s a really great clip. And so I showed it to Todd, and we kind of hustled and he altered one song to kind of fit that paradigm. Did you pull from any other references? Love: Not really from my end—most of it came from having to learn different kind of phrasing and not the Stones-y, grungy rock that I grew up making. It has some rock in it, but it’s also got a Todd Almond stamp of originality. I had to work really hard to learn how to sing like that. Almond: Courtney is such a brilliant actress and singer that, of course, she brings all this inspiration and life to it. It’s something that I never knew that it could be, thanks to her vitality and artistry. What inspired the decision to bring it to Miami Courtney Love has the ability to shock, awe, and move seamlessly from during Art Basel? one art form to another. Thanks to a star turn in Kansas City Choir Love: I don’t know. It’s exciting, though. [Laughs] Boy, a musical created by Todd Almond about a young woman who flees Almond: [Laughs] I don’t know either! There have been a lot of cities that wanted us to come and we to the big city and leaves a broken heart in her wake, she’s added smallscale opera to her résumé. After receiving rave reviews during its New York can’t always work it out, but this seemed exciting to everyone. run, the emotionally wrenching show is coming to Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Love: I’ve never been to Art Basel before. My friends Center from November 30 through December 11. Love and Almond fill us would be like, “Are you going?” and I’d be like, “I’m going as an artist or I’m not going.” I didn’t want to in on their unique collaboration. go there just to hang out and go to some Gagosian BY PAIGE REDDINGER party and talk to artists. I had a pretty busy schedule, but I was like, “Let’s do this during Art Basel.” I’m still Todd, the character of Athena is a muse and who go to theater—sometimes bands come, but not trying to figure out the neighborhoods, so I can figure long-lost love for your protagonist, a tortured always. There’s one song where I really let down my out my Airbnb and get to the theater on time and musician. Why was Courtney right for this role? wall, but it’s not about me, it’s about the character stuff like that. Todd Almond: Courtney and I had become friends of Athena. Courtney, it seems like everyone is referencing through Mark Subias [Love’s agent and Almond’s Do you relate to your characters? the ’90s these days. Thoughts? TWO OF HEARTS Onstage, Love Love: If there was a real revival of the husband], but [director] Kevin [Newbury] and I were Love: I certainly do—I came from a and Almond explore themes of talking and we said, “Wouldn’t Courtney be the most small town and wanted to get to the 90’s right now, there would be more of intimacy and longing. perfect human being for this role and wouldn’t it be big city. Tragic things happened, and a revival of rock music and there isn’t. such a dream if she said yes?” Because she and I are I’m still here. I didn’t leave anyone There’s independent, underground, behind in this kind of way, but I friendly, I felt comfortable asking her and luckily, she alternative rock music, but nobody’s definitely relate to her ambitions and came on board. making rent from that. It’s unlike her desires. Courtney Love: I wasn’t doing anything at the time the ’90s in the sense that the charts Almond: I relate in the sense that that was more important. I’ve been trying to write a are full of rap and pop and not full of I’m always going back to small-town book for five years, and I was erratically collecting rock. Every once in a while, you’ll get America versus big-city America. I was different songs so I can make an album at some a Nickelback song [Laughs], but it’s inspired to write Kansas City Choir Boy point. It was something of a risk, but I thought it good to see bands like Jane’s Addiction by the unfortunate events of a young would be really cool and I really respected Todd and getting nominated for the Rock & actress I had worked with at Juilliard. I Kevin and the whole team. Roll Hall of Fame. On the fashion didn’t know her very well, but she was The mood is very intimate. How does that affect front, though, I’m doing my second murdered in New York. It was quite your performance? collection with Nasty Gal—and it’s devastating. There was a missing girl Love: Well, it’s acting. There are a lot of grown-ups going really well! ß

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CHANGING HER TUNE

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It's Always Summer in Miami Miami Beach - Midtown

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the faena phenom Alan Faena has turned a oncesleepy stretch of Collins Avenue into a cultural mecca, complete with an ambitious arts center and one of the world’s top hotels. As the Faena Arts District nears completion, meet the visionaries who made it happen. EDITED BY ashley baker AND EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOgraph BY SEBASTIAN FAENA

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I l l u s t r a t i o n s b y J i l l S E RRA W I L D E FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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He’s GOT THE LOOK Alan Faena, dressed in his signature all-white ensemble, nods to the fedora.

meet the master What was your idea for the Faena Forum? The Forum is a place for cultural interaction—it's a pioneering new public venue dedicated to presenting and showcasing the ambitious, the innovative, and the groundbreaking in fields ranging from art and entertainment to business and beyond. Evocative of the ancient civic and architectural concept of a forum, the Forum aims to offer Miami a dynamic setting, allowing for ongoing programming under the direction of Faena Art, as well as use by private companies, institutions, and individuals. You opened the hotel about a year ago. What’s the year been like for you? It’s very pleasant. At the end of the day, I’m a storyteller and I created this place to bring fantasy to people, and elevate their lives. I feel very happy when I see people enjoying it all, from the Cathedral to the Theater. We’re creating fantasy in such a different way from the rest of the [hospitality] industry. Are you the most popular guy in town during Art Basel? I don’t think so. [Laughs] For me it’s about creation and doing my best, and Art Basel is a good moment to show it to the world. Do you get nervous about openings? Yes. I try to have everything perfect. Had you worked with Juan Gatti before the hotel? No. I’ve just been a fan and I had bought some of his

art; I’ve known him for a long time. For the hotel, I worked a lot with Juan and Baz Luhrmann to create a window to my heart and life. Each thing we made is based on a story. How did you connect with Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin? I always admired them, and my business partner, Len Blavatnik, introduced me to them. I had worked with top designers before, but I didn’t get what I was looking for—they were great designs, but they could be in any city in the world. I was trying to tell my story about my life, my beliefs, and my past. To get what I wanted, I knew I had to work with filmmakers. They are used to working with a script. I always tell my team we aren’t here to be cool—we have to tell the story of the heart. What was your vision for the C’est Rouge show? I always loved theater. I create a lot of different stages to create different stories. The Forum has a stage; the Theater has a stage. What’s your favorite theatrical piece? Cabaret! Do you have a favorite piece of art in the hotel? "Gone but Not Forgotten," Juan Gatti's murals, and Alberto Garutti's chandeliers. When you worked in fashion, you wore mostly black. Now, you wear all white. There’s only one pair of pants and one shirt that I like.

I have my clothes made, and I wear them with Crocs. How long were you a fashion designer? I started very young after school, and by the time I was 20, I had a big company. Would you ever return to fashion design? No, because what I am doing now involves fashion in a much more 360 way. Sebastian Faena is your cousin. What’s your relationship like? He’s my best friend, a brother. I’m very happy for him— he’s created a niche in such a difficult market. He’s super talented and one of the best photographers in the world. He’s a warrior, he’s a musician, he’s a singer, he writes, he makes cinema. We need more Sebastians. Do you work seven days a week? I do what I love, so I never work.—EDDIE ROCHE Below: The Faena Theater

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the vIsionary: alan faena


Faena Hotel, the nirvana on Collins Avenue.

THE FAENA EFFECT

Philip Levine, the Mayor of Miami Beach, explains how ALAN Faena’s vision has energized the city. What has the Faena District brought to Miami Beach? Literally, it’s a shining star to this area of Miami Beach whose light resonates not only nationally but internationally. It’s a tremendous asset to the state of Florida. What was your first impression of Alan? His reputation precedes him. I happen to love Argentina and what Alan had done with [his property] in Puerto Madero, so I had seen and understood his tremendous capability and creative genius. What he created in Puerto Madero didn’t just resonate in Argentina, but in all of Latin America. When you look in his eyes, you see endless possibilities. Alan gives out that energy. To know him is to like him. He is the Wizard of Oz, but I like the way he dresses better than the Wizard. He always wears white, and that’s symbolic of his personality, which is openness. To me, his white outfit is like a white canvas, waiting for folks in the creative community to put their ideas onto it.

ALAN’S COLLABORATORS

LORENZO DE’ MEDICI v. ALAN FAENA How do the two Renaissance men match up?

From A-list filmmakers to local business leaders, Alan Faena’s partnerships bring his vision to life.

t o dd e b e r l e ; g e t t y i m a g e s ( 4 ) ; a l l o t h e r s c o u r t e s y ; s h u t t e r s t o c k

“We first met Alan Faena and Ximena Caminos as The Great Gatsby was opening, and instantly fell in love with them and their singular point of view. We were intrigued by their ideas and decided to help them in the early development of their project. Our focus was to create a narrative for the Faena Hotel that would translate the essence of the Faena vision from Buenos Aires to Miami. Alan has his own very distinct sensibility and aesthetic. He is the star and guiding light of this project, the lead player in the adventure of the creation of the Faena Hotel and its surrounding district, and we are very happy to have contributed to the realization of Alan’s vision.” —Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin “Working with Alan can be an abstract process. On one hand, Alan stays mystical; on the other hand, he’s a true perfectionist. Together with Ximena and Len, they took over the place, not just by developing a cool hotel but by creating a mini nirvana. Alan is a creative visionary you only see in movies. He’s moving, thinking, and acting like he was born and raised on the sun.”—Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel, co-founders, Studio Job

Baz Luhrmann and Catherine Martin Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel

You frequent the hotel often. What do you enjoy about it? The service. The people. The energy that Alan has created. I have a quote on the wall at City Hall that reads, “The speed of the leader determines the rate of the pack.” That’s true of any company and organization. Alan’s leadership creates that service, that warmth, that feeling of endless possibility. I had some work done in my house over a weekend and I needed to stay at a hotel, and I ended up staying at the Faena. I told Alan that it’s good and bad here. It’s good because I enjoyed it, but the bad was I didn’t want to leave. What’s Art Basel like for you as the Mayor? It’s like having the Super Bowl in your city every year. It’s an honor, and it’s so much fun. Do you get any sleep? That’s the problem! After one week of Basel, you almost need to go on a vacation for a week after.—EDDIE ROCHE

VS lorenzo de’ medici “il Magnifico” (the magnificent)

Writing poetry and sonnets, mostly about love

Greek, Latin, and an extraordinarily flowery version of Italian

A horse named Morello di Vento—the guy loved to joust!

alan faena nickname

teenage pastimes

language proficiency

prized pet

“the Miami Magnifico”

Music and soccer

English and the most musical kind of Spanish

Whippets, including a favorite named Wimpy

His cousin is the renowned photographer Sebastian Faena.

His father, Cosimo de Medici, led the Republic of Florence.

groundbreaking relative

Florence’s status as the cultural capital of Europe was solidified

under his reign

South Beach became Miami’s preeminent destination for both hospitality and art

signature look

An all-white shirt, pants, and his signature fedora. “I try to be as minimalist as I can,” Faena says.

Puffed sleeves, anything velvet, but nothing too outré

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VISION ACCOMPLISHED THE ARCHITECT: SHOHEI SHIGEMATSU

Shohei Shigematsu, who oversees OMA’s New York office, is no stranger to collaborating with tastemakers—his short list includes Kanye West, Marina Abramovic, and the Whitney Museum. His latest creative companion? Alan Faena, who tapped the architect to build out the Faena District. When you first met Alan in 2011, what was the scope of the project? I was in Buenos Aires, staying at his hotel. I knew who he was, but I’d never met him. I ran into him in the hotel courtyard, and we started talking about collaborations. He was interested in our office structure, which has OMA as the architect, but the branding and think tank of AMO. So he was interested in us doing branding research. That was the critical assignment: to understand who he and Ximena [Caminos] were and their company’s ambition. At that moment the company was kind of exploding, and when a company is expanding, the biggest anxiety is about keeping the brand intact. What was your initial vision for the District? Across Collins Avenue, Alan had three sites. We had the ambition of creating a neighborhood. In Miami Beach, the beach side is always the active side and the other is quieter, residential, and non-

How did you envision the assembly hall? We conceived two different volumes. We wanted to have flexible use for everything from visual art, performance art, and corporate events to weddings. Typically, functional and flexible space ends up looking the same—a boxy ballroom with flexible walls. But knowing Alan and Ximena, we wanted to give a certain character to the space. We thought a cube could be contemporary and the circle could be classical. It has this interesting dichotomy—is it two or is it one? That was our intention. This is the first project where you designed a parking garage—what research went into that? Miami Beach is strangely the mecca of well-designed The exterior of Faena Bazaar

developed. We wanted to create the cultural heart of the community and cater to events like Art Basel. The tradition [in Miami Beach] is to create a big hotel compound, so people don’t have to leave, but Alan’s concept was basically the opposite: to create multiple buildings in multiple blocks. What inspired you to base the design of the Forum on the cylinder and cube interplay? We were surprised how different the atmospheres of the Collins side and the Indian Creek side are. Instead of one big building and two smaller ones, we made the big one into two smaller ones, so there are four equal volumes. We split the biggest site in half—one volume facing Collins, and one facing Indian Creek. One is a classical cylinder and dome, and one is contemporary and box-like. We pushed the interior configuration to have a distinct feeling and space inside, too. That was key—to create a diverse experience and diversity of use.

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The Faena Forum


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parking projects, like 1111 Lincoln Road. In our case, it was a mechanical parking system, so it was a little easier. Alan was quite firm on making underground parking, which is very difficult, technically and budget-wise, because in Miami Beach the water table is so high. It became an urban gesture—underground parking that serves the entire neighborhood. What features did you give the garage to make it its own destination? We gave it a restaurant; a flexible, rentable space at the top; and retail at the bottom—multifunctional parking that also has a unique sense of life. The penetrations are angled, so it has an interesting way of permeating light. There will always be some sort of activity going on for the people. How did you envision the retail space for Faena Bazaar? [We renovated the] Atlantic Hotel, which is a protected landmark, and we inserted a courtyard. The ambition was to create a building that’s not typical retail. If it’s all new, it won’t show authenticity, and if it’s all old, then there’s a limitation. Even if it’s cute and tiny, I think it was important for us to have this existing building. How do you expect the project to evolve? Ximena is so passionate about the programming and the usage of the Forum, which defines that building. The Forum can become a cultural jewel of the Faena District, and of Miami Beach. I think it will evolve into a multifunctional space where a lot of content can be created and not just consumed. Alan might expand the District, but the idea will evolve organically. That’s the future I’m looking at. How have your impressions of Miami as a city changed throughout this project? Right now, to me, Miami is the capital of Latin America. The fact that Alan did this in Miami Beach represents the status of the city. It’s become one of the most energetic, attractive cities in the U.S. in terms of living, working, and culture. It’s rewarding to be a part of that momentum. Miami and other beach cities used to be resort-only cities, but now they’re working, living cities. That’s kind of a remarkable transformation. What’s it like to work with Alan? He has a strong vision, and he knows how to achieve it. That was a fundamental part of the success of the project. He understands the commercial side but also the cultural. That kind of dialectic relationship was exciting to us. —KRISTEN HEINZINGER

The X Factor THE CURATOR: ximena CAMINOS

There aren’t enough hours in the day to keep up with Ximena Caminos, who has been working around the clock to unveil the Faena Forum, a new platform for artists from around the world. As the artistic director of the Faena Group, chair of Faena Art, and a force in the art world, she has plans that are bigger than ever. What’s your background? My family is embedded in the cultural world in Argentina. I was fortunate; I grew up with the most influential intellectuals and artists in my country. My godmother was the director of the Museum of Modern Art, so at a very early age she sent me to study the Latin American masters. At the same time, I studied art history and stage design at the opera house. I also studied psychology and philosophy for two years. At 19, I started working at the Centro Cultural Recoleta in Argentina, which was the epicenter of the cultural revolution that happened in the ’90s. I was assistant director for 10 years, and we had 21 exhibition rooms, a cinema, and a theater in the heart of Buenos Aires. During that period, I curated and brought artists like Alex Katz and Jenny Holzer to the country. When I met Alan [Faena] through a common friend, I was the curator for a special project for the Museum of Latin Art [MALBA]. Alan had bought the hotel in Buenos Aries but hadn’t reopened it yet. He asked me to collaborate with him, which I turned down at the beginning because I had an amazing job. I wasn’t interested in hotels. But I understood what he wanted, and I’ve been working with him for 13 years now. At some point in that relationship, we ended up getting married and having a child! I became his creative partner and helped him infuse the whole concept with high culture. Who introduced you? Gustavo Cerati, the leader of Soda Stereo, the largest rock band in Latin America. He was my best friend for years and years, and he died in 2014. I designed many of his shows for fun. Even though I was trained in the arts, my interest is creation and creativity at large. I had the same fun designing a rock ’n’ roll show as a museum exhibition. How did he introduce you to Alan? We ended up at Alan’s beach house one night and danced until 9 the next morning. Alan told me to come back for lunch the same day. He started asking me questions and said he wanted me to come work for him. I didn’t know who he was. I knew he had some project. I worked for the richest man in Latin America doing whatever I wanted already, so why would I work with him? I was flattered, but I declined. He insisted a lot. Eventually, he convinced me, and thank God he did. It changed our lives forever. We became best friends very quickly. When did you fall in love? A couple of years later. We get along so well. We’re like gunpowder and dynamite. He makes me better, I make him better, but in a very exponential way. We are a very interesting formula because we are very similar in many things and very different in many things. The combination has proven to be so fun and so creative and so successful, ultimately. How are you different? Alan is a very wise businessman. He has the bird’s-eye view of the process and the strategic mind, and I’m more about developing the content and creating the secret formula that will make this thing grow. Is this district everything you imagined? It’s even more than what Alan imagined, and it surpassed

Ximena Caminos

my expectations. I knew we were going to be very welcomed by the city. I knew we were going to make a difference, but I didn’t know it would be at this scale. What’s your focus in the Forum? Developing the cultural content through fine art. The Forum is an amazing building, but buildings are buildings. Our ambition for the Forum was to make it a platform for the world’s creative class to come together and experiment. We want it to be a cultural incubator. Who are some of the artists you’ll work with? Some are world-renowned, and some aren’t known at all. We want to be a preview of what’s coming. We want to give people a taste of the future. Who came up with the idea to create a geodesic dome on the beach for Art Basel? It was my idea. I wanted to do it because the fair is so private—it’s commercial, it’s about celebrity and exclusivity. Last year with Faena Art, I put a roller rink on the beach with Assume Vivid Astro Focus because I wanted to do something open and free for the public. That’s what we are about. We can be exclusive but at the same time we want to bring art to the people, and we want to share our daily experience of contemporary art. It’s a public immersive installation. How long did it take to build? About three weeks. We didn’t rent a dome—we conceived a whole new thing. It’s going to be spectacular. You and Alan have a 7–year-old son. Does he have an interest in art? Not at all. I guess he will develop it. He has an interest in design—he has a very fine eye. He appreciates looking at art but doesn’t like executing it himself. He’d rather have an iPad in his hand. How do you keep your energy up during periods like Art Basel? I do a lot of acupuncture and yoga, and I take Chinese herbs. I’m a raw vegan; I eat well. You have to be an athlete to keep up with this rhythm. Alan is an athlete, too. He looks like an Olympic swimmer. He trains very hard, eats super healthy, and we go to bed and wake up early. We are very focused—but that doesn’t mean we don’t party once in a while. We have fun!—EDDIE ROCHE FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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PURE FANTASY

g at t i : p e t e r l i n d b e r g h ; to d d e b e r l e ; a l l ot h e r s c o u r t e s y

THE MICHELANGELO OF THE FAENA: JUAN GATTI

How did you first meet Alan Faena? I met him in 2012. At that time, I had an exhibition in Buenos Aires called “Natural Sciences.” He went to the exhibition and bought several paintings. I think we connected at that moment. What were your initial impressions of him? Apart from his appearance, which is already very particular and attractive, the first impression he gave me was that of a person very sure of himself, and who was very clear in his interests. What impressed you about his vision? His ability to make his dreams even more ambitious, which I had already seen in his previous projects. How well did you know Miami before you began working on the project? What did you think of the city? I knew very little about Miami—only a few quick trips during the ’80s and ’90s, where there was more of a spirit of Versace and Madonna. The Miami I encountered when I started my project there had nothing to do with the spirit of Ocean Drive I had in mind. Now, I find a city more cultured and more interested in cultural phenomena and real estate developments. You live in Madrid. What, if anything, do the two cities have in common? I see few points of contact with Miami. Here, everything is old, and in Miami, everything is new, but there is also a Latin spirit that gives you energy and passion. The eight murals in the Cathedral reference moments in Alan’s life and journey. How did the two of you work together to narrow down the subject matter and arrive at these works? Before starting the project, we had long talks about his life because in a way the project was also about that of a conqueror who does not try to find the City of Gold, but to build it. Somehow, I felt like a Renaissance artist to whom a Medici nobleman in Florence made a commission to perpetuate himself in history. Taken as a whole, the murals are intended to illuminate the path to a place called “Futopia.” How do you describe it?

The murals try to reflect a journey, as if a conqueror had found the lost paradise and by certain archaeological ruins discovers that there was an earlier civilization that was dominated by nature. What kind of impression did you intend to give people entering the space for the first time? It has always been called the Cathedral, hence, its ecclesiastical connotation; although I also get the impression—and more so when they added Damien Hirst’s “Gone But Not Forgotten”—of a kind of Museum of Natural Sciences of the Victorian era made by an hermetic artist influenced by the Theosophical School of Madame Blavatsky. Can you tell us about the work you’ve created for the Faena’s Art Basel projects? For Art Basel, I have created a geodesic dome in which I have made the exterior decoration, and in the interior there will be

various artistic manifestations. One of them will be the projection of a 360-degree film made by me that is called Backlight. How do you think the Faena has impacted Miami and how the city is viewed around the world? I think the works of Faena have had a great impact on the city and especially on South Beach. The rest of the world’s vision for Miami is that it is becoming the cultural and artistic center of America. —ASHLEY BAKER

DETAIL-ORIENTED Gatti’s designs for the Faena Hotel’s Cathedral were inspired by seminal moments in Alan Faena’s life. Juan Gatti

EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED Gatti’s geodesic dome on the Faena’s beach is called “Time Capsule.” During ABMB, it will feature films, 360-degree projections, virtual-reality experiences, and performances organized by Faena Art.

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Future Icon

wilde thing Artist, performer, activist, and allaround bon vivant Daniel Lismore is making his inaugural trip to Art Basel to reveal his ultra-rare collection of haute couture. Before the “Theater of Self ” exhibition storms SoBe, we rang him up at home in London to learn more about the guy who has captivated some of the fashion world’s most discerning hearts and minds. Why did you name the original exhibition at SCAD “Be Yourself; Everyone Else Is Already Taken”? It’s my favorite Oscar Wilde quote. It explains the show without saying it. When you walk into the room and see the exhibition, someone who is not familiar with me might go: “Does this person actually exist?” The answer is yes! You can be whomever you want to be. What have you included in the show? There are 4,000 pieces that form a tapestry of my journey and travels. There’s haute couture, tribal pieces, weird objects, and things I’ve made for my own label, Sorapol. There’s a lot of Alexander McQueen, as well as some Jean Paul Gaultier and Matthew Williamson. There are also pieces that my friend Boy George has given me over the years. What attracts you to these over-the-top looks? They’re great armor. The world is a scary place. I like how people respond. Where do you keep everything? In a storage unit! Are you well-organized? No. I prefer not to be. Life should be spontaneous. You had an exhibition at SCAD earlier this year. How did that relationship begin? I know Rafael Gomes, the museum director, and I told him that I wanted to exhibit my clothes. He mentioned that he was heading to SCAD with Vivienne Westwood and offered to talk to the team there. When he showed them some of the pieces in my collection, they loved the idea. To put the exhibition together, I worked closely with him and SCAD’s team. It’s not just a fashion story; it’s an art story. How did you become such a fashion guy? I’m from a small village in the middle of England. I studied photography and art and fashion. I was thrown into the fashion world full-throttle when I started modeling many years ago. I was working with all these greats in the industry, and then I got lost in nightlife for a few years, where I got to know FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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l i s m o r e : s i m o n h a r r i s ; r a f t e r m a n ; c h i a c h o n g ; d a n e l ly o t

BY EDDIE ROCHE


“One of the greatest things about being me is being able to change things politically. People do listen.”

l i s m o r e : s i m o n h a r r i s ; r a f t e r m a n ; c h i a c h o n g ; d a n e l ly o t

Must-see Lismore’s “Theater of Self ” at SCAD at Miami is a re-creation of his “Be Yourself; Everyone Else Is Already Taken” exhibition, which was featured at SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film in Atlanta earlier this year. It’s open to the public from December 2–13.

everybody. I learned a lot from Nicola Formichetti, who would style me to go out to the clubs on the weekend. I also worked with Isabella Blow. Listening to her talk about clothes formed this idea in my head: I had to go out there and be my own entity. That’s how I discovered myself, really—through others. What was Isabella like? She was one of the most beautiful people I’ve ever met. She was an original. She was like a beautiful thunderstorm, and when the lightning struck, it was glorious. She was a ray of energy. She taught me so much. She taught me confidence. She didn’t like the way she looked and wasn’t happy with herself, but she was a walking work of art. Her style blew your mind. I had never seen anything like that before. She taught me not to give a damn about what people thought of me.

Are you still involved with the nightlife scene in London? I don’t go to nightclubs as much anymore; I’d rather go to an event. There are few pockets of culture left. The [recent] closing down of so many venues in London is really affecting the creativity. London’s at a really strange place in time: It’s so expensive to live here, so many artists are now living outside of the city. What’s your upcoming book about? It’s an in-depth look at the exhibition. Hilary Alexander and Paul Wallace wrote most of the text, and there are quotes from Edward Enninful, Vivienne Westwood, Matt Lucas, Debbie Harry, Boy George, Stefano Pilati, and Stephen Fry. Who’s your spirit animal? It changes all the time, but right now, it’s Daphne

Guinness or Björk. I admire their artistry, and they are beautiful people, inside and out. One of the reasons I do what I do is that I’m trying to change perceptions. I’m an activist at heart. One of the greatest things about being me is being able to change things politically. People do listen. I don’t know why, because I’m not an expert, but I believe in just causes, whether it’s fracking or WikiLeaks or LGBT rights. Thoughts on WikiLeaks? I’m so for it. I know Julian [Assange], and he’s a wonderful person. He’s actually showing the people what’s really going on. Governments don’t like it, and they treated him diabolically. I think he’s one of the great people of our time. People say he’s doing it for many reasons, but he’s actually doing it for the greater good of humanity. Understanding that is why I support him. How did you meet him? London is the hub of the world! Everyone turns up here. [Laughs] One of the ways I met him was through Vivienne Westwood—I work with her on the Climate Revolution project. Who are your favorite artists? It’s so cliché: Warhol, Picasso, Dalí, and David LaChapelle. They’re always in my mind somewhere; their work is always haunting me. David became a friend, and he’s such a beautiful man. His life is like his work—there’s never a dull moment. If you could live in any other period of time, which would it be? The Pre-Raphaelite era. I love the paintings from that time, as well as their ideas about beauty. And I would have loved to have lived in Marie Antoinette’s court. You’ve been compared to Leigh Bowery. I didn’t know who Leigh Bowery was for a very long time. I ended up at a friend’s house once, and he gave me Paris Is Burning and a Leigh Bowery documentary to watch. I was like, “Oh, my God! This is crazy. I do this, too. Why didn’t I know this character?” Later on, Boy George asked me to play Leigh in the musical Taboo. I studied the role, so now, I know so much about him. I met everyone he’s been around and interviewed them. He was a genius, but Klaus Nomi from that period was the one for me. You recently appeared in the Ab Fab movie. Jealous! I was in two scenes and had a few lines. I was thrilled. It was a lifelong ambition to be in it. It’s my bible! The premiere was like Ab Fab come to life. It was a real moment—the weirdest mix of people, but so brilliant. Finally, congrats on being named among Out’s most compelling people of 2016! It’s a bit surreal. What have I done? ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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retailReport

No one is more influential in Miami’s fashion scene than Laure HériardDubreuil. Her boutique, The Webster, has captured the hearts of wellheeled locals as well as in-the-know visitors. Together with her husband, artist Aaron Young, the two have merged their art and fashion worlds so successfully that they even share clients. While they are now based in New York, Hériard-Dubreuil explains how The Webster has evolved. BY PAIGE REDDINGER

What drew you to Miami in the first place? I was working for Saint Laurent in Paris at the time, and I came to New York for work. It was November and it was cold, it was raining, and some friends told me to come for Art Basel Miami for the weekend. I arrived and it was a wonderland. Everyone’s gorgeous and looks amazing. The crowd for Basel was so refined and sophisticated. I had nothing to wear because I only had winter clothes. I went everywhere to look for something to wear and I couldn’t find anything. That’s how I started thinking that there was potential in Miami. I didn’t know anybody when I moved here. I arrived with little suitcases! You started the store during the height of the recession. How did you manage to stay afloat? It was a big challenge; the renovation took so long. We even had to open temporary stores down the street. The Art Basel crowd helped a lot, because they helped spread the word and they became very faithful clients. Right away, I had support from the designers and the fashion crowd. I managed to have all the most established and beautiful houses and also younger, contemporary designers. That’s what made the magic. And I was able to develop exclusive collections and I always select pieces that are not picked up by anyone else. In the end, I’m a merchandiser not a retailer.

Explain how they differ. I curate the store with what I love and believe in. The Webster feels like a home—you have the café, the vintage wallpaper, the furniture. I developed orange blossom scent exclusively for The Webster. I had met Elisabeth de Feydeau, an amazing nose, who recreated Marie Antoinette’s fragrance because she got the recipe from her fragrance maker. I fell in love with her and that’s how it started. It’s an orange blossom that’s tropical, fresh, and green. Who are some of the new designers that you’ve been buying lately? Sies Marjan and HVN, Harley Viera-Newton’s dress collection. I love Atlein from Paris, with all the drapes; and I really like Gül Hürgel, too. What are your favorite local spots? I love Mandolin. It’s a Mediterranean restaurant and I’m friends with the owners, Ahmet Erkaya and Anastasia Koutsioukis. They are in the design district, but they also opened their restaurant at the Soho House, which I also love. I also love Cecconi’s restaurant in the Soho House. The Standard Hotel, which has a super cool vintage feel. You can actually eat on the water, which is rare in Miami. I love also the Faena Hotel. It’s so beautiful. What was your entrée into the art world? I’ve always been interested in art. I met my husband

The Webster (Clockwise from left) The store’s interiors; founder Laure Hériard-Dubreuil; the historic art deco building at 1220 Collins Avenue in Miami Beach that houses the multibrand boutique.

[artist Aaron Young] in Miami during Basel. How long was it after you moved there that you met him? It was in 2008, one or two years after I moved there. His collectors are my clients and vice versa, so we could do a lot of things together. It’s crazy because I own a piece from Ryan McGinley—I bought it years ago in Paris and it’s been following me ever since. The first time my husband came to my place he saw the painting and said, “Ryan is a very dear friend of mine, and I actually know the girl in the photo!” We were connected before we were with each other, and it made it all super organic. Which other artists do you collect now? Other than Aaron’s art, we also have pieces by Nate Lowman, who is our son’s godfather, Adam McEwen, Terry Richardson, Dan Colen, Franz West, and Ed Ruscha. Are there any female artists that you admire right now? A lot! Hanna Liden, Taryn Simon, Laurie Simmons, Cindy Sherman, Marilyn Minter, Anne Collier, Sophie Kahn, Jessica Craig-Martin, and so on. Do you have a favorite piece of artwork that your husband has created? I love all of them, but the rock at the entrance to our residence is among my favorites. It says Go Home. It was one of his early pieces; he showed it at the Whitney Biennial. How much time do you spend between Miami and New York? I’m always traveling. Now, I also have The Webster locations in Houston and Costa Mesa, so I’m always on the go. I came back last week from Paris Fashion Week and I’m leaving next week to go to China because I’m doing a talk in Beijing. Then I’m going to California! But I’m lucky and blessed. I love what I do. ß

courtesy

WEBSTER DOMINATION

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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11/23/16 11:21 AM


Building The Bond Interior designer Kara Mann has reimagined spaces like the Chelsea Hotel, and now, she’s taking on NYC’s NoHo nabe for her latest endeavor: Equinox’s latest outpost, coming to Bond Street this fall. BY KRISTEN HEINZINGER Have you always worked in interior design? It’s my second career—I studied fine arts, but decided that I probably wasn’t going to be a true artist. I ended up working as a stylist in the fashion industry. I realized that I was interested in creating the whole environment, so I went back to school to study interiors, and kicked off my career a little late in the game.

RESTORE AND RENEW Kara Mann is tackling her first wellness space in an historic Bond Street building with Equinox.

Which projects put you on the map? I started as a residential designer in Chicago. As my career developed, I got into more commercial projects. I worked on the Chelsea Hotel, and continue to work on hotels and restaurants. I recently did a hair salon and the Goop pop-up shop in Chicago. What’s your role at Kara Mann Design HQ? In some ways it’s creative director, and setting the tone for the office of about 20. It’s everything from finding new clients to landing the job to coming up with the look and feel, and then managing the process. Design is 20 percent—80 percent is getting something built. How many projects are you working on? We never have less than 15. They’re all at various stages, so while something is being built, I’m doing construction, administration, and creative aspects for another. It’s an ebb and flow as the projects evolve, but we’re really in the trenches for a whole year. What’s your design process like? Whether it’s residential or commercial, my approach is the same. I love getting in clients’ heads, understanding the psyche of the brand or the person. In the beginning, it’s programming the idea, then we move on with conceptual design, referencing images and getting to the meat of who the client is. If we’re working with a significant architectural location, we dig into its history. Then it’s research and imagery, and it becomes an editing process. Editing is the backbone of great design. Then we go into execution mode, doing construction sets and managing the site. The installation of the final product is important, too—placing things, accessorizing, and those finishing touches that make the space feel just right. What will we find on your vision boards? I reference fashion for palettes, textures, and mood—I look at fashion magazines more than I do interiors magazines. [Laughs] I love looking back on classic architecture. I’m often looking for a piece of furniture that is the backbone to a room, and build

off of that. Whom do you admire in the design sphere? John Pawson, for his classic architecture and his thoughtful approach to minimal interiors. Joseph Dirand is kind of heartstopping these days. I love the classics like Elsie de Wolfe, [Carlo] Scarpa…I’m a total mixed bag. I like too many things; that’s why editing is important! Fill us in on your latest project, Equinox’s Bond Street location in New York. Equinox has such a strong brand— they really pushed the envelope in terms of fitness and lifestyle. We dug into their DNA to understand what they’ve done in the past and where they want to take the brand going forward. The idea was to understand this specific space and location—being on Bond Street, it’s considered edgier. We honed in on the true grit of NYC mixed with the brand identity. What are some highlights of the space? Everything has an authenticity about it. The building had existing brick archways, which we emphasized by tucking the vanity areas into them. The stair is kind of “the moment”—the architectural focal point. The Equinox project marks your first foray into health and wellness. What challenges did you face? The hardest part is that a space like this gets beat up. People are using it. We had to find materials that had the look and feel that we wanted, along with durability. We had to find that authenticity, materiality, softness… sometimes commercial products go a little too stark. What inspired you? The Venice Biennale. I saw an amazing installation at the Fortuny Gallery—a room that was covered in paint and black tape, an upscale idea of graffiti. It was an interesting approach to turning up the volume on that. What do you look forward to at Art Basel Miami? The entire Design District is pretty killer. I’m excited to get down there and see the latest and greatest. ß

construction report

Aaron Richter, Equinox’s VP of design, discusses the club’s Bond Street digs.

Why did Equinox choose this neighborhood? Our other clubs were drawing members from the area, and [the neighborhood] is special because of its history. What’s the building's story? It was a manufacturing building and dates back to 1873. The ceilings have double-high Corinthian columns, and there are large brick archways internally. It’s four levels—a small groundfloor entry with retail, locker rooms and spa on the lower level, fitness facilities on the second floor, and a yoga studio and more fitness areas on the top floor. Why was Kara the right fit? We tried to find someone who could thread the needle between the history of the building and what we do as a brand, and bring her own flair. The tipping point was her work on the Chelsea Hotel. It was an impressive way of doing an historic place without being nostalgic.

r i c h t e r : j o e s c h i l d h o r n / b fa . c o m ; a l l ot h e r s c o u r t e s y

NEW YORK News

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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NEXTGen

Whit & WISDOM

Since it’s never too early to get your art on, we sent brothers Jameson and Hudson Kroenig—ages 5 and 8, respectively—to the Whitney Museum for an educational afternoon in the company of Gary Simmons, Peter Saul, Allan D’Arcangelo, and more. Take it away, boys! By sydney sadick photography by stefania curto

high standards

First, Hudson and Jameson checked in to receive their age-appropriate guides. Their favorite artists? Jameson picked Van Gogh, while Hudson remains an Andy Warhol fan. “I’ve always liked his art!” he said.

Peter Saul’s de Kooning’s “Woman With Bicycle” was the first painting that enchanted the brothers. Given that they take art class at school and study painting at home, they’re well-versed in the subject matter. “In the mornings, I look up cartoon pictures and free-hand them on paper,” says Hudson. “Mom and Dad are really impressed!”

getty images

CRITICAL THINKING

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DRAWING REFERENCES “It looks like Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump!” exclaims Jameson of Allan D’Arcangelo’s Madonna and Child painting. “I know there’s a bow in the blonde girl’s hair, but still!” affirms Hudson.

The Karl Lagerfeld Connection

Brad Kroenig is not only dad to Jameson and Hudson—he’s also one of Lagerfeld’s muses and closest friends. In fact, the Kaiser is Hudson’s godfather, and Lagerfeld takes the role very seriously. “Karl’s taught me the most about design and ways to do techniques, like blending and sketching,” says Hudson. Both boys have also graced the Chanel runway.

weekend wonders

How do the brothers generally unwind on Saturdays? “We usually stay home [in New Jersey], but sometimes we come into the city to go to the park, restaurants, or shop,” says Hudson. “We usually go to museums in the summer when they’re not as busy.”

getty images

sneaker heads

ART 411 (From left) Peter Saul’s de Kooning’s “Woman With Bicycle,” (1976), © Peter Saul; Charles Ray, Untitled, (1973, printed 1989), courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles; Gary Simmons’ Gold Plated Basketball Shoes, (1993), © Gary Simmons; Allan D’Arcangelo’s Madonna and Child, (1963), © estate of Allan D’Arcangelo.

“I don’t think I can fit in these, but Dad could!” says Jameson of Gary Simmons’ Gold Plated Basketball Shoes. “I ordered a pair of Yeezys online like two months ago, but they still haven’t come,” moans Hudson. “I’m not sure if the company I bought them from is real!”

RIDING HIGH

The boys ended the day with a trip to the gift shop, where they bought prints for their bedrooms. “We’ll be back!” vows Hudson. Their other favorite weekend activity? “Traveling!” says Jameson. “I love St. Tropez and Paris.” (Hudson is a fan of Dubai.) Naturally, the boys have traveled on Karl’s private jet. “The best part is they serve you food whenever you want!” says Hudson. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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getty images (7); all others courtesy FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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testingTesting…

ARE YOU A BASEL BALLER?

Do you know your Saraiva from your Sarofim, your Gagosian from your Gehry, your Chromeo from your Chromat? Take the test! BY ASHLEY BAKER

6. Why was Petra Collins’ Instagram account (temporarily) shut down?

A. He spent $18 million on a wax replica of his own pinky finger B. It was the first time he came to Miami after the murder of Gianni Versace C. He eschewed the parties in favor of private surf lessons with Laird Hamilton D. He developed an unshakable addiction to Café Cubano that persists to this day

A. She posted clips from Kim Kardashian’s sex tape B. She posted underwear shots that revealed an unshaven bikini line C. She was revealed to be impersonating Alessandro Michele D. She ghosted Evan Spiegel

2. Which of the following is not true about Colby Jordan, who married Alberto “Tico” Mugrabi in September?

A. $25,000 B. $90,000 C. $450,000, including 25 selfies with event organizers and a lesson in how to properly exclaim, “That’s hot!” D. $1 million

A. Her father sits on the board of New York's Museum of Modern Art B. She once wrote a fashion blog called Minnie Muse C. On her wedding day, she was 23 years old D. Security at her nuptials was so high that her father boasted that Hôtel du Cap would be “the safest place on the planet”

3. What was the inspiration behind Pierpaolo Piccioli’s Valentino collection? A. Duchamp’s “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2” B. Egon Schiele’s “Seated Woman With Bent Knee” C. Hieronymus Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights” D. Tracey Emin’s “Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963 - 1995”

getty images (7); all others courtesy

4. What’s the latest with Alasdhair Willis? A. A new furniture line made entirely of Styrofoam B. A new baby C. An exhibit of nude selfies at the Tate Modern D. A trial run of Stella McCartney's new menswear collection, which he wore to her recent show

5. What should you expect to see at the “Ground Control” public art exhibition? A. An in-depth look at Stumptown’s roasting process B. Sculptures and other works loosely inspired by David Bowie C. Live video feeds from air traffic-control towers throughout the world D. Ultra-precise landscapes from notoriously neurotic painters

7. How much does Paris Hilton allegedly get paid per DJ set?

8. How many parties did André Saraiva attend during Art Basel in 2015? A. 7 B. 11 C. 24 D. More than you attended in the entirety of your twenties

9. Which of the following consumer brands has not hosted an activation at Art Basel? A. Lululemon B. Tampax C. Proper Attire condoms D. Davidoff cigars

10. Who is performing a top-secret show for 400 people at the Faena this week? A. Kendrick Lamar B. Eminem C. Barry Manilow D. Billy Corgan

11. How many times have we used the word “Faena” in this issue? A. Three B. 12 C. 23 D. 60+, and you know you love it

12. Which DJ was allegedly assaulted by a bouncer at the Delano during Art Basel in 2015? A. Paul Oakenfold B. Skrillex C. DJ Mazurbate D. Chelsea Leyland

13. Who are the infamous Haas brothers? A. The latest additions to Trump’s cabinet B. Los Angeles–based designers C. Hollywood-based actors D. Miami’s most fearsome break-dancers

14. Once again, Aby Rosen is hosting his blowout ABMB dinner. Which of the following celebrities has not attended in previous years? A. Owen Wilson B. Naomi Campbell C. Monica Lewinsky D. Lenny Kravitz

0–4 CORRECT ANSWERS: YOU ARE…LARRY BIRD Totally out of your league, darling—please don’t stay that way. Take an art history class—and update your look at Alchemist!—before we get seriously worried.

5–9 CORRECT ANSWERS: YOU ARE…LARRY DAVID Your savvy is the stuff of legend, but the art world is changing so quickly, no? Devour your Daily and pull overtime at the fairs, and you will regain status in no time.

10–14 CORRECT ANSWERS: YOU ARE…LARRY GAGOSIAN You’re so insider, it practically hurts. But nobody ever said life at the top was easy!

ANSWERS: 1. B; 2. A; 3. C; 4. D; 5. B; 6. B; 7. D; 8. D; 9. B; 10. A; 11. D; 12. C; 13. B; 14. C

1. What was notable about Karl Lagerfeld’s first visit to Art Basel Miami Beach?

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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CHICLessons

MIA GOTH

Johannes Vermeer’s Girl With a Pearl Earring

JUSTIN O’SHEA Vincent van Gogh’s Self-Portrait, (1887)

Matthew SchNeier

Raphael’s Portrait of Pietro Bembo

you’re a work of art! Is it coincidence or destiny that these fashion-world legends look so…iconic? By ASHLEY BAKER VANESSA FRIEDMAN

NICOLE PHELPS

STEPHEN JONES John Singleton Copley’s Detail of Thomas Boylston

ISABELLA BLOW

Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer II

vivienne westwood Jan van Eyck’s Margaret, the Artist’s Wife

g e t t y i m a g e s ( 1 1 ) ; pat r i c k m c m u l l a n . c o m ( 2 ) ; a l l ot h e r s c o u r t e s y

John Singleton Copley’s Mrs. Roger Norris

John Singer Sargent’s Madame X

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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11/23/16 12:27 PM


Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami

On view Nov 29 through Mar 26, 2017

Free Admission! icamiami.org Thomas Bayrle, Yu-Ichi (Atari Faces), 1991. Offset print on paper, 86 x 62 cm. Courtesy of the Artist. Photo: Wolfgang GĂźnzel.

ICA Miami exhibitions are funded through the Knight Contemporary Art Fund at The Miami Foundation. Major support is provided by:

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11/16/16 12:53 PM


CMYK

NEW YORK BEVERLY HILLS MIAMI HOUSTON DALLAS CHICAGO LAS VEGAS ATLANTA

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TOMFORD.COM

11/16/16 5:52 PM

The Daily Front Row Miami  

The Daily Front Row Miami

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