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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XLIII

FAILED TEST BU recieves F grade for health research innovation, page 3.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

PERFECT MATCH

Match School gives students a superb opportunity, page 5.

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HYNES CAUGHTUP Pitcher Lauren Hynes improves in a close loss to Harvard, page 8.

WEATHER

Today: Few showers/High 62 Tonight: Showers/Low 46 Tomorrow: 46/41 Data Courtesy of weather.com

SAO, Dean of Students launch new websites Mass. court rules

KIERA BLESSING/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

College of Arts and Sciences junior Tubby Pandita performs with fellow Jalwa dancers CAS freshman Nalini Balakrishnan, College of Engineering senior Jake Kallarackal and CAS sophomore Arsh Kakar at a launch party for the new Student Activities Office website Monday night in BU Central. By Gina Choi Daily Free Press Contributor

Both the Student Activities Office and Dean of Students Office are reworking their websites to increase accessibility for Boston University students and connect in a simpler, more engaging way, officials said. SAO Associate Director Raul Fernandez said the website was revamped in order to meet students’ needs and to improve com-

munication between students and the BU administration. SAO officials launched their new website at a launch party Tuesday afternoon at BU Central. “It [the new website] is something that our students deserved, and it gives students an even better way to connect and engage with organizations on campus,” he said. “We definitely knew that it was time for something fresh and new that really

matched what our students are seeing in the world in terms of web design.” The new website will make searching for groups and activities on campus more fluid and dynamic, Fernandez said. “We’ve got some great students that work here at the office we have received feedback from about our previous website,” he said. “It’s one of those sites where until you have it launched live, you don’t know what the response will be. The response has been fantastic from both the students in our office and students on campus.” Fernandez said he hopes the website will include more video material and will highlight award-winning groups. The website, while officially online, is still a work in progress, he said. “It’s like an organism — it’s still growing. It’s not a finished product or a done deal. It’s rather open for more development,” Fernandez said. “It’ll thrive off its feedback. The more feedback, the better.” The Dean of Students office is also in the process of launching a new website, said Katherine Cornetta, assistant to the Dean. “Every office in the university is encouraged to look at their websites and refresh them every couple of years,” Cornetta said. “We haven’t redone the website since the 2008-09 school year. The thing with the website redo in 2008 was that we took such a giant leap forward — the website was go-

Websites, see page 2

Outside spending in senate race tops $1.25 million By Alice Bazerghi Daily Free Press Staff

Outside spending in special senate race tops $1.25 million Outside spending in the upcoming Massachusetts special U.S. Senate election has topped $1.25 million, with the greatest amount of funding going to Democratic candidate Edward Markey. The League of Conservation Voters, a national advocacy group, has topped out the spending pool with $545,000 toward the Markey campaign, according to the government watchdog group, the Sunlight Foundation. Markey will face U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch in the Democratic primary April 30. Lynch’s biggest spender has been the International Association of Firefighters, who have spent more than $85,300 in this election, according to the Sunlight Foundation. Connor Yunitz, a spokesman for Lynch,

said only about 6.6 percent of the $1.25 million spent by outside groups in the race has been spent on Lynch’s behalf, with most of that spent by the firefighters to paint a bus. “The vast majority of outside money in this race has been spent by groups working to defeat Congressman Lynch,” Yunitz said. Members of the Lynch campaign claim that outside money is minimal, unlike their competition. “Congressman Lynch is glad that most of his supporters have heeded his calls to keep outside money away from this special election and let the votes decide,” said Yunitz. “Unfortunately, too many groups on the other side have continued to pour money in.” Members of the Markey campaign declined to comment on outside spending matters. Liz Bartolomeo, a Sunlight Foundation

YOU SCREAM, ICE CREAM

SARAH FISHER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Boston University students line up in front of the George Sherman Union to receive free Ben & Jerry’s ice cream on Free Cone Day Tuesday afternoon.

spokeswoman, said it is important to know how these outside groups make independent expenditures, because they can have a big impact on the election’s outcome. “Take last year’s GOP presidential race, for example,” she said. “Outside groups were one of the factors for prolonging the primary season, with Super PACs supporting Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum spending millions of dollars to keep them in the running. Four House candidates saw their chances of winning increase after receiving a significant boost from outside nonprofits and Super PACs attacking their opponents or praising them.” Boston University economics professor Randall Ellis said outside spending is a significant concern, particularly when the sponsors are unknown, but he did not think Massachusetts’s residents would be upset that certain organizations were spending

Spending, see page 2

social sharing of marijuana legal By Steven Dufour Daily Free Press Staff

In a group of four cases, the highest court in Massachusetts ruled Friday that social sharing of marijuana is not criminal, but growing the plant is still an offense worthy of arrest. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court’s decisions involved four cases of marijuana-related arrests made after Massachusetts residents voted to decriminalize possession of one ounce or less of cannabis in 2008. Under that law, possession of less than an ounce, while not criminal, remains a civil offense with a maximum penalty of $100. In one of the cases, Commonwealth v. Kiiyan Jackson, the defendant, Jackson, was arrested in 2010 at Hempfest, an annual gathering in the Boston Common to advocate the legalization of marijuana, by two police officers in civilian clothing. The officers allegedly saw him passing a marijuana cigarette to someone sitting next to him and arrested him for distribution, an offense worthy of up to two years in prison or $5,000 in fines. The court, however, ruled that, as opposed to paid distribution, “the social sharing of marijuana is no longer a crime,” according to the opinion released Friday. In another case involving a 2010 arrest, Commonwealth v. Kenneth J. Palmer, Jr., police officers consensually entered Palmer’s house and arrested him on outstanding warrants for cultivation of marijuana in a school zone, a felony worthy of up to 15 years in prison and $10,000 in fines. The collected amount of marijuana weighed less than an ounce and a district court ruled that the case should not be considered a criminal offense. The Supreme Judicial Court countered the ruling, asserting that “cultivation of marijuana … and the offense of simple possession of marijuana are ‘listed separately in the General Laws,’” according to the opinion. The court said growth of marijuana for personal use is not different than growth with intent to distribute, stating the law “contains no language creating an exception for cultivation for “personal use” or “indeed any exception at all.” Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, which filed an amicus brief in

Marijuana, see page 2

3 potential Student Gov. slates announced By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

Tuesday evening marked the beginning of conduction of the spring 2013 Boston University Student Government election, Student Elections Commission officials announced at a small gathering in the SG Office. While all candidates officially submitted intents to run by Monday evening, campaigning is prohibited until Thursday night at midnight. The Dean of Students office must ensure that each candidate is in good academic and judicial standing and eligible to run before allowing slates to campaign, said SEC Co-Chair Kerry Ford. “At this time, we are excited to know who will potentially be running in the election, and are excited to announce that all of the potential candidates have chosen to run as part of a slate,” Ford, a School of Education sophomore, said. While SG officials are elected on an individual basis, this year’s candidates make up three different slates, named Becoming

United, The BU Ignition and Can’t B Without U. “We, the Student Elections Commission, are thrilled to have such a motivated and passionate pool of potential candidates,” Ford said. Becoming United is comprised of College of Arts and Sciences junior Edmo Gamelin, who is seeking the position of president, CAS freshman Richa Kaul seeking executive vice president, School of Management junior Thatcher Hoyt seeking vice president of internal affairs and SMG sophomore Fiona Chen seeking vice president of finance. The BU Ignition includes College of Communication junior Dexter McCoy seeking president, CAS freshman Saurabh Mahajan seeking executive vice president, SED freshman Bonnie Tynes seeking vice president of internal affairs and SMG junior Aditya Rudra seeking vice president of finance. McCoy served as SG president during

SEC, see page 2


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SEC organizes ‘coffee and conversation,’ debate with SG slates SEC: From Page 1

the fall 2012 semester and Rudra is the current SG president. Can’t B Without U includes CAS junior Luke Rebecchi seeking president, CAS junior Chris Addis seeking executive vice president, SED sophomore Emily Talley seeking vice president of internal affairs and CAS freshman Noor Turaif seeking vice president of finance. Ford said she hopes this election attracts more voters than the

previous election, which was an emergency election for an interim executive board due to complications in determining the election cycle calendar. The current SG executive board won an unopposed election in November with votes from about 1,300, or 7 percent, of the undergraduate population. “Hopefully, with the three slates this semester, they will be competing with each other,” she said “… We’re going to be doing a lot of outreach as well, but hopefully the

slates will be reaching out too.” Voting begins April 22 at noon and ends April 26 at noon, Ford said. Winners will be announced on the evening of April 26. Ford said SEC outreach opportunities surrounding the election include meet-and-greets with candidates and a debate that is set to take place before voting begins. SEC officials have not yet finalized times and locations for these events. The first will take place April 12 in the George Sherman Union

Link, involving “coffee and conversation” with candidates from all three slates, Kerry said. “We’re going to reach out to all parts of campus to make sure everyone gets involved in the election,” she said. SG Executive Vice President Lauren LaVelle said she is hoping for a large voter turnout from students not already involved in SG. “In general, I’m really excited to see so many strong and passionate student leaders on campus running for the Executive Board

of Boston University Student Government,” LaVelle, an SMG junior, said. “I’m excited to see what happens.” SG Assistant Director of Advocacy Avi Levy said each slate will advocate for different issues on campus. “I think this is going to be a very interesting election because it’s going to determine how Student Government runs in the future,” Levy, a CAS sophomore, said. “There are very different ideas coming to the table.”

Former White House advisor: Marijuana of Dean’s assistant: Website will today ‘more potent’ than in previous years emphasize Elmore’s social media Marijuana: From Page 1

one of the cases, said this was the latest in a series of steps taken by the Commonwealth toward full legalization of the drug. “I don’t think there is any doubt that these decisions did not remove Massachusetts from what we perceive as the top four states for [marijuana] reform in the United States,” he said. “Decriminalization in [2008] … medical marijuana in 2012, and potentially legalization in 2014 — No other state has effectively taken that many bites out of the reform apple that quickly.” Dr. Kevin Sabet, co-founder of Project Smart Approaches to Marijuana and former White House advisor on national drug control poli-

cy, said the growth ruling was a step in the right direction for reasons pertaining to health concerns. “Today’s marijuana is not the Woodstock weed of the sixties,” he said. “It’s a lot stronger than it was in the early sixties. It causes emergency room admissions for hundreds of thousands of people a year. It’s linked to deaths … because people are abusing it more. I’m worried about the abuse.” The rulings also stated that while the smell of marijuana constitutes probable cause for searching a vehicle and suspicion of operating under the influence, it does not constitute probable cause for suspicion of distribution, according to the court’s opinions. The biggest impacts of the cases,

though, deal with getting closer to both clarification of what state laws already exist and taking steps toward legalization, St. Pierre saud. “The state is caught between legalization and decriminalization,” he said. “These cases affirm that the judiciary is not entirely keen on casting all of cannabis policy in a non-regulated free market.” St. Pierre said the court’s concern is well placed because reforms enacted too quickly without research to back them can be dangerous. “[The court doesn’t want] to create laws and standards where the science does not exist,” he said. “However, it’s [the rulings] definitely more of a positive thing than not.”

Econ prof.: Funding amounts to 19 cents per resident SpEnding: From Page 1

great amounts of money to support candidates. “$1.25 million in a state with 6.6 million residents is only 19 cents per resident. This is not much for anyone to get worried about,” he said. Ellis said some economic studies suggest spending on political elections does not particularly af-

fect the outcome of close races. “Much of political spending is to curry favor by candidates so that after the election they will vote the way the supporter wishes,” he said. “Some firms give money to both sides of the race, for instance. Buying influence from senators is a more serious problem in the U.S. than influencing election results themselves.” Bartolomeo said transparency

should be encouraged with campaign funding. “These political groups can pour in hundred of thousands, even millions of dollar before election day,” she said. “We should be able to know not only how political groups are spending money in real time, but also who gives money to them in the same fast reporting online.”

WEbSitES: From Page 1

ing to be cutting edge and relevant for the next few years.” Cornetta said the website will emphasize Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore’s use of social media. “Dean Elmore always likes to innovate, so when our office got contacted for the re-op, we decided to do another complete 360 degree change from before,” she said. Due to its popularity with parents seeking information about BU, the new website will feature a page specifically for parents, Cornetta said. Dean of Students office members track frequently asked questions. “We keep notes on what people call or email us about, because that means if they’re looking for information and they seem to be relatively easy questions, that means our website isn’t answering these questions,” Cornetta said. BU Interactive Design Principal Designer Andrew Rader, who was in charge of designing the

websites, said both were due for an update. “Both sites were updated since Student Activities reports to the Dean of Students, and both were in need of a refresh,” Rader said. “We were asked us to do both websites to help maintain consistency across the departments under the Dean of Students.” Rader said the goal of launching these sites is to highlight the vibrant BU community while providing helpful content about what methods both SAO and the Dean of Students office use to keep student groups running smoothly. He said he hopes students use it as a resource. “The biggest improvement is the focus on getting the community excited about all of the amazing things happening at BU both inside and outside of the classroom,” Rader said. “I’d love to see students using the site and finding it a great resource to staying connected to other students and the greater BU community.”

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Campus & C ity BU receives ‘F’ for innovation in health research City Crime Logs just beat it By Regine Sarah Capungan Daily Free Press Staff

The following crime reports were taken from the AllstonBrighton District D-14 crime logs from April 2 to April 9. A man walking home was assaulted during an armed robbery at about 12:25 a.m. Saturday at 175 Lake St. The victim stated that he noticed three Hispanic men following him as he walked down Lake Street. To escape, the victim attempted to flee by entering a gated area. The suspects continued to follow the victim and punched him in the face with a handgun. The victim fell to the ground and one of the men stood above him with the handgun pointed at his head. He then stated, “I have a gun. Give me your money. Give me your phone,” while another suspect began to search the victim’s pockets. They took the victim’s phone and wallet before fleeing on foot toward Commonwealth Avenue. While the police were en route to the scene of the crime, officers observed the suspects speeding down Lake Street in a gray BMW. They stopped the suspects and placed them under arrest for armed robbery and assault by means of a dangerous weapon. Really? At Wonder Bar? A fight at Wonder Bar, located at 186 Harvard Ave., occurred at about 1:19 a.m. Saturday. The police removed one of the suspects from the bar, but the man continued to act in an aggressive manor and yelled at onlookers. His friends started to push him down the street while officers tried to get him to go home. At that point, the man began yelling at another man and threw a punch at him. The aggressor also struck a police officer while they were attempting to place hivm in handcuffs. He was arrested for affray, disturbing the peace and assault and battery on a police officer. GTA: The Hub A woman was assaulted in her car near the intersection of Cambridge Street and Henshaw Street at about 12:45 a.m. Friday. The victim stated that a man tailgated her as she drove down Cambridge Street. When she slowed down for a red light, the man left his vehicle and opened the victim’s driver-side door. He grabbed the victim’s hand and tried to drag her out of her vehicle. He gave her scratches on her hands, chest and face. The suspect yelled, “Oh, you’re a female you [expletive expletive].” When he noticed the victim taking pictures of the victim’s car and license plate numbers he yelled, “You’re taking a picture of my car, who cares? Go ahead.” The suspect then ran back to his vehicle and drove down Washington Street toward Market Street. The officer was unable to figure out who was driving the suspect’s vehicle or get the name of the owner because it was a leased vehicle.

By Paola Salazar Daily Free Press Staff

Falling behind many other major research institutions, Boston University tied for 35th in its quality of research in global health and neglected diseases, according to an evaluation released Thursday by Universities Allied for Essential Medicines. The UAEM development team graded 54 Canadian and U.S. universities based on each institution’s research innovation, accessibility and empowerment for action, according to the evaluation, performed for the first time and titled the University Global Health Impact Report Card. BU received an F, a C+ and a B- in each respective category, earning a combined score of C-. “I was quite surprised that this is the picture of BU that the researchers present,” said Lance Laird, a BU professor of family medicine. “It makes me wonder what BU is doing at least to promote awareness for the research that is available and arrangements that people are actively involved in, such as strengthening infrastructure or partnerships with the government.” Laird, who is also director of the Boston Healing Landscape Project, said the low rankings may stem from a lack of response, as some of the

Boston University students are partnering with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention to sponsor and raise funds for BU’s Out of the Darkness Walk on the Charles River Campus to raise awareness for suicide and depression. Swanson Ninan, vice president of BU’s Out of the Darkness group, said one of the walk’s primary goals is to raise funds for suicide prevention. “There’s a lot of stigma around suicide, and we want to make sure that these are conversations that people are able to have. We all experience immense amounts of stress, and we just want to make sure that people feel supported all of the time, especially in our community,” Ninan, a College of Arts and Science sophomore, said. Although the walk was first held at BU in 2012, this year is the first that BU’s Out of the Darkness group — which organized the walk — is recognized as an official student group by the Student Activities Office, Ninan said. The walk will take

First section of fast fiber-optic network lit By Clinton Nguyen Daily Free Press Staff

INFORMATION FROM GLOBALHEALTHGRADES.ORG GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Universities Allied for Essential Medicines made a University Global Health Impact Report Card to evaluate top U.S. and Canadian universities.

UAEM questions went unanswered by BU officials. “It’s more a criticism of the people who hold the information,” he said. “I just can’t believe it [the ranking].” The University of British Columbia, Case Western Reserve University and Johns Hopkins University scored first, second and third place respectively. BU was tied for 35th with The University of Chicago, University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Massachusetts. BU officials could not be reached

for comment. Alex Lankowski, a fourth-year BU medical student and part of UAEM’s Report Card Project development team, said the study considered each individual university’s efforts to encourage progress in both the global health and neglected disease fields, which he said could be improved by attempting to hire faculty with global health expertise. “In order to increase the amount of neglected disease research … the university could recruit faculty in-

Health Research, see page 4

New official group to host suicide prevention walk By Amira Francis Daily Free Press Staff

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

place April 28. “This year we applied to be a student group ... so we’ve been having more meetings, we’ve had a lot more input from student groups who want to be involved,” he said. Rosie Bauder, president of Out of the Darkness said the organization hopes to begin having a larger presence in all of Boston. “Because we are a new group, we’re very excited about this walk,” Bauder, a CAS sophomore, said. “But for next semester, we’d like to build a presence in our community and make these resources accessible to BU students and others in the Boston community.” Bauder said because mental illness affects many students, it is important to educate the community. “Suicide is a problem particularly among college students,” she said. “It’s the third leading cause of preventable death among 15 to 24-yearolds, and it’s something we figure that we should all be able to prevent. As students with these sets of skills — and as human beings — we should care for everyone and make

sure that everyone feels that suicide isn’t the answer.” The walk will begin outside the George Sherman Union by the Fox Fountain and will loop through the Esplanade and back to the GSU, Ninan said. There will be performances and speak-outs for people to share their experiences with suicide and depression. Bauder said the fundraiser, which ends July 1, has already raised enough money to meet the group’s goal. “Our goal was $5,000, but we’re thinking of raising that goal to $7,000 because we’ve had so much support from our students and their families,” she said. Organizers hope to create a network for those affected by, or at risk of suicide and depression, Bauder said. “For someone who loses someone to suicide … what we want to do is to be there for them,” she said. “It’s a network. It’s a support network so people can communicate and share their stories with other people in this safe, empathetic environment.”

Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick lit the first section of the MassBroadband 123 fiber-optic network, a 1,200mile network that will bring fast Internet access to under-served communities across central and western Massachusetts, according to an April 3 press release. “Today is a remarkable milestone because now every corner of the Commonwealth will be connected to the educational and economic opportunities everywhere else in the world,” Patrick said in the release. The MassBroadband 123 network, first lit from Springfield to Sandisfield, will serve approximately 1,200 public facilities in 120 communities, including libraries, schools, town halls and public safety and health care facilities. The 1,200 facilities, or Community Anchor Institutions, will be provided with a much speedier fiberoptic infrastructure. According to the press release, this will benefit local communities by providing better contentstreaming bandwidth to schools, video-conferencing hubs that will help narrow the digital divide for the elderly and disabled, and fast access to the criminal information database for police forces region-wide. Jason Whittet, deputy director of the Massachusetts Broadband Institute, said the network cost $85 million to produce. It will be maintained by Axia NGNetworks USA, he said. “If you think of the Internet as a network of networks, that network was missing in western Massachusetts,” Whittet said. “We came in and built the foundation so all of western Mass. has as robust a telecommunications network as you can get anywhere in the world.” The connections running into Anchor Institutions are capable of handling gigabit connections, not unlike the recent Google Fiber network introduced to Kansas City, Mo. in July, Whittet said. “The fiber-optic network takes a significant chunk out of Internet providers setup costs,” he said. “That’s dramatically increasing the number

Fiber Optics, see page 4

Boston Children’s Hospital creates program tailored to female athletes By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

The Boston Children’s Hospital announced the creation of a Female Athlete Program on April 3 that will combine sports medicine to help female athletes stay healthy to compete. “We started developing this program about a year ago to give a holistic approach for female athletes since there is a female-specific treatment for injury prevention that is different from males,” said Kathryn Ackerman, co-director for the Female Athlete Program and division of sports medicine at BCH. Martha Murray, co-director of the program and division of sports medicine at BCH, said understanding the differences between female and male athlete treatment is crucial in to keeping all athletes healthy and able to compete through proper procedures.

“During adolescence, women’s bodies mature differently than men’s,” Murray said in a press release last Wednesday. “While most boys gain muscle mass relatively easily during puberty, it’s not automatic for young women. However, women athletes can work to improve their strength and agility and subsequently reduce their risk of injury.” Ackerman said the program would be led by several sports medicine physicians that will offer specialized treatment and research for female athletes to find out if they are getting the treatment they need to compete. “When they come to a clinic, they [the physicians] try to focus on prevention,” she said. “They are already trained to do these things and we are excited for the program to be underway.” This is one of the only pro-

Hospitals, see page 4

CHRISTIANA MECCA/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Boston Children’s Hospital announced a new program that will focus on holistic treatments of female athletes.


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Study: About 1.3 percent of BU research directed toward neglected diseases HEaltH rESEarCH: From Page 3

terested in this sort of work,” Lankowski said. “They could also establish a dedicated center for the study of neglected diseases, which we’ve shown is generally associated with greater neglected disease funding.” Lankowski said since pharmaceutical companies are obligated to maximize profit for their shareholders, universities must step up to the plate to ensure there is adequate global health and neglected disease research each year. “NDs [neglected diseases] account for nearly 10 percent of the global burden of disease,” Lankowski said. “Universities as a whole are

not coming close to putting 10 percent of their research budget toward them ... The distribution of research funding should at least somewhat mirror the distribution of global disease burden.” UAEM’s research shows most universities dedicate less than 2 percent of research to neglected diseases, Lankowski said. About 1.3 percent of BU’s research is dedicated to neglected diseases, according to the study. Lankowski said as a student, he was disappointed in BU’s unwillingness to supply information for the study, which in part affected re-

sults for its grades. Second-year Graduate School of Management student Jean-Paul Weaver said he was not surprised with BU’s rankings or the grades that BU’s research received. “There are so many concerns that BU is attempting to tackle at the same time, so it’s believable that it wouldn’t include diseases that aren’t directly under BU’s radar,” he said. “I’d imagine their focus should be on getting their research to developing countries. Any tools to help information spread will be good.” Nikki Long, a College of Arts and Sciences senior, said she thought the study might have

yielded different results if it had incorporated the global health and neglected disease research efforts of students. “I’d like to see more [in the study] on student involvement, though,” she said. “This is mostly faculty and researchers, which is great, but there should be something on student involvement.” Lankowski said he hopes the evaluation will motivate research institutes to change their policies. “Universities can make this happen,” Lankowski said. “The report card aims to give them a wake-up call to get moving on it.”

Broadband to reach 1,200 public facilities Phys. therapy prof: Genders differ in hips FibEr OptiCS: From Page 3

of providers in the region, as well as making it less expensive to get services.” Whittet said he foresees a high adoption rate among residents. Jason Lefferts, a spokesman for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development said the Patrick-

Murray administration was committed to the project, having recognized the importance of reliable high-speed Internet access. “By improving and expanding our infrastructure, we are creating new economic opportunity for everyone in the Commonwealth, including businesses and residents in communities that previously were unable to rely on a strong Internet connection,” Lefferts said.

HOSpitalS: From Page 3

grams in the country of its kind that uses sports medicine specialties to help female athletes stay healthy when competing, according to the release. “A lot of places in the country have this program, but we adjusted it to deal with multiple issues and problems that females deal with when it comes to sport injuries,” she said. “Hopefully it [the program] will decrease their injuries and they learn to take care of themselves and compete in a healthier way.” The number of girls competing in high school sports increased from about 295,000 to 3.2 million in the last 40 years, with the number of women playing collegiate sports also increasing, according to the release. Kathryn Webster, professor of physical therapy and athletic training at Boston University, said there is a need for programs like the Female Athlete Program around the country. “As a healthcare provider, I’ve been involved in a couple other programs that do provide this kind of service for females just because it is a unique type of situation for

female athletes, as far as their susceptibility to injury is a little different than males,” she said. Webster said there are many differences in male and female physical builds that require differing treatments. “There tend to be some differences in muscle control, particularly in the lower extremity as far as the hamstring-to-quadricep ratio in the leg, and the hamstrings tend to be a little bit weaker in females,” she said. “Women have wider hips because we’re child bearing, so the alignment of the hip to the knee can sometimes be more troublesome for females than it is for men. The program could target some of those muscles.” With the competiveness of high school athletes, Webster said many high school athletes are looking for an advantage to stay in peak condition. “If they [high school athletes] watch their friends become injured or get sidelined for knee injury, they’re trying to figure out how to avoid that particularly injury, so this [program] is obviously helpful to prevent injury and to keep them strong in the way they,” she said. “It sounds like it would be a good program to invest in.”

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Match Corps offer opportunities for BU graduates Samantha Wong Features Staff

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hile not directly affiliated with Boston University, the Match Public Charter High School, much like T. Anthony’s or the CITGO sign, is something of a landmark for BU students. The Match School, which is located at the Babcock Street Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority station, is a Match Education high school. Match students, most of whom come from low-income minority families, are enrolled at the school through a blind lottery system. The students, along with having a full course load, students receiveparticipate in a tutoring program called Match Corps. Many college graduates work as tutors in the Match Corps program to gain teaching experience for their future careers in education. BU students gain teaching experience Match Corps does not just offer its students a better foundation for their schooling. Match also provides a solid educational base for graduates who want to pursue a teaching career. Gaby Diller, a 2012 BU graduate from the College of Arts and Sciences, works with Match Corps. As a student, Diller said that Match was somewhat of a mystery to her, but after graduation, she found it was a good start to a career in teaching. “After I discovered my passion for education and working to close the achievement gap, I realized Match offered an incomparable teacher training program, and it was an opportunity that I couldn’t pass,” Diller said. “It just happened to be a coincidence that one of the best teacher training programs in Boston was a block away from where I lived for four years.” Diller said tutors in the Match Corps program work Monday through Friday along with completing other responsibilities for one year. Some of these Match Corps tutors are also in Match Teacher Residencies. Match Teacher Residencies work with Match Corps through tutoring in addition to taking courses that center around teaching. Later, they move on to teaching fulltime at a “no excuses charter school.” After passing two years of the residency, studentteachers are then eligible for a Masters in Effective Teaching. Diller said she would complete the Corps at the end of July and graduate as part of the Match Teacher Residency in July of 2014. “[This experience] is meaningful and more than essential to the development of my career in education,” Diller said. Diller said her positive experiences are not just when she knows her students have succeeded, but when the students realize they have succeeded. “We have built a community that fosters patience, compassion, dedication and way too much fun,” Diller said. “We have not only become friends and colleagues, but

MADISON FRANCOIS / DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Match Public Charter High School offers a tutoring program, Match Corps, which allows students to gain after-school help and future teachers to gain hands-on experience.

we have become family.” Diller said she did an activity with her students to practice goal setting and reflection. She had the students discuss their goals in a group and then give shout-outs to their fellow students in an effort to praise and inspire each other. “One of my students shouted me out and thanked me for my patience and love,” Diller said. “At that moment, I knew I was more than just a tutor and teacher, but a mentor. I realized I had the ability to be a positive force in their lives to foster not only academic success, but also an appreciation for learning.” Diller said next year she will work as a high school English Special Educator at Boston Preparatory Charter Public High School. “I work with a few students with learning disabilities and my one-on-one time with those students has had a huge impact on my life,” Diller said. “To be able to give those students the extra support they need to be successful has shown me that each individual student is capable of excellence. I realized that with patience, compassion and individualized planning catered to students’ needs, every student can be successful and reach their goals.” Match Corps administration Recruitment manager of Match Education Sara Parr has been working with Match for two years. Parr said she tutored in the Match Corps program last year. “The Match Corps absolutely provides great opportunities for recent graduates,”

Parr said. “It’s an excellent stepping stone for somebody interested in transitioning into a career in education, public policy, or the nonprofit sector; for individuals hoping to go on to graduate or professional school, the Match Corps is a truly unique gap-year program that allows for professional development while serving high-need students.” The majority of the people who enter Match Corps are recent college graduates, Parr said. With the Match Public Charter High School so close to the BU campus and community, it is not a surprise that so many of these graduates come out of BU. “We certainly see a number of BU alumni in the Corps and we have great brand recognition at BU since Match is right on West Campus,” Parr said. Parr said the supportive environment within the school is something that setsMatch apart from other tutoring opportunities. “As a tutor, you work with the same students for the whole year,” Parr said. “You build incredibly close relationships because you’re with them for all failures and successes.” Parr said the biggest success often comes at the end of the program, when the little victories pay off and a student passes a particularly challenging class. These small gains make significant groundwork for a student who wants to move to the next grade and some day graduate. Parr said the Match Corps program benefits the tutors as it much as it benefits its students. “Match Corps is a good ‘match’ for the

tutors and their students because it allows the tutors to gain on-the-ground experience in public service and education while allowing the students to have one-on-one attention from an educator every single day,” Parr said. BU students consider the possibility Dorothy Ovalles, a CAS senior, is minoring in Education and said a teaching position with Match Corps would be a tough because of its hours, but likely a worthy experience nonetheless. “I like the possibility of gaining experience in an urban setting,” Ovalles said. “With the Match Corps Teaching Residency, I really like the possibility of getting a Master’s degree alongside real classroom experience.” College of Communication senior Katy Meyer said the program’s ability to provide a dual benefit makes Match Corps especially appealing. “Tutoring is invaluable for students because it gives them the one-on-one help they might need to really understand something,” Meyer said.“It’s invaluable for the tutor because it gives them experience for teaching (if they want to be a teacher). It also teaches the tutors how to explain things in an easy-to-understand way, which can be a useful skill for anything in life.” Match is not only a program that provides a basis for education, but also one that fosters a sense of understanding as to how people can connect and build success in a mutually beneficial partnership.

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ednesday,

April 10, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 85 F Issue 43

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Brian Latimer, Opinion Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager

Sandor Mark

Shakti Rovner, Office Manager

The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2013 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Got to start budget cuts somewhere

While Americans brace themselves for the impact of sequester budget cuts, the capital is seeing slight cuts of its own. The budget for White House tours has been slashed and the Blue Angels have been grounded for six to seven months. Although those pilots will lose hundreds of paid flight hours, these cuts come at an opportune time. And this is where the debate gets dicey. These cuts — tours and jets — seem unnecessary and comparatively insignificant to the $633 million cut from the Department of Education’s Special Education programs, or the $125 million cut from Wildland Fire Management. But they may be more symbolic than practical. To begin counteracting major sequester cuts, the White House is creating a narrative that shows Americans that everyone will be affected when the sequester takes full effect. Even U.S. President Barack Obama is showing solidarity with the possible upcoming financial turmoil, and has given back 5 percent of his salary, which amounts to about $20,000. That money starts to support the country. This move, which may be

more about public relations than contributing to the economy, shows the American people that even those as powerful as the president are and will be affected. But with a weak February jobs report and a lukewarm start to first quarter earnings reports, little sacrifices may not be the comfort Americans need. The U.S. market is still tepid, waiting for the other foot of this man-made crisis to drop. And while spending cuts are seemingly across the board, businesses are still relying on support from the Federal Reserve with stimulus programs. A government cannot just stop spending money, even if it has already fallen off a fiscal cliff. So yes, dispensable programs like White House tours and nationally sponsored air shows have been cut, and they may seem silly and minute, but maybe it will cause a few less dollars to be cut from research grants for universities, airport officials or defense. And if cutting the little things neither saves a dollar nor decreases the debt, it at least reminds America that everyone is feeling a little empty in the pockets.

No trespassing in a public domain

A new report has revealed that the Internal Revenue Service will be checking into individual Twitter and Facebook accounts to check for improprieties. By checking social media, the IRS will be able to evaluate people claiming large deductions or those marked as potential frauds. Not all citizens should expect a friend request from their neighborhood IRS agent, but people flagged as a potential fraud may be “stalked” by IRS agents. This could start an uproar of criticism regarding its legality, but by using public, social media, all users are complicit. The IRS is not breaking any laws if they check or begin looking at people’s social media accounts. Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, among many others, are all public websites and anyone with an Internet connection has the ability and right to look. By creating a Facebook account, the user has agreed to make his or her social life — or whatever components thereof he or she chooses to display— public. The IRS can legally find out if a person lied on tax returns by looking at their latest tweet or flipping through photos and posts. There is nothing wrong with proving fraud on a public domain. Now the IRS can sift through Facebooks to

Join me on my Soap Box

make sure the taxpayer did not lie. The outcome of a Facebook search all depends on how much information the taxpayer shares online. Before the social media boom, personal lives were separated from work and business pretty easily. Future employers, as well, can “stalk” potential employees to see if they were truthful in interviews. Although the IRS can only judge whether there might be instances of fraud, employers can judge the character of potential employees through social media, and perhaps in a manner that is unfair. Now that Facebook and Twitter are used almost universally for work and leisure, users are complicit with anyone from anywhere in the world looking at their posts and tweets. However, there should be laws or regulations that restrict the abilities of employers to force potential employees to divulge social media presences and information, unless the job requires a large social media presence. Employees should not have to change their social lives to avoid negative repercussions (within reason), but they should also maintain a professional profile, one free of excessive partying or gloats about cheating the IRS, just in case “Big Brother” is in fact watching.

It seems like a requirement for being a celebrity is to skirt the line of sanity and to do so in the most public of ways. Sad to say, Amanda Bynes is the latest case of celebrity meltdowns. Over the weekend the former Nickelodeon star began tweeting incoherent messages, apparently trying to convince people that she had an eating disorder. She also claimed that a series of pictures taken of her and put online were not actually her, but an imposter roaming the streets of New York. Her behavior became even more concerning when she showed up at a gymnastics class at Chelsea Piers wearing fishnets and lingerie. Bynes apparently went out on the mat and started twirling and mumbling incoherently — speculation is that she is experiencing a manic episode. I can’t say that I’m really surprised. Obviously it’s a serious matter and I don’t want to belittle whatever is going on, but Amanda Bynes basically started her career based on dissociative personality disorder — multiple personality disorder for those who don’t know. I remember as a kid watching the “Amanda Show” and being slightly unnerved by her stalker alter ego, Penelope Taint. Bynes would dress up in a wig and pretend to be an obsessed fan. Catty comments aside, laughing about mental illness isn’t okay and enjoying someone’s life as it spirals into a train wreck is cruel, especially when it happens in a public domain as it does for many celebrities. The celebrity meltdown has become a frequent occurrence in our culture. Britney Spears had her meltdown when she cut off all her hair and gained the equivalent of her younger sister. When Mel Gibson had his anti-Semitic and alcohol-induced rant, we all basically shrugged our shoulders and said, “see I told you he hated Jews.” And Charlie Sheen? Well, he’s Charlie Sheen. I’d like to say that the increasing frequency of these meltdowns is merely a product of how public everyone’s lives have become. Everything can be uploaded to the Internet through our phones. Everyone has a camera in his or her pocket. When anything you do could wind up being a story on TMZ it’s amazing that stuff like Amanda Bynes’s case doesn’t happen every week. Being a celebrity in America is basically culturally induced schizophrenia, only those paranoid thoughts are completely justified and true. The irony of publically writing about my own feelings of disdain for the obsession American culture has with celebrities is that I’m a willing participant in the ugliness that I myself hate. We all know this, and the fact that we do shows that hating the superficiality of celebrity gossip and all its poison is mainstream. There’s nothing subversive or new about hating a story like Amanda Bynes losing her mind, or Char-

lie Sheen publically going off the deep end, in fact its what we’re expected to do. The whole phenomenon is a self-perpetuating cycle that is geared to creating a higher demand of celebrity gossip and inane information to drown out anything important. The more I talk about it, the more people search for the story and not talking about it is not a solution, either. Remaining silent when you feel a sense of moral outrage is an impotent response. As a solution, ignoring celebrity gossip depends on a collective effort to stop reading gossip news and feeding into celebrity culture. I don’t mean to sound like a defeatist, but so long as personable people do things to captivate our imaginations, there will always be a cult of celebrity of worship. You would almost have to ban people from being exceptional, interesting or entertaining altogether. Of course anyone could argue that there is a positive side to having these incidents publically broadcast. They allow the issue of mental health in this country to come to the forefront. They allow those who are suffering from an apparent breakdown to get help and it allows people to show support to their favorite stars. But when Charlie Sheen had his infamous meltdown no one was talking about the issue of bipolar disorder in this country. All we did was make ironic t-shirts and Internet memes. And in terms of showing support, that’s the problem with celebrity culture isn’t it? We feel like we have a personal relationship with people who are complete strangers to us — there’s basically a stalker vibe built into the phenomenon. Saying it’s okay to broadcast someone’s mental instability is an irresponsible and disgusting aspect of our culture. And if it strikes anyone as presumptuous of me to lecture over a wellknown and fully derided part of our culture, then all I have to say is that I’ll stop beating a dead horse when we stop treating people’s private lives as entertainment. So are we collectively driving people to insanity? Is celebrity gossip a sickness in American culture? Are celebrity meltdowns the result of the pressure that we put on people to be exceptional? If so, does that make us a vicious and cruel people? It’s sad to say, but I think it does. It’s almost vampiric the way in which we prop people up in this idolatrous way and then find voyeuristic satisfaction in watching their lives play out, good or bad. The most frustrating part is that those who really care can’t really do anything about to change it. Gossip is homogenously mixed into the stew. So in this case, self-deprecation is called for. Sandor Mark is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at smark@bu.edu.

Letters@dailyfreepress Letters@dailyfreepress Letters@dailyfreepress

Terrier Talk Reflections

Now that the administration is charging students $7 more a semester in student fees, the FreeP wanted to hear where students wanted their money to go. Here’s what some of them said. INTERVIEWS AND PHOTOS BY HEATHER GOLDIN

KYLE ROGERS

“It would be great if they could split the fee up depending on the student. I’m a chem major, so it would be great if it could go to the chemistry department.” -CAS junior

GIANNA ABSI

“I would put it towards funding for different clubs.” -CGS freshman

GINA SAVELLA

“I would put it towards the CAS building for more resources and better classrooms.” -SAR sophomore

ANA BOWDEN

“As an athlete, I would put it toward a new field so the club soccer team can actually have a home field to play on.” -CAS sophomore


Wednesday, April 10, 2013

7

King: College athletics prove to be huge benefit to community King: From Page 8

ally attached to its new teammate and will show up at birthday parties, visit him or her in his or her hospital room and become motivated by its newest “sibling.” The Long Island University-Brooklyn Blackbirds basketball team drafted an 8-year-old child by the name of Londell Johnson this past fall. Londell has sickle cell anemia and receives a blood transfusion once every three weeks. The longest amount of time he has spent outside of a hospital has been a mere 2 months. Imagine being Londell, bouncing between attending school and sitting in a hos-

pital room when, at eight years old, all he should be worrying about is who he wants to pick next for his kickball team. The Blackbirds changed the dynamic of Londell’s life from the confines of schoolwork and blood transfusions to cutting down the Northeast Conference championship nets after they defeated Mount St. Mary’s University a few weeks ago. Londell says the team treats him like a little brother and they have all taught him different aspects of the game he would have otherwise never experienced — dribbling the ball between his legs, spinning the ball on his finger and teaching him to dunk — but most importantly, they help Londell forget what’s happening to him.

They make him smile. Talk about getting involved in something remarkable. Not only do kids such as Londell develop a sense of hope and connection by getting involved with team IMPACT, but college athletes gain a little dose of perspective as well. With all the injuries that occur in college sports and the level of dedication and drive it takes to keep pushing to improve, having a kid around who is always smiling and loving life despite his or her circumstance, one can’t help but realize how good they really have it. Having an “adopted” teammate could really change the dynamic of the team, al-

ter the attitudes of self-absorbed players and serve as a sense of motivation. Play for the kid. It’s heartwarming that so many schools have taken to team IMPACT already. In just two years, schools such as Babson College, the College of the Holy Cross and Merrimack College all have multiple athletic teams partnering with team IMPACT. Today, there are 250 children spread across 115 schools in 18 different states developing a sense of hope and connection, all thanks to college athletes. Despite the clichéd “jock” label, college athletes are in fact making an amazing IMPACT.

Etrasco showing offensive prowess Lacrosse: From Page 8

riers and has been a huge reason they have stayed with teams late in games on several occasions. In her last three games, Etrasco has netted 16 goals, including a seven-goal outburst against the University of Vermont. “She’s been huge, I’ve said this over and over again, we’ve asked her to be a leader and she’s really stepped up to the plate,” Robertshaw said. “If she continues to take chances on cage and finishes her shots, it really loosens up the rest of the attacking unit to go and take chances for shots as well.” In the Terriers’ 17-9 loss to Albany, Etrasco accounted for more than half of the BU offense as she poured in five goals to help keep BU in the game. She also came up big against Harvard University, when the Terriers spent a good portion of the game fighting to come back from a 6-0 deficit. Etrasco found the net four times, including crucial scores in the second half to keep the Terriers within striking distance of the Crimson (2-7). She also had a key assist late in the second frame that led to the game-tying goal. “What’s overlooked with Danielle is the amount of work that she does on the draw control on the ride,” Robertshaw said. This season, Etrasco not only leads the team in scoring, but also leads the team in draw controls with 25. “I’m really pleased with the way she’s been stepping up and she knows that she needs to continue,” Robertshaw said.

Supporting cast doing its job Due to the injuries that have plagued the Terrier, a supporting cast alongside Etrasco has stepped up and generated offense lately. In its past three games, BU has seen scoring from nine different players against Vermont (6-8, 1-3 America East), four different players against the University at Albany and six different players against Harvard “That’s something we’ve been talking about all year and something that we know we needed in order to win games,” Robertshaw said about finding alternative scorers. “Even in games where we’ve lost or come close, other people are stepping up and that’s what we have to do.” The position of the role players on the Terrier team this year was really emphasized in the game against Harvard. In the closing seconds, junior midfielder Sydney Godett, who had only scored three goals all season, was awarded a position shot and found the back of the net to give BU the victory, tallying her second game-winning goal. Along with Etrasco in the top 10 for all major scoring categories in the America East Conference, the Terriers have two different players in the top 10 in assists per game in the conference. Other than Etrasco, sophomore attack Lindsay Weiner is among the conference leaders in assists per game. “In practice, I’m constantly challenging our younger players to take chances on cage and to take shots,” Robertshaw said. “And I think that’s something that in the game against Vermont they did a good job of doing that.”

Hynes’s performance provides potential spark Softball: From Page 8

timed, full-count strike sent senior Stephanie Regan back to the dugout, getting Hynes out of another jam. Gleason praised the vast improvement of Hynes over the past few weeks. “Lauren has come a long way,” she said. “She has become a lot more confident, especially after her performance against the University of Arizona. She’s a competitor, a fighter and doesn’t back down from any challenge.” After three innings of no-hit baseball by Groom, Hynes took matters into her own hands and singled on a 2-2 pitch. Despite stealing a base with no outs, Hynes’ teammates couldn’t attain a lead, with the next three batters being sent back to the dugout in orderly fashion. In the top of the sixth inning, BU was the first team to break the shutouts being thrown. Harvard brought in a new pitcher in the fifth inning, freshman Jamie Halula, and it did not take long for the Terriers to break through against her. After a pop up by sophomore right fielder Emily Felbaum, junior center fielder Jayme Mask gave the offense the spark it needed, getting a single followed by a steal. The stolen base paid off, as an error at second base allowed Mask to score and give the Terriers a 1-0 lead. But this was all the offense produced in the game for the Terriers, as Hynes was picked off after reaching scoring position.

With two runners on base and two outs, junior shortstop Brittany Clendenny flied out, forcing the Terriers to end the inning with only a 1-0 lead. The following half inning, Hynes gave up two early doubles. With the help from an error, Harvard took a 2-1 lead. That would be enough to give the Crimson the edge, as a scoreless seventh inning by BU sealed the final score. “Unfortunately in the sixth, [Lauren] gave up back-to-back doubles, and we just didn’t pick up the ball after that,” Gleason said. The outing marked an improvement for Hynes, who has put up average numbers from the hill this season. After allowing just one earned run and five hits while getting five strikeouts over six innings pitched, Hynes’ ERA on the season sits at 5.33. If she can build on her effective start and take some of the slack off stalwart pitcher Tuthill, it would be a valued spark to a team that is certainly in need of one. It has been a slow and tough road for this year’s softball team. After making the Women’s College World Series last season, the team has experienced quite a drop off, losing three of its last four. Despite this, Gleason remains optimistic. “The encouraging thing is that we’re in close games,” Gleason said. “We just have to find a way to get those runs across. Our pitchers are holding the other guys, we just need to score.”

SARAH FISHER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Senior attack Danielle Etrasco has scored 16 goals in her last 3 games.

Arsenault shows potential at George Davis Inv. Track and Field: From Page 8

tive and former high school state champion in the long jump, boasts a personal best of 6.86m in the event in outdoors. Last season, he placed third at the America East Championships in the event with a mark of 6.72m. “Last year was really kind of a comeback year,” Johnson said. “This year, he’s really starting to show some of his potential and some of the success he had in high school.” This past weekend at the George Davis

Invitational in Lowell, Arsenault placed third in both the 110m hurdles and the long jump. His time of 15.86 seconds in the hurdles was a personal best. Earlier in the season, he placed second in the long jump in at the Snowflake Classic in Medford, where he earned his personal best. “He still really is progressing, and he’s doing a good job,” Johnson said. “He’s competing ­­— he’s hanging in there. He’s stayed injury-free, knock on wood. I’m really looking forward to seeing what he can do when he’s in top shape and ready to compete at a higher level.”

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Quotable

I’m really looking forward to seeing what he can do when he’s in top shape...

- BU director of track and field Robyne Johnson on senior Sam Arsenault’s potential

page 8

The Inner Edge

Sports

NO SCORIN’ LAUREN

The daily Free press

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

BU freshman pitcher Lauren Hynes pitched a gem Tuesday afternoon, allowing only one earned run to cross the plate vs. Harvard. P. 7.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Softball loses pitchers’ duel to Harvard Lacrosse team

suffering from defensive issues

I.M.P.A.C.T.

By Matt Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Haley King

College athletes can be an interesting breed. Depending on the school and the sport, star athletes are spoon-fed and handed everything they need to succeed on a silver platter. Because of this, they are generally thick-headed, ignorant and deeply embedded in the “jock lifestyle.” Regardless of their egotistical attitudes, kids everywhere look up to them, and children suffering from life-threatening illnesses are no different. Some would ask why we let children get caught up in obsessing over stardom at such an early age. But once critics catch wind of college sports teams that have partnered with the two-year old, Boston-based nonprofit Team IMPACT, they’ll develop a different perspective on college athletes and the direction collegiate sports are heading. Team IMPACT, standing for Inspire, Motivate, Play Against Challenges Together, aims at improving the lives of children who are suffering from life-threatening illnesses by attacking what they believe to be the most degrading condition: Social isolation. It’s no secret that a little eight-year-old girl battling cancer won’t be all that popular when she returns to school after her first chemo treatment. Rather than let a young girl become socially devastated, Team IMPACT supplies kids with a sense of belonging and hope by taking their minds off of their condition. How do they accomplish this? By “drafting” children who are suffering from life-threatening illnesses — things like cancer, a brain tumor, or sickle cell anemia to name a few — onto college sports teams across the nation. Once a kid is drafted, he or she receives his or her own locker and jersey, gets VIP seats at home games and gets to attend everything from team practices to social gatherings. The children are basically adopted by a college sports team, sealing the deal by signing a letter of intent! Perhaps the coolest part of this organization is the “foster” team, as we’ll call it, becomes emotion-

King, see page 7

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier freshman pitcher Lauren Hynes allowed one earned run in six innings against against Harvard University. By Christopher Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

Facing off against Harvard University, crucial errors late in the game caused the Boston University softball team to fall Tuesday afternoon at Soldiers Field in a pitchers’ duel, 2-1. After getting plenty of work in over the weekend during the team’s series against the University of Hartford, BU coach Kathryn Gleason gave senior pitcher Whitney Tuthill the afternoon off, put-

No Events Scheduled Rangers closer Joe Nathan recorded his 300th career save on a blown call by umpire Marty Foster.

Lantz to fly out to center field, getting out of the jam. It was more of the same in the second inning, as BU couldn’t earn against Harvard’s freshman starter Morgan Groom. In the bottom of the second, Harvard aimed to finish what it started in the first with runners on first and second with two outs. A wild pitch by Hynes brought the runners 90 feet closer, but a well-

SOFtball, see page 7

Etrasco’s outburst On attack, senior Danielle Etrasco has shouldered much of the offensive burden for the Ter-

laCrOSSE, see page 7

Track and field athletes post marks among best in America East By Sarah Kirkpatrick Daily Free Press Staff

Several members of the Boston University track and field team lead all competitors in their respective events within America East. Senior R.J. Page holds the top spots in the conference in both the 100m dash (10.54 seconds) and the 200m dash (21.07 seconds). Classmate Tewado Latty is right behind Page in the 200m dash, ranking second in the conference with a time of 21.45 seconds. Latty also sits atop the conference in the 400m dash, with a time of 47.16 seconds. Graduate student Zachary Ray owns the tops spots in the 110m hurdles (14.01 seconds) and 400m hurdles (51.16 seconds). Junior

The Bottom Line

Wednesday, April 10

ting freshman Lauren Hynes in the circle. Hynes has struggled early in the season, as she held an ERA of 6.03 entering Tuesday’s game. The Terriers (11-20-1, 2-4 America East) did not earn a single base runner in the top of the first inning. In the bottom half, Harvard (12-17) looked to jump ahead early with sophomore Katherine Lantz at the plate and two runners in scoring position. Hynes, however, had other plans in mind, and was able to force

The Boston University women’s lacrosse team is still in the process of working through injuries to find its identity as a team as it makes its way through the conference portion of its schedule. One of the Terriers’ (4-6, 1-2 America East) weaknesses this year has been their defense. In their last three games, they have averaged 15 goals against. “It’s been a challenge for us to have the kind of defense we did in the beginning of the season with the loss of Monica Baumgartner and Christie Hart for the last two weeks,” said BU coach Liz Robertshaw. “So I think this group is trying to adapt and adjust as best they can, and we’re not there yet.” At the beginning of the season, the Terriers went on a three-game skid during which they gave up an average of almost 14 goals per game. Anchoring the defense this season has been junior goalkeeper Christina Sheridan. She is leading all goalkeepers in the America East Conference with 10 saves a game. But statistically, the Terriers are being outplayed in their defensive third. Opponents have outshot BU 278-245, which illustrates the number of the Terrier offense has been give. However, the Terriers have been able to get stops in the cage area, as they are only trailing in the goal-scoring department 124109.

Thursday, April 11 Softball @ UMass, 5 p.m

Stephen Vitale ranks behind Ray in the 400m hurdles with a time of 52.91 seconds. Perennial national powerhouse, junior Rich Peters, easily holds the top spot in the 1,500m run, with a time of 3:43.26. Freshman Reuben Horace ranks first in the hammer throw, with a mark of 57.54m. On the women’s side, junior Sarah Dillard’s mark of 39.63m in the discus is the best in America East. “That’s what you look for, that’s what you want, to be able to see the fruits of their labor ... to make it worthwhile,” said Director of Track and Field Robyne Johnson. “It really speaks to their dedication to the sport, and everybody keeps getting a little better.”

Friday, April 12

No Events Scheduled The pitch came on a 3-2 count, with two out in the ninth. It was several inches off the plate, thrown into the dirt.

Latty excels as a runner and leader In addition to being a crucial element of the team in terms of talent, Latty is an essential leader, Johnson said. “He’s a very consistent, hard worker, he’s very dedicated to the team,” Johnson said. “He brings a lot of leadership to our team.” Latty, one of the team’s captains, is a two-time America East champion in the 400m dash. He advanced to the NCAA East Regional Quarterfinals in the same event last season, and was a member of the 4x200m and 4x400m relay teams that broke school records in 2012. This season, Latty ranks 20th in the NCAA East Region, and Johnson said she thinks he can push himself to run even faster

times. “We’re very happy to have him, and I expect some big things from him,” she said. “I’m hoping he can qualify for the national championships this year ... He’s doing really well, and we’re just looking forward to seeing what can happen here towards the end of his NCAA career. “He’s got a big future and I’d like to see him accomplish some of those goals for us here, and I think he’s headed down the right path.”

Saturday, April 13

Sunday, April 14

Field Hockey @ Boston College, 9 a.m. Softball vs. UMBC, 1 p.m./3 p.m. W. Lacrosse vs. Binghamton, 1 p.m. Track @ George Mason Invite, All Day

Arsenault’s improvement Senior Sam Arsenault, after battling injury his first two seasons, is starting to come into his own, Johnson said. Arsenault, a Newtonville na-

traCK and FiEld, see page 7

No Events Scheduled Jim Joyce could be heard saying “It wasn’t my fault this time!”


April 10th Daily Free Press