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©2018 COACH® ©KEITH HARING FOUNDATION. LICENSED BY ARTESTAR, NEW YORK. ©2018 COACH® ©KEITH HARING FOUNDATION. LICENSED BY ARTESTAR, NEW YORK.


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WE’RE BACK WITH A BRAND-NEW LOOK. 4 3 7 N O RT H RO D E O D R I V E

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DOLCE & GABBANA FALL 2018

S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 3 ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; E V E R E T T C O L L E C T I O N ( 1 )

“Did you do your homework?!?”

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TESTINGTesting…

ANA

HOW INSIDER ARE YOU, ANYWAY? Do you know your Sacai from your Spago, your Cardi B from your Gucci cardi, your Haddish from your hashish? Take the test! BY ASHLEY BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TACHMAN

A. $194,221 B. $43,550 (including $1,081 in Portugal) C. $1.2 million D. $312,007

2. What’s the new gig of Steph Shep, the former COO of Kardashian West Brands? A. CEO of Jenner Enterprises B. Head of Communications at the White House C. Director of Influencer Relations at Vine D. Face of 8 Other Reasons, a low-priced jewelry line

S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 3 ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; E V E R E T T C O L L E C T I O N ( 1 )

3. What experience nearly broke Demi Lovato’s sobriety?

C. She wore it when she hosted Saturday Night Live D. It was custom-designed for Haddish by Sarah Burton

12. A soonish-to-be-opened shop at The Standard West Hollywood will specialize in…

6. Influencer throwdown! Which icon has the most followers on IG?

A. Condoms B. Swimwear C. Edibles D. SkinnyPop

A. Kim Kardashian West B. Selena Gomez C. Taylor Swift D. Beyoncé

7. Which of the following headlines did not recently appear on goop.com? A. “Is There Radioactive Radium in Your Tap Water?” B. “How to Add 5.4 Years to Your Life Expectancy in One Easy Supplement” C. “How a Weighted Blanket Can Ease Your Stress + Other Stories” D. “What Do Facial Cupping, a Psychic Medium, and Chelsea Handler Have in Common?”

A. Getting a second-row seat at Chanel B. Attending the Met Ball C. Shooting a Maxim cover D. Losing her luggage—including 13 key pieces from Balenciaga—somewhere between Newark and Malpensa

8. Who is Parisa Fitz-Henley?

4. Seemingly seconds after Lovato shared that story, what did vogue.com publish?

9. What’s the latest news at Versace?

A. A merciless takedown of Demi Lovato B. A makeunder story about Demi Lovato C. A first-person essay by a Demi Lovato fangirl D. A fashion well story featuring Demi Lovato, a personable toucan, and Maison Martin Margiela’s entire S/S 18 haute couture collection

5. Which of the following is not true about the dress Tiffany Haddish wore to the Oscars? A. She bought it for $4,000 at Alexander McQueen B. She wore it to the premiere of Girls Trip

A. The new designer at Schiaparelli B. Marc Jacobs’ interior designer C. The actress playing Meghan Markle in an upcoming Lifetime movie D. Mick Jagger’s latest baby mama

A. Donatella’s done with fur! B. A branded casino in Macau C. Donatella’s off pasta! D. A new capsule collection with—wait for it!— KitchenAid

10. Sob story! What is the fate of Westside Pavilion, the mall made iconic by Clueless? A. It’s the new global HQ of Hooli B. It’ll be mostly office space C. It’s been renovated into a new palace for Candy Spelling D. Welcome to the global headquarters of American Apparel!

11. What is The Violet Code? A. L.A.’s hottest S&M party B. A group text comprised of Hollywood’s top female studio executives C. Violet Grey’s testing process and set of standards for curating its beauty products D. Uma Thurman’s roman à clef, which is allegedly nabbing an eight-figure advance

13. How did Target celebrate its collection with Hunter Boots? A. A pop-up mosh pit at Glastonbury B. A music festival at the Rose Bowl with Charli XCX, OneRepublic, and Troye Sivan C. A mud-wrestling match at Bootsy Bellows D. A cocktail party with an in-store rainstorm at the Museum of Ice Cream

14. Which Los Angeles icons recently graced the Opening Ceremony runway? A. Minnie and Mickey B. Dakota and Elle C. Paris and Nicky D. Tori and Dean

15. Which of the following stars does not have a beauty line? A. Serena Williams B. Victoria Beckham C. Aubrey O’Day D. Cardi B

0–4 CORRECT RESPONSES: YOU ARE…JEREMY LIN Once a known quantity to the style set, you’ve gone entirely off our radar. Shop a pilot, hire a stylist—read on for some ideas—peruse our back issues on issuu.com, and consider yourself reacquainted with all things chic!

5–9 CORRECT RESPONSES: YOU ARE…JEREMY IRONS An icon among us, you’re a Hollywood legend—if a bit lacking in fash-savvy. (We get it—one can only be an expert at so many things!) Still, we adore, so sit down, relax, and take notes.

10–15 CORRECT RESPONSES: YOU ARE…JEREMY SCOTT You’re at the epicenter of all the action—no wonder you’re getting an award! See you at the Beverly Hills Hotel, darling. ANSWERS: 1. B; 2. D; 3. B; 4. B; 5. D; 6. B; 7. B; 8. C; 9. A; 10. B; 11. C; 12. C; 13. B; 14. A; 15. C

1. According to the-numbers.com, what was the worldwide total box office gross for Woodshock, the debut feature film from Rodarte’s Kate and Laura Mulleavy?

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Brandusa Niro

Editor in Chief, CEO “I find the In-N-Out that’s Deputy Editor approximately Eddie Roche 30 seconds from the Executive Editor terminal and Ashley Baker immediately Managing Editor down a protein burger, animalTangie Silva “I fly down PCH style, with a straight to Duke’s Creative Director Diet Coke.” in Malibu for the Jill Serra Wilde fish tacos. Taco Digital Director Tuesdays are “A quesadilla legend!” Charles Manning from Guisados. My mouth is Contributing Editor watering Taylor Harris just thinking Contributing Photo Editor about it!” Hannah Turner-Harts Contributing Designer Eric Perry Contributing Photographer Giorgio Niro Contributing Copy Editor Joseph Manghise Imaging Specialists Neal Clayton, George Maier Editorial Interns Nick Lindo, Kamellia Thomas

WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO FOOD AFTER LANDING AT LAX?

5 1 2 3 4 5

THINGS TO DISCUSS!

Mansur Gavriel

Stylist Jamie Mizrahi is the new creative director at Juicy Couture and the fashion crowd is heavily enamored with her debut. Her first collection is hitting stores now, so naturally we had a couple of questions:

Britney Spears for Kenzo. Totally gonzo, and we love! Marchesa. Despite its absence on the red carpet during this year’s awards season, it’s still being sold at the likes of Bergdorf Goodman, Saks, and Nordstrom. Is a comeback in the works? Drew Barrymore’s intimate, ultrapersonal IG account. We totally feel like we’re besties now! Speaking of Insta, celebrity chronicler @obviousbutamazing. Where else to find breaking news about Ben Affleck’s massive back tattoo? Cynthia Nixon, Governor? Stranger things have happened!

Cynthia Nixon

Jessica Diehl

MELROSE IS HAVING A MOMENT!

A slew of new designer boutiques in this hood are making spring shopping even more attractive. A few of our faves:

VERONICA BEARD Veronica Miele Beard and Veronica Swanson Beard worked with interior designer Carolina de Neufville on their first L.A. boutique using vintage furniture and Kuba upholstery. On top of the brand’s ready-to-wear, the store will also sell accessories from Clare V. and Le Specs. 8471 Melrose Pl.

MANSUR GAVRIEL Shoes, bags, knitwear—is there anything that Rachel Mansur and THIS Floriana Gavriel can’t do? Their JUST IN! new outpost also goes the extra mile with an in-store Fashion news you’ll use… • Kim Jones has been named café. As well as clothes and creative director at Dior Homme. bags, the shop will carry • Hollywood favorite Jessica Diehl housewares and vintage. is out at Vanity Fair. 8475 Melrose Pl. • Young Thug is totally a designer! He’s launched limited-edition backpacks with Sprayground.

Kim Jones Young Thug

FLA WINNER: BEST DESIGN DEBUT!

OUTDOOR VOICES Athleisure done right is de rigueur at this sunny destination for wellness enthusiasts. These neck-toankles ensembles look so great that we’re tempted to do a double at SoulCycle. 8425 Melrose Ave.

How are you infusing Juicy’s L.A. heritage in your collection?

I always think back to what Juicy was when it first started—what it was known for: fabrics, colors, the J zip, the track suit, the emotions it evoked—and I try to tap into that. For example, we’re designing updated body styles and using new fabrics for track suits. There’s something for everyone, whether you want more of a casual, inexpensive version in French terry or something more luxe like cashmere. How do you split your time between styling your clients and working on Juicy?

It all depends on what’s going on at any given time— they’re both huge jobs, but I’ve found a way to make them work. I do feel extremely lucky!

Rainey Qualley, Jamie Mizrahi, Ashley Benson, and Serayah

Mark Tevis

Chief Revenue Officer “The first taco truck I can find!”

Luxury Account Director Betsy Jones Fashion Publishing Director Monica Forman Director of Marketing & Special Events Amanda Dilauro Digital Operations Daniel Chivu Publishing Associate CJ Obediente Manufacturing Operations Michael Esposito, Amy Taylor

“I Uber straight to Villa Blanca to sip a glass of rosé with Lisa Vanderpump and Erika Jayne. No food needed!”

The Daily Front Row is a Daily Front Row Inc. publication. Copyright 2018. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Requests for reprints must be submitted in writing to: The Daily, Attn: Tangie Silva, 810 Seventh Avenue, Ste. 400A, New York, NY 10019.

ON THE COVER: Emily Ratajkowski, photographed by Alasdair McLellan.

PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 6 ) ; S H U T T E R S TO C K ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

SCENE

Salut, les filles et garçons! Your Daily is back with our fourth-annual Fashion Los Angeles Awards—and our very own Hollywood issue, to boot. We’re here to celebrate the intersection of fashion and entertainment, and the tastemakers that make the red carpet the most exciting place to be. So, cozy up in your Saarinen chair, add some adaptogenic herbs to your turmeric latte, and read on for plenty of Daily deliciousness. See you on Sunday, April 8, at the awards!

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HEARD

Required reading! Is anyone else chomping at the We’re moderately bit for the new Gisele book? We’ll have to wait until obsessed with the new October 2 for Lessons: My Path to a Meaningful Classic Petite Black Life to be released, but until then, spending way Sheffield watch in rose too much time on her IG will have to suffice. gold from Daniel Wellington. • Bill Cunningham wrote a secret memoir! After his death in 2016, the shutterbug’s family discovered a manuscript titled Fashion Climbing, and it was acquired at auction by Penguin Press. Expect to hear much more about the book when it’s published this September! • Congrats to Virgil Abloh, the new men’s artistic director at Louis Vuitton. Epic!

CHIC CHAT!

WITH HIRO CLARK’S ANDY SALZER

What’s the story behind Hiro Clark? Los Angeles is a city of duality: a city in the sun but also a town with a dark underbelly. We like to say, “the brighter the light, the darker the shadow.” We embrace both sides. Hiro Clark is that alter ego—a Superman in every Clark Kent. Where are you selling? You can definitely cop all the good stuff at hiroclark.com, including the limited-edition items. Some of our favorite partners include Ron Herman, Harvey Nichols, and, coming soon, Lane Crawford. What’s next for you? The uniform. We wanted to give our guys some options. We now have the T-shirt, the sweatshirt, the hoodie, and the sweatpants. Keep the edit tight, but definitely no jacket required.

RETOUCHED BY AN ANGEL What if…Nicole Kidman and Helena Bonham Carter switched coifs? READY FOR OUR CHECK-IN!

ALL EYES ON THIS! THINGS TO DISCUSS, PART 1 The Weinstein Company’s creditors: David Bowie (?!), former intern Malia Obama, Michael Bay, and Daniel Radcliffe.

Red Cherry Eyelashes has introduced four exclusive styles inspired by Jacqueline Susann’s Valley of the Dolls. Our fave? The ultra-dramatic Neely, of course. Set of four for $34.95, redcherrylashes.com

There’s a new haute spot in town—The Jeremy West Hollywood Hotel (located at the corner of Sunset and La Cienega) is emerging as a place to see, be seen, and sleep! With 286 guest rooms and two penthouse suites, the sleeping quarters have panoramic views of the Hollywood Hills. And with more than 10,000 square feet of flexible meeting and event spaces, there are plenty of ways to entertain a large group of friends, colleagues, whomever. And there’s nourishment, too—Cali-centric cuisine at Etcho Café and clever cocktails at Joao cocktail bar, as well as The Rooftop bar and lounge. For more information, visit jeremyhotel.com.

WHERE TO EAT!

We asked Wolk Morais designers (and bona fide foodies) Brian Wolk and Claude Morais to dish on their dining spots du moment:

VESPERTINE: Ultra high-end fine dining from Jordan Kahn. Reservations only! 3599 Hayden Ave. POLLEN: Australian-esque breakfast and lunch in Echo Park. 2100 Echo Park Ave. THE HEARTH & HOUND: A hot spot in Hollywood from Spotted Pig impresario April Bloomfield. 6530 Sunset Blvd. 189 BY DOMINIQUE ANSEL: A new spot at the Grove from the inventor of the Cronut. 189 The Grove Dr. THE EXCHANGE RESTAURANT: Great Israeli food in Downtown L.A. 416 W. Eighth St. KISMET: A cool place in Los Feliz from Brooklyn transplants. 4648 Hollywood Blvd. PIZZANA: What’s not to love about Neapolitan pizza? 11712 San Vicente Blvd. FREEDMAN’S: A gastronomic Jewish deli in Silverlake. 2619 Sunset Blvd. ROSSOBLU: Bolognese-inspired cuisine from chef Steve Samson. 1124 San Julian St. MAJORDOMO: David Chang’s highly anticipated L.A. outpost. 1725 Naud St.

S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 5 ) ; G E T T Y I M A G E S ( 2 ) ; J A KO B L AY M A N ( 1 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

WATCH THIS!

THI THINGS TO DISCUSS, PART 2

Lindsay Lohan is the new face of lawyer.com. We’ll just let you ponder that for a while.

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BESTInShow

ILARIA URBINATI

FIRST MAJOR CLIENTS: Chris Evans and Bradley Cooper. They’re still my clients after 10 years. BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: I see girls come in to work as interns or assistants, and they think the job is going to be just shopping. But it’s actually a whole lot of schlepping. And it’s also a whole lot of dealing with the politics of the industry and managing personalities. Donald Glover CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: My most referenced moments are Donald Glover in the brown velvet Gucci tuxedo when he won his Golden Globe. Armie Hammer’s red velvet custom Armani tux at the Oscars this year. Nina Dobrev and Lizzy Caplan at the Emmys, both in Donna Karan Atelier. In general, my work with Tom Hiddleston and Rami Malek gets a lot of love. My work making over The Rock is getting attention—people really love him! Another career highlight has been getting to do the cover of The Hollywood Reporter Stylists & Stars issue two years in a row— once with Tom and once with Rami. PERSONAL STYLE: I’m going through a ’70s Klute vibe. FASHION FAVORITES: I am obsessed with the Eidos collection, now that it’s being designed by Simon Spurr.

SAMANTHA MCMILLAN

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Johnny Depp. NOBODY KNOWS… How organized you need to be. People don’t understand the sheer volume of merchandise we deal with on a daily basis. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Probably both times Elle Fanning has been to Cannes, and both times Dakota Fanning has been to Venice. TREND TURN-OFF: I’ve never been a fan of white pumps. ALWAYS WEARING: My gold Saint Laurent boots. FASHION FAVORITES: Some of my goto’s are Pierpaolo Piccioli; Fernando [Garcia] and Laura [Kim] from Monse and Oscar de la Renta; Kate and Laura [Mulleavy] from Rodarte. I also love all things Miuccia Prada. Joseph Altuzarra is wonderful to collaborate with. I love Karl [Lagerfeld] and Clare Waight Keller. I’m excited to see what Virgil [Abloh] does at Vuitton, Hedi [Slimane] does at Céline, and Kim [Jones] at Dior Homme!

THE DAILY is co-hosting a luncheon with THE OUTNET to toast this town’s most sought-after stylists. Meet the image makers who made the guest list! BY TAYLOR HARRIS

MICAELA ERLANGER

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Michelle Dockery. That first year together was a super special one. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: It’s hard to choose! Lupita [Nyong’o] in the blue Prada gown that she won the Oscar in or the red Ralph Lauren at the Globes; Michelle Dockery in Alexandre Vauthier (then an emerging couturier) at the Globes. And dressing Meryl Streep across the board has been an incredible experience—her red Dior at the Oscars this year was especially memorable. PERSONAL STYLE: Classic. ALWAYS WEARING: My vintage Rolex. I never take it off! NEW DESIGNER PICKS: I am loving Halpern, Jacquemus, Monse, and Attico. I am always excited about new designers!

Lupita Nyong’o

Elle Fanning

LAW ROACH

THE BEST PART: Making beautiful women feel even more beautiful. FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Zendaya. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Zendaya in the Moschino butterfly dress; Céline Dion’s Stéphane Rolland gown at the Billboard Music Awards; and Zendaya at the world premiere of Spider-Man. PERSONAL STYLE: Tacky. NEW DESIGNER PICKS: Toni Maticevski. I just love the way he plays with shapes.

Zendaya

S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 5 ) ; E R I K A S L A ( 1 ) ; D AV I D C R OT T Y ( 1 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

STYLISTS WE L❤VE

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Introducing LIFEWTR Series 4. We advance and showcase the sources of creation and creativity.


BESTInShow

JEN RADE THE BEST PART: Being employed! FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Olivia Wilde. Oprah Winfrey CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Styling Oprah Winfrey for her InStyle cover. TREND TURN-OFF: Best- and worst-dressed lists. Very often they feel misinformed and thoughtless. PERSONAL STYLE: Tomboy chic. ALWAYS WEARING: I’m wearing my T bracelet from Tiffany nonstop lately. It feels very fancy lady!

ERICA CLOUD

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Mandy Moore was my first when I went out on my own. I feel very lucky! CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Mandy Moore in the navy Naeem Khan at the 2017 Golden Globes. It was her first award season being back on the scene and This Is Us had just started. It was a coming-out party for us both in different ways and such an incredible reception! TREND TURN-OFF: I hate the “Who Wore It Better” Mandy Moore comparison. I think it should be called “Twice as Nice” and applaud the different ways a look can be styled. Celebrate our differences!

NICOLAS BRU

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Daft Punk. BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: People don’t understand how involved we are in fostering relationships between clients and fashion houses. FASHION FAVORITES: Anthony Vaccarello at Saint Laurent and Demna Gvasalia at Vetements and Balenciaga.

THE BEST PART: There are two fulfilling parts: The first is building women’s confidence, and the second is giving fashion designers their starring moment. FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Gwyneth Paltrow. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: You tell me! If I had to say, it’d be Saoirse Ronan’s Calvin Klein by Appointment pink bow at the Oscars this year and Gwyneth Paltrow’s white Tom Ford cape at the 2012 Oscars. TREND TURN-OFF: I hate the word “hate,” but I strongly dislike “flattering” clothing. ALWAYS WEARING: My Elder Statesman navy blue sweater vest; white long-sleeve T-shirts; Céline trousers, and my Saoirse Ronan Tom Ford coat. NEW DESIGNER PICKS: Mother of Pearl, Brandon Maxwell, Richard Quinn, and Jacquemus. This is just off the top of my head; there are definitely a hundred more!

JORDAN JOHNSON AND JILL LINCOLN

GEORGE KOTSIOPOULOS FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Kate Hudson for her Almost Famous press tour. BIGGEST STYLIST CRUSH: Elizabeth Stewart is at the top of my list. She was my boss and mentor at The New York Times Magazine for eight years. CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Working with Freida Pinto, and all the kids from Slumdog Millionaire when the film won a slew of Oscars. TREND TURNOFF: I guess I hate anything that looks “styled.” A skilled stylist makes it all look effortless and organic. Freida Pinto

ELIZABETH SALTZMAN

MARYAM MALAKPOUR

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: The Rolling Stones, whom I’ve worked with since 1997. BIGGEST STYLIST CRUSH: Carine Roitfeld. CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Meeting with Karl Lagerfeld and the late Johnny Hallyday in Paris.

THE BEST PART: When we get a great placement for a new designer we really believe in. BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: People think we always make the final call. We do our best to assert our positions, but there are often many voices in the room. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Jennifer Lawrence at the 2016 Golden Globes and Kiernan Shipka at the 2015 Emmys—both looks were Dior Couture. Jennifer Lawrence ALWAYS WEARING: These incredible brocade personalized Dior totes. People accost us on the streets asking about them!

B. AKERLUND

BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: That this is a job where you just go shopping. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Styling Madonna for the Super Bowl halftime show, and Lady Gaga for her “Paparazzi” music video. PERSONAL STYLE: Experimental. Goth with a punk rock twist. BIGGEST STYLIST CRUSH: Patti Wilson. Her vision is electrifying.

SHUTTERSTOCK (5); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

KARLA WELCH

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Snoop Dog. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Angelina Jolie at the 2004 and the 2009 Oscars. TREND TURN-OFF: Athleisure isn’t my thing. I hope this look disappears. PERSONAL STYLE: Whatever is on the Angelina Jolie floor near my bed.

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Series 4.2 Arts in Education

©2018 LIFEWTR and THIRST INSPIRATION are trademarks.

Inspiration on the outside. Hydration on the inside.

Art by KRIVVY


BESTInShow

JESSICA PASTER ADE SAMUEL FIRST MAJOR CLIENTS: Kim Basinger

FIRST MAJOR CLIENTS: Yara Shahidi and Big Sean. CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Styling the cast of Marvel’s Black Panther in Essence magazine. TREND TURN-OFF: I’ve always had an issue with the athleisure trend outside of the gym environment.

and Minnie Driver. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Working with Cate Blanchett for the first 12 years of her career. The John Galliano purple hummingbird dress that she wore to the Oscars in 1999 is referenced as one of the top Oscar dresses of all time. BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: There is a lot of heavy lifting. We’re not little genies and with the blink of an eye a rack appears! Cate Blanchett TREND TURN-OFF: I can’t get on board with athleisure—you won’t find me in a sweatsuit and sneakers!

MAEVE REILLY LINDSAY DUPUIS THE BEST PART: Helping a few of BLEDSOE my girls develop their brand. A great example is Halsey, who has a YSL Beauty contract, along with some major fashion magazine covers coming out. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Hailey Baldwin hosting the iHeartRadio Music Awards; Janelle Monáe’s award season run in 2017, especially the Elie Saab Oscar gown; and Halsey on SNL. LAST-MINUTE MOMENTS: Hailey wanted to add something representing the kids of Stoneman Douglas High for the iHeartRadio Awards, so I had to have the T-shirt custom-made. We got the Sally LaPointe pants and the Bulgari jewelry Hailey Baldwin literally the day before.

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Sharon Stone at this year’s Globes. One dress checked all the boxes. Boom, one and done! It was the only dress she tried on and didn’t need a stitch of tailoring! ALWAYS WEARING: I splurged on a Versace belt from the Tribute collection.

Jennifer Lopez

MARIEL HAENN AND ROB ZANGARDI

PENNY LOVELL

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Keira Knightley. BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: People think of us like the fairy godmother in Cinderella, with a magic wand that spirits up dresses out of nowhere. That’s so far from the truth. PERSONAL STYLE: I’m British, so it’s in my DNA to worry about the weather. The result tends to be practical with something girly. Think track pants with a lace tee.

BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION: That we’re playing dress up and frolicking down Rodeo Drive. There’s a lot more to it. CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Jennifer [Lopez]’s Las Vegas residency for All I Have, among others!

FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Jessica Alba. BIGGEST STYLIST CRUSH: Law Roach. You can tell he loves fashion! CAREER HIGHLIGHTS: Natalia Dyer in Dior couture at SAG; and Jessica Alba in Oscar de la Renta and a $6-million-dollar Harry Winston necklace at the Globes. PERSONAL STYLE: Polished chic with a little showgirl in it! ALWAYS WEARING: A Balenciaga cropped Natalia Dyer leather moto jacket.

MICAH SCHIFMAN

CAREER HIGHLIGHT: Working with Diane Kruger at Cannes. PERSONAL STYLE: Understated uniform. NEW DESIGNER PICKS: Jacquemus and Monse are exciting right now.

MISCONCEPTION: That it’s all glitz and glam! TREND TURN-OFF: Crocs! I was a little surprised Balenciaga tried to bring them back. It’s just one trend I cannot get into. ALWAYS WEARING: Lorraine Schwartz made me a gold diamondplated necklace with my son Leonardo’s name. I never take it off and I layer it with my cross necklace by Jacquie Aiche. I wear them both every day.

Rose’s client Chrissy Teigen

JAMIE MIZRAHI FIRST MAJOR CLIENT: Eva Mendes. ALWAYS WEARING: My Taffin engagement ring and my Jennifer Meyer wedding band—I never take them off. NEW DESIGNER PICKS: Juicy Couture is exciting me, of course!

SHUTTERSTOCK (4); GETTY IMAGES (1); YU TSA (1)

MONICA ROSE BIGGEST

BRAD GORESKI

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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Series 4.3 Arts in Education

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FANTASY LAND

Stylish, nostalgic, and infused with a heady dose of rock ’n’ roll, Land of Distraction is emerging as one of the hautest new brands coming out of Los Angeles. Meet founder Danita Short, who has used the freewheeling spirit of the ’70s to create a collection that’s charming the discerning chicsters of today. BY ASHLEY BAKER

What’s your backstory? I don’t come from a traditional fashion background, which I think helps our brand stand apart. I was a nurse for 12 years, working mainly in the emergency department. Once we had the concept for the brand, we built a team of industry veterans to help us bring our vision to life. Our first hires were Christian Juul Nielsen as creative director and Joshua Reed as chief marketing officer. How did Christian end up joining the team? We met during one of our initial trips to New York and while I was of course impressed by his résumé, we had great chemistry right away. There’s a wonderful synergy between our backgrounds that you can see in the collection. And what about Josh? We met Josh early on, and he really helped us map out both the launch of the brand and building our team. How did you come up with the name? We wanted something bigger than a fashion house, so we decided to launch a “land” of our own and create subcultures or categories within it. The distraction part is about being spontaneous and not focusing on the mundane details of everyday life.

What did you feel was missing in the marketplace? We felt there was a need in the market for a cool, seasonless brand that would empower women and help them express themselves by using fashion as a vehicle. Land of Distraction is inspired, in part, by the look and attitude of the ’70s. What were some of your favorite style moments from that decade? The overall rebellious spirit of the ’70s is the most inspiring to us, especially how people mixed textures, fabrics, and prints, and the color palette feels relevant to us. How is Land of Distraction a global brand? I’m a Canadian primarily based

in Los Angeles, and Christian is a European based in New York. The collection is a result of our backgrounds and interests, but also our various inspiration trips, which have taken us to places as diverse as Warsaw, Berlin, Tokyo, and Nashville. Our office and production are based in L.A., with satellite offices in New York as well. How has the initial collection been received so far? The response has been overwhelming. We are extremely grateful. What are the key silhouettes or pieces in the collection? It’s all about the corduroy pieces, and the flared denim and leather pants. Where are you producing the clothes, and what are the price points? The majority of the clothes are manufactured domestically, with prices starting at $98 and going up to $800, with a few pieces above that. What’s your distribution strategy? We are currently selling exclusively on our website, and we’re exploring wholesale distribution as well. You launched in November with a pretty epic party at the Chateau Marmont. What do you love about that venue? The Chateau is such an iconic venue with an inspiring history. It holds a special place in my heart as it is the first place I stayed when I rode my motorcycle from Canada to L.A. to plan the brand’s launch. Where do you see Land of Distraction in the next five or 10 years? We want to grow our brand organically and focus on cultivating a loyal community in our “land.” As we grow over time, we hope to expand into other categories. ß

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BEFORE


AND THE WINNERS ARE… EMILY RATAJKOWSKI ( Model of the Year) JEREMY SCOTT (Creative of the Year) STUART VEVERS FOR COACH ( Designer of the Year) ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI ( Photographer of the Year) CAMILA MORRONE ( Emerging Talent) JAMIE MIZRAHI FOR JUICY COUTURE ( Best Design Debut) KATE YOUNG (Women’s Stylist of the Year) WENDI & NICOLE FERREIRA ( Men’s Stylists of the Year) JEN ATKIN ( Hair Artist of the Year) & PHILIPP PLEIN (Fashion Rebel)

2018 HOSTED BY DEREK BLASBERG

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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AND GOD CREATED JEREMY…

CREATIVE OF THE YEAR: JEREMY SCOTT Jeremy Scott, the genius behind his namesake label as well as Moschino, is a fountain of both vision and originality. The People’s Designer tells us how it’s done. BY EDDIE ROCHE

FIRSTVIEW

What’s the first thing you ever created? I didn’t learn how to sew properly until I went to school, but I cut up vegetable ads from Japanese newspapers and taped them together to make a jacket when I was a kid. I made a hat out of scraps of velvet. It was all very intuitive. They weren’t the most functional garments, but they had personality! Who encouraged your creativity as a child? My family. No one was dismissive. We came from farm people, so we did creative things out of necessity. My grandmother saved every scrap of fabric that she could and would make quilts out of them. We were poor. My grandmother would save every bread wrapper and weave together a rug or a jump rope. I grew up seeing one thing becoming another. Did you take art class in school? I was in art classes early on in public school. When I got to high school, I devoured them because there was more flexibility in my schedule. I took every class available, to the point where they had to create a new code and give me my own free time to create art. I was an exemplary student, and my teacher had me eventually teach her freshman class. She was very supportive of me. I was a super, super art student. Did the other students appreciate your creativity? No. I had my group of friends, but in large part I was ostracized at school. By the time I was a senior, I had cycled through and it was harder for younger people to be too much of a dick, but the first couple of years were excruciatingly awful with being physically and verbally attacked. It was challenging. I never really thought about it much until I made my documentary [Jeremy Scott: The People’s Designer]. I kept moving forward and had to shut myself off mentally to what was going on. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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FIRSTVIEW

“SOME PEOPLE CALL ME A GENIUS; SOME PEOPLE CALL ME A FRAUD. I STRIVE TO DO SOMETHING SPECIAL, UNIQUE, AND FROM MY HEART.”

FASHION ORIGINAL Scott’s namesake label and Moschino collections bring out top mods such as Gigi Hadid and Kaia Gerber. The designer (right) dons a My Little Pony T-shirt celebrating his Spring 2018 collection. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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FLOWER TO THE PEOPLE Scott dressed mods as flowers and floral bouquets for his Spring 2018 Moschino show.

FIRSTVIEW

I realized it was temporary. I knew I would get out of school and be with the people I chose. I wasn’t going to have an ordinary job. You put out so many collections every year. How do you nurture your creative spirit? I’m always open to inspiration. If there is ever the time that something doesn’t come instantly, I move on to the next thing. There’s a lot of cross-pollinating when I’m doing one thing that inspires me about another thing. Keeping busy is helpful to keep the machine welloiled. I don’t do anything in particular to replenish the well, but I try to keep myself a happy, whole person. I function best from a place of happiness. That’s why I live in Los Angeles. Do you ever feel creatively stuck? Not really. My assistant can attest to this. I’ve already told her what the next three Moschino shows will be for. I’m able to plan a lot further in advance. Having scheduling works really well for me in my creativity. I work well with deadlines. Are you able to turn off when you’re on holiday? Yeah. I don’t do a lot of vacations, to be truthful, but I can lie on a beach and read a book. If there isn’t anything urgent nagging at me, I don’t have to worry about it. Who do you create with? My friends. Pablo [Olea] has been around a long time, and a lot of ideas are bounced his way. I’m inclusive [with my ideas]. Maybe it’s talk therapy—even when people disagree, it’s fine, because it helps me flesh them out. Who are some of your favorite creators? Ettore Sottsass [of The Memphis Group] is my favorite designer of all time. I adore him, and all the furniture he designed. Of fashion designers, Jean Paul Gaultier was my childhood hero. I loved his work and personality. He was the first designer who broke the mold of looking cool enough to hang out with at a party, but he also made cool clothes. When I was a kid, most designers looked like they could be bankers. Do you pay attention to critiques of your work? I don’t follow them closely anymore. It’s not that I don’t ever see them or avoid them, but I don’t think you should put your value or self-worth wholly into other people’s opinions—good or bad, positive or negative. Some people call me a genius; some people call me a fraud. I strive to do something special, unique, and from my heart. I try to inspire people, open some eyes, and put a smile on people’s faces. I’m more concerned with what my friends think! Do you feel the industry is treating you differently these days than perhaps in the past? Maybe I’ve become more difficult to dismiss. A lot of what I’ve done in my almost 21 years in the business has been at the forefront of where things are now. If you really pay attention, you’d have to acknowledge that. How has working within a large infrastructure like Moschino affected your creativity? I definitely have more resources to be able to complete a fully fleshed-out idea. I’ve been able to share my vision closer to how I imagine and desire it to be. What do you think the future of fashion shows will look like? So many things are different from how they were 20 years ago, and yet we still gather in a room and watch impossibly tall, generally skinny girls walk a runway—and we’re still captivated. Fashion shows endure, like theater and musical performances. Something about that human aspect is fundamentally keeping us involved. I don’t think [shows are] dying. You’ve done so many collaborations over the years. Do you have any dream project that you haven’t yet tackled? There are still things I’d love to do. I’m always excited when I can play with the DNA of an iconic brand and create something new. I only do these things with products that I like or would want to give to a friend. There’s still an open sign on my door! Many years ago, you told us that one of your dreams was to be a judge on RuPaul’s Drag Race. I was on Season 2 of All Stars! It was my favorite thing I’ve ever done. You show Moschino in Los Angeles once a year. Why? Besides the fact that I get to sleep in my own bed at night? I go to SoulCycle on the day of my show and can be centered and zen. I love it here, and it’s nice to be able to share my work with my friends and community. It’s the most love-filled show. My heart wants to burst out of my chest. I feel so loved and so appreciated and so wrapped up in warmth. It’s hard not to love L.A.! ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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FIRSTVIEW

“I FEEL SO LOVED AND SO APPRECIATED AND SO WRAPPED UP IN WARMTH. IT’S HARD NOT TO LOVE L.A.!”

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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GIRL ON FIRE

MODEL OF THE YEAR: EMILY RATAJKOWSKI Model, actress, budding mogul—Emily Ratajkowski is fashion’s mostwatched multihyphenate, and she’s spreading her message of positivity everywhere she goes. After a long day of filming an upcoming television project, she fills us in on her strategy and sensibility. BY ASHLEY BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOO GEORGE What’s the job description of a model in 2018? It’s really expanded. Being a model in 2018 means understanding your brand, having an honesty about your brand and who you are, and learning how to share that—in the way that we used to think of companies sharing themselves. I also think that there’s a real responsibility to set an example for young women. If you’d have to give a boilerplate for what your brand is about, what would it be? My pitch or my thesis is about body positivity and sex positivity and ownership over sexuality and even empowerment through it, but not necessarily in a super self-serious way—in a joyful, expressive way. You’ve had an amazing year. In addition to your modeling work, your acting career is taking off. What’s coming up? I Feel Pretty is coming out on April 20. It’s a comedy with Amy Schumer—it’s really funny, and it also has an important message to young women. Welcome Home, which should be coming out in the next few months, is a thriller; it’s probably my first real lead in a movie. It was basically me and Aaron Paul and an Italian actor [Riccardo Scamarcio]; we shot it in Italy last summer. I have another movie called Lying and Stealing with Theo James, which should be coming out in the fall. What do you love about acting? I started doing theater before I even started modeling. I signed with a modeling agency because I came to L.A. at 14 and signed with an acting agency; they were like, “She should go over to Ford,” and then they signed me on the spot. That took off first. I’m a creative person—I went to school for fine art, and I’ve always loved writing and reading. For me, acting is an incredible creative release. And of course, I love movies. Film work aside, tell us about some of your favorite projects over the past year—campaigns, editorial… I really love working with Katie Grand. She’s one of the people who definitely gave me my “in” in the fashion world, and contributed so much to where my career has gone. Shooting with LOVE is really amazing every time. Katie is really smart, and she really cares

about women and politics. Shooting with her is an amazing experience, because it’s collaborative and also so artful. I had my first hair campaign this year with Kerastase, which was shot by Inez and Vinoodh, and I love them so much. Kerastase is an incredible brand, and I love how smart they are about their branding and marketing. When they bring on a face, they’re really bringing on everything that I stand for. That’s a total pleasure. When do you feel the most empowered? As a woman, as a model, as an actress… It happens in all kinds of moments. I’m definitely a businesswoman; I have my own swimwear company, Inamorata, and I also have film deals…managing all those things can make me feel super empowered. But honestly, just putting on a great pair of shoes that I love, and going out to dinner with good friends— having a great night, feeling comfortable in my own skin—can be just as empowering. What have you learned about the fashion business since you launched Inamorata? A ton, because as a model, you get really into creative, whether it be the design or the lighting or the images. But understanding the production and my market, and managing so many people to bring concepts to life...I have so much respect for that now. I don’t come from a business background—my dad is an artist and was a painting teacher, and my mom was an English professor. Where do you want to take the business? I’m eager to see it grow even more. We’re growing into other areas and bringing on hires. The next six months are going to be huge for us. Where we are now was definitely a part of the plan. I have some incredible licensing deals with The Kooples and others, and having that experience really prepared me for how to build Inamorata and its potential success. In some ways, I think that D-to-C—directto-consumer—is definitely the future of shopping. Instagram and social tools—and being really passionate about what they want you to sell and make—are so key. The consumer is really smart. They want to feel that integrity and honesty in your company. That’s what they’re interested in, maybe even more than the product.

“BEING A MODEL IN 2018 MEANS UNDERSTANDING YOUR BRAND, HAVING AN HONESTY ABOUT YOUR BRAND AND WHO YOU ARE, AND LEARNING HOW TO SHARE THAT.…” Who are your most trusted sounding boards? I definitely love my team—my manager and my agents are incredible. I have an interesting system. I’m with DNA and UTA, and they’re very supportive of each other. It’s nice to be able to bounce things off the other agency sometimes. I have a lot of friends who aren’t necessarily models, but they work in the industry, whether it’s through sales or merchandising or they’re writing about fashion. I bounce things off of them, too. And, of course, my husband and my parents. Ultimately, in business, you are kind of alone in your decision, and it’s important to feel truly committed to whatever way you go on something. You show a lot of love to your mom on IG. What are her most inspiring qualities, and what has she taught you about beauty? A lot of the things I feel about women and sexuality— ownership over your body, not feeling the weight of worrying too much about what that all means and enjoying it—comes from what she taught me when I was younger. That’s huge. She’s very expressive and emotional, but she’s powerful, and I love that. I try to strike that balance in my own life, too. Does anything make you feel self-conscious? Totally. When I’m acting, it’s a character, and when it’s modeling, it’s a fantasy world. Even when I’m taking pictures for my Instagram, that’s a specific second of a world; that’s not reality. Sometimes, when my friends take a picture of me on vacation, or I’m with my husband, I feel camera-shy. When my husband pulls out the camera, I get super embarrassed and nervous, because it’s so much more intimate and honest and really us. What did it feel like to walk by every newsstand in the country and see yourself on a cover for the first time? I’m definitely one of those people who’s like, “Well, that’s cool. That happened. But I don’t know what’s coming next.…” I was cautious. My mom is always asking me when I’m going to stop and celebrate. Looking back, I wish I had been a little bit more like, “Hell, yeah, Emily.” [Laughs] That’s why it’s really nice to be honored with this award. How do you take a break from fashion? I always make time to be alone. I’m an only child, and it’s a good way to check in with yourself. Right now, I’m really tired, but I’m going to meet a girlfriend for dinner who I haven’t gotten to see in awhile. I always want to be with my friends and connecting with the people I love. I grew up in San Diego—if I really need to unwind and relax, I get myself to warm weather and a beautiful beach. ß

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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THE COACH REVOLUTION

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR: STUART VEVERS FOR COACH We can almost count on our hands the number of designers who enter a house and manage to completely turn it upside down…for the better. Stuart Vevers, executive creative director of Coach, has mastered that particular transformation. His whimsical approach to design (complete with Rexy, the dino!) has ensured that this American powerhouse is back where it rightfully belongs—on top. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM JESS LAIRD You’ve been at Coach for a few seasons now. Is the brand where you want it to be? I’m really proud of what we’ve achieved, but there’s never an end to my ambitions. First and foremost, Coach is a fashion house, and that’s one of the things I’m most proud of. We will always be most known for our leather goods—I see Coach as America’s original house of leather—but a shearling coat is now as much a part of Coach as a saddlebag. What’s in Coach stores for Spring this season? Shine, sparkle, and grit! It’s the Coach girls’ downtown take on dressing up. It was all about New York City attitude. Keith Haring’s graphics were key to the collection. I’ve always loved his work and being able to reference his work from an authentic New York house like Coach was really exciting. Does that collection feel like a million years away now? [Laughs] Kind of! It does, but I’m very proud of it. I love the immediacy when I see it in the store. What else is new at the brand these days? We have an exciting collection coming up in September. I’ve been working with Selena [Gomez] on a capsule collection of leather goods, but also readyto-wear. That’s going to be really fun! Are you surprised that Rexy [the dinosaur] has become such a thing? That wasn’t our plan—there was no strategy there. I’m drawn to working with people who like to laugh and have fun, and Rexy definitely came about in one of those moments in the creative process! Now she’s become a Coach mascot and has her own celebrity following—Selena Gomez, Julia Roberts, Kate Moss, Zayn Malik, Michael B. Jordan. Your shows are very impactful. Why is a major production so important? The first collection came together quickly, and I feel fortunate that the stars were aligned. It generated a really positive reaction, and that gave me the confidence to push my vision for Coach forward. Showing during New York Fashion Week was really my chance to say, “You know, look things are changing, things are happening. This is a new day for Coach.”

And that’s why it’s been really important to show it. Why was Selena Gomez the right fit for your campaign? The words I use to describe Selena are the same words that I use when I talk about Coach—honest, authentic—and she has a certain effortlessness. Selena makes a real point of being close to her fans. There’s a reason why she has such a strong following in the world of social media. She’s also really lovely, fun, charming, beautiful. One of the things that Selena has done with us is be a supporter of a group called Step Up, which is all about empowerment of young women through mentorship and education. Tell us more about working with her. It was super fun. Selena is obviously very creative, and we sat down [to conceptualize it] as two creatives. I brought the knowledge of leather goods; I worked with her to really figure out what she would want to use. It was very personal. Then we talked a lot about how we would make this really unique to her. It has a lot of personal touches—an empowering phrase that she wrote that’s inside the bag, for example. We played, pulled out swatches, and had a real laugh. She really wanted to understand how the process worked and wanted to see all the stages, and that made the experience authentic. Do you have a favorite Selena Gomez jam? It’s a tie between “Fetish” and “Bad Liar.” Why did you pick Steven Meisel to shoot the campaign? He was my first and only choice. I don’t have to explain the level and quality of his work. I wanted to convey that Coach was about celebrating a downto-earth and honest approach to luxury. I’m not interested in some fashion fantasy lifestyle! I felt like Steven was the only choice for making that “everyday feel” seem super special, and giving it that kind of finesse that his work has. Your casting is excellent. Who are your muses? I’ve worked a lot with Lexi [Boling]. She was in that first presentation for Coach, and we’ve done loads of things together. I love Chloë Grace Moretz, Zoë Kravitz.… I’m definitely drawn to people who have

something to say and a point of view. Of course, Adwoa [Aboah]—I’ve known her for well over a decade. Was she modeling at the time? No. She was a little girl—she could have been 8 or 9. She and her sister, Kesewa, were in a Coach show together, and I thought that was really charming. I loved seeing them together backstage. Fashion has shifted to Los Angeles in recent years. Why do you think the town has become more relevant? For me it’s a reference. Whether it’s for inspiration or the youth or surf culture. It’s the home of some very unique style tribes.

“I’M REALLY PROUD OF WHAT WE’VE ACHIEVED, BUT THERE’S NEVER AN END TO MY AMBITIONS.” You’re based in New York, but what are your favorite things to do when you visit Los Angeles? I like to do very L.A. things when I’m there, like go to dinner in Malibu or Santa Monica. I like to do all the things you wouldn’t be able to do in a lot of other cities. I usually stay at the Chateau Marmont, and I really like that kind of dark vibe and those rich fabrics. It’s such a cool place to hang out. The movie Somewhere [shot at the hotel] is one of my favorite movies of all time. I bought a poster signed by [director] Sofia Coppola. I really enjoy shopping at Opening Ceremony here. There’s always something really new and special there. Last but not least, I

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A MAN AND HIS MUSE Vevers (right) with model Adwoa Aboah. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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F I R S T V I E W ( 5 ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; W I L L I A M J E S S L A I R D ( 2 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

THE COACH APPROACH Steven Meisel shot the brand’s current Spring 2018 campaign, which features Selena Gomez (left).

GUTTER CREDITS HERE

always try to make it to Disneyland. It’s the original, so there’s something super nostalgic and charming about going there. Who’s your favorite Disney character? Wow. That’s difficult. It would probably have to be Mickey Mouse. He’s an icon. The David Hockney LACMA opening is this month. We understand you are a huge fan of his work. Maybe it’s because we are both from the same part of the world. I was born in Yorkshire [England] like him. The thing that I always take away from Hockney’s work is it’s so transportive. When you are standing and looking at a piece, you feel transported. Whether it’s his paintings about Mount Fuji or his famous ones from the ’60s, there’s something transportive about it. Do you have a favorite piece? I love the L.A. pool series. The most famous one being “A Bigger Splash.” There’s a nostalgia to them that I really love. Do you remember your first visit to the West Coast? I think I was 21 or 22 years old and I was living in New York. I met two friends and we did a long weekend, and we did that classic L.A. to San Francisco on the Pacific Coastal route. We did one night in L.A. and one night in San Francisco. It was so much fun. What struck me about the trip was the landscape. That Californian landscape is so epic. In L.A., we stayed in a motel somewhere. It was really rough and ready, but when you’re that age, that’s fine. ß


COMING SOON Coach’s Fall 2018 Runway.

STUART’S FAN CLUB

“In Stuart’s four-year tenure as creative director of Coach, he has brought the brand into the fashion conversation and built Coach’s credibility as a true fashion house. He has been able to draw on the brand’s DNA as America’s first house of leather, while infusing Coach with modernity, blending Americana with a distinctly New York spirit.” —VICTOR LUIS, CEO, TAPESTRY

“As America’s first heritage leathergoods brand, Coach knew that the best things in life get better in time. Take, for example, its signature glove-tanned leather, inspired by a baseball mitt. With his bold transformation of Coach into a fashion powerhouse, Stuart Vevers has hit a home run.”

F I R S T V I E W ( 5 ) ; PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; W I L L I A M J E S S L A I R D ( 2 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

GUTTER CREDITS HERE

—GLENDA BAILEY, EIC, HARPER’S BAZAAR

“There’s no one more deserving than Stuart for this year’s Designer of the Year honor. I’ve loved getting to know and work with him. He has made my experience with Coach so much fun! I’m so glad his creativity is being noticed.” —SELENA GOMEZ

“Stuart is a genius. He’s been a legend in my life.” —KATE YOUNG, STYLIST FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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PRINCE CHARMING

PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI Alexi Lubomirski has long been revered as one of the most in-demand photographers. Now, thanks to his engagement pictures of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, he’s a global sensation. THE DAILY sat down with this charismatic real-life prince. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEPHAN ALESSI

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“TIMES ARE CHANGING FAST, AND THE OLD ORDER IS GOING TO SEEM OUT OF TOUCH VERY, VERY QUICKLY.”

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FASHION FORWARD Lubomirski’s inventive style infuses fashion and lifestyle portraits with rich context. A few recent examples (clockwise from left): Liya Kebede in Rizzoli’s Philip Treacy book; Lily Aldridge in Harper’s Bazaar Arabia; His Royal Highness Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s engagement photo; Londone Myers in Harper’s Bazaar.

What’s your backstory? I have a Polish/French father and a Peruvian/English mother. I was born in London, raised in Botswana, and then moved around from Paris to Oxford to London and then ended up working for Mario [Testino]. Then I ended up in New York. It was only supposed to be for two years, and I ended up waking up one morning with a wife and kids. Now, I’ve been here for a decade! So let’s talk about everything in between! [Laughs] I think we’re good! I didn’t get everything I need! Where did your interest in photography begin? My stepfather had a camera and would take lots of pictures of us in Botswana, which always fascinated me. He got me a camera when I was 11, and I started taking photos of my brothers and sisters. I was hooked! How did you learn your craft? I went to University of Brighton [in England] and was in line to be a men’s fashion designer. I became friends with one of the fine-arts painters. My designs went from sharp tailored suits to feather boas and crop tops. My teacher told me that I created a niche for myself, and I was going to be the next Jean Paul Gaultier, but design wasn’t for me. I looked at my work, put it into a drawer, and went into the photography lab and said, “You said I had a good eye. Teach me!” What did you do after university? I was an ambitious little monkey. I knocked on everybody’s door to ask people in the industry for advice. When I was completely downtrodden, [CLM agency founder] Camilla Lowther took pity on me and laughed at my work because there was a sense of humor about it. She didn’t think I was ready to be a photographer, but she knew Mario Testino was looking for an assistant. Two weeks later, I got the job. What did you learn from him? People skills. I was always a people watcher, because I was super quiet at school. I learned about how people behave with each other on set. Mario taught me to know when you had the shot and not labor over it. What did you do after your time assisting? One of my fashion fairy godmothers was Katie Grand. When I did my first test, I showed her the Polaroids and she put them in The Face magazine. It was my first published shoot. She booked me for a few more shoots and then Glenda Bailey called me one day and said we need to reshoot a cover in two days’ time, and we did it.

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THE LOOK OF LUBOMIRSKI Alexi’s photography often conveys a sense of intimacy, whether it’s between his subjects themselves or between his model and the viewer.

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Did you ever model? For six months! That’s missing from your official bio! It was so inconsequential! Somebody said I could make some money modeling, so Boss Models took me on. After six months, I realized that [achieving success] was going to take a long time, and I didn’t have the patience. I think I shot two or three jobs. One was a poster for an AIDS charity, and one was a spread in a teeny-bop girls magazine. I didn’t get paid for either of them. I think I lost money in the end. Let’s talk about some of your work. Whose idea was it shoot Angelina Jolie with cheetahs for Harper’s Bazaar? I think that came from her camp. It was an incredible experience, because I flew two hours outside the capital city of Namibia, and there was nothing—I felt like I was flying over Mars. You could walk for days and still end up in the desert! The three cheetahs we shot were raised by the people on the reserve. They were used to being around people—it was bizarre. I was trying to get the right shot for the cover, and there was a cheetah licking my leg! You’ve worked with Julia Roberts on several occasions. We seem to get on! She’s so laid-back and cool on set. The vibe is so relaxed. When she flashes that smile, everybody in the room goes, “Aww!” One of my friends said he didn’t realize I made it until he saw I shot Julia Roberts. She’s been in our lives for so long. How did you end up shooting Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s engagement photos? I’m only allowed to say what I said in my Instagram post, which is that it was a massive honor to shoot them. I felt lucky to be a firsthand witness to their affection and be able to document it. Once the photos were released, you became a person of interest. Was that surprising? I presumed that I would get some press out of it, given that I was credited for the photos. I was so happy with the shots—the black and white close-up was such a departure, and not what people expected, so it sparked interest. It was humbling that my work was received so well. How did your friends respond to that moment? [Laughs] They were angry that I hadn’t told them that I was doing it! The day before I shot it, I lied to them all and told them I was doing a shoot with a celebrity for an Asian magazine. We discovered that you are also a prince yourself! My parents divorced when I was young, but my dad would write me letters and they would always be addressed to Alexi Lubomirski, and one day, a letter came addressed to HSH Prince Alexi Lubomirski. I showed it to my mom and she said, “I guess he wants you to know now!” When you are an 11-year-old boy and someone tells you you’re a prince, it’s fireworks! I was quickly doused by my mother, who said, “There’s nothing left—no palace, no money, no art, no armies.” My reaction was, “What’s the point of the title?”

My wise, wonderful mother said that if you want to be a prince in today’s world, you have to be a prince in your heart and through actions. I didn’t take that on board that day because I was too disillusioned, but it stuck with me and was the impetus for the book I wrote for my sons, Princely Advice for a Happy Life. I rebelled against the title thing, because my father would tell me about it and it was this moral obligation to pass it on to his son. It was way too confusing for me. It wasn’t until I was in my thirties that I came around. It’s important to know where you come from. If I was to teach my sons about it, I didn’t want it to be a burden. I wanted to use it as a benchmark or standard for them to live up to. All those cliché characteristics of what a prince is: charitable, chivalrous, he protects the weak…which is essentially being a good guy. How has fatherhood changed you? I have a very addictive personality, and I’m very gung ho about everything. If I party, I’m the best partier. Thank God my kids came along! I really delve into that side of things. It’s the best high you can get. I’m an overachiever, so when I’m at home, as soon as I wake up in the morning, I want

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“I WANT TO TRY AND USE WHATEVER INFLUENCE OR FOLLOWING I HAVE TO INSPIRE POSITIVE CHANGE AND RAISE AWARENESS FOR ISSUES. WORKING IN THIS INDUSTRY IS A HUGE BLESSING.”

to make breakfast, take them to school, and get them dressed. I travel, so when I come back, I want to be a 100-percent hands-on dad. I taught them to meditate. It’s so cool! What are your passions outside of photography? I’m a hermit! I call it the Gatsby effect. New York is this huge party, but you can stay inside and watch it from the window. New Yorkers are such a big inspiration to me. If I’m not working, I’m concentrating on my family. When the kids are in bed, I work on my projects. Veganism is a big part of my life. One of the other projects that I work on is my YouTube channel. I try to educate and share knowledge and pull back the curtain a bit. What are your future career ambitions? Right now, at the same time as continuing to build a career, I want to try and use whatever influence or following I have to inspire positive change and raise awareness for issues. Working in this industry is a huge blessing. We get to create, travel, meet fascinating people, and influence tastes by what we create. However, this blessing should not come at the cost to others. There’s a responsibility to make this industry the best version of itself that it can be. What changes would you like to see? We need to do away with fur and exotic skins, and constantly address the diversity issue. It should be tackled every month, in every magazine and campaign, where we ask ourselves if we are representing a balanced outlook. We should also continue to create greener shoots and make environmentally conscious clothing. No more emotional, physical, and sexual abuse in the workplace! We should all want to get to the end of our careers and be able to look back and say we made the right choices where it mattered and stood on the right side of the fence. Times are changing fast, and the old order is going to seem out of touch very, very quickly. Let’s make the right changes, move with the times, see beautiful results, and still enjoy the hell out of our jobs. ß

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CAMI BY HER NAME

“I HAVE MUCH MORE LIFE EXPERIENCE THAN SOMEONE WHO GREW UP IN A SMALL TOWN.”

Nice! When is it coming out? Late Summer 2018, and it’s a super fun, raunchy, girls comedy. It’s like the female Superbad. It’s a feel-good movie; I’m excited for people to see it. What’s Never Goin’ Back about? Jessie and Angela are two best friends who live in Texas and are dirt-poor. My character doesn’t give a s**t about anything and knows what she wants and With an exciting role in an upcoming film and an intriguing circle of will do anything in the world to get it. The movie is an friends, Camila Morrone is on her way to becoming fully entrenched adventure story that follows them as they try to leave in Hollywood. The 20-year-old model and actress explains how she’s Garland, Texas, and escape from poverty. Anything else lined up? navigating her way to the top while keeping her feet on the ground! I’m in the upcoming remake of Valley Girl, playing BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEBASTIAN FAENA the daughter of Alicia Silverstone. It’s not a big role, but there are some sweet scenes between us. It was You don’t always meet people born and raised in scenes with my partner. I tell anyone who asks me super cool, because I was such a fan of Clueless and Los Angeles. What was that experience like? about acting now that if you can get an intensive her earlier work. Every single film I do is for a reason. It’s less common than people think. I grew up in class under your belt, it’s beneficial. You learn how Right now I’m figuring out what project I should tap a Spanish-speaking household because my mom to break down a scene and get comfortable in front into next, which is super fun. and dad are from Argentina. I have much more life of the camera. Practice as much as you can, whether We understand that there was an incident before experience than someone who grew up in a small that’s reading scripts or working on scenes. It’s an our ACT 1 photo shoot with you in Miami… town. You grow up faster in this industry! I was laughing with my best friend Isabella at a entirely new world and unlike anything else. Do you think that’s a good thing? Did Al Pacino [the partner of Morrone’s mother] birthday dinner the night before, and we were If you navigate it well, it can be a great thing. hunched over and laughing, and we bumped our give you any acting advice? How much time did you spend in Argentina teeth. She was like, “Cam! Your teeth are chipped!” He’s always said to be natural and to always work growing up? [Photographer] Sebastian [Faena] told me not to on my craft, always be reading scripts, always be I would go visit my family during summer breaks and worry about it. And in the end, it’s cute! It gives me auditioning. You have to stay in shape and be actively at Christmas. It was nice to mix it up. character. working on it and growing. But that’s his only advice Your mom [Lucila Solá] is an actress. Did you Are your teeth fixed now? for me—he pretty much stays out of it. grow up on sets? It was the first thing I did Death Wish came out I’d go on auditions with my parents, even if I didn’t when I got home. this year. What was IT GIRL (From left) At the 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar party in really want to. My parents were divorced when I What are you going it like working with Beverly Hills; on the red carpet at the amfAR Gala Cannes at was very young, and I didn’t have a nanny. I got my to do for your 21st Bruce Willis? Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc in 2017. first commercial just by accompanying them on an birthday? I played his daughter, and audition. I hated it as a kid, but it was great, because I have to start thinking most of my scenes were I got comfortable with the process. And it wasn’t as about that—it’s only a with him. It was my first scary when I was doing it on my own. few months away. I’m not significant role in a movie, Why did you dislike the auditions? one of those people who so working with Bruce As a kid, you don’t want to be sitting in a waiting will go to Vegas and get on such a big-budget, room with your parents for hours. Watching your destroyed. I’ll probably high-level studio movie parents acting is also a little bit cringey. have a taco stand with was terrifying. But he was When did you decide to pursue acting? friends in my backyard such a great mentor. I grew up loving theater. I did every play I could and and call it a day. You went to Sundance Success brings an auditioned for every musical. My first role was in Al this year with your invasion of your [Pacino’s] rendition of Salomé. I played the young upcoming film, Never personal life. How do version of Jessica Chastain. My role was cut out of Goin’ Back. you deal with being the movie, but after that experience, I decided that It was an even crazier written about? acting was what I wanted to do. I was only 8 years experience. It was not That’s part of growing up old, so I had a couple more years of my childhood! only my first film festival, in L.A. I grew up around [Laughs] I did two short films with James Franco, and but the first film of mine a lot of famous and I finished high school and moved to New York for a that I had seen on-screen, successful people, so I’ve bit. When I booked [the Bruce Willis film] Death Wish, because Death Wish seen it for a long time. I it was my excuse to move back to L.A. and commit to hadn’t been released honestly try not to read acting full time. yet. Luckily A24 bought it. You can drive yourself Where did you study your craft? the movie—they did nuts. You have to roll with I took intensive classes that were eight hours a day, Moonlight and all these the punches. ß four days a week. Then I went home and worked on incredible films.

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EMERGING TALENT: CAMILA MORRONE

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FOREVER YOUNG

WOMEN’S STYLIST OF THE YEAR: KATE YOUNG She’s one of the most sought-after and respected stylists in Hollywood, but Kate Young doesn’t have any plans to settle on the West Coast. We stopped by her New York office just days before the Oscars to unearth what’s keeping her up at night. BY EDDIE ROCHE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM JESS LAIRD

You’ve had quite a year. Highlights? I’m really proud of the awards run with Margot [Robbie]. She’s worn so many young designers, and so many important designers, and unexpected things. It’s been creatively satisfying—and overwhelming! It was also fun to do Fifty Shades Darker with Dakota [Johnson] in Paris. Sienna [Miller] is always fun to work with. It’s fun to have Rachel [Weisz] do movies again, too. I was super happy with the look she wore to the BAFTAs for The Vampire’s Wife. And don’t forget Selena Gomez! Yes! The cowboy Versace look she wore for the Billboard Music Awards was really great. I have an incredibly soft spot for Versace. I came to New York and started working in fashion around 1998, and a lot of [today’s] Versace revival references looks from that period. Those were the first clothes that I knew professionally. I was Anna [Wintour’s] assistant during the Versace Met Gala, and stood behind her

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“A LOT OF PEOPLE INTERVIEW ME AND CARE WHAT I THINK… THE DAY AFTER THE OSCARS, IT STOPS. I GET E-MAILS ABOUT A SALE AT PATAGONIA. I HAVE TO LEARN HOW TO BE A NORMAL PERSON AGAIN.”


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while she was wearing the chain-mail dress. As you grow older, you have all these sentimental feelings toward clothes. Some people have them about their mother’s party dress or their grandmother’s coat; I have that about those Versace dresses. What’s a typical day like for Kate Young? It changes a lot! I try to do a lot of appointments. It’s not easy for me to just pull off [seeing] pictures from the Internet. I need to touch and see clothes in person to know if they will work or not. We do a lot of fittings where we take pictures and create wardrobe plans for the girls. I do fittings in an easy pair of Miu Miu shoes that fit with everything, and then do accessory fittings on my own. I spend a lot of time with my clients on FaceTime. I have a really big team now. It’s been a crazy season. I’ve never had so many clients doing so much stuff at the same time. Would it be easier to be based in Los Angeles? I’ve thought about it a few times, but I’m a New Yorker. I can’t live anywhere else! I’ve been working in fashion in New York for years, so I have personal relationships with a lot of publicists and designers. It’s an important part of my process. How do you follow fashion? On the Vogue Runway app. I’m a morning person, especially when I’m stressed, and I get up and drink lots of coffee, look on Instagram, and send e-mails. What’s the earliest you send an e-mail? I save them as drafts, and wait to send them. Today, I didn’t send one until 7:05. That’s early! What time do you wake up? I can’t sleep during this time of the year. The Oscars are in four days. Everything is done. The custom dress has been designed; the embroideries have been approved; the backup dress has been tried on. All I’m doing now is sitting around and waiting. We haven’t yet seen the dress on a human body—I’ve only seen weird pictures on a mannequin. On [Oscar] Sunday, there will be a lot of energy and space devoted to either praising or critiquing my work. It’s a really anxious cycle! How do you stay in good spirits? I watch silly YouTube videos. We have a friend who is the world’s leading BTS photographer—and also the funniest human being on earth—so we text him and he sends us insane 1980s Tampax commercials. What do you do when the Oscars are over? I fly home! I try not to work in March. It’s a weird transition. I get a little depressed. After I drop off my kids at school, I have coffee with my friends and tell them, “Of course I’m going to get depressed!” I’m addicted to my phone at this time of year. In the time between drop-off and getting coffee, I get 22 e-mails! A lot of people interview me and care what I think, and that validation is good for my ego. The day after the Oscars, it stops. I get e-mails about a sale at Patagonia. I have to learn how to be a normal person again. Which dress has earned you the most attention? Michelle Williams’ Vera Wang dress [at the 2006 Oscars]. It was her moment. She had just had a baby, she had done an epic movie [Brokeback Mountain], Heath [Ledger] was such a heartthrob, and she looked so pretty. It was exciting to see somebody with an alternative style at the Oscars. The red carpet at that time had gotten a little pristine. I say this and nobody believes me, but while I was watching the red carpet, the commentary was like, “Oh, my God! A yellow dress and red lips? It’s like McDonald’s.” It didn’t immediately strike people as gorgeous. But when they liked it, they loved it. You got your start in magazines. Are people curious to know what it was like to work with Anna Wintour? They always ask about it. I had a different

experience from the author of The Devil Wears Prada. When I saw that movie, I felt a little shell-shocked because my experience there was so different. I loved Vogue. I couldn’t wait to get to work every day. When [Anna] put her coat on my desk, my reaction was, “Oh, my God! It’s Fendi and it’s chinchilla!” I wasn’t like, “How humiliating!” When I got to do her dry cleaning, I was psyched that I could hold the Spring/ Summer 1998 collection. I didn’t feel victimized at all. It was a privilege to do those things. Maybe that’s a sign of who I am as a person, but I loved it. I have enormous respect for Anna. She’s really supportive of my career. She introduced me to Sienna Miller. I still have a good relationship with her. How did you come into your own as a stylist? My first clients were Jennifer Connelly and Salma Hayek, and then Hilary Swank, Natalie Portman, and then Michelle and Rachel. How has your job changed? People care a lot more about it now. For a long time, nobody really noticed what I did. Social media changed that. Who is your most opinionated client? Everyone has opinions. That’s like being asked which of your friends talks the most!

Sienna? Weirdly, no. We have similar tastes, so we barely talk about clothes. What’s next for you? I would love to do an accessory line. I love doing my eyeglass line for Tura. I’d love to do costume jewelry, too—I like making things. I’m much more interested in collaborating with people who have the skills and knowledge to make and sell things. We’re not doing anything serious. We’re making interesting girls look pretty and cool. It’s not a bad gig! ß

GLAM SQUAD (From left) Selena Gomez in Valentino Couture at a Harper’s Bazaar party during NYFW; Michelle Williams in Louis Vuitton at the BAFTAs; Margot Robbie in Chanel at the 2018 Academy Awards; Sienna Miller in Proenza Schouler at the New York premiere of Phantom Thread.

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MEN’S STYLISTS OF THE YEAR: WENDI & NICOLE FERREIRA For Wendi and Nicole Ferreira, spending time with Hollywood’s leading hunks in their underwear is all part of a day’s work. Known for their transformative styling of top talents like Channing Tatum, James and Dave Franco, and Chris Pine, among others, this duo’s work is inspiring dapper gents around the globe. BY ASHLEY BAKER

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SISTER ACT

Where did you grow up? Wendi Ferreira: Our roots are in North Dakota—our family is there, our mom was born and raised there— but we moved out to Orange County when we were really young. Where did your interest in fashion come from? Nicole Ferreira: Growing up, back-to-school shopping with our mom was a big activity for us—we’d make a special trip to San Francisco or L.A. And then we both went to school for fashion—I studied design, and Wendi went for merchandising and display. How did you break into styling? Nicole: I interned for several stylists while I was in school, and when I was getting ready to graduate, I reached out to one of them who needed me to start yesterday. [Laughs] And then when Wendi moved to L.A., it was awards season, and we needed extra help, so she started working as an assistant to that stylist as well.


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How did you initially land some of your first clients? Wendi: Shia LaBeouf was our first big breakout client. We owe those initial partnerships to the publicists we continue to work with today. Nicole: Melissa Kates, Evelyn Karamanos, Jessica Kolstad, and Jennifer Allen—to this day, we still work closely with all of them. When you start working with a new client, what’s your process? Wendi: We always tell them that our first fitting is probably going to be our longest fitting, because we do as much research as we can about what they’ve worn in the past, and how we can help to evolve that. So our first fittings involve a lot more clothes, and then we hone in on what their style is. Nicole: It’s a discovery fitting—we figure out what makes them comfortable, and then we ask, “Would you go here?” How do you toe the line between respecting their comfort zones and pushing them to try new things? Nicole: I think it’s one of the biggest benefits of being in this partnership—Wendi and I balance each other out very well in terms of listening to our clients and pushing them forward. Wendi: Nicole spots new trends, and figures out what’s going to elevate their style. Sometimes, I have to rein her in and say, “That’s not exactly going to make that person feel comfortable on the red carpet.” And that’s an important thing—if something’s too tight or too itchy and simply not you, it shows. Tell us about your tailor! Wendi: He’s gone! He just moved to Berlin. We’re crushed. We’re currently looking for an excellent tailor. Nicole: Do you guys have classifieds? [Laughs] Wendi: Our tailor is everything to us. During awards season, what is your tailor’s life like? Nicole: What life? [Laughs] Wendi: Our tailor, who did Octavia Spencer’s dress this year [for the Oscars], fit her at 7 p.m. on Saturday night, and I believe he stayed up all night long, sewing and pressing and making that dress perfect. How have your jobs evolved over the course of your career? Nicole: We did a ton more editorial work in the beginning, and now, it’s mostly red carpet, major movie premieres, and press tours. Do you dress your guys for the street as well? Wendi: We don’t. Our guys truly love the clothes that they wear, so those are pieces that they then wear on the street, but we are not styling streetwear for our men. How did you meet Channing Tatum? Wendi: We started working with him through Evelyn Karamanos. Chan gives us a direction that’s usually somewhere out in left field, and we rein it back in to the ballpark where most people would think it was normal, and then we go with that. He’s got a killer sense of personal style. But he let us do our thing—he definitely lets us make him look like a movie star. What’s it like hanging out with him? Nicole: We get along with all our clients really well; we have a lot of fun with all of them. He’s a really good guy. Wendi: Channing is like family. How do people react when they find out that you two spend a lot of your time with Hollywood’s leading men in their underwear? Nicole: We do get that question, and it’s like, “Well, I guess, but we don’t really think about it that way.” It’s just a matter of changing very quickly.

Without betraying any confidences, will you share your favorite brands of men’s underwear? As a service to the guys who are reading this! Wendi: We love Calvin Klein underwear—nice, basic, and it fits well. Nicole: And 2(X)IST, if you want something a little tighter. And we will always advise wearing briefs with suits! You outfit your clients for press tours all over the world—any packing tips? Nicole: We love Away suitcases. The large carryon is awesome for a really short trip. It’s hard, as stylists, because we want to put a different shoe with every little thing someone’s wearing. We do end up narrowing down the shoe—although not to compromise a look, ever. Wendi: We are master packers. We hang and separately garment-bag and label everything, and then we fold that into a suitcase. What are the best and worst things about working with a sister? Nicole: There’s not much that’s bad about it at all. We Nicole: Mine’s not really that different, although I’m can be pretty candid with each other without hurting a little bit edgier. I do love to wear a dress, if weather feelings. We talk things through, because we’ve is permitting. I’ve been wearing jeans all winter. I spent a lifetime doing that. There’s a deep loyalty and like Dries, Céline, Chloé…and I’ve got a really great honesty, too. Calvin Klein jacket that I love, and it’s just going to Wendi: You know that you’re not going to hurt this get better. On a day-to-day basis, whatever is easiest person, and this person is not going to hurt you. to put on and get out of the door! I have really great There’s no way they’re out to get you in any way. dresses for going out, and I have jeans and T-shirts Nicole: At the end of the day, our relationship is for during the day. I’m trying to find the in-between! more important than anything else. If there’s ever a Where do you see yourselves in five years? conflict, we work through it. Wendi: Doing some brand collaborations is a goal. Wendi: We spend all our work time together, and And also, using the excess of this business to benefit then we spend a lot of our free time together, some of the people who don’t have as much as we do because we each have two kids who love each other is another goal. as much as we do, and our husbands are best friends Nicole: A lot of things are worn once, and there are a and practically brothers. There’s never any time lot of people in need. We’re trying to figure out a way apart, really. [Laughs] to sort that out. ß Wendi: We sleep apart, and we have separate houses! [Laughs] You’re living the sibling SUIT UP (From left) Dave Franco in Givenchy and James Franco dream. in Dolce & Gabbana at the L.A. Nicole: We’re living a parent’s premiere of The Disaster Artist; sibling dream. I can only hope Channing Tatum in Salvatore that my kids have what we have. Ferragamo at the U.K. opening of Kingsman: The Golden Circle; It makes me a little emotional—I Chris Pine in Giorgio Armani don’t know what our mom did! Made to Measure at the L.A. Have you ever had a real red- premiere of Wonder Woman. carpet miss? Wendi: Of course we have. Everyone has. Nicole: There are some things that we didn’t think worked, but our client was still happy. All those misses are such learning moments for us—it’s a good opportunity to reflect on how we can be better. We know what your clients dress like—what do you like to wear? Wendi: I’m a huge fan of Levi’s and a white top. I love the Hanes x Karla—I pretty much wear mine every day with some sort of jacket. In my fantasy style, I love Dries, Valentino, Gucci—but who doesn’t?—and a good Dolce fit-and-flare dress that makes you feel like you’re in Italy.

“WE’RE LIVING A PARENT’S SIBLING DREAM. I CAN ONLY HOPE THAT MY KIDS HAVE WHAT WE HAVE.”

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MANE EVENT

“I UNDERSTAND HOW TO NURTURE MY GIRLS. I’M ALSO NOT SKETCHY! I CAN KEEP A SECRET.”

Working with Jennifer Lopez was epic; going on Madonna’s tour was incredible. I have a good five seconds of “Oh, my God!” but then I remember they are human beings, and I move on. How do you convince clients to change their looks? It’s a collaborative effort. I don’t always need to create a “moment” with my hair—if anything, I like to be the accessory. You’d think beloved hairstylist Jen Atkin is content to focus exclusively on her hair Why did you name your brand Ouai? epic client list of the Kardashian/Jenner clan, Gigi and Bella Hadid, and Kaia I wanted the name to be a conversation piece. I didn’t Gerber, but she’s a woman on a mission. With Ouai and Mane Addicts, her want it to be easy to say—it’s pronounced like “way.” The word “ouais” is the casual way of saying yes in digital platform for hair enthusiasts, she’s got something for everyone. French, and my mood board was all about FrenchBY EDDIE ROCHE inspired, effortless hair. Ouai looked amazing, and it was easy to trademark. I had no idea how many puns Have you had a lifelong love of hair? overachievers. Growing up, I was taught to scrapbook we’d be able to get out of it! Growing up, I only watched movies that had shopping and write down moments and goals. It’s helped me so Jewelry designer Lorraine Schwartz has been a montages and makeover scenes. I’m obsessed with big player in your career. much as an entrepreneur. movies from the ’80s. I love the idea of being able She’s my fairy godmother. I met her when I was What’s a typical day like for you? to change your appearance. [My obsession] wasn’t My work/life balance is in shambles, but I have an assisting—I was asked to do a blow-out of her hair, really hair until I got into high school. There was a amazing team that helps. Everything is a priority and we just clicked. I owe her so much. Lorraine haircut that I wanted that nobody could give me, so I to me, so we make it all work and find the time. It is always looking out for people around her and gave it to myself. sounds so cliché, but I really love what I do. I love connecting dots. She introduced me to John Galliano How did you end up in Los Angeles? my clients, as well as being in the office and working and I got to do his hair for The Met Ball, which was I was raised Mormon and was going to get married, such a huge moment for me. I worked with him for on Mane Addicts, an online platform that connects have kids, the whole shebang, but a friend and I had a few years after that. Dior would fly me to Paris hairstylists with influencers. an epiphany—we weren’t ready to get married. We to do hair. I met Kim Kardashian in Lorraine’s room You work with Kim Kardashian, Gigi Hadid, decided to move to L.A. She wanted to work in fashion; and Bella Hadid, among others…why do you during an Oscar party. I met Sofía Vergara through I didn’t think of hair as an actual career, but I knew I Lorraine, too. I married my husband because of think you get along so well with these women? didn’t want to stay in Utah. We packed up our Honda Lorraine! Let’s conference them in and ask! [Laughs] When Civic and drove to L.A. We would cold call places, we’d Love that! I first started out, I met glam squads who thought pass out our résumés, and I happened to get a job as a She said, “I just met the cutest guy, and you are not they were the stars. I understand how to nurture my receptionist in my second year there at a salon. letting him go.” girls. I’m also not sketchy! I can keep a secret. I care How were you as a receptionist? What do people ask you about? about them, and I know my place. Even as I’ve gained It was really important for me to do that first, because a social media following and launched a brand, I know The Kardashians! Now, they also ask how I do it all— I needed to see the business side of doing hair. It was that I work in a service industry. At the end of the day, and when I’m having kids. my time to observe hairstylists. We were coming out I’m there to take care of these girls. It’s not about me. What’s the answer? of the ’90s, when hairstylists felt like they were kings I froze embryos. There’s no rush! Any pinch-me moments? and their success was never going to end. I saw a lot We read a quote where Kim called you snarky, Gwen Stefani for the cover of Vogue was insane. of drugs and spending a lot of money on but you don’t seem snarky at all. Are clothes. It was amazing for me coming from you secretly snarky? WELL-COIFFED Atkin’s stylings, as seen on ( from left) Bella Hadid, Kaia Gerber, and Kendall Jenner. Utah…. I didn’t know what gay guys were! I I can be, but I’m not mean! I have a was so sheltered. sarcastic sense of humor. I get along so What did you think of gay men when well with Chrissy Teigen because we have you first met them? very similar sensibilities. I can remember being so in awe of these What else do you want to do? beautiful guys and I was like, “You don’t Career-wise, I’m so happy with what’s want to have sex with me, you just want to happened so far. With Ouai, we’ve go dancing?!” I was enamored. I really feel changed the conversation about haircare, like I was raised by gay wolves. My friends but there’s so much more to do. I really taught me about music and culture and want to help the next generation of photographers. And we danced. A lot! hairstylists emulate what I’ve done. I You’re an entrepreneur now. Was that really came from nothing, besides an always in the cards, or is it something incredible family. It’s not about money—I that just happened? have no idea how much money I have in Being raised Mormon taught me a lot my bank account right now. I truly love about setting goals. The culture is about helping people. ß

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PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; E L I Z A B E T H L I P P M A N ( 1 )

HAIR ARTIST OF THE YEAR: JEN ATKIN


PAT R I C K M C M U L L A N . C O M ( 2 ) ; E L I Z A B E T H L I P P M A N ( 1 )

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THE GREATEST SHOWMAN With a love for razzle-dazzle and a fearless attitude, Philipp Plein is bringing showmanship back to fashion and rewriting the rules along the way. BY EDDIE ROCHE FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

FIRSTVIEW (2)

FASHION REBEL: PHILIPP PLEIN


SNOW DAY Supermod Irina Shayk and a robot walked Plein’s Fall 2018 runway in faux snow.

You’ve brought the glam back to New York Fashion Week. Why do you want to do these big shows? We have to ask ourselves, “Why do we still need fashion shows?” We live in a world of change. When people talk about fashion, they think it’s a modern industry, but it’s not. It’s one of the oldest industries in the world. Maybe prostitution is older? It’s dominated by a few big fashion groups, and the way they operate and move is slow. You can’t recognize it until you are inside this industry. But things are starting to change. Fashion shows are not what they once were. In the past, it was the only tool to let the world know about your fashion and that you exist. If journalists didn’t write about you, you would be invisible. I came from a different background. I didn’t want to be in fashion. I never planned it. It was unexpected. I went to law school, and went into furniture design and from there, I started designing clothes. What was your first time showing? It was in Milan, and nobody knew who we were, so they didn’t even give us a slot on the calendar. I put the show on in the evening when every other show was done, and the

“I CAN DO WHAT I WANT. I CAN’T GET FIRED. I DON’T HAVE TO SAY THANK YOU TO ANYBODY FOR HELPING ME. THIS IS THE BIGGEST ADVANTAGE.”

cost shocked me. I decided to make it a party. If you’re already spending all that money, it doesn’t cost that much to give people a good time. We were focusing more on our clients than the press. And then, it became bigger. Fashion is made for the people. They pay me. You write for your readers. Other brands are selective about who will come to the show and who sits front row. Those people don’t pay for the clothes. I always fought with my press team; I didn’t want to exclude our clients. What was your approach? If we want to be a part of the industry, let’s do it in a different way. In Milan, the fashion industry is old. America is a little more modern and new. When you look at Fashion Week, you have a lot of cool and upcoming brands—in Europe, it’s dominated by old fashion houses. I wanted to be part of the new generation. It helped that I wasn’t part of the industry; I didn’t go to fashion school. I didn’t know anything about distribution. To this day, I haven’t been to any other fashion shows except my own. Really? No! I don’t have any way to compare or measure. Sometimes it’s good to be an outsider. What brought you to New York to show? Our production became so big in Milan. So many kids wanted to come to our shows; it was like a back-in-the-day Backstreet Boys concert. I questioned if we still needed fashion shows, but then I thought we should do something completely different, and come to America, where we want to improve the visibility of our brand. When we came, there were no expectations. It wasn’t easy, but I like challenges—they keep you focused. I enjoy bringing something to New York that wasn’t here before. The last time I was here, a UPS driver came up to me and said he liked what I was doing, and that he was at our fashion show. A UPS driver? Yes. Our party is for the people! A girl who works for me told me that when she came to New York, the immigration officer [at the airport] asked her what brought her to New York, and she said she worked in fashion. He said, “What brand?” and she said, “Philipp Plein,” and he said, “Oh, I wanted to come to the party, but they couldn’t let me in!” These two stories tell me that somehow, we did something right. Do you sell tickets to your show? No! How does a UPS driver know about the show? It’s viral marketing. Word of mouth helps. The show in September had too many people trying to get in, but it was a magical feeling: young people, old people, real estate people, fashion people. Suzy Menkes was filming; we had the daughter of Trump there, and Leonardo DiCaprio came to the after-party. I found it really exciting. We brought all these different kinds of people together. You also work with the best models. I work with Carine Roitfeld [as the show stylist], and she has an idea of how to put the casting together. We try to cast in a different way. In a classic fashion show, you have the most beautiful people presenting your clothes. But it’s more interesting to have people with stories. It’s not only the most beautiful person, it’s the most interesting person. It doesn’t matter how many followers you have on Instagram. FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


Tell us about the Fall collection you showed earlier this year. I make clothes for the people. Some brands try to be someone else. They aren’t honest with themselves. It’s a big problem for many brands. Our clothes are wearable, and what you see on the runway goes in the store. For our Winter collection, we’re flying to the moon. It’s a new interpretation of [the Jane Fonda movie] Barbarella—a huge spaceship coming from the sky. Do you read reviews after your shows? I did in the beginning, because I wanted to really understand how people would see us, and the reviews were bad. They would write things about us, the collection, “What is the guy doing here? He’s not one of us, blah, blah, blah.” I got upset because I put a lot of effort into it. I thought, “Okay, guys! What am I doing wrong?” I’m coming here, and I’m not stealing anything from anybody. They were comparing us to other brands, and I didn’t want to be compared. We were here because we worked hard for it. We’re an independent brand. We don’t have a loan. I don’t have rich parents. I started from zero to do this business, and last year we made $300 million. I can do whatever I want in this company. There’s no investor, no partner. I’m proud of this. Somehow, we must do something right or we wouldn’t be here. It can’t be that we are so bad and somehow successful. Something doesn’t match. Our product is selling. If you don’t like it, I get it, but there are people who like it, and that’s why we exist. Over the years, people started to respect us more. It was hard to ignore us and not respect us. The perception of the brand changed. At the end of the day, FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

OUT OF THIS WORLD One of the most extravagant shows ever staged at New York Fashion Week was Plein’s Fall 2018 collection.

what makes a brand become a brand? Brand awareness. If you’re not visible in the market, nobody knows you exist. We’ve brought a lot of fun to New York. In America, you have a global stage, and access to celebrities. When Madonna or Kylie Jenner come to our show, people around the world see it. Do you think of yourself as a fashion rebel? I’m a dreamer and a believer. I have a dream, and believe in it until it comes true. We don’t look left or right about what’s happening around us. We’ve never tried to be like someone else. We are who we are, and we’re proud of who we are. What was your upbringing like? My mother was married to a man who was an alcoholic, and she left him when I was 3 years old. It was a tough time for her, because she was alone and a young mother. We didn’t have a lot of money. My mom remarried, and they built a great life together. My father is a heart surgeon. The first time I came to New York, we stayed in a Days Inn Hotel on Broadway. It had no windows. I was 14, and [my father] was in New York for a convention. It was exciting for me to be in America. In Europe, we grew up very Americanized, with Coca-Cola, McDonald’s, watching American TV shows.... When we were in New York on this trip, my father took a picture of me in front of what is today my office in New York. When I celebrated my birthday, my mother sent me the photo. She didn’t even know it was my office! Do you pinch yourself over everything you’ve achieved? When I was young, I had only one dream—I wanted to be rich. I’m honest about that. I’m proud that I built a company in an industry that’s competitive. It’s not the

FIRSTVIEW (6); GETTY IMAGES (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

“WHEN I WAS YOUNG, I HAD ONLY ONE DREAM— I WANTED TO BE RICH.”


new economy, where you come up with an idea and make a billion dollars overnight. I’m proud to say that I built something in an industry that was not supporting us. When you work so much, you start to question why. [Picks up phone and scrolls through photos of the late Franca Sozzani] She was one of the people who believed in me. We never talked about fashion, ever. Not one time. This was my dream. When you work so much, you start to question why. Money doesn’t make you happy. At a certain point, I stopped working for money. I have what I want. I have houses in France, New York, I’m building a house in Los Angeles; I have two houses in Switzerland. I like doing something that I feel nobody has ever done before. It’s even more challenging when people don’t believe in you—you

become more motivated. I’m proud of what I’ve reached. You can call it the nouveau riche. I am one of them because I enjoy it. You’re so honest! Why should I lie? I always say what I think. I don’t have any shareholders who I have to impress. I’m not a politician. If you find me having sex with five men and five women at the same time, I couldn’t care less! My clients would probably think it’s cool. I can do what I want. I can’t get fired. I don’t have to say thank you to anybody for helping me. This is the biggest advantage. I feel independent. When you don’t have a bank supporting you, you are free. If I decide tomorrow to spend $5 million for a show or $1 million for a show, I just do it, because I can. If I wasn’t enjoying it, I wouldn’t be doing this kind

of production. I don’t do it to make myself bigger. I get excited! Do you pop open champagne after you’re done with a show? No, I don’t really drink alcohol. I’m always the one who goes home first! When the show is done, it’s done. I hate when there are so many people around you at a certain point. I’m not a celebrity. In that environment, they treat you like one. We know you love Red Bull! How many do you drink a day? Quite a lot. I’m a fan. I’ve been to their headquarters. Tell us about having your name tattooed on your arm. It was my first tattoo. I did it when I was 24 years old, and I made my first million selling dog beds! ß

MAKING A SPLASH Plein and a pal took a dive at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival where he showed his Resort collection (above).

FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M


LO OK FROM WINE-STAINED LIPS TO ELECTRICALLY LINED EYES, FALL 2018 GAVE A GIRL A LOT TO PLAY WITH. HERE, WE LOOK AT FALL’S BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL. BY TANGIE SILVA

C O U R T E S Y M AY B E L L I N E

UP!

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C O U R T E S Y M AY B E L L I N E

O K

TOMMY HILFIGER

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BEAUTYReport RED ALERT

CUSHNIE ET OCHS

A ruby-hued pout is still a major trend for fall with an even wider spectrum of shades this season. Pick the one that suits your skin tone.

ERDEM

F I R S T V I E W ( 3 ) ; S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 2 ) ; C O U R T E S Y M AY B E L L I N E ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Sensational Shaping Lip Liner in Brick Red, $7.99; Maybelline Lip Studio Python Metallic Lip Kit in Passionate, $9.99; both at maybelline.com

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F I R S T V I E W ( 3 ) ; S H U T T E R S TO C K ( 2 ) ; C O U R T E S Y M AY B E L L I N E ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

BOTTEGA VENETA

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK SuperStay Matte Ink Liquid Lipstick in Voyager, $9.49; maybelline.com

MAX MARA

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BEAUTYReport DOMINO EFFECT

HANNAH TURNER-HARTS (2); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

Pair a flawless complexion with a contrasting smoky eye. The combination is a standout look without going too extreme.

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Fit Me! Loose Finishing Powder in Fair Light, $7.99, maybelline.com

SELF-PORTRAIT FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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HANNAH TURNER-HARTS (2); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

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BEAUTYReport BRONZED GODDESS

BROCK COLLECTION

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GUTTER CREDITS HERE

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Total Temptation Eyeshadow + Highlight Palettes, $11.99, maybelline.com

FIRSTVIEW (3); SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

Black smoky eye feel too bold for you? Get an earthier sense of drama by layering nudes and brown shades. Sweep the lids with a shimmery gold shadow for a little glam.


FLAWLESS ARCHES GUTTER CREDITS HERE

FIRSTVIEW (3); SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

We’re glad this trend isn’t going anywhere. Brush upward and outward to maximize volume. Then use a pencil to fill in patchiness, thicken existing hair, and sharpen your arch.

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Total Temptation Eyebrow Definer in Deep Brown, $7.99, maybelline.com

ALBERTA FERRETTI FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

BEAUTYReport

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JASON WU

EYE SPY

SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

Graphic liner gets a futuristic reboot by adding electric hues to the mix. Focus on winged tips at the outer edges and abstract shapes on the inner lids.

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Master Precise Skinny Gel Pencil in Defining Black, $7.99, maybelline.com

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BEAUTYReport

NAEEM KHAN

EMERALD CITY

Pro tip: Jewel-tone green complements every eye color. Forest green with coppery, shimmery undertones is a sure way to make those peepers pop.

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FIRSTVIEW (1); SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

GUTTER CREDITS HERE

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Expert Wear Eyeshadow in Forest Green, $3.99; maybelline.com


GUTTER CREDITS HERE

FIRSTVIEW (1); SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

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FIRSTVIEW (1); HANNAH TURNER-HARTS (1);SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

BEAUTYReport

PHILIPP PLEIN

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK The City Kits All-In-One Eye & Cheek Palette in Pink Edge, $11.99; maybelline.com

CANDY LAND

Pink doesn’t always have to feel hypergirly or fussy. Sweep cotton candy or powder pink on your lids and build from there. It’s the perfect pink-me-up!

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WHITE OUT

More like h-eye-lighter. Pat a highly reflective shadow on the inner corners. Then take a matte white crayon liner to your waterline.

FIRSTVIEW (1); HANNAH TURNER-HARTS (1);SHUTTERSTOCK (1); ALL OTHERS COURTESY

PRABAL GURUNG

TOMMY HILFIGER

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK FaceStudio Master Holographic Prismatic Highlighter in Opal, $9.99; Maybelline EyeStudio Lasting Drama Waterproof Gel Pencil in Cashmere White, $7.99; both at maybelline.com FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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BEAUTYReport VAMPIRE DIARIES

The best accompaniment to a red lip? Ocular understatement. Black liquid liner and highperformance mascara is always a winning combo.

COURTESY

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK EyeStudio Master Precise Liquid Eyeliner in Black, $7.99; Maybelline Total Temptation Washable Mascara in Blackest Black, $9.49; both at maybelline.com

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COURTESY

JONATHAN SIMKHAI

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BEAUTYReport LASHING OUT

FIRSTVIEW (5); SHUTTERSTOCK (1)

Hyperhued lashes aren’t for the faint of heart, but it’s time to get bold. Start with a deep purple version to dip your toe into the trend. Swoop on some electric-hued shadow to match your colored lashes for some superhero chic!

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Volum' Express The Colossal Big Shot Mascara X Shayla, $8.49 maybelline.com DRIES VAN NOTEN

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FIRSTVIEW (5); SHUTTERSTOCK (1)

PRADA

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BEAUTYReport SMART MOUTH

BRANDON MAXWELL

FIRSTVIEW (4); SHUTTERSTOCK (2)

No look says sophistication quite like a properly executed bold lip. Go classic (think fire-engine red) or more of-themoment in unexpected blue.

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Sensational Lip Color in Red Revival, $7.49; maybelline.com

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FIRSTVIEW (4); SHUTTERSTOCK (2)

MAISON MARGIELA

GET THE LOOK: MAYBELLINE NEW YORK Color Color Sensational T Loaded The oaded Bolds Lipstick ipstick in Midnight Blue, lue, $7.49; maybelline. com

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THIRSTQuencher

WTR bottles all around town FE LI n see y ad re al e u’v yo ter It’s likely ssed. The sleekly branded wa scu di g in be e ar n io sh fa d an designers wherever art t, recruiting both artists and ation,” ar of s rk wo ld he nd ha es at Educ company cre r Series 4, focusing on “Arts In Gonzalez, Fo . ns sig de e ttl bo eir th up Luis to whip lents—high school art student t David Lee. ta g un yo ree th ted lis en TR LIFEW KRIVVY, and street artis a cartoonist known simply as ANDRA ILYASHOV BY ALEX

LUIS GONZALEZ How would you describe the creative process of designing your LIFEWTR bottle? When I daydream, I feel most creative. Once I focus on an image, I find the materials and colors that best express my vision. When did you first start creating art? Art crept up on me. I always loved to doodle and draw, but I didn’t take it seriously until I got to high school. That’s when I started to work with my high school art teacher and mentor, Ari Hauben. And I began to see how important art was in my life. With his support, I gained the

confidence and skills to find my niche. When people started paying me for my artwork, and then LIFEWTR chose to use my design, I realized that art was the perfect profession for me because it connects my passion with vocation. How has Ari Hauben inspired you? He showed me that my art is more than just an outlet, and that with dedication and perseverance, I can do anything I set my mind to. I found that art was in my everyday life; I was always trying to create something new. This motivated me to finish my schoolwork

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CR EA TIV E CLASS

early, and spend more time working on my art. Mr. H. really planted the seed, and he showed me that art could let me express my feelings and thoughts while creating something beautiful. And as my interest grew, so did the time he provided for me in his classroom. I was in school more, and connecting with more positive things and distancing myself from the negative. Which artists do you look up to? I look up to Mr. Hauben a lot. I also like street artists—Banksy, Kaws, and Shepard Fairey. They use layering, stenciling, big color, and social messages. I’ve been influenced by branding, logos, cartoons, and even toys. As a Boston native, where are your favorite places to get inspired artistically? My favorite art is at the Boston Button Factory because it displays Ari Hauben’s [and his colleagues’] artworks. I admire the gallery’s use of multiple mediums, which make its work compelling; this inspires me to try different modes of creating. I also love the ICA Boston, because it has an incredible variety of new artists and styles, including street art, abstract art, sculpture, video, photography, and more, showing me that there are no limits on great art. My neighborhood, Dorchester, is the most important inspiration for me. It’s where I feel most myself, most able to connect to things that are important to me. I hope that I can inspire other young people to create art and follow their dreams.

IT’S ALL FLUID Gonzalez’s design for LIFEWTR consists of an organic take on flowing panels of color.

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W p L L i p w o d n c o i c


and Peanuts, mostly. As I got older, I dipped into autobiographical zines and other self-published works. I think my work is surreal because I’m surreal. I don’t plan anything out. I just draw, draw, draw. It comes from a weird place inside me. I’ve always loved things that were slightly off-kilter, and spent a lot of my time letting things come out and not trying to confine them. I’m a fan of the strange and bizarre; I think that has something to do with it. How did you get interested in sticker making? I cannot get enough

PERSONALITY DRIVEN KRIVVY’s LIFEWTR bottle features an assortment of characters she created herself.

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KRIVVY What was the design process like for your LIFEWTR bottle? LIFEWTR had seen an image I had created previously, and they wanted me to expand on it for the bottle. I drew an embarrassing number of different characters until I settled on the ones for the final image. I drank a lot of coffee and skipped a lot

of work, but I’m super happy with the result. Where did your interest in surrealist cartoons come from? I’m interested in exploring the human condition. I tend to focus on figurative works because I have my loved ones on the brain most of the time. I grew up reading a lot of graphic novels and comics—Calvin and Hobbes, The Far Side,

of stickers. Every time there’s the option to buy stickers, I cave. When I was younger, I hated them because they’re designed for single-use. I’d hoard my favorites and never use them, but then no one would ever see them. As I got older, I let go of the mentality I had as a kid

DAVID LEE A GRAPHIC TAKE Lee’s LIFEWTR design makes use of a bold diamond pattern.

and became a lot more comfortable with letting good things go when they needed to. I started drawing on label paper and sticking them everywhere—on bank cards, on shoes. I just couldn’t stop. Any art mediums you want to dabble in? I’d like to start sculpting, to bring some of these little characters to the 3-D realm. What does your work as a graphic recorder and counselor in training entail? Graphic recording is essentially taping a huge piece of paper to a wall and visually outlining and mapping the goals and objectives of the meeting taking place— whatever the facilitator or group wants to capture. I’ve recorded in both creative and corporate settings. It’s always a new experience. To a certain extent, everyone is a visual learner. I’m also currently enrolled in George Brown College’s Assaulted Women’s and Children’s Counselor/ Advocate program, which will hopefully open new paths to continue working with communities and making a difference.

What inspired your LIFEWTR bottle design? I wanted to create something balanced— that’s what I think of when I think of water. I usually sketch first to get out my ideas, but this time, I just went straight to the computer to create different patterns. The pattern you see on the bottle stuck out to me. As for seeing my work on a bottle, I still can’t believe it. It still feels like a dream. How did doodling as a tween lead you to graphic design? My doodles in middle school were of graffiti and abstract shapes. I wasn’t really good at it, but I like to think if you keep practicing, you get better. But doodling helped me in school. Whenever we had a lecture, whatever the subject was, I would try writing the word in block letters or bubble letters in my notes. When I studied, I’d see them and remember what the teacher was talking about in the lecture. It’s like a photographic memory, but with little doodles. What about graphic design and typography excites you? The thing about graphic design is that everyone can do it. Everyone has their own style. I like to do vectors and some Photoshop. And typography looks so simple, but it’s so much more than just

simply writing. I took a typography class one semester, and it blew my mind. For example, the anatomy of typography opened my eyes. There’s a reason why everything looks balanced, and whenever it doesn’t, it’s because something’s off. Where do you go in L.A. to check out I usually go to Little Tokyo, Koreatown, Echo Park, Venice Beach, and downtown L.A. You’ll see one piece one week; the next week, there’s something completely different in the same spot. That is what I love about L.A.—the art is always changing.

Are there any specific inspire you? Chaz Bojórquez, Retna, Alex Kizu aka Defer, El Mac, and Nychos. How do you think art in the world? Art allows people to express themselves when words can’t. Sometimes, I just want to be alone, so I turn to art to express myself. Art helps make words and complex concepts visual so all ages can understand them, and it can also display messages to a variety of people, even when we don’t speak the same language. It helps get the word out. ß FA S H I O N W E E K D A I L Y. C O M

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ANNIVERSARYSpecial

PERFECT 10 WELL COIFFED Sara Sampaio, Moroccanoil’s mane woman.

Ten years ago, Moroccanoil introduced its signature Treatment to an influential group of hairobsessed stylists. Today, the brand is a pioneer in the oil-infused beauty category, with skincare, suncare, and even its own candle. Carmen Tal, the brand’s co-founder, reflects on her recipe for success.

Take us back. How did you initially discover argan oil? Funny enough, I always think that when bad things happen, you can always find something good that comes from it. In my case, my hair was severely damaged at a salon. I was devastated. I went to a wedding in Tel Aviv, and when I was there, someone

took me to a stylist who applied what is today the Moroccanoil Treatment in my hair. I was so wowed with the results that I thought, “Oh, my God. I have to do something with this!” I knew right away that it was something I needed to share with everyone. My husband at the time and I teamed up with a group of visionaries to perfect the formula—not a lot, just

the fragrance and packaging—and it became what is today our signature product. What was your first big success? Definitely getting it into the stylists’ hands. Once they loved the Moroccanoil Treatment, the product propelled the brand and created a new, oil-infused beauty category. It was truly a revolution at the time. The moment that a hairdresser sees the results, and experiences how easy it is to use, it’s fantastic. Today, it’s a global phenomenon and a best-seller for us, even after 10 years. Truly, there is no other argan oil–infused treatment on the market that is quite like it. The key to its success is not only in the highest-quality ingredients, but it’s also the versatility. It can be used as a conditioner as well as a styling finish that nourishes hair while also helping to condition it over time. It’s a no-brainer, truly— once you try it, you’re sold. What was your initial expansion plan for the brand? In the early years, we focused only on building the brand itself. We were extremely lucky to have a remarkably successful product; worldwide success is just a bonus of having an amazing brand. Evolving into a lifestyle beauty brand has been such an incredible journey. It began with the Treatment, and then we pioneered the oil-infused beauty category. Today, we’re a head-to-toe experience that’s offered in 70 countries. I never could have imagined this success, and the number of women whose lives we’ve been able to touch with our Inspired by Women campaign. It’s our hope that we’ve not only inspired but also empowered countless women around the world to make their own dreams a reality. If you can inspire people, it’s an incredible achievement. We’re very proud of that. What brought about your foray into suncare? Our customers inspire us to create new products all the time. When you have such a cult of followers who are benefitting from the product, it’s impossible not to create new ones! The Moroccanoil Sun Lotion collection was a natural next step for us following the success of the haircare line. It’s a luxurious treatment

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COURTESY

BY ASHLEY BAKER


“IT’S OUR HOPE THAT WE’VE NOT ONLY INSPIRED BUT ALSO EMPOWERED COUNTLESS WOMEN AROUND THE WORLD TO MAKE THEIR OWN DREAMS A REALITY.” start their days with a sense of ease. That’s my job— you have to do whatever you have to do. When people recognize the brand, it’s a good feeling, but I just don’t get it! [Laughs] Are your kids involved? One of my daughters just joined us—she finished a bachelor’s degree in psychology at Barnard College in New York, and she’s in a transition, deciding between going back to school and staying in the business. She’s now working in product development and loving it. You always have really phenomenal women in your ad campaigns. We’re always looking for women who have strong personalities and something besides their beauty. At the end of the day, we love beauty, and beauty is part of what we’re selling. Hair is super important— Sara [Sampaio] is passionate about her hair; she talks about it constantly. We look at a lot of things when we choose a model or start a campaign. The girl has to have good hair, a great personality, and be interested in things other than modeling. How has social media impacted the business? It’s very important. Consumers are more informed than ever, particularly this new generation. We are becoming more and more present in that part of the world, and I think it’s the future. Until something else comes along! [Laughs] And we’ll be ready for that, too. ß

BOLD AND BEAUTIFUL (Clockwise from right) Carmen Tal; products from Moroccanoil’s Sun Lotion collection; Inspired by Women honorees.

COURTESY

that not only transforms the hair, but the skin as well. It was also inspired by my personal experience—I grew up in Chile, and I remember using sun lotions with incredible fragrances. When we started creating this collection, it reminded me of myself when I was 17. These emotional experiences are so resonant in people’s lives. We are looking for not just a good product but also an experience. Who are your most trusted sounding boards and advisers? At this moment, our CEO, JuE Wong. She just recently joined the company, and she has been really propelling the Moroccanoil brand. A CEO is such an important part of the mix of becoming successful; JuE is inspiring not only in a professional capacity, but in a personal one as well. We share a lot of the same ideals, and it’s fantastic to work with a woman as a CEO. I trust that she will grow and evolve the brand beyond anything I could have hoped for. Where do you see the brand in another 10 years? The brand is still young. Our main goal is to continue our product innovation, bringing easy yet effective products to hairstylists as well as consumers. We would like to continue to pursue something that is dear to me—environmentally friendly initiatives. I’m excited to see how the brand will grow and evolve over the next decade. I cannot reveal to you exactly where we’ll be, but I dream very, very big. The sky’s the limit in terms of where the brand can go, and what we can achieve. What are your favorite products? It’s always been the Moroccanoil Treatment and the Hydrating Styling Cream. For my type of hair, which is a little bit frizzy, these two products are so fabulous that I don’t think I could live without them. They really make my day—I don’t even need to brush or blowdry; I just run my fingers through, and my hair is shiny and beautiful. What is the reaction you get from women who find out that you’re the entrepreneur behind Moroccanoil? I am a humble person, honestly, and I never felt like I accomplished such an incredible thing. It’s great to be a part of this wonderful brand that has helped women

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CHICCollab REVEL WITH A CAUSE (Clockwise from left) Kang with The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills star Lisa Vanderpump at the MCM x Eddie Kang launch event in Los Angeles; animal fans Jamie Chung and Scheana Marie.

When accessory impresario MCM Worldwide teams up with artist du moment Eddie Kang, great things are guaranteed. Introducing MCM x Eddie Kang, a limited-edition capsule collection of handbags, small leather goods, hats, and T-shirts that combine the artist’s playful illustrations with the brand’s seriously chic silhouettes. Kang explains the project’s inception!

PET PROJECT How and when did you partner with MCM? I began my partnership and collaborative relationship with MCM shortly after my solo New York show in 2016. MCM had seen my work and felt there were great similarities and loved the overall story that inspires my work. Soon after, the brand reached out to suggest a possible collaboration for 2018 and here we are today, with a capsule

collection both MCM and myself are proud to present. Tell us about your design process for this collection. How did you come up with the concept? At first, I began by incorporating my signature characters and patterns to set the overall tone of the collection. Loveless, the white puppy character,

and Happy Cells are essentially my icons. I believe we can all agree that the cohesive message of both parties in this capsule collection is reflected through each pattern and style, which is definitely crucial. Together, we want to emphasize that the most important concept or purpose is to save and care for all the loveless animals around the world. The overall campaign motto of the collection is, "Save the loveless!" What was the coolest thing you discovered about the brand during this process? Honestly, diversity. While working on this project I realized that as a brand, MCM is inclusive of employees from all walks of life and differentiating cultures. I believe MCM’s collections have the unique opportunity to be designed in multiple directions while still looking beautiful in all of them; classic yet on trend. Traditional yet exciting. Chic and tasteful, all at once. Why is it so important that art is accessible to the masses? When an artist has the opportunity to collaborate with such an established fashion brand like MCM— especially one with so many global retail stores—it provides a new and exciting way for larger audiences to approach and learn about the artist. Overall, it really helps artists to expand their creative formats and receive chances to showcase their art to the world in a nontraditional way. Do you have a favorite piece from the collection? I have to admit, the mini tote is my favorite because of its petite size, which fits well for my characters. What else are you working on at the moment? As of now I am working on a few upcoming art exhibitions in China, which will include mostly paintings, sculptures, drawings, and short narratives. ß

J O N AT H A N L E I B S O N / B FA . C O M ( 3 ) ; A L L OT H E R S C O U R T E S Y

BY ASHLEY BAKER

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Loveless top-zip pouch with wristlet, $425

Loveless charm, $225

Loveless T-shirt and sweatshirt, prices upon request

Reversible shopper, $750

Loveless zip wallet, $270

THE LOOK Empire actress Serayah.

Loveless mesh cap, price upon request

iPhone 6S/7/8 Plus case, $225

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RE-Dial

EVERETT COLLECTION

“Darling, I’m a bit concerned that this Emily Ratajkowski is stealing my look!”

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Runway. All day.

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