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FEBRUARY 15, 2016

ROCK ON

GIGI RIRI =FASHION HEAVEN

ALL HAIL KING YEEZY! PLUS!

WHEN CALVIN MET BROOKLYN… AND! WHO IS YOUR

FASHION

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CHICMoments

LOVEFEST!

WITH JEREMY SCOTT

Do you and Rihanna talk shop? Not so much about this kind of stuff. We’re friends. She didn’t reach out for advice or anything like that. She’s been good about it on her own. Do you have a favorite Rihanna moment? We’ve had so many fun times and moments. Even on the step and repeat tonight, we had our own little moments. When I first met her, it was special. I went to one of her concerts, and this was many concerts ago, and she was way across the room hugging someone, and her head went over her shoulder and her eyes met mine and she ran over. I was so touched. I was surprised she even recognized me, because we had never met in person. That always strikes me as one of my favorite things, but there are so many things. She’s rideor-die. I know that she’s there with me forever as I am with her. She will always be my girl. I love her.

FENTY X PUMA BY RIHANNA

Rihanna’s first collection for Puma was a splash on several levels. A massive venue at 23 Wall Street was a date night setting for Anna Wintour, avec longtime love Shelby Bryan, and Glenda Bailey, who appeared with Steve Sumner. “It looks like a darkroom!” marveled one editor of the cavernous space, which was rumored to have been tricked out thanks to a budget of $2.8 million. “I’m friends with her publicist,” explained Mickey Boardman of how he met the star. “Rihanna called me a little teddy bear, which was very sweet in her Barbados accent. It basically means I’m fat, but I’ll take it.” The clothes were stylish and street savvy, especially the creepers, which were made at a little mom-and-pop shop in the East Village.

Naomi Campbell

DEEP THOUGHTS!

Chris Rock

Foxy Brown

WITH PETE WENTZ

Do you have a favorite Rihanna moment? I like when she’s had the anti-Rihanna moments. Whether it was the song “Stay” or “Work” or even “Diamonds.” Nobody really ever expected that song. She’s one of those artists who has a really interesting perspective, because she is well versed in who she is. A lot of artists often aren’t.

Pete Wentz

Alana Hadid

Wale

Nomzamo

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

RiRi with mom Monica Braithwaite and brother Rajad Fenty

B FA N YC . C O M ( 7 ) ; F I R S T V I E W ( 1 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 8 )

Sofia Richie


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CHICMoments

MODEL INTEL!

WITH FORD’S NOEL BERRY

Do you have a relationship with Calvin? I’ve done some underwear shows and random things with them. I love everything they do. Especially the #MyCalvins. When’s the last time you were dazed? I’ve been sleepy and in my own zone all day. Are you walking this season? It’s not something I’m really interested in. It’s really time-consuming, and I’m working on other things. I did some stuff with GQ recently, and I want to do more of the Victoria’s Secret vibe. I’ve been going more toward that.

BACKSTORY! WITH KEVIN CARRIGAN Noel Berry

Kevin Carrigan

CALVIN KLEIN X DAZED100

Calvin Klein and Dazed magazine hosted a party to celebrate the launch of the DAZED 100, a group of talents who are expected to shape fashion, music, art, and youth culture in 2016. A live performance by Kelela energized the crowd at The 1896 venue in Brooklyn.

How did this come together? I’m English. I’ve been working in New York for 20 years, and Jefferson Hack and I have been friends for a long time. The Dazed 100 and Calvin Klein make a perfect partnership. It goes back a long time as a personal partnership, as well. Why not do something together and do something out of the ordinary? Where do you live? I’ve always been a downtown person, really from the ’80s. I was in the club scene in London. I’ve always been on the cusp of nightlife and going out and street fashion. Calvin generationally has always been on that cusp. We have to. That’s what’s new! When’s the last time you were dazed? In Amsterdam last weekend? When’s the last time you were confused? I’m always confused! I think that’s a permanent state.

Italo Zucchelli and Mitchell Slaggert Sebastian Faena and Miles McMillan

HEARD Caroline Hjelt and Aino Jawo

Jessica Hart

“IT’S COOL THEY’RE DOING THAT! IT WOULD BE A DREAM TO BE IN IT!” —model EMILY RATAJKOWSKI, on To Kill a Mockingbird coming to Broadway

Ashley Smith

Emily Cindy Bruna

COMMUTING!

WITH GABRIEL-KANE DAY-LEWIS

Jefferson Hack and Kelela

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Caroline Vreeland

Gabriel-KaneDay-Lewis

B I L LY F A R R E L L / B F A N Y C . C O M

Stella Maxwell

Do you live in Manhattan or Brooklyn? I just recently moved to a new place in Bushwick, off the J/Z train. Sometimes it takes 45 minutes to get into the city, but I’ll take comfort over convenience. For what I’m paying, I feel like it’s a place I can actually call home. How many Fashion Weeks have you done now? I didn’t start doing anything in fashion until I signed with IMG Models about a year and a half ago. I never do any runway stuff. I feel like walking would take away the focus on my music, but I love attending shows and checking out new collections. What’s your music vibe? I’m a singer/songwriter and think of my music as being acoustic soul. It’s marketable, but in the vein of what Ed Sheeran, John Mayer, and John Legend do. I released my first single a few months ago and the next one is coming out in three weeks on Spotify and iTunes. If all goes according to plan, I’ll release my first album in the fall. Hopefully we can meet the deadline. Are you loving New York City life? I moved here five years ago from Paris and fell in love. I can’t see myself living anywhere else. I’ve been putting money aside in order to buy my own place here in a couple of years.


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Yeezy Season 3

FAMILY AFFAIR

(Clockwise from left) Kourtney and Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner, and North West. Below: Kid Cudi and Kanye West.

TRADITION CROWD SIZE

Between 250 and 1,000

LIBATIONS

Gratis champagne, water, and craft cocktails

OUTSIDE SCENE

Street-style photographers and lots of copies of The Daily

DELAY

Around 20 minutes (excluding the Marc Jacobs experience)

READING MATERIAL Dullsville show notes

COST OF ADMISSION

CROWD SIZE 18,200

LIBATIONS

Whatever was available at the concession stand—in the case of Robbie Myers, a $6 bottle of Dasani

OUTSIDE SCENE

Scalpers selling tickets and lots of copies of The Daily

DELAY

39 minutes. Consider us impressed!

READING MATERIAL

A souvenir program, for those willing to spend $200

COST OF ADMISSION

$74 and up, although editors and buyers were comped

SECURITY CHECK

SECURITY CHECK

DURATION

DURATION

14 minutes

Kanye West’s Yeezy show at MSG doubled as a listening party for his new album, The Life of Pablo. “They look like they’re performing in the Ice Capades,” mused one awestruck editor of the Kardashian crew, who sported coordinating white ensembles designed by Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing. “Tell me how you all feel—did I deliver on my promise for an album?” asked West as the affair drew to a close. “Tell me how you all feel about the clothes this season. You might think that [because] I’m a celebrity and I made my money in rap that this s**t is easy to do. One of the hardest things to do was to get the talented people that worked on the collection to believe in my vision enough to come roll with a rapper.” Darling, you nailed it.

VS

Gratis, except for maybe a little bit of your soul

A friendly face from KCD

YEEZY SEASON 3

YEEZY

VIPS

Robin Givhan, Vanessa Friedman, and Anna Wintour

AUDIENCE ATTIRE Editors in Céline

GET YOUR TICKETS BY… Collecting them from your assistant

SIGNATURE SCENT

A whiff of a model’s Marlboro Light

SOUNDTRACK

Metal detectors

2+ hours

VIPS

Anna Wintour and Lamar Odom, in his first post-scandal appearance

AUDIENCE ATTIRE

The Kardashian crew in vintage ABBA costumes

GET YOUR TICKETS BY…

Sending your assistant to pick them up at the London Hotel. Code name: “Romulus”

SIGNATURE SCENT

Is weed officially legal now?

SOUNDTRACK

This season, a lot of David Bowie

The designer’s interminable opus, featuring lyrics like, “I love you like Kanye loves Kanye”

PREDICTABLE DRAMA

PREDICTABLE DRAMA

A flack blowing up at her assistant

EXIT STRATEGY

Designers bow, the crowd files out

Kanye West blowing up in front of 18,200 guests

EXIT STRATEGY

Designer talks and talks and talks and talks as the crowd stampedes toward 34th Street

B FA N YC . C O M ( 8 ) ; S H U T T E R S TO C K

CHICMoment


MONCLER

SCENE

Ryan Roche took to the gym at Avenues: The World School (the for-profit institution that counted Suri Cruise among its well-heeled student body) to show her beautiful fall wares. Roche’s daughter Luella, 12, and Fionn, 11, accompanied the affair, along with bandmates from the Paul Green Rock Academy in Saugerties. “I wouldn’t say they’re hippies,” Roche said. “They’re all super passionate and love to jam out. I’m so inspired by them.” • A decidedly less cozy affair happened in the evening at Lincoln Center, when Moncler Grenoble stuck with its plans to hold an outdoor presentation despite the singledigit temps. Some editors bravely soldiered on to be eventually taunted by the ultra-luxe fur and weatherproof jackets on display; others simply chose to honor their health and happiness. • Continuing in the tradition of bringing ’90s actresses to his front row, Christian Siriano gave us Thora Birch. OITNB’s Jason Biggs kept his seatmates chuckling while the crowd took in some feel-good fashion.

BLAST FROM THE PAST!

LAUGHING MAN! WITH JASON BIGGS

SHOES OF THE DAILY

Stuart Weitzman’s NEARLYNUDE in Aqua Suede is a classic minimalist sandal reinvented by way of a bold block heel and offered in sumptuous suede. Pair with a silk crepe de chine blouse and tailored cropped flares. $398, available in Stuart Weitzman boutiques and at stuartweitzman.com.

The KENT in Gold Linen is Stuart Weitzman’s warm-weather rendition of the creeper. It melds the sleek styling of an oxford with the quirky appeal of a flatform. Set atop a woven elevated sole and crafted from luxe linen, the KENT is the perfect complement to printed trousers and a cropped jacket. $598, available in stores and at stuartweitzman.com.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

FLACK FILES! WITH CHRISTIAN SIRIANO

How often do you talk to your publicist? I talk to my publicist, Bianca Bianconi, every day. Half the time it’s not about work. What’s she like? She’s a fiery Italian redhead. I love her so much. I like the fact that she works with me and also reps very famous actresses and It girls.

Mr. Armani, is that you?

Can we ask you some questions for The Daily Front Row? Jason Biggs What if I had been sitting second row? and Jenny We’d still talk to you! We don’t see you Mollen at a lot of shows. You sure don’t! My wife, Jenny, and I are friends with Christian, so when she asks me to come, I go. Thoughts on the front row scene? It’s fun. This stuff is bananas. It only gets more and more intense. Everyone looks beautiful. I have to assume that a lot of people are intimidated by me being here because I’m so fashionable and so good-looking. [Laughs] Who do you wear? Vince, Theory, Ted Baker, Varvatos, James Perse. I hate shopping, so when I go in, I leave with bags. Nice. Have you ever walked in a runway show? I get asked all the time! When I was 5 and started acting, I was a little kid model and I did a show or two. But it’s a young man’s game, so I retired when I was 11. You used to be on As the World Turns! I did! One of those nights when I was googling myself, because HEARD I do that all the time, I ended up on the cast list on IMDB and the list for As the World Turns is like 20,000 people. If you spend some time with it you see the list of people who were on that show is bananas—James Earl Jones, Meg Ryan… —CHRISTIAN Jason Biggs! SIRIANO

“I’M AROUND CLOTHES ALL DAY. I GET SICK OF THEM.”

G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 1 4 ) ; B FA N YC . C O M ( 3 ) ; F I R S T V I E W ( 2 ) ; C O U R T E S Y

WITH THORA BIRCH

Welcome! What brings you out? I went through this phase where I had no vanity, and I’m just starting to get back into loving fashion as an art. I jumped at the chance to come. What was the first fashion show you ever attended? An Armani show way back in 2001 or 2002. It was a madhouse. Did you meet Mr. Armani? I did. I had the pleasure of being fitted by him for the Emmys. They should make trophies of him!

RYAN ROCHE


I N S P I R E D

PLENTY BY TRACY REESE Dress, $248

S H O P O U R F L AG S H I P S TO R E O N F I F T H AV E N U E AT 3 9 T H S T R E E T •

LO R D A N DTAY LO R . C O M


BABY ALERT!

Congrats to WSJ.’s Kristina O’Neill and Magnus Berger, who welcomed their son, Dexter Richards Berger, on February 6 at NYU Hospital. #Babydex joins big sister Stella and is surely already sporting ultra-chic luxury goods.

Ellie Kemper

SCENE

Color us happy! Kate Spade’s cheerful collection took over the Rainbow Room, and true to form, an adorbs coterie of Young Hollywood types showed to support Deborah Lloyd and crew. • On Saturday night, Diesel toasted the reopening of its Madison Avenue store with a party at a private residence on the Upper East Side hosted by Nicola Formichetti and Ladyfag.

Caroline Vreeland Renzo Rosso and Naomi Campbell

DIESEL PARTY

Mark Hunter

Carlotta Kohl and Atlanta de Cadenet Taylor

Coco Rocha

KATE SPADE

Ladyfag and Sita Abellan

HEARD

—DEBORAH LLOYD, on her first experience with her show venue

TOTAL LOVEFEST!

WITH ELLIE KEMPER

TEMP CHECK!

BREAKING NEWS!

WITH KATE BOSWORTH

How are you? I’m not feeling well today. I have a terrible cough. First time at the Rainbow Room? My dad used to take me here when I was a little girl. He worked in the city, and we lived in Connecticut. I feel very nostalgic. What did your father do? He worked for Zegna as executive vice president of North America. He ended up working at Talbots. Who knew! How’s your husband? He’s so good! He’s holding down the fort in L.A.

We assume you’re in Kate Spade today? You nailed it. They put forth a very bright and colorful image, and I want to be a part of that. It’s also very elegant and chic. Love Kimmy Schmidt! We binged. That’s such a huge compliment. That makes me very happy. When is it coming back? April 15th! Tax day! To cushion the blow of the IRS? What do you think of Kimmy’s wardrobe? Zosia Mamet Speaking of colors! I have found that when I wear all the colorful prints and solids she wears, I feel cheerier. I’m trying to incorporate more of that into my own wardrobe. I do think it affects your outlook. Last season she was dressing as a teenager because that’s Jamie Chung how she knew fashion, but this season she is Jaime King unintentionally diving into a cooler area. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Hannah Bronfman and Brendan Fallis

Joe Jonas and Nicola Formichetti

Freida Pinto

WITH JAY FIELDEN AT POLO RALPH LAUREN

We knew before WWD that you were going to Esquire, chéri. It was a complicated moment, as you can imagine. Your e-mail was very astute, but I don’t read my e-mail all the time. No worries. Congratulations! I officially start March 31, but one can’t keep their brain from turning in the meantime. Especially early in the morning when I should be asleep. Was it an easy decision to join Esquire? There’s a quote from Winston Churchill during World War II where he says, “Everything I’ve done all my life has prepared me for this moment.” I can’t say I don’t feel the same way, though I have the good kind of trepidation. Will there be a new editor in chief announced for Town & Country? We hope we’ll be able to announce it by the end of the month. Is it hard to say goodbye to Town & Country? It makes me a little sad to be on different floors, but we’ll see each other several times a week. The staff is truly a family. I’ve depended on them for my daily subsistence—we have a good time together. It would make me sad to say goodbye. What will your Esquire look like? The hallmarks that I hope for are to honor the past by hopefully outdoing it. I’ll be more specific in the future, but that’s my ambition. Will you be bringing in a lot of new people? I’m eager to get to know the people who are there. Many of them I don’t know at all. It’s an amazingly deep and skilled group. AND WE QUOTE What’s been the reaction from the media community? Extraordinary and a bit humbling. Calls from Mr. Lauren. Calls from a lot of people in Europe. More e-mails than my little fingers can return. All the encouragement that a person could have going into a big job. I’m filling the shoes of someone who did an amazing job before me. What did you think of the presentation? —JAY FIELDEN, former I love this! Are you kidding? I worked in Ralph Lauren employee, a Ralph Lauren shop in high school and at the Polo presentation college. It’s in my blood!

“I SHOULD TAKE OFF MY JACKET AND HELP THEM SELL SOME CLOTHES.”

B FA N YC . C O M ( 1 9 ) ; V I TA L A G I B A L O W ( 1 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 1 )

“I CAME HERE FOR MY BACHELORETTE WEEKEND. I’M A SUCKER FOR A ROOM WITH A VIEW.”


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2/4/16 2:05 PM


THE DAILY Wonders…

What’s the best gift you’ve recently received?

HEARD

Candice Swanepoel, Derek Blasberg, and Karlie Kloss

SERIOUS ISSUES! WITH LINDSEY WIXSON

Have you ever partied in a garage before? Maybe in Kansas. What would your superpower be? To read people’s minds. Do you think that would drive you crazy after awhile? I would never leave my house. You’re a supporter of Bernie Sanders? Absolutely. Dasha Zhukova Why is he awesome? and Bob Iger He’s rooting for the people and doesn’t want to take money from big business. Would you ever run for office? I’d rather hide and disappear forever. I’m not cut out for politics.

SURVIVALISTS of THE DAILY TOME’S RAMON MARTIN AND RYAN LOBO

When we met: During our first year at Sydney University. We hated each other’s guts because we were both stealing each other’s limelight. Why we made it: A resolute inability to do anything else. Means of transportation: On our broomsticks! NYFW essentials: Red, red wine. Go-to beverage: Coffee. Valentine’s Day redux: Ramon We threw a Valentine’s Day and Ryan party with Leandra Medine, who DJed for the first time. How we dealt with that particular holiday: Binge drinking.

At GARAGE’s party at a garage located at 165 Mercer Street, Dasha Zhukova welcomed her model pals and more for a selfie-strewn affair that had everyone feeling like a hero. • “So you’ve never googled me?”— Peter Marino, when asked about his favorite hors-fashion project, at Louis Vuitton’s “store restoration” party. • “They had us down in the basement, which was a little grim sometimes, but I’m grateful to them for giving me my start.”—IMG mod and Transparent star Hari Nef, of her internship at VFiles, at Yeezy.

KATE K KA TE SPADE SPADE

Jasmine Sanders

Wintry pastels in a mash-up of textures.

Journee collection pumps,

$40

Tevolio tulle maxi skirt,

$80

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Mark Tevis Publisher

Fashion & Luxury Goods Director Chloe Worden Director of Marketing & Special Events Alex Dickerson Digital Director Daniel Chivu Advertising Sales & Special Projects Haralux, Lottie Oakley Los Angeles Gypset & Associates, Dayna Zegarelli Midwest Kathy Burke Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito, Amy Taylor

To advertise, call (646) 768-8102 Or e-mail: mark@dailyfrontrow.com

Quilted crossbody bag, $27

GETTY IMAGES The Official Photo Agency of The Daily Front Row

Get the look at Target.com.

THE NEW ROMANTIC BROCK COLLECTION FALL 2016

Deputy Editor Eddie Roche Executive Editor Ashley Baker Moschino’s Managing Editor new Tangie Silva fragrance. Design Director Jill Serra Wilde Fashion Editor Paige Reddinger Senior Editor Kristen Heinzinger An Uber credit, just in Art Director time for the Teresa Platt frost. Contributing Designer Magdalena Long Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Photo Editor Jean Borrie Contributing Copy Editors Joseph Manghise, Cynthia Puleo Imaging Specialists Neal Clayton, RJ Hamilton, George Maier Editorial Assistant Kassidy Silva Killer turnout at our Target party.

LOOK of THE DAILY

A 15 % increase in ad revenue for this February Fashion Week!

Only “whispers of color”—a fine application of glowing taupe eye shadow and thin coat of mascara—were used to create an absolutely dreamy look backstage by Maybelline New York guest makeup artist Benjamin Puckey. To enhance the skin, he blended Face Studio Master Strobe Illuminating Face Stick in Porcelain (out this June!) to cheekbones, the nose bridge, and cupid’s bow. BEAUTY MUST: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Sensational the Creamy Mattes in Divine Wine ($7.49), Maybelline.com.

The Daily Front Row is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must b submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 250 West 57th Street, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10107.

PRO TIP: Apply just a touch of lipstick to your ring finger then lightly dab it onto the lips to create a stain look.

ON THE COVER:

Gigi Hadid in Fenty x Puma by Rihanna Fall 2016 photographed by JP Yim/Getty Images.

S T E FA N I A C U R TO ; C O U R T E S Y; B FA N YC . C O M ( 4 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 2 ) ; S H U T T E R S TO C K

GARAGE PARTY

Brandusa Niro

Editor in Chief, CEO


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RUNWAYReport

DIVINE INSPIRATION

Over the weekend, the New York shows got off to an especially strong start, thanks to knockout moments from Alexander Wang and Joseph Altuzarra. BY ASHLEY BAKER & PAIGE REDDINGER

ALTUZARRA

FIRSTVIEW

With Jim Jarmusch’s film Only Lovers Left Alive as a starting point, Joseph Altuzarra turned out a tricked-out collection that paired leather-laced sweaters and sporty drawstring pants with jacquards, paisleys, and peasant dresses. It’s a new iteration of that ’70s trend, and one that’s going to look especially welcome after all the maxi dresses and festival fare we’ll be seeing as soon as the weather allows. Altuzarra excels in outerwear, and his printed, patched shearlings and oversize furs are destined for It status. Same goes for his printed boots—want one, want all. Wisely, he also upped his bag game, introducing a boxy new style to the très cher Ghianda saddlebags that we’re willing to starve for.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


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RUNWAYReport

ALEXANDER WANG Alex Wang has learned a few things from his séjour in Paris, aside from the machinations of the modern-day luxury house. His starting point: tweedy, bouclé, luncheoning ladies fare, which he rescued from the usual done-to-death iterations and butchered and remade it in the spirit of la fille Wang. She may deign to wear a suit if the skirt is micro and she gets a dog collar and studded creepers instead of the usual pearls and pumps. And then, les stripteaseuses. The outline of a pole dancer appeared on a fuzzy sweater, the word GIRLS ran across a pair of tights, and evocative adjectives like “strict,” “tender,” and “violator” also made cameos on beanies and dresses. Wang’s richly layered collection left the impression of a designer who is not afraid to explore the big questions— making him a more vital part of the scene than ever.

Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs have the sexy-chic look on lockdown, and flush with new investors and infused with a grown-up sensibility, they delivered a crisp assortment that will appeal to more women than ever. Not like they’ve left Young Hollywood out in the subzero temps— strategically placed cutouts and slits can turn even modest midi dresses into paparazzi bait. The designers also tried their hand at outwear (long coats, including one in a leopard print) and jackets (cropped tuxedo styles), but for the moment, their dresses are dominating in their category. Good thing we have so many great ones to choose from.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

HAUTE HAIR TREND!

SLEEK PARTS

By Antonio Corral Calero for MOROCCANOIL

FIRSTVIEW (6); GETTY IMAGES (5)

CUSHNIE ET OCHS


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Dwelling units include features for persons with disabilities required by the FHA. Photograph by Richard Berenholtz


RUNWAYReport

JASON WU Outerwear for all. Jason Wu knows a good coat when he sees one, and his expertly tailored take on these silhouettes lends itself brilliantly to the season’s mood. A windowpane plaid style was especially on-point; pair it with one of his lean midi dresses in a matching print, or a navy abstracted jacquard number, if you dare. There were lots of winning daytime looks, including navy pants with a velvet sleeveless top on Lineisy Montero and a fiery red overcoat paired with a ribbed camel cardigan and fur shoulder shrug. Wu excels in statement-making basics, which sounds counterintuitive, but throw on just one of these options, and you’re better dressed than 99.9 percent of everyone else on the street. Emerging designers, it’s okay to take notes.

BEAUTY TREND ALERT!

SPIDER LASHES

By Yadim for MAYBELLINE NEW YORK

The theme for Nicole Miller’s Fall ’16 show was, to say the least, fitting for the impending polar vortex in NYC: nordic chic (“You can blame me for the weather,” Miller told us). Amid an ice sculpture and a chill-inducing fog-filled runway, models paraded along in a medley of fur coats and Scandinavian-inspired prints and fabrics that had us shivering in our seats. Highlights included long boho dresses—many with deep Vs and some bedazzled—’70sthrowback tassel necklaces, and separates, such as semisheer, boho-patterned tops and a fringe-lined skirt. #NMGoesNorth was certainly the appropriate show hashtag!

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

W U : F I R ST V I EW; M I L L E R : N E I L SO N BA R N A R D/G E T T Y I M AG ES

NICOLE MILLER


Invitation

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2/11/16 11:59 AM


RETAIL Star

Sarah Rutson has been at the forefront of fashion retail for three decades. But it was her move from Hong Kong’s Lane Crawford as fashion director to become Net-A-Porter’s vice president of global buying that cemented her status in luxury’s big league. Rutson, who is renowned for her own incredible style and razor-sharp eye for spotting the next big trend, is already taking the luxury e-comm behemoth to the next level. BY PAIGE REDDINGER

How did you get your first break in fashion? I got my first job a couple of days after my 16th birthday. I was working in a shop—I think it was called Jean Machine. It doesn’t exist anymore, but the owner of the store was Sir Philip Green, who’s now a friend. I worked all day Saturday, and a couple of late nights after school during the week selling jeans. A week later, I found out that Marks & Spencer paid double the amount, so I went and got myself a job there. Did that inspire you to study fashion at university? Ah, you see, therein lies the interesting part—I didn’t go to university. I was at Marks & Spencer doing my Saturday job, working late nights after school and full-time through the summer holidays, and I got the bug. I knew I was a retailer, and this was what I wanted to do. I managed to go into the graduate training program for Marks & Spencer. Why did you abandon London for Hong Kong? I was at Marks & Spencer for nine years and worked my way up through every possible level. Then I woke up one morning when I was 24, and I thought, Is this it? I FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

NET GAIN

had done so much. I’d risen through the ranks and had a fantastic time, but I wanted an adventure. As fate would have it I walked past a travel agent’s storefront—they actually existed in those days—and saw some oldfashioned piece of junk with HONG KONG written above it. I went, “That’s where I want to go.” So I bought a oneway ticket to Hong Kong. What was the plan when you got there? I had no job and didn’t know a single person, but I had a fantastic résumé. I toured Hong Kong and looked at many department stores before coming across Lane Crawford. I called up the switchboard and said, “I want to speak to the president.” I got him on the phone and said, “You need to employ me.” He asked me to fax my résumé through, so I did, and he said, “I’m leaving tonight on a three-month buying trip—can you meet me now?” I said, “Yes, I can.” That was it, I got the job on the spot. In fact, they created a job for me. Would this ever happen today? In fashion, you have to make things happen. I enjoy

working for companies that have an entrepreneurial spirit. That’s why I love being at Net-a-Porter— anything’s possible, and everyone and everything strives to move forward. You have to stay alive and fresh. If you are passionate and have that personality and the ability to work really hard, you can do it. Working for a global company must have its challenges. Net-A-Porter is the only true global player. We’re buying for Asia Pacific, Europe, and America. Asia Pacific is fascinating, because in it, of course, you’ve got Australia, which is working toward a different season. The market’s very different to Hong Kong; Hong Kong is very different to Singapore; Singapore and Hong Kong are totally different to Japan. What’s critical is that we have amazing personal shoppers. They’re based out of each district, and give us so much information. I travel a great deal and meet them personally. We do customer events and pop-up shops, so we’re able to meet the customers. I did one during last New York Fashion Week,


B FA N YC . C O M ( 1 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 2 ) ; F I R S T V I E W ( 2 )

“IT’S MY JOB TO BE THE ZEITGEIST.” and I’ve just come back from Dubai, so we get a lot of intel. For example, suede never sells in Asia Pacific. Long maxi lengths don’t work in Hong Kong, but they sell super well in Europe, Australia and west coast America. How do you manage your schedule? Fashion never sleeps, and neither do I—it’s the nature of the job. The secret to survival is stamina and dedication, and I never get sick. Obviously, it’s a lot of travel, and in the past 10 years it’s really ramped up. Buying trips, fashion, that’s all part and parcel—we also have to run a business, plan our strategy, work on budgets, and always be forward thinking. We plan out our year very well. Plus, I have an amazing team and an amazing boss, so that all helps. Divulge your travel tips, please! I hate packing in winter because we’re getting into snowstorms, and by the time you get to Paris it can either be cold or it can feel like spring, and you only have two suitcases for five weeks. In general, I am a very clever packer because I do have to travel for around seven weeks at a time. I tend to wear a uniform. Wear a smile, and you’ll be fine wherever you go. Tell us about the YOOX acquisition. There’s a lot we can do for each other, bringing new and exciting brands to the customers on both sides. It’s been very positive and honestly, none of us have skipped a beat here. It hasn’t changed fundamentally how we do business going forward. What is your vision for the future of Net-A-Porter? Net-A-Porter is now 15 years old. We have a strong designer presence—we already sell a lot of ready-to-wear. I felt that for the next wave, for customer acquisition and also from a business standpoint, taking on contemporary is an opportunity to grow and expand. And I felt that we needed to grow shoes, bags, and accessories. Which brands are on the radar? We’ve exploded Aquazzurra—the Wild Thing shoe was one of our best-selling shoes ever. We looked at opportunities to put it in a lower block heel. Building a great edit and working with designers in fantastic collaborations is a focus. I felt that for the next wave, taking on contemporary was an opportunity to grow and expand. Overall, we’ve brought a lot of new brands in this season, whether it was Monse out of New York, Juan Carlos Obando, or March 11, which makes these fabulous Ukrainian dresses. We used to carry Vita Kin and were having so much success with them, but they couldn’t keep up with production, so we brought in March 11. However, we will have Vita Kin again once she produces more stock. We put Johanna Ortiz on the site this month and we were 85 percent sold out in less than two weeks. There was a snowstorm going on and we were selling all these beautiful off-the-shoulder colorful cotton pieces. Sacai has taken prominence—it’s a brand I discovered in Japan 10 years ago, so I’ve been working with them for a long time. One of my babies, Jacquemus from Paris, was the first brand that I picked up for NetA-Porter in my first week—it’s cooler. I want to make sure that we fill in that edgier dialogue. Do you have influence over what designers put into their collections? I do it with smaller and bigger brands. I’m a merchandiser and I’ve been around a long time, so I know what it takes to build a collection. At Net-A-Porter, we’re looking at brands on a global level. That’s very powerful. I’m very close with Joseph Altuzarra and have always mentored Joseph in growing the Altuzarra business. He really listens,

but it’s always a collaboration. That’s the good bit about the job. When you get to a certain point in your career, it’s not about going into a showroom and saying, “Yeah, I like that, I don’t like that.” It goes much further. I was delighted when Monse came to me at the end of March last year in New York with some sketches and fabrics and a lot of excitement in their eyes. I looked through their sketches and after seeing one of their shirt dresses, I told them to build the story around the shirt. That, to me, says something really important. They executed it brilliantly. The reworked shirt has been a massive story for the Spring/Summer season. It’s my job to be the zeitgeist. We hear Monse contacted you through LinkedIn. Everybody contacts me—everyone. It’s important to be constantly open—whether it’s a phone call, an e-mail, LinkedIn, Instagram, or just overhearing someone talking about something new. The reality is there are thousands of brands out there. I’ve got a very good antenna for people and talent. There was something about both of them—the way they worded their LinkedIn message. I’m hardly on LinkedIn, so it must have been the one day I was on and I clicked it. I called them immediately and said, “Come and see me tomorrow.” What’s the best way to grab your attention? I get a lot of people who do the, “I know we’ll do very well on your site, it’s a partnership, I’d like to set up a meeting with you on Thursday at four o’clock.” There was a sensitivity to Monse’s letter. It was elegantly done. I adore them. In fact, I get back to New York and see them a couple of hours after landing. I give them my time; it’s important.

iPhones, and everybody shops online. Why are we still doing the same system in the same way we have been for 30 years? It doesn’t add up. Do you ever set foot inside brick-and-mortar stores? Ha! [Laughs] I was just buying some groceries the other night. Other than that I really can’t remember—online saves my life. I’m going to Paris next week, and everything’s going to be delivered from Net-A-Porter to my hotel. What can we find in your own wardrobe? I lived in Hong Kong for 23 years, so I tend to be edgier in terms of my personal choices. I love Junya Watanabe, and I own a lot of Sacai. I’ve really started wearing a lot of Jacquemus. Haider Ackermann works brilliantly for me. I also wear Proenza Schouler and Altuzarra. I love Christopher Kane as well. In general, I love buttondown shirts. I love a silky shirt undone to the waist with some beautiful lingerie. I always wear beautiful lingerie. Those sort of things are important. I started my career in buying for lingerie. If I get knocked down by a bus, I will never have to worry what I’m going to look like in the hospital. [Laughs] But I dress from the feet up. I’ve always been a high-heel girl, but after moving to New York a year ago, I started wearing flats. I could run in high heels, but it’s not so practical to walk 25 blocks in them. Which flats are in your arsenal? I’m so in love with my Gucci loafers. They’re just divine. You know, we do not sell fur on Net-A-Porter. I have the loafer that you can wear with the back up or you can flatten it. It’s so butter-soft; it’s like a slipper. That’s my little obsession at the moment.

ON SARAH’S RADAR Spring 2016 collections from Altuzarra, Monse, and Jacquemus.

What’s on your hit list this season? I want more “buy now, wear now” pieces. In a time of immediacy, the fashion model needs to change. It’s been one of the warmest winters on record, and the snowstorm hit when fall sales had been going on for quite some time. None of us know what’s going to happen with the weather. There’s an interesting dialogue now to be had of looking at this calendar and seeing how it works. Fundamentally, product is still going to take the same length of time to be designed, made, and produced to get to the end user online. But how are we going to handle the lead times from when the consumer first sees it? Maybe shows have to change to four weeks before the product hits the floor. Who should spearhead the revolution? It takes an industry, just like it takes a village. Fashion is all about change, and the customer has changed so much. Now, everybody looks at everything on their

When you’re not running a global fashion empire, where will we find you? I do love Ibiza in August. It’s fun and I really let my hair down—I dance every night of the week for three weeks. I turn dark chocolate brown in Ibiza—I know you’re not supposed to, but I do. Because I lived in Asia, I make sure I do Europe and America now with my family and my 14-year-old daughter. We’re wanderlusters. What’s on that dancing playlist? I’m reliving my ’80s club days when I used to go to the Mud Club in London. It’s a lot of Depeche Mode, the Cure, Psychedelic Furs, and New Order. When I’m out for a run, it’s Massive Attack’s “Unfinished Symphony”— that’s probably my favorite track of all time. Music keeps me feeling alive, switched on, and happy. More than anything, I need to be happy, I need to be laughing, I need to be smiling. ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


IMAGEMaker

PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE In an era of sensory overload, master creative director and retouching guru Pascal Dangin has that all-too-rare ability to make images stick. Over coffee at his soaring new office space in Chelsea, he explains his mastery of the medium. BY ASHLEY BAKER What happened to your building in the Meatpacking District? I sold it. I moved the backbone of the company— production, printing, film editing—over to Gowanus. I go there every other day, but more importantly, I have my team come here. This space is more of my own space—I can think without too many people around me. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

What’s your staff setup? How do you divide your time? We have about 60 employees total, between design, production, and post-production. I don’t really divide my time. It’s not divisible. You founded your creative agency, KiDS, in 2013. Why was it the right time? I don’t know if it was the right time, but it was what

I wanted to do. It felt like a natural evolution of my work after all these years. I had sort of done it for a long time—behind the scenes, I suppose. I didn’t really make a plan. Who were your first supporters at KiDS? Alex [Wang] really believed in what I was doing, and I felt I could relate to him very well with the urban quality he had, and the groundbreaking, no-recipe instinct. I liked him a lot, and he was instrumental in making me believe that there was something there to do, creatively. Whose idea was it to shoot Anna Ewers basically naked, except for a pair of jeans, in the Wang ad campaign? It’s usually a collaborative effort. I’ve always loved a picture from the viewpoint of the legs, and I felt like it was okay to pull the jeans down to her ankles. She was amazing—she played the game with us. But it’s about creating an arresting image that stops people in their tracks, just so you get a chance to impress an image on their mind. Perhaps they want to see it again. We are bombarded with billions of images all the time; it’s perhaps difficult to create an image that people actually respond to—positively or negatively. What do you think about the quality of the images we’re seeing all day? Are they by and large good? By and large bad? I would say by and large good. One of the reasons I started KiDS is because I wanted to really gain control over the image process I felt was slipping away. There were generic ideas about how to approach an image. I felt that by controlling it A to Z, from its conception to its realization, that I would try to bring some quality to the photograph, as opposed to a generic image. Do you worry about distribution of images? No, not at all. I think the digital medium is amazing at sharing and displaying the work. It’s perhaps not as tangible as the page of a printed magazine. I think magazines have a huge role to play. They aren’t so much about the news anymore, because of bloggers and Twitter and Instagram, but women are still looking to magazines for an opinion. How do magazines need to evolve in this new world? I want to see magazines with more of an opinion— less of giving what people want, and more of what they don’t know what they want. They should shift their desire from being newsworthy to evolve more as the trendsetters they once were. People will find inspiration through Instagram and Pinterest and the opinion of their peers, but there is a leadership that magazines have, a taste. Are magazines still a dynamic place to place ads? Very much so. A magazine that stays on a table, or in your life, for however long, plays a different role than an image that is just wiped away from your device. What about video? Video is huge. It’s really important to communicate a style, a mood. Obviously, sound and images together create a better story. There’s a misconception about how to prep a [fashion] film—I feel like a lot of the films are ending up like glorified PDFs, made of stills. A series of images as a flip book isn’t really a video; it’s more of a screen saver. It’s just that video requires a lot more writing and a different type of team. It’s probably still too cost-prohibitive. Fashion brands don’t want or need to go to TV, and it’s a webonly thing, but the ROI is so difficult to calculate for those brands that it’s hard to justify a half-a-milliondollar production that will stay for a few minutes. Eventually, as budgets shift and evolve, we’ll see more and more of them.


What do you make of the movement of choosing more anonymous, behind-the-scenes designers to lead European fashion houses? At some point, the John Gallianos and Lee McQueens and Tom Fords were anonymous. I don’t see a difference between now and then. It’s just a matter of finding the right fit: Do I have the right creative mind to lead this brand? Does this person understand where we want to be? Why did you name the agency KiDS? It stands for “knowledge in design strategy.” But children, to me, are very new. I have kids, and they tend to have the most amazing way of coming up with new things, almost from an instinctual point of view. They tend to tell the truth and be fearless. They’ll go to touch a flame, not knowing that it’s going to burn them. I also didn’t want to name the agency with my name. What do you look for when you’re hiring? Collaborators—people I can have around a table, who can think and develop ideas. I look for a dedication to the pursuit of excellence, in terms of image. And I’m also looking to always have a challenge of the mind— to question why, or why not, we could do things. When you got started, there was a different mentality among photographers—many didn’t

is not enough—he’s going to have to oversee how hair and makeup are done, and obviously stylists are there to fill that role as well, but the collaboration is huge between them. Some photographers don’t understand the basic fundamentals of what fashion is, and maybe they should do other types of photography if they don’t really have a keen interest for style. What do you make of all the masses online who are protesting these retouched photos? [Unretouched photos] would be a lot cheaper, and they would take less time. There’s such a misconception about what’s retouched and what’s not. A photograph is one point of view in space. The way the camera looks at that particular subject is very different from how that same camera would look two inches on the left or two inches on the right. Take a very simple image, like black and white. Black and white is not real. I can change that photograph by printing it, without even retouching it, and I can make you feel anxious or sad or happy. Of course, there have been people who have perhaps gone too far, but I say, retouching is the same thing as putting on red lips. When you do that, you are drawing the viewer to a point in your face that you would like them to see first. It’s always a journey—what is the first thing you see, what is the second thing, the third thing, and so

of absolutely nothing. She was able to impose her image and share her image in ways that haven’t really been matched until now, and kudos to her for being the Kim Kardashian that she became. The image of the kiss [between Kardashian and West] was very important to me. The campaign was all about love, and I tried to show one intimate moment. Alex’s last collection for Balenciaga was so beautiful and romantic. What was going through your mind during the show? Alex did the collection that he really wanted to do. Perhaps at the beginning, when you go to a brand like Balenciaga, you have to be influenced by what had been. [For the last collection], he kind of said it, and I only wish perhaps he had done that earlier. But he didn’t, and so be it. I think he was so happy to be part of that—he learned so much, at least that’s what he said—and it’s been a great adventure for him. You have so many different collaborators, and you have so many people on your staff now. Are there any photographers you still work with on a one-on-one basis? I work with all of them on a one-on-one basis, to a certain extent. Two people secluding themselves and having discussions is sometimes a better way to exploit the potential of an idea. I usually edit, the

PAT R I C K D E M A R C H E L I E R ; C O U R T E S Y

KiDS-produced campaigns for Balmain, Vera Wang, and Balenciaga.

want anyone to touch their photos. You changed the game. Well, they always touched their pictures—this makes me feel very old—back in the day. They didn’t have control over their production as much as they would want. Digital post-production has given them that control. I, perhaps, was interfacing that a lot in the beginning, but the advent of technology—the awareness, the know-how, the software evolution— has given everybody the ability to control how the image is going to be seen and perceived. I think that’s the control they always wanted to have. What does the photographer of the future look like? I would say that a photographer is a photographer, with the exception of a fashion photographer. A fashion photographer is really a different type of photographer, because of the subject matter. There are two kinds of fashion photographers—people who love fashion, to a point of passion for it, who love clothes, who love girls, who love hair, love makeup and shoes and bags, and tell the story of a woman through everything around her. These people tend to be fascinated by the clothes themselves. And then there are other photographers who are more into portraits, but still love style. They have a very clean sense of how images should look, and how girls or boys should be. They may not care as much about fashion. The evolution will still be the same way. If a photographer on a set is ultimately the person responsible for conveying an image, his choice of light

on. It’s like a map. To be attractive, or to push, we all naturally do things to our bodies and image to attract attention. Why do we put highlights in our hair? Why do we pluck our eyebrows? Why do we put on a push-up bra? Why do we wear a corset? Why are we doing all of that? We’re retouching ourselves, in some ways. We’re manipulating our own reality. But most importantly, it makes us feel better. How has Instagram changed our relationship with photography? I don’t think it changed it—I think it amplified it. Our parents had boxes and boxes of pictures, and now, we just have a digital version of them, in an aggregated community. It’s a great opportunity for people to show what they have. But again, the sea of sameness is quite vast. On the subject of Instagram stars, how did you hook up with Olivier [Rousteing] on Balmain? He liked what I was doing on Balenciaga, and he wanted to meet me, and we met. We just shot the children’s lookbook in Paris. It was great—the kids are amazing; they give you a whole different set. There’s a lot of direction: Do that, don’t do that, be yourself, don’t be yourself. Easier than celebrities, or more difficult? I don’t think that any of it is difficult. It’s just a matter of adaptation to your subject. You shot Kim Kardashian and Kanye West for Balmain. What do you think about their power as imagemakers? Kim definitely has created a brand for herself out

photographer does his own edit, and we merge the two. Then we fight—no, we don’t fight, we don’t fight. [Laughs] Another pair of eyes is good. What was it like to be profiled by The New Yorker? It was great. I was happy and proud. I think my mom was prouder than I was. And my children… Was it limiting to your creativity to be followed around by a reporter for months? No, [writer Lauren Collins] was amazing, and very patient. I brought her to my world, and it’s tedious. Long hours. And she was very keen on understanding. But that’s the thing—The New Yorker touched on really the retouching aspect of the work. People who know me very well thought that it wasn’t as complete as it could be. Other people who didn’t know me were very interested in it. For some reason, people think that retouching has been everything, but it’s always been one sliver of my work. How many full-length feature films have you done? Seven or eight. With Gus Van Sant, James Gray, Woody Allen…I did the last two films with him, Irrational Man and Magic in the Moonlight. He’s amazing to be around. That’s what I love about my work—I get to be with people like that. You can observe how they work very closely. What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie? I love them all, but I think it’s Annie Hall. I do like a good sense of humor, as long as it’s intelligent and dry. A good laugh is a good laugh. ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


TOPExec

WACK IS BACK

When Bill Wackermann parted ways with Condé Nast in November after 20 years with the company, all eyes were on his next move. Naturally, he landed back on top as the newly minted CEO of legendary agency Wilhelmina Models. Get ready for a poaching spree… BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIORGIO NIRO

MODEL MAN Bill Wackermann in his new office.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

How did you score this gig? After leaving Condé Nast, I didn’t think I would immediately go back into a corporate culture. I planned to spend some time consulting and take some time off. Initially, when I got a call from a headhunter, they said, “There’s an opportunity, would you come in?” I wasn’t sure, but the moment the person said it’s at Wilhelmina Models, I almost jumped across the table. There are those a-ha moments in your life. One of them was when I was 29 years old and Details relaunched. They shopped it around, and no one wanted the job. I knew I could do it, and I had the same feeling about this opportunity at Wilhelmina. It’s such a powerful brand. Will you also be modeling? [Laughs] Unless we’re starting a senior division, probably not. How is the modeling world similar to publishing? In publishing, we were in the business of taking content and developing, promoting, and creating opportunities in the market to drive revenue around that content. What we do in the modeling business is not too dissimilar—instead of a magazine, it’s a person. We’re going out in the marketplace, and we’re developing that talent, and we’re talking about ways to create opportunities through editorial, advertising campaigns, and runway shows. The similarities are quite aligned. In the modeling world, we’re talking to the editors of magazines, advertisers, PR people, and casting agents, and a lot of those worlds are really symbiotic. What’s your focus? We will push more aggressively into high-end editorials for women. We have a great stable of leading talent, but it’s about continuing to attract the best talent in the marketplace and get the highest level of visibility. What kind of research have you done? I’ve spent the past couple of months in the vetting process, so I’ve spent a tremendous amount of time with [executive chairman at Wilhelmina International] Mark Schwarz and the board of directors. I’ve spent


time understanding the financials of a publicly traded company, and the responsibilities that come along with that. I’ve also been reading and researching Wilhelmina Cooper herself, her life and her legacy. I’ve also been talking to all my friends who have relationships in the fashion and modeling communities to understand the key players, where Wilhelmina’s strength lies, and where we can develop moving forward. What have you learned? The modeling business grew organically, and that agency was driven around personalities and relationships. In 2016, modeling is a big business that affects advertising, as well as the ability to help move product and create trends. Today, Wilhelmina is a multinational modeling agency that doesn’t just cover high-end women’s and men’s but has a full line of commercial, fitness, and curve divisions. What are your other priorities? Raising the visibility of the brand. We’ve photographed talent for our new campaign wearing “I am the face of Wilhelmina” shirts. When Wilhelmina Cooper started out, her vision was always about celebrating diversity. She was the first agent to book an African-American woman on the cover of Vogue, and that was Beverly Johnson. Wilhelmina today looks at celebrating the diversity of faces all around the world, and so the “I am the face” campaign is to support the idea that if you are a high-end editorial girl, this is a home for you. If you are commercial model, a curve model, a fitness model, this is the home for you. You can all be the face of Wilhelmina. Which divisions are you excited about working with? Wilhelmina men’s division is a leader in the industry, and it’s under the direction of Taylor Hendrich, who is a tremendous talent. He has built a team here, so I think they are in a really great place. The direct business, which is more the commercial business, includes curve and fitness. It’s had 40 percent growth in 2015, so they are in a great place. My immediate focus is going to be in changing the perceptions of Wilhelmina’s high-end women’s board as a place that you can go and grow your career longterm. Sometimes the impression [for models] was to start at Wilhelmina, get to a certain place, and move on. I’m dead-set on stopping that impression. I want every young girl around the world to dream of being a Wilhelmina model, and to know that if they entrust their careers with us, we will create opportunities that no one else can. What have you learned from the managers you’ve sat down with so far? I learned that the similarities of my old position and where I am at Wilhelmina are not so dissimilar; they are both filled with tremendously creative and passionate individuals who really care. I'm convinced that we’ll grow our business in powerful ways, but at the core, I want to fill this agency with people who are passionate about the idea of helping someone else fulfill their dreams. As you walk down the halls here, the energy and the love that people have for this brand is palpable. What was the reaction from your peers about getting this gig? I was overwhelmed by the amount of support I received in the marketplace. When you’re at a place for as long as I was, you have such a healthy respect and admiration for your previous employment and the talent that exists there. There are some incredibly talented individuals. But when you leave it, and you get out there, you realize there’s this other incredible world that exists of other opportunities and new faces to meet. It almost feels like I graduated a little

bit—you leave your friends in high school that you were very close to, but you start making new friends in college. It’s about adding to relationships as opposed to taking anything away. How did you spend your time post-Condé? At the end of the day, I learned a valuable lesson— you have to know who you are, and at my core, I’m a hustler. There was a fantasy of lying on a beach somewhere, or working out three times a day, or all the things we tell ourselves on that really crappy winter night, when we’re like, “Why am I here? I just want to be in L.A. with a Starbucks cup in my hand.” But I was bored in a week and a half. I was driving my partner crazy, I was driving my friends crazy—if I don’t have a phone attached to my fingers 24 hours a day, I don’t know what to do with myself. That realization was really powerful for me, because I was excited to dig in to a project that was going to be a full-time commitment. Did you occasionally turn on General Hospital? I watched zero television. I don’t know how the days went. Our dog did get a lot more attention! I had the leisure of lengthy lunches, but you can only do that so many times. How did you handle the public nature of the departure? You can’t have the reputation of being a tough, business motivator, and then be super sensitive, so the answer is I laughed out loud. When I saw the picture in The New York Post of me jumping into the water, pushed overboard, I texted it to my kids and laughed. My son said, “In some way, I know you’re liking this.” Are you thinking about exploring a relationship between Wilhelmina and one of the big talent agencies, like ICM or CAA? We have a division already called Wilhelmina Artist Management, and under our celebrity division we have Demi Lovato, Nick Jonas, and we just recently signed [singer] Shawn Mendes. We won’t merge with anyone else—we have those capabilities here, and we will be building up the talent and hiring in those areas to further develop Wilhelmina’s Artist Management. We have to be deeper in that game. It’s essential to our success that we do that. Should the other agencies be scared? I wouldn’t be so presumptuous to say anyone should be scared. There are a lot of great agencies with a lot of great talent out there. Wilhelmina is committed to increasing opportunity for our talent. Competition is good and raises our game. If you are a spectator, prepare for a good match. You seem ready for this. I couldn’t be more thrilled. I have opinions; I’m going to change things. In six months, the people who are here and passionate will feel like it’s a whole new place with a whole new day happening around them. ß

THAT’S WACK! Elisabeth Erm and Ronald Epps give Wackermann a posing lesson.

MODEL CHATTER MEET RONALD EPPS!

How were you discovered? I was working as a janitor at Whole Foods, sweeping and cleaning bathrooms, when a guy walked up to me and said I should be modeling. I laughed and said, “Thank you, send me in the right direction.” He gave me a photographer’s number, and I did a little photo shoot and posted it on Facebook. A scout, and now good friend of mine by the name of Fletcher Harrington, saw my pictures and sent me to Wilhelmina, which signed me on the spot. And the rest is history! What’s been your most memorable day on the job? Booking the cover of i-D magazine with Joan Smalls, and then seeing the cover for the first time. I almost fainted. I had a honeycombs smile on my face for the next week! You might have to Google the “honeycombs” reference! What advice do you have for Bill Wackermann? Bill and I hit it off from the beginning because he went to school in Philadelphia and also lived there for a while. The only advice I have, which of course he knows, is that relationships are key. A lot of people think I have a dashing appearance; others don’t. But being humble, remembering names, and keeping relationships strong will always give you an edge. Even when someone looks better than you, is smarter than you, or even is a better actor than you. Congrats again, Bill!

HI THERE, ELISABETH ERM!

“I LEARNED A VALUABLE LESSON— YOU HAVE TO KNOW WHO YOU ARE, AND AT MY CORE, I’M A HUSTLER.”

Where were you discovered? At a local mall in my hometown. An agent in Estonia walked up to me and asked if I had ever thought about modeling. What do your friends want to know about your job? The most-asked questions are usually whether I do catwalks or editorial photos. They assume that you can only do one or the other. And of course, I always get asked if I get free clothes! What’s been your most memorable day so far? Walking my first show. It was Lacoste! Who would you still like to work with? Victoria’s Secret and Peter Lindbergh.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


PERFECTMod

THERE’S SOMETHING ABOUT

ROMEE By nature, models are genetically blessed, but not every girl is stopyou-in-your-tracks stunning. In the case of Dutch-born bombshell Romee Strijd, Victoria’s Secret Angel and current face of Carolina Herrera, we can categorically confirm this.

MODEL PREP Backstage at Marchesa’s Spring 2016 show.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 4 ) ; B FA N YC . C O M

BY NATASHA SILVA-JELLY


G

E

“IT WAS LIKE A DREAM WORLD FULL OF BARBIES, AND I WANTED TO BE ONE OF THEM.”

STAYING SOCIAL Sneaking in some text time before the Victoria’s Secret show.

C

laudia Schiffer beautiful meets Brigitte Bardot sexy—which translates to hot property right now. Romee Strijd, the 20-yearold New York–based model, signed with DNA in 2011, was shot by Paolo Roversi for British Vogue in 2012, given her wings in 2014, and granted “Angel” status the following year. And what with that long, thick blonde mane, bright blue eyes, and perpetual healthy glow, it’s not exactly difficult to see why. “I used to watch the [Victoria’s Secret] shows on my laptop at home in Holland when I was 15,” says Strijd over tea at the Hotel Americano in Chelsea ahead of New York Fashion Week. “It was like a dream world full of Barbies, and I wanted to be one of them.” If becoming an Angel was a dream come true, it is certainly in stark contrast to Strijd’s early ambitions. “I liked to clean,” she muses. We suspect between VS shows, walking for the likes of Louis Vuitton, Prada, and Céline (which she did for her first season), fronting advertising campaigns, and shooting for American and French Vogue, there isn’t

much time to mop these days. “I really love Inez and Vinoodh—I worked with them recently for French Vogue [“Pop Safari,” March 2015], and that has been my highlight. They’re great photographers. They’re also from Holland, and I really liked the story and working with Carlyne [Cerf de Dudzeele]. We shot in a studio in New York, and it was such a fun day that I will never forget.” Strijd also admits to being a fan of Mario Testino, who shot her alongside fellow Angel Lily Aldridge for Carolina Herrera’s Spring/Summer 2016 campaign. “I really admire Mario and Patrick [Demarchelier]. You come on set and they say, “Do this” and “Go stand there,” and you know they know exactly what they are doing and they get the shot in five minutes.” Despite walking for Jeremy Scott, Marchesa, and Herrera last NYFW, it’s unclear whether she will hit the catwalk for Fall. “I really enjoy runway because it gives me some kind of adrenaline rush,” says Strij, who looks the part of the proverbial downtown mod in the off-duty uniform of black Acne biker jacket, jeans, and sneakers. “I’m not too girlie," she says. “I really like Acne and Isabel Marant and mostly wear jeans, though on set, it’s quite fun to wear a long feminine dress and play a character.” Like many model narratives, Strijd was the ripe old age of 13 when she was scouted while shopping with her mother in her native Holland. She declined the offer before having a change of heart at 15, trying her luck locally, then being whisked away to New York with DNA. “Now I really enjoy it—you meet so many people from around the world and everyone’s story is unique,” says Strijd, whose model posse includes VS glamazons Taylor Hill and Jasmine Tookes. “We all live one minute from each other, so we work out together, have movie night, one of us cooks, or we go out for dinner.” If she had to call it, however, it’s Doutzen Kroes that Strijd cites as her favorite Angel—“of course, because she’s from Holland,” she says with a laugh— while she holds Natalia Vodianova as the example of one who has harnessed the power models have today for the greater good. “I have a lot of respect for Natalia—she’s done it for such a long time, she’s had kids and come back, and does so much charity work,” she says. With 1.4 million followers on Instagram, Strijd plans to leverage that reach to get behind a cause of her own. For now, she says, “I like being out of my comfort zone,” and she’s open to this ride, as long as it lasts.

“People see me as energetic and positive and say I’m a hard worker,” she says. “But I’m super crazy at home. Sometimes after posing all day, I come home and explode with energy, jumping around and annoying my boyfriend, who I met in Holland and have been with for six years. It’s a big release—then I’m in bed at eight.” ß

ROMEE’S NEW YORK

“ I’m from Amsterdam and love it, especially the canals and beautiful houses. For now, I totally prefer New York because it has so much energy and everyone is here for their career, so you get into the vibe. I live in Chelsea, so I take the High Line to the Meatpacking District and West Village. I love every restaurant on Hudson Street. They’re so intimate. On the weekends I love to go for brunch, work out at Chelsea Piers, and go to Bookmarc in the West Village. Interior design books are a passion.” FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


MINIMALAppeal every day. You really do have they feeling that you’re walking into someone’s home. How would you describe the aesthetic? We look for items with versatility that aren’t for a specific time or season—that can speak to different women, different ages. It’s meant to be the foundation for your wardrobe, your home, your bathroom—a little bit of everything. Has anyone asked you to orchestrate the same look for their home? It happens all the time. We’re actually working on that as well—all our salespeople are really stylists and interior specialists, so that’s totally possible. We’re more than happy to do that and work with people within their own closets or interiors. You also sell artwork. How do you choose which artists you’re featuring in there? We work with a private art dealer, so the items are on consignment. Right now, it’s mostly photography—we have a beautiful Irving Penn, some Henri Cartier-Bresson prints, a Robert

The Apartment NYC

APARTMENT THERAPY Vignettes from Traina’s retail concept.

LOFTY AMBITIONS

The Apartment L. A.

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

How did The Line come together? We launched two years ago in October. It started with the idea of putting items into context for customers and the desire to create a timeless wardrobe based on essential items that are the building blocks of any woman’s wardrobe. From there, the idea of The Line arose. Who is this girl? What is her world? Where does she live? What products does she use? How did you find the space for the first Apartment? We wanted to find something quintessentially New York, and a Soho loft was ideal. We didn’t want to do ground-floor retail, so it was a big win to get the space. Now, we actually have signage! There are quite a few people who just stumble upon it, and we’ve been so lucky to have a steady flow of traffic

Mapplethorpe, and some Annie Leibovitz. Which brands are you carrying for Spring? Gabriela Hearst. I really love her stuff. It speaks to our ethos for dressing, and it’s beautifully made and easily digestible and translatable into any kind of wardrobe. We also picked up Vetements for Spring, and we just started carrying Loewe and Manolo Blahnik—that was a huge score. We also picked up Hillier Bartley, and we have some great jewelry brands that we’ve picked up, like Repossi and CVC Stones. You recently launched Tenfold, your new home line. Will you expand into other categories? Definitely. Tenfold is doing incredibly well. We filled a big gap within the home market, and it certainly is satisfying a lot of our customers’ needs. What can we find in your own closet? I dress for my mood. I don’t necessarily have a uniform. I change it up, but I always have a pair of Manolos on my feet. All my basics and foundational items come from The Line, whether it’s Acne Studios denim or a Proenza Schouler sweater or a dress from Altuzarra. How do the New York and Los Angeles stores differ? We always try to highlight the versatility of the items, so we have some of the same products in both stores, but showing them differently is part of the goal and the mission. The New York store is a floor-through loft with original moldings and original floors. It’s moody, dark, and very cozy, whereas the L.A. store is much lighter and brighter and sprawling. Each one highlights the landscape of their respective cities, but both still convey the same message. ß

GETTY IMAGES (1); COURTESY

When Vanessa Traina founded e-tailer The Line, the idea was to sell wear-everywhere essentials that mix nicely with ultradesigner fare. The Apartments, complimentary retail spaces in New York and L.A., serve as full lifestyle displays of the e-comm offering. Traina fills us in on the concept. BY PAIGE REDDINGER


Factoring · Accounts Receivable Financing International Factoring and Financing Purchase Order Financing · Letters of Credit

JOSHUA K APELMAN · GARY WASSNER · CRISTOPHER WASSNER TIM MOORE · CHRISTINA MALLEOS · BRITTANY PARISH · MATTHEW MOECK

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STYLINGGuru

A

IT TAKES TWO Jason Rembert is known for styling some of the biggest names in music and entertainment, but his client Rita Ora is his main muse. Meet the man behind some of Ora’s most stunning looks.

As a go-to guy for stars in the music and entertainment industries, Jason Rembert is known for his chic stylings that can turn any old press event into a bona fide moment. The New York native recently landed a coveted spot on THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER’s list of the 25 most powerful celebrity stylists in the business—and now, he fills us in on his journey from ELLE to the tapis rouge. BY PAIGE REDDINGER

How did you get into the fashion industry? I was looking on ed2010.com and saw an internship for Elle magazine’s fashion closet. I applied, and Mitsu Tsuchiya [now at Complex] asked me if I could come in to interview. The internship was for someone in their third year of college; I lied and said I was a junior. Were you always a fashion guy? I was always interested in it, but it’s something I kind of shied away from. I grew up in South Jamaica, Queens, where being a cop, a lawyer, or a doctor was considered a real job. In my neighborhood, what you aspired to was a $200 shirt. I didn’t know anything about a $2,000 shirt—I didn’t even know that existed. What did you major in? Mathematics. My professor told me that I should become an actuary—they make a six-figure salary. Were fashion salaries a rude awakening? I was willing to make the sacrifice. Fashion assistants made their jobs look so glamorous! The first time I heard about Christian Louboutin was about 10 years ago from Jen Gach. She was just walking around the office in these black pumps with a red sole and six-inch heels. Malina Joseph [Gilchrist] would be in Margiela for days. And to work under icons like Nina FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Garcia, Joe Zee, Kyle Anderson, and Kate Lanphear was amazing. Were your parents and friends supportive of your fashion career? My mom was very supportive. My brothers thought I was weird. What did you do after your internship at Elle? I interned at W, and that was an experience. This was a good time to be at W, because Carolyn Tate Angel and Alex White were there. The way Alex styles is so romantic; I love it. Eventually, I started assisting stylist Wouri Vice, who was styling Alicia Keys at the time. When did you start venturing out on your own? June Ambrose asked me to style a show on BET called Rip the Runway. After that, I got an agent. How did your agent change your career? I started working with artists from Roc Nation, and then I started working with Nicki Minaj and I was booked for Usher. One week, while I was styling A$AP Rocky, I got a call from my agent about styling a new artist, Rita Ora, for the Cartier Juste un Clou event—she was performing, and it was her first red carpet appearance in America. She wasn’t known yet. I requested clothing for her, and every single person said no. The only person who said yes was the vice president of Aeffe, Lisa Lawrence. She lent me Gaultier and Moschino and some other really amazing brands. What did Rita end up wearing? My friend had previously left Donna Karan to come to Cartier. She called Donna Karan and they provided me with some samples from a few seasons back. We got six dresses, all old—some even had holes in them. Rita wore this Donna Karan black long-sleeve backless dress, and then she performed in Gaultier.

Every single brand that told me no e-mailed me and apologized. How did you build the relationship with Rita? At the beginning, she was only doing appearances. For the 2012 VMAs, I got Gucci to make a jumpsuit for the red carpet. To present, she wore Stéphane Rolland, and for the after-party, she wore Alexandre Vauthier. That November, at the MOBO Awards show, Rita wore Mugler, designed by Nicola Formichetti, on the carpet. That dress gave her a 22-inch waist. She didn’t want to wear it, but when she walked out in it, jaws dropped. From that point on, we were really in sync. Soon, it was just fashion moment after fashion moment. She was wearing looks straight off the runway. Why has she become such a star? Rita has major personal style. She’s able to add a piece, take away a piece, and cut something up because she knows how she’s feeling. One day, I heard Donna [Karan] tell Rita that she’s one of the few people who can wear Donna Karan atelier, Donna Karan, and DKNY. What do you love about your job? Celebrity styling is very gratifying and instant. One day you shoot a video, the next day you shoot a magazine cover, the next day it’s a movie premiere… I’m doing a different job every single day. ß

B FA N YC . C O M ( 1 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 3 )

GAME


BRANDTo Watch

FOOT FORWARD For the better part of three decades, Charles David has been wowing Hollywood and beyond with a chic and wearable take on footwear. Ashley Michaelsen, the brand’s “foot,” discusses its European history, commitment to craftsmanship, and starring role in the movies. BY NATASHA SILVA-JELLY

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

factories in Italy and around the world, our craftsmen aim to create shoes that redefine the cost of luxury. We do not sacrifice design or quality, but we want to provide an affordable product. What’s the brand message? Charles David is an approachable brand, and we like to establish an identity in everyday places and common surroundings. Our campaigns can be shot at the beach in Malibu or in trendier places, like the W Hotel in Los Angeles or at a home in the Hollywood Hills. Our customer loves the glamorous lifestyle, but she also lives in the hustle and bustle of today’s world and wants a product that can keep up. Social media has helped us establish an identity with our customer by connecting with the bloggers and style watchers who drive fashion. We have lots of blogger events, where we host a lovely dinner and show them the collection. Our fans have always loved our product, but now, we want to make that emotional connection. You have an impressive roster of celebrity devotees. Our DNA is very Hollywood-driven, as our design team is West Coast–based, and I work closely with movie producers. Natalie Portman was a fan of our vegan line, and the products were featured in Black Swan. Emmanuelle Chriqui, Eva Longoria, Jennifer

TASK MASTER Ashley Michaelsen in the brand’s campaign.

Hudson, and Halle Berry have all worn our shoes. They also have a starring role in two films set to be in theaters this summer—Running Wild with Sharon Stone and Praying for Rain with Jane Seymour. Any plans to open retail stores? We no longer have stand-alone stores, so our focus is on our wholesale and e-commerce. We are stocked in around 40 retailers, including Nordstrom, Macy’s, Lord & Taylor, and Bloomingdale’s. Our customers want to connect to the lifestyle of the brand with the ability to choose options in one place. ß

COURTESY

You’re the face of the brand, but you wear many hats. Yes! I started out as a shoe model, then turned into the face of the company, and then became creative director of the campaigns. Now, I also manage all the PR and marketing. How did you get your start in modeling? My parents were models, and so it was inevitable. I’ve been modeling since I was 6. I then transitioned into the fashion industry after graduating from FIT, where I studied fashion merchandising. As I got older, I wanted to be on the other end of the campaign—producing, casting, and booking the hair and makeup teams. What is the brand’s mission? Jeanne Zornada is the creative director; she has been with us for two years. She had her own shoe line and also worked at Vera Wang, Ralph Lauren, Kenneth Cole, and Brown Shoe Company. Her focus is to create sexy, sophisticated footwear with a fashion edge. We look to the latest trends and classic shoe silhouettes and reinterpret them in an updated and elevated way. What kind of influences is she working with? A lot of inspiration for the brand comes from our beginnings in Italy. We look at the quality and craftsmanship of masters like Salvatore Ferragamo, Gianvito Rossi, Aquazzura, and Prada. Within our


Real-world education means value-added employees. Berkeley College graduates enter the workforce with more than a typical classroom education. Programs developed with input from industry experts. Outstanding faculty. Access to top fashion industry resources. That’s what the Fashion Marketing and Management program at Berkeley College is all about. In fact, our time-tested approach to education is so effective that leading companies and organizations hire Berkeley grads year after year.

Call 800-446-5400 ext. BFF, visit BerkeleyCollege.edu or email info@BerkeleyCollege.edu

Find us @BerkeleyCollege • #BerkeleyCollege

Berkeley College reserves the right to add, discontinue, or modify its programs and policies at any time. Modifications subsequent to the original publication of this information may not be reflected here. For the most up-to-date information, please visit BerkeleyCollege.edu. For more information about Berkeley College graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed programs, and other important disclosures, please visit BerkeleyCollege.edu/disclosures.

“Through the Fashion Program at Berkeley College, I have met knowledgeable professors who emphasize the skills needed to succeed. I have also had opportunities to connect with industry professionals. Now, I am ready to chase my dreams.” Kaja Berg (left) Fashion Marketing and Management Student P4597-8.2014


FINALThought

JESUS OR FASHION GOD? Nobody has divinely intervened with the fashion world quite like Gucci’s newish creative director. BY ASHLEY BAKER

ALESSANDRO MICHELE

JESUS

PROVENANCE Bethlehem

MASS APPEAL

MASS APPEAL

Fed 5,000 people with seven loaves of bread and a few small fish

Created a 5,000-person waiting list for fur-lined slides

MISSION

“ Fashion is a religion in one sense. Once upon a time, our brand was considered the sanctum sanctorum of fashion. I want to produce things that people really want to buy.”

MISSION

To fulfill God’s plan

PROVENANCE Rome

FLOWER POWER

FLOWER POWER

Showed his followers blooming plants as signs of God’s abundant care

Turned a floral tote into the season’s most coveted “It” bag

DISLIKES

Old-school ideas of sexiness. “ Some women are forced by men to look a certain way, to be accepted by the general public, and I find that terrible.”

DISLIKES

Beggars in front of temples

SURVIVAL INSTINCT

LEADERSHIP ROLE

Beloved by 2.2 billion believers around the world

Masterminds a $3.9-billion-a-year fashion empire

SURVIVAL INSTINCT ALSO KNOWN AS

Light of the World, Prince of Peace, Son of God, Word of God…

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

Resurrected Gucci

ALSO KNOWN AS

@lallo25 on Instagram

GETTY IMAGES (2); SHUTTERSTOCK; ALL OTHERS COURTESY

LEADERSHIP ROLE

Rose from the dead


Some classrooms may have great acoustics or comfortable seats, but our students live and learn in fashion’s most powerful classroom – New York City. With roots in midtown Manhattan and a front door on 5th Avenue, we give our students the professional connections, internship opportunities, and cultural exposure you can only access here in the fashion capital of the world. We think BEYOND THE CLASSROOM to propel our students beyond their expectations.

LEARN MORE AT LIMCOLLEGE.EDU/BEYOND Michelle Nicolas ‘15 Marketing

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Profile for DAILY FRONT ROW INC

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