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Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XL

DOWN THE LINE Green Line expansions expected in 2019, page 3.

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Thursday, April 4, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

FACE TAT

Muse gets up close and personal with Ryan Gosling, page 5.

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Catcher an offensive bright spot for struggling softball team, page 8.

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Menino demands overview for broken taxi industry With Menino on the out, politicians vie for mayoral seat

SARAH SIEGEL/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino announced Monday a sweeping overview of the corrupt taxi industry after the Globe Spotlight team ran a three-part story giving a behind-the-scenes look at taxi companies. By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino ordered an extensive review of the city’s taxi industry Monday after The Boston Globe Spotlight Team released a report documenting a failed industry with years of abuse of cab drivers by owners. After a nine-month investigation, the Spotlight team reported Sunday that drivers would sometimes have to pay bribes to get keys to their cabs while cab owners

violated Boston Police Department regulations. Monday, Menino called for an independent review of the entire taxi industry to be conducted by a third party, according to officials at the mayor’s office. The review will include a report with recommendations to focus on unresolved problems between cab drivers and the owners, city growth and demand for taxis, the growth of technology and impacts of the industry and the overall management of the Hackney Division in the police department,

according to mayor’s office officials. The Hackney Division oversees the city’s taxis, and Mark Cohen, civilian director of licensing for the Police Department, has overseen the industry since the 1980s. It is unclear whether Cohen will remain in the position. “The first change [for the industry] needs to be the removal of Mark Cohen because he is one of the fundamental problems of the industry right now,” said Donna Blythe-Shaw, staff representative for the United Steelworkers and Boston Taxi Drivers Association. Blythe-Shaw said she has been asking the mayor and legislature to reform the industry for many years now and wants Menino to establish a better licensing division. “The second [change] is to establish a legitimate licensing division made up of representatives from communities and drivers’ unions who would be responsible for regulation, oversight, auditing and adherence to proper business management,” she said. Blythe-Shaw said Menino should sign an executive order changing the independent contract of cab companies to employee status to allow them to receive work benefits. Mass. State Treasurer Steven Grossman filed legislation to end the program because only a few entities can afford the cost and upkeep of a taxi system.

Taxi, see page 2

Medical marijuana proposal may change BU policy, rules By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University’s policies toward the use of medical marijuana have yet to be decided, officials said Wednesday in response to the preliminary regulations for use of the drug released Friday by the Massachusetts Department of Health. BU Police Department Detective Lieutenant Peter DiDomenica said if in compliance with any regulations the BU officials might establish, students’ use of medical marijuana would be treated similarly to the use of any other prescription drug. “If you have a legal right to medication and it’s authorized by law and it’s prescribed to you, you’ll be able to possess it just like any other medication,” he said. Under the new proposed regulations, licensed physicians would decide whether a patient qualifies to use medical marijuana. Qualified patients would then be permit-

ted a 60-day supply, which amounts to ten ounces of marijuana. The set of preliminary guidelines also proposes regulation regarding the distribution of medical marijuana, allowing a maximum of 35 dispensaries in Massachusetts and up to five per county. DiDomenica said although students holding medical marijuana cards may not be cited in a criminal context if they are abiding by the law, the university may create rules restricting the use of medical marijuana. “It’s a possibility that the university could impose some administrative regulations, just like on weapons,” he said. “You could be licensed to carry a firearm, but you can’t bring that to the university. The school is going to have to work out administrative provisions about how this is handled.” He also said students with medical mari-

juana cards will be held responsible using their prescribed marijuana in an inappropriate way. “There shouldn’t be issues, but if people want to misuse it and use it as an opportunity to bring controlled substances and share, it they’re going to have a big problem,” he said. “They’re going to be violating the law.” BU spokesman Colin Riley said while BU officials might adopt the marijuana policy, it is too early to say what adaptations will be made to current rules. “I think it’s premature to know what, if any, changes will be made, but we’ll be guided by Massachusetts state and city officials,” he said. The regulations proposed by the Department of Public Health are restrictive, said Bill Downing, treasurer of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijua-

Marijuana, see page 2

By Sophia Goldberg Daily Free Press Staff

Just days after Boston Mayor Thomas Menino announced he would not seek reelection, a crowd of local politicians have thrown their names into the race. Five candidates have declared their candidacy for the seat, with many others considering a possible run. Dan Conley, Suffolk County District attorney, announced Wednesday that he would run for the mayoral position. “Boston is a great city, and with the right leadership and vision, its best days are still ahead. So today I am officially declaring that I am a candidate for Mayor of Boston,” Conley said in a statement. Conley said he would focus on helping the poor during his campaign. “My entire career has been dedicated to giving voice to the voiceless and hope to the most poor and vulnerable among us,” Conley said. “Boston needs to be a city where longtime residents and those fixed on incomes can feel secure, and where middle-class families aren’t priced out.” Mass. Rep. Martin Walsh announced Tuesday his interest in the Mayoral seat. “I want to be an advocate for the folks who don’t have a voice,” he said. “I’ve done that my entire political career as a state representative for 16 years, and I want to continue to be an advocate for those people and move our city forward.” Katherine Levine Einstein, a professor of political science at Boston University, said the increased interest in the mayoral position is natural after Menino’s occupation of the seat for more than 20 years, a relatively lengthy term. “Essentially, you have an entire generation of local politicians who have not been able to access that particular level of office,” she said. “You have essentially a huge amount of pent up energy and that’s being reflected by a large number of candidates that have announced interest in running for mayor.” City Councilor At-Large John Connolly was the first to announce his candidacy Feb. 26 for the seat, and said he would focus on education during the campaign. Will Dorcena, former City Council candidate, and Charles Clemons, cofounder of

Mayor, see page 2

Experts weigh in on rising tuition costs at student panel assessing higher ed. By Trisha Thadani Daily Free Press Staff

“Is BU worth it?” In response to recent tuition increases at Boston University, student-run activist group !mpact (pronounced “impact”) hosted a panel Wednesday to answer this question. About 30 people attended the panel to listen to experts and engage in a discussion around the rising cost of tuition. !mpact is a student-run activist group that advocates for a collective student effort to set up a campaign with enough support to ultimately freeze tuition hikes at BU, said Nancy Vegas, a College of Arts and Sciences senior and group member. “We are trying to create a group of people that care and will commit to doing something about the rising tuition,” Vegas said. “They [tuition hikes] are not an individual issue, but an issue of the entire university.” In an email to students March 18, BU President Robert Brown announced tuition will rise to $43,970, for the 2013-3014 year,

marking a 3.7 percent increase from the 2012-2013 cost. Vegas said the entire student body must unite and create a broad base of support to take action and show the administration that students support !mpact’s cause. Wayne Langley, an expert in the financial structure of higher education, spoke during the panel about the high costs of tuition at U.S. institutions of higher education. “Higher education has morphed into a for-profit industry, just like the auto industry, where the privileged and rich are able to benefit more than lower income groups,” he said. Students who attended the panel asked questions regarding where their money was going in light of the recent rise in university costs. “Has higher education ever been a tool of social mobility?” asked Luke Rebecchi, a CAS junior.

Worth, see page 4

MAYA DEVEREAUX/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Wayne Langley, an expert on the financial structure of higher education, describes the negative direction higher education is moving to !mpact BU followers Wednesday evening.


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thursday, april 4, 2013

City Councilors Ayanna Pressley, Tito Jackson rumored to consider mayoral run Mayor: From Page 1

TOUCH 106.1 FM, also announced runs for the seat before Menino made his announcement to step down. Einstein said the lack of female politicians interested in running is not uncommon for Boston.

“There’s been a lot of research that looks at why women aren’t running,” she said. “There are a lot of complicated issues at play, but the bottom line is this is something that happens at pretty much every level of government.” Several other politicians are rumored to be considering a run for the position, including City Councilors Ayanna Pressley, Tito Jack-

Treasurer of Mass. Cannabis Reform Coalition: ‘these are just draft regulations’ Marijuana: From Page 1

na Laws’ state affiliate the Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition. “They want to make sure that doctors don’t prescribe this for other than what they think is reasonable,” he said. Downing said the regulations are only preliminary, and Massachusetts will probably instate dispensaries during the summer of 2014. “You’ve got to keep in mind that these are just draft regulations — that none of this stuff has actually been enacted yet,” he said. Jacquelyn Malis, a College of Communication sophomore, said students with medical marijuana cards should be allowed to have medical marijuana as long as they are not misusing the drug or violating university policies. “If you have the card, I believe that you should be allowed to exercise that right,” she said. “However, if they start violating the rights, such as selling it for instance, I think that the school can step in and have an issue with it because it’s still illegal in

that sense.” COM junior Mary Bell said students with cards should have a designated location on campus where they can use marijuana for medical purposes. “If you have a medical marijuana card, then you should be able to smoke somewhere on campus, but not in dorms,” she said. Bell said the use of medical marijuana in Massachusetts will not affect students who use the drug for recreation already. “There are students that smoke weed regularly,” she said. “They’re not going to stop doing that or be less cautious about it because it’s legal medically.” Ella Radcliffe, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore, said an increased use of marijuana on campus due to medical needs might bother others at the university. “Most people are cool with walking down Commonwealth [Avenue] and having the person in front of them smoke a cigarette — that’s sort of normal,” Radcliffe said. “There would probably be some people that would be bothered by somebody smoking a joint on the way to class.”

son and Michael Ross. “I want to thank our Mayor for his invaluable contributions to the city of Boston,” Ross said in a statement Wednesday. “As for my own political future, things are uncertain at this point, but I can tell you that I’m giving a hard look at the position.” Einstein said the candidates will have

many issues to address in their campaigns. “I think that [minority representation] will potentially be an issue during this falls campaign,” she said. Dealing with transit, housing affordability [and] retaining young graduates are all of the issues that mayors have to deal with. Boston is a city with a lot of changes to face.”

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Cab owner: Drivers independent businessmen taxi: From Page 1

“All taxis should have proper insurance,” Grossman said in a statement Wednesday. “And we have filed legislation to eliminate the self insurance program because it is entirely inadequate.” He proposed that the required $20,000 in coverage is insufficient to cover people’s injuries no matter if it is paid through traditional insurance policies or self-insurance, according to the Motor Vehicles and Aircraft legislation. Boston cabbies sued taxi owners Feb. 12 for allegedly denying them fair wages and benefits. Edward Tutunjian, a cab owner, said, in

the case, that taxi drivers are independent businessmen and he does not get involved in how much money they make in a shift in relation to how much the drivers lease him. “I don’t get involved about how much he is making. They pay the lease amount. I don’t go into specifics. It is their business. They run their own business. I don’t go into details on how much they make,” Tutunjian said in a transcript of the case provided by the Spotlight Team’s report. Blythe-Shaw said she is glad Menino is finally reviewing the corrupt taxi industry. “If Menino wants to help, that’s [the review’s suggestions] what he needs to do,” she said. “It’s a lopsided system and it needs to end.”

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Campus & City Column

Girl, 20 Party Fowl

The best feature of fresh eggs is eating them (and obviously coloring them when our lord and savior resurrects himself), but watching them come into existence is just as gratifying, especially when the hens are personal acquaintances. When I was younger, my parents thought it would be fun to adopt six chickens of diverse breeds and house them in our back- SYDNEY L. SHEA yard, so the egglaying process is one I’ve been able to watch on copious occasions for the short time we pretended to be farmers. My winged friends included three black, two speckled and one white hen, all of different temperaments and ages. I could only pick up the white one and speckled ones, as the black chickens were complete pricks. After school — this was middle school at the time — I’d come home, go into the coop and watch them interact with my Labrador salivating on the other side of the chicken-wire (no pun intended) fence. A lot of bruck-bruck-brucking and flappetyflapping made up their lives, unable to fly and caged even if they could. On a rare day, one of my chickens would decide that instead of coming down from her perch to play, she would stay isolated while a tasty treat percolated inside of her uterus. Sounds appetizing, yeah? I would watch whatever chicken of the day was in this mode while she cooed softly, concentrating on her objective of dislodging the shelly oval from her crotch. As the cooing became louder and more bothered, the egg would begin to crown, and gradually it made its way out into the nest to be taken up by me and cleaned, cracked and poured out into cookie batter. Chickens, however, serve other functions besides making edible excretions. When the weather was warm enough to open the windows, the early-morning crows became a sufficient alarm system, but at the same time annoying, since there was no “sleep” mode to turn the damn things off. In vain attempts at bargaining with them to please shut the hell up, the stubborn hens would just keep brucking until it was time for them to commence their daily errands, such as worm-gathering, pecking at things and filing tax reports. But one fateful morning in my pseudo-bucolic childhood, I visited my feathered friends before cheerleading practice without changing my sneakers afterward. An innocent mistake — perhaps I dragged in a little dirt to the gymnasium, but it’s not as if this could do any harm, right? Wrong. When my teammates lifted me up into a half elevator, they were unpleasantly surprised to find brown residue on their hands when I jumped off. Talk about an awkward situation. My current life in Kenmore Square disqualifies me for chicken ownership, to say the least, but sometimes I still like to see chickens at farms and fairs around the Commonwealth. When my parents gave up our chickens 10 years ago, a friendly woman took them in on her farm and promised that I could visit them whenever I wanted, but when I did all that was left were some empty eggshells and a coop with its door ajar. Sydney Shea is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences and can be reached at slshea@bu.edu

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Green Line expansion planned for 2019 Suspicions arise

of covert police Twitter accounts By Amira Francis Daily Free Press Staff

MADELEINE ATKINSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is proposing to extend the Green Line beyond Lechmere in East Cambridge to Union Square in Somerville and College Avenue in Medford. By Jenna Lavin Daily Free Press Staff

Despite a growing burden of debt, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority could begin construction on extending the Green Line from Lechmere to College Avenue in Medford and Union Square in Somerville in the coming months. “The extension of the Green Line in to Somerville and Medford will greatly improve mobility in the area,” said Kelly Smith, deputy press secretary for the MBTA. The extension would take place on the E line and include the construction of seven new stations, including the relocation of the current Lechmere station in Cambridge, according to the Green Line Extension Project website. It would also require the relocation of both the Lowell and Fitchburg Commuter Rail tracks to allow for construction of new tracks in the space, according to the project website. The MBTA expects the project to be completed by July 2019 with trains operating every five to six minutes during rush hour, according to the website. Smith said the project could bring economic opportunities and

community development to the area. Some real estate agents said they are concerned about the impact the project will have on the communities in the area, especially on housing prices. “It would certainly increase the [home] prices for people coming into that area,” said Renee Lawyer, realtor at Century 21 Advance Realty in Medford. “People do like to be near public transportation so that’s a selling point.” She said home prices in the Medford area are not too expensive, but there is already a higher demand for property in the area because of the anticipation of the Green Line extension. “Medford already has the commuter rail. We’ve actually seen that area change quite a bit and prices go up [because of that],” Lawyer said. Despite general enthusiasm for this project, some residents said they are worried about how much it will cost to ride out to Somerville and Medford. “It’s nice that they’re going to extend the train out to Medford,” said Vanessa Spatafora, 29, a financial consultant from Winthrop. “It’s probably going to be a little

more expensive … you move people and you’ve got to pay extra.” Spatafora said the extension could be a better alternative to the current commuter rail service. Ryan Cook, 26, an advertising revenue manager from Back Bay, said he hopes the extension will not be too much of a burden on taxpayers, but that it could benefit people in the Cambridge area. “A lot of people come in from Medford or the Northern extension of Massachusetts, so it would probably work well for them and for people in Cambridge,” he said. Jessica Jackson, 26, associate operations manager at a publishing firm from Stoneham, said the project is important for the expansion of housing in the area. “[The project would] definitely increase public transit,” she said. “I definitely think that people would be more prone to moving out that way [to Medford and Somerville].” Jackson said the extension could convince people to be more environmentally friendly. “It would help with the whole global warming fiasco,” she said. “More people would be likely to take public transit.”

BU organization to host conference on Palestinian ‘right of return’ this weekend By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University will host a conference to address implementing Palestinian “right of return” this weekend in the BU Law auditorium. Raed Habayeb, a member of the Right of Return Organizing Committee, said the conference aims to create a stronger conversation surrounding the plight of displaced Palestinians. “The Conference will touch on the above issues but intends to expand the discourse relating to Palestinian rights by incorporating the practical methods and implications of the refugees’ return,” he said. “The conference will also feature four Keynotes speeches by world-renowned academics and scholars with an expertise on Palestinian refugees.” The debate surrounding “right to return” has long been fought and is highly political, Habayeb said. “Over half the world-wide Pal-

estinian population is composed of refugees and displaced people making it the largest refugee population in the world,” he said. “The plight of these now approximately 5 million refugees has been unresolved since the birth of the Palestinian refugee tragedy. Israel has so far refused allowing the Palestinian refugees back to their land, and original places of inhabitance, making this a central issue behind the now-65-year-old Palestinian quest for justice.” While the conference has not been met with open opposition, members from BU Students for Israel said they were displeased with the conference being held on campus. Leora Kaufman, a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Communication and co-president of BUSI said she was very displeased with the conference. “If we were to try and prevent

the conference it would cause even more of an uproar, but for me personally I do not like that the conference is happening on BU’s campus.” Kaufman said the idea of “right of return” undermines the two-state solution and international law. “This would completely disrupt the Jewish majority within the state of Israel — a state that was created so that the Jewish people would never be persecuted again,” she said. “Every nation deserves a home.” Habayeb said more than 250 people are expected to attend and the conference itself has been met with little opposition. “Most feedback and interactions with the BU student community, faculty and administration has been positive, and thus, the Organizing Committee did not experience any opposition that actively sought to prevent the Conference from occurring,” he said.

Suspicions have begun to circulate that police officers in the Boston area are going undercover as concertgoers in order to break up local house shows, according to several news outlets. The suspected undercover police officers used Facebook and Twitter accounts to message local venues that host house-shows, saying things like, “Patty’s day is a mad house I am still pissing green beer. The cops do break balls something wicked here. What’s the address for Saturday Night, love DIY concerts.” The Boston Police Department has declined to comment on any possible involvement. David Rossman, Boston University Professor of Law, said if Boston police officers are going undercover to monitor house shows, it is perfectly within their rights to do so. “There are police officers that pretend to be drug users to catch drug dealers, police officers that pretend to be prostitutes in order to catch that sort of thing,” he said. “They can basically go undercover to do anything, certainly if they’re not invading someone’s privacy.” Rossman said if police entered the home as undercover agents, there might be regulations. “There may be constitutional problems with going undercover and having someone invite you [a police officer] into their home if they’re inviting you in, not to participate in a crime, but because you pretend to be some innocent third party,” he said. “But if all they’re doing is setting up something like a Facebook page, they’re not invading your privacy by doing so.” Grant Gochnaur, 26, a musician from Pennsylvania touring Boston with his band, Eyes Wide, said he wondered if police were entering house shows while still undercover. “Are they going into someone’s home without consent?” he said. “In areas that are kind of bad, and you have vandalism and stuff like that, I can see patrolling the area, but I don’t think going into houses is the way to do that.” Rene del Fierro, a 28 year-old musician and producer who lived in Boston for about nine years, said he thinks people feel uncomfortable about police allegedly going undercover because of the legal aspects. “It’s a weird topic that doesn’t really fit into a law, so that’s why many people feel strangely about it, because it’s kind of ambiguous,” he said. “But if people are advertising and trying to sell tickets, then the city technically has the right to shut it down.” Brandon Gepfer, 25, a musician touring Boston with his band, Placeholder, said there are more important issues for the police to focus on. “I think it’s [expletive] that the cops are doing this,” he said. “In a city the size of Boston, there are probably a lot bigger things, like the war on drugs or, you know, murders – real things that are happening, not shows where

Twitter, see page 4


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Thursday, April 4, 2013

Musician: Police Financial expert: ‘Concerned’ how institutions use revenue how institutions use and incorpo- acceptance among professionals industry,” he said. Langley also said students must that a problem in regards to higher their revenue.” ‘destroying local Langley said he thinks there are rateAndrew Cho, a CAS freshman, education exists, but he has a dif- fight for the democracy, affordvalues in higher educa- asked where the money gained ferent opinion than most about ability, transparency and accounttion, however it is just not worth through tuition hikes goes. culture’ of shows definite how these problems should be ability of their tuition. the money in the way it is set up Worth: From Page 1

Twitter: From Page 1

20-year-olds are just drinking and having fun, doing nothing to harm society at large.” Tim Johnson, 19, a sophomore at Emerson College who has attended house shows and basement shows for about three years, said police are harming the local music culture. “The police have valid reasons for breaking up these shows,” he said. “But the reality is that by shutting down these shows, they’re destroying local culture, because these acts can’t get booked at clubs or venues, and being booked at bars restricts people under 21 from being able to attend.”

now. “I am personally and professionally a big booster of higher education, as it is an essential part of this country’s future,” Langley said. “I am just concerned about

Langley said although administrative costs have risen dramatically, there are so many income streams at major universities that it is very hard to tell where exactly the money is allocated. He said there is a widespread

solved. He also said students have more collective power than people realize, and that students should come together in order to fight for their own future. “If you don’t fight for your rights, you are then a victim of this

“You [students] are all essentially stakeholders in these institutions, but you have no voice,” he said. “You don’t have a seat at the table and you don’t get to determine how your investment is being used.”

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Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

INTERVIEW: Ryan Gosling, Eva Mendes and the Genius of Derek Cianfrance Michela Smith

I

tion. “I got to know the women that worked there and I heard some amazing stories. They were born and raised in Schenectady … it really helped me get into my role. [The customers] were hungry, they wanted their food and they wanted it fast. And if I didn’t get it to them, they would not leave me a tip,” Mendes said. “It was a common complaint that she didn’t put enough salt on the French fries,” joked Cianfrance. While this type of method acting has been practiced to obtain authenticity for decades, Cianfrance pushes his actors to race at even higher miles per hour. At these high speeds, not only do Cianfrance’s actors experience life as their characters, they get the opportunity to make serious film decisions. When it came time to cast, Mendes was allowed the final say in who would play her mother, Malena (Olga Merediz), a strong supporting role in Pines. “I hung out with fifteen amazing women [during the casting process],” she said. “The last person came in … [and] had all of these qualities that my real mother has. I immediately felt this connection with her. I called Derek and said, ‘So I found this lady, you want to watch her tape?’” “And he said, ‘Okay, then she’ll play your mother, ”’ Mendes remembered. “I still can’t believe that [he] gave me that freedom. It was incredible. Derek provides this environment for you — it’s so realistic that it feels like you’re watching a documentary.” Similarly, Cianfrance’s insistence on realism forced Gosling to truly encapsulate motorcyclist Luke’s experience. “I was creating this guy who was a melting pot of all of these masculine clichés: Motorcycles, tattoos, guns, knives, muscles. And [in preparing for Pines] I had this face tattoo … I regretted immediately,” Gosling said. “I said to Derek, ‘I can’t do this, I look ridiculous. It’s going to ruin your movie,’” he said. “And he said, ‘That’s what happens when people get face tattoos, they regret them. This movie is about consequences and now you’ve had to pay for what you’ve done,’” quoted Gosling. “I felt so much shame about doing that, that I had taken it too far and I was going to ruin everything ... I couldn’t look at myself in the mirror … I had this shame that I don’t think I could have acted … [it] gave me a connection to the character that I don’t think I would’ve had. Because when I was holding this [baby], I felt ashamed that I was his father, that I was this person that I had chose to be. It was a gift from Derek that I never could have planned.” Harkening back to Danica Patrick, Cianfrance acknowledged the high speeds he requires of his filmmaking team. “I ask my actors [and crew] to crash for me — although not on a motorcycle — and fail. And if they can do that, then, all of a sudden, there’s no more judgment,” he said. “They can succeed greatly because

Film/TV Editor it’s okay to fail.” Cianfrance’s encouragement to crash and fail in order to heighten realism only intensifies in Pines’ cinematography. While visceral camerawork penetrates throughout Pines, it is particularly palpable in the film’s opening scene. To introduce the danger of motorcyclist Luke, Cianfrance and cinematographer Sean Bobbitt follow Luke from his trailer, through circus grounds, into an arena tent, and then to the cage of three motorcycles, “The Globe of Death.” “We thought that we needed to start an epic movie off with an epic opening shot like so many of our favorite films, like Touch of Evil … constantly revealing something new, you’re going to learn some things as this shot unfolds. Sean [mirrors] the physicality of the actors [when he shoots] … he kind of floats in a way, it’s beautiful,” he said. But cinematographer Sean Bobbitt wanted to take Cianfrance’s commitment to reality one step further … to film inside “The Globe of Death.” “I said it was crazy,” insists Cianfrance. But Bobbitt insisted on the persistence of reality in Pines. “’No,

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOCUS FEATURES

Ryan Gosling plays a speed racer in upcoming movie, The Play Beyond the Pines.

we must go to the center,” Cianfrance remembered Bobbitt demanding. “So Sean [followed] in the cage. And there are beautiful images of throttles, revving ... the motorcycles start spinning around Sean. It’s abstract and visceral and beautiful. And all of a sudden, my monitor goes static.” In story, performances, and cin-

ematography, The Place Beyond the Pines indeed snaps audiences to attention, its visceral authenticity forcing audiences to be alert and active. And just as he painstakingly directs his cast and crew, Cianfrance too directs his audiences. He makes them drive just that little bit faster.

The attorneys who taught our classes were extremely knowledgeable about their specific areas of law. I made some connections among the faculty, broadened my understanding of law, and gained a better footing in my field.” — SHANNON HOGAN, BU certificate awarded 2011

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t is strange to be in the same room as Ryan Gosling, but indeed much stranger to find the man sitting next to Gosling far more interesting. Derek Cianfrance, widely recognized, but only recently, for his neorealistic filmmaking in the acclaimed Blue Valentine, sat in our interview eager to prove the triumph of method acting, to honor the courage of cinematographer, Sean Bobbitt, and to encourage jaded moviemakers to push the boundaries of conventional film. Cianfrance is again in the spotlight with The Place Beyond the Pines, an unapologetically genuine look at legacy in the faded town of Schenectady, N.Y. Cianfrance’s commitment to authenticity is unmistakable and palpable onscreen. But his surprising methodology of weaving story, acting and photography in a purposeful construct — an epic — became clear in speaking with him and the Pines cast, including Gosling, Eva Mendes, Dane DeHaan and Emory Cohen in Manhattan last month. But before revealing his directorial secrets, Cianfrance initially disoriented a room of reporters – he attributed his filmmaking process to racecar driver Danica Patrick. “She always knew how fast she could drive,” Cianfrance recalled. “She would always drive that fast, but then she’d drive a couple more mph over the speed in which she felt in control. And that meant, oftentimes, she would crash. But by crashing, she would also push her own boundaries and get better.” Cianfrance does indeed drive far over the Hollywood speed limit in Pines. When literal speed racer, Luke (Ryan Gosling) discovers that he has fathered a child with the destitute Romina (Eva Mendes), he begins to rob Schenectady banks to provide for his son. His string of heists entangles him with Officer Avery (Bradley Cooper). Perhaps even more risky, however, is that the triptych epic, encompassing three individual periods in time, unravels chronologically, a style virtually unheard of in modern day film. But for Cianfrance, it was the only way to communicate the importance of legacy in Pines. “Structure is really important to me, to do it in this chronological order … to talk about American legacy and everything that doesn’t go away,” Cianfrance explained. “I wanted this film to have a Biblical feeling to it.” Cianfrance faced plenty of opposition in designing the film to be chronological, Gosling recalled. “Everybody told him to cut it and to change it and not to do it that way,” he said. “I think everyone assumed that he would eventually cave in the edit and he didn’t. He’s the most stubborn man of all time.” Cianfrance’s directorial strategies are risky, especially in his exploration of method acting, a performance style that allows actors to absorb rather than project the qualities of their characters. Cianfrance encouraged Mendes, whose character Romina works at a sleepy Schenectady diner, to work as a waitress to find inspira-


6T

hursday,

April 4, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 36

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Brian Latimer, Opinion Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

They are the boss

Harvard University faculty has expressed its disappointment in the administration once new information surfaced in an ongoing email scandal, the Harvard Crimson reports. Deans Michael Smith and Evelynn Hammonds issued a statement in September that two email subject headlines in two faculty members’ private Harvard email accounts were read, but no emails were opened, read or forwarded. Information surfaced in March that there is evidence that administrators did not reveal they accessed up to 16 email addresses. Harvard administrators have now hired a non-affiliated lawyer and formed a task force to investigate the scandal. It is a federal offense to rifle through, open or read through someone else’s mail without permission. While emails are slowly replacing physical mail services, should these laws include emails? Both physical and electronic correspondence can hold extremely private information or details the receiver wishes to keep private. Should emails be treated the same way? When you are using an organizations email, like @bu.edu or even @dailyfreepress.com, administrators can reserve the right to look through and scrutinize emails sent and received through that email. The organization’s name is attached to the email address and employees have been granted permission to use the domain. In

Harvard’s case, their reputation can be affected by any correspondence, so to maintain a positive image, administrators can reserve the right to check @harvard.edu faculty emails. There was no official confidentiality agreement, but it is assumed that anyone would be agitated if they found out someone accessed their emails without permission. Harvard administrators should have held an open discussion beforehand to inform faculty that the University reserves the right to access email accounts affiliated with the school. The Residence Housing Association informs residents within the first week of fall that, because dormitories and the furniture inside are Boston University property, resident assistants have the power to search rooms. The faculty members’ names are also attached to the email, so there is an understandable reason the Crimson reported professors referring to the scandal is a corrosion of a “culture of trust.” The task force will report that administrators did not open emails and the lawyer will find that the access was legal. Instead of employing other people to explain why the administration did nothing illegal, there should be an open conversation about the scandal, and faculty should know how much seemingly private information the administration reserves the right to see.

After the surging popularity of BU Confessions and the flop of BU Hookups, a new, anynmous BU Facebook page has emerged. So we here at the ol’ Free Press decided to see what each college would post to woo its crush. • COM: Wanna have a Foursquare? • CGS: they’re are so many pretty girls but your the only one for me, • CFA: Draw me like one of your French girls. • ENG: Hey to the one female in EK 127. HMU. • SMG: My net worth isn’t the only thing that’s on the rise. • BU Athletics: I’m trying to score. Wanna puck? • President Brown: I mustache you a question and I don’t want to shave it for later. • The FreeP: Wanna know what Interrobang really means?

le t t er s@dail yfr eepr e s s .com le t t er s@dail yfr eepr e s s .com Ha ve all t he op inions ? S U BMIT A GUES T COLUM N ! le t t er s@dail yfr eepr e s s .com le t t er s@dail yfr eepr e s s .com

EXITMENT

Slug Bug Red, no Punch Buggie Back DAVID FONTANA You see a red Volkswagen Beetle, a bug as there more commonly known, and what do you do? Well, it’s simple really: Step one: Clench your fist. Step two: Prepare to punch the person standing next to you (friend, family, foe or stranger) And step three — the most controversial step of this entire, elaborate, diabolical system: You yell out “slug bug red! No slug bugs back!” Please note: The perfect player performs all of three steps simultaneously. However, margins of error are granted to the more unskilled beginners (aka: n00bz). Now, I’m sure most of you find “step three” acceptable, sound proof and 100 percent, without a doubt — I’m talking about “Moses bringing down the 10 commandants” kind of truth — completely accurate. If so then bravo, here’s to you, you just won “the game,” hurray hurrah, you shall henceforth be bathed in riches. However, for those of you who find some issue with this unchangeable, wellestablished, law binding step, for those of you who perhaps want to say something about a “punch buggie,” well you’re wrong, you’re not just ignorant, but you’re straight up stupid and simply put in the most delicate words that I can possibly find in all of the languages I have ever studied (that would be 6 if you’re wondering) I — and I always will — hate you. There, I’ve said it. It’s true. You have no sense of culture, you aren’t funny at all and your face is ugly too. The tribe has spoken. It’s time for you leave. Humor — it’s a pretty funny thing (badum ching). It develops all over the world and everywhere it’s unique. Often times the differences are obvious when it comes to the specific topics or even the punch lines a society uses. But other differences can be more subtle. Sometimes it’s the difference between “punch buggie” and “slug bug.” Yet, beyond the different development of humor between countries, states or even cities, it also develops differently in each of us, too. We each have our own culture of humor. That’s right, at this very moment you have something growing inside of you, or even worse, it’s already full-grown! It’s slimy, it wiggles and often times it opens your mouth and projects an audible choking sound that we all enjoy. In fact, we encourage it. It’s kind of like a little internal pet. Here little humor — here little humor. Good boy.

I know it sounds obvious to say that we are all unique — it’s been drilled into our brains since we first pooped on a piece of paper and our parents and teachers cooed “art.” But this Crayola crayon selection of humors is a rather important subject. This unique “Culture of Humor” we each have, or our COH factor, is of the utmost importance to the industry of humor: comedians, actors, writers, directors and artists alike. All of these people make a living, stay alive and remain happy by forcing a convulsion of your diaphragm. They just like to hear you laugh. Yet they spend their whole lives figuring out the right stimuli to accomplish this goal: Should I tickle them or hit myself in the head, do I quote Adam Sandler or Samuel Beckett, should I laugh my way through this joke or do I keep a very straight face? In short, Monster’s Inc. really does exist, and somewhere right now, in the depths of Hollywood, a conglomeration of celebrities are collecting our laughter in yellow tubes. These will, of course, be used to keep them all looking young. All right, so humor might not be a fountain of youth, in fact, it’s often the main culprit for those wrinkles on your face, but there is something magic about laughter. Medical accuracy aside, laughter makes you smile, it helps pull people from the depths of depression and can calm down even the most nervous of nellies. I wouldn’t be surprised if we eventually figured out that laughter was really the cure for the common cold. But more importantly it’s where our COHs meet that friendships form. If you can’t laugh together, then you probably aren’t going to be friends together either. Now, that’s not to say that our humor doesn’t change for different people. While in Chicago I might spend 90 percent of my time “false-tensing” or relying on a little “A! . . . B!” action, but here in Boston I survive on pretentious jokes about Greek Mythology and giggling when someone says, “duty.” Sometime all it takes is that one really good laugh a day, to keep the doctor away, a smile on your face and a friend at your side. And if that doesn’t work, you’ve always got that red Beetle to rely on for some good ol’ “anger management red, and no anger management back!” David Fontana is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. He can be reached at fontad5@bu.edu.

Special Letter from the Women’s Basketball team BU Band, Cheer and Dance, We want to thank you for everything this season! Playing in Case Gym would not have been the same without your support and spirit! We are grateful for the relationships that we have built with you, and no what matter the attendance was we always felt your

support for home games and some road games too. Win or lose, at the end of the game we always heard all of your cheering and encouragement. You are the best. An extra special thanks to all of the seniors! Thanks, BU Women’s Basketball

The Daily Free Press welcomes your feedback and commentary. Send us your thoughts!


Thursday, April 4, 2013

7

Burek goes off with 3 goals vs. Terriers Lacrosse: From Page 8

Morse scored her second goal of the game with 2:11 remaining to bring the score to 17-9, which would become the final tally. The Terriers finished the game with a 15-13 advantage in draw controls, a positive result from a team that has struggled in securing the draw this season, as BU currently ranks last in the conference with fewer than 10 draws per game. Despite their successes at controlling the draw, the Terriers were edged out by the Great Danes in ground balls, 18-12. Senior Rachael Burek had a huge game for the Great Danes, scoring three goals and recording six assists to finish with nine points. “Their leading scorers, who we talked about and who I thought were going to do some damage, did,” Robertshaw said. “Ra-

chael Burek had at least eight points. She’s a good player and she really took it to us.” Goalkeeper Anna Berman, who entered the game ranked ninth in the conference in save percentage (.427), stymied the Terriers’ offense throughout the game, recording eight saves and holding the Terriers to just two goals in the final 30 minutes of action. After the game, Robertshaw said the team would have to work on solving miscommunication issues on defense, and especially finishing plays on offense. “We had opportunities to get the ball, I just don’t think we finished the play,” Robertshaw said. “That is something that I addressed with the team afterwards, which is that we’re watching. We’re watching these games go by, watching these plays go by, and we have to start making our own plays happen and stop watching.”

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Junior attack Elizabeth Morse scored 2 goals in BU’s loss to University at Albany.

Ekart’s 3-run homer, 6th-inning BU error opens gates to UConn’s gameruns not enough to get job done changing 5-run, 5-hit 3rd inning rally Softball: From Page 8

ing.” Gleason said. Despite Felbaum forcing Fernandez out at second on a fielder’s choice, Hynes was able to score and put the Terriers on the board for the first time all afternoon. An RBI single to left by junior outfielder Jayme Mask put another runner across the plate and two runners on base for junior catcher Amy Ekart. Ekart continued to up her RBI count with a two-out, three-run home run. When the inning ended, the score was 8-5, UConn’s pitcher had been pulled and the Terriers seemed to be back in the game. Hynes shut down the Huskies with a 1-2-3 top of the fifth, but BU was unable to plate a runner in the bottom of the inning. After UConn added another run in the top of the sixth, BU made another offensive push, coming within one run of its opponent. “[The freshmen] continue to step up and continue to not play like freshmen,” Glea-

son said. “And I told them in the spring, right in January, ‘you’re not freshmen anymore.’ So they continue to step up in pressure situations.” Mask continued her season-long offensive success by opening up the Terriers’ offense with a double. Coming in to pinch hit, Kehr knocked Mask in with an RBI single down the right-field line, before scoring herself on a double to left center by junior shortstop Brittany Clendenny. A ground out by Hynes brought in BU’s final run of the inning as it went into the seventh down 9-8. BU could not stop UConn from scoring and allowed two runs in the top of the seventh, giving the Huskies their final lead of 11-8. Despite having the bases loaded with just one out, Clendenny hit into a double play to end the game. “I told them after the game, it’s tough to have 13 hits and eight runs and lose the game, but ... I think that that’s a great boost for us going into BC tomorrow,” Gleason said.

Follow us on Twitter: @DFPSports @BOShockeyblog @BUbballBlog

Pitching: From Page 8

lissa Guches, one of three UConn batters to get hits off of Schuppert in the inning. “That put us behind right off the bat — having them score two runs.” Gleason said. Although Schuppert escaped the first with only two runs having scored, she was unable to avoid the UConn hitters for too long. Thanks in part to a BU error, the Huskies pounded out five hits and as many runs to build up a seemingly commanding 7-0 lead in the top of the third. Schuppert was removed after the score was 4-0 for freshman pitcher Lauren Hynes, but runners were still on base. Hynes, like Schuppert, has struggled in the early part of the season in the circle. Coming into Wednesday, Hynes held a 6.75 ERA, and opposing hitters possessed a .317 batting average against the freshman. Initially, Hynes struggled, giving up a two-run double to UConn designated hitter Lauren Duggan as the Terriers fell behind 6-0. Hynes eventually settled down, but the Huskies added another run before doing so, and BU trailed 7-0 before getting to bat for a third time. “Lauren came in and had a rough start at the beginning,” Gleason said. “Then she really settled down and kept their hitters off base.”

Despite keeping runners off the bases later in the game, the runs in the early innings of the contest proved crucial, as the Terriers could not capture the victory. Coupled with the struggles of the pitching in the early innings were the runners left on base by the Terriers. Despite the fact that BU scored eight runs, batters left a total of 11 runners on base and missed out on plenty of golden opportunities to tie or take the lead. Most notably, in the final two innings, the Terriers had the bases loaded but could not get the tying run across. In the sixth inning, with the Terriers mounting a comeback and only down by one run, sophomore left fielder Mandy Fernandez stepped up to the plate with the chance to tie or give her team the lead. Although given the opportunity, she struck out swinging to end the inning. The seventh frame saw a similar situation for the Terriers, as they loaded the bases while down three runs with only one out. However, junior shortstop Brittany Clendenny hit into a double play, ending the game on a sour note. “IWe see a couple of more pitches instead of going right at them,” Gleason said. “We left eleven on base. But at least we’re giving ourselves a chance. That’s better than having nobody to drive in. We have 24 hours, we have to forget about it.”

Terrier defense unable to counter constant aggressive approach from opposing offenses Defensive struggles: From Page 8

in the first half. In the second half, as the sense of urgency rose on the defense for the Terriers, the Great Danes committed eight turnovers. In its previous game against Harvard, the defense again forced turnovers as the Crimson committed 16 in the contest, but BU had issues capitalizing offensively. Coming out of the locker room in the second half, the Terriers’ defense was solid, giving up only five goals in the final frame, but their offense was stagnant as they went on a nearly 21-minute scoring drought. This season, the Terriers have performed much better in the first half than in the second half. So far, BU has been outscored 51-39 in the second half, whereas they have kept

games close in the first period, only trailing by a 54-48 margin. The Terriers have also had trouble limiting opponents around the cage, as they have been outshot 199-157. Against the Great Danes, BU was outshot 29-22. As opponents continue to be aggressive with the Terriers’ defense, BU’s foul totals continue to climb, creating many free-position shot opportunities for the opposition. Against Albany, the Terriers committed 32 fouls compared to the Great Danes’ 22. This translated to six free-position shot opportunities for Albany, which led to four goals. “There seemed to be miscommunication on the crease, as well as on who was marking who, and that led to openings,” Robertshaw said.


Quotable

We have to start making our own plays happen and stop watching.

-BU coach Liz Robertshaw on lacrosse’s need to improve

paGE 8

Sports

A PERFECT 10

The daily Free press

Junior catcher Amy Ekart put up 2 hits and 3 RBIs, including a 3-run shot, in BU softball’s 11-8 loss. P.7.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, April 4, 2013

Softball loses to UConn despite 8-run comeback attempt

Terriers fail to get key runs home in hard-fought defeat

Pitching fails to come through for BU in home loss

By Sam Simmons Daily Free Press Staff

By Andrew Battifarano Daily Free Press Staff

After falling behind 8-0 in the first three innings, the Boston University softball team seemed on the brink of a comeback multiple times in Wednesday afternoon’s game against the University of Connecticut. However, failures to bring in the goahead or tying runs doomed the Terriers to a devastating 11-8 loss in their home opener. “I was really disappointed in the way we started the game,” said BU coach Kathryn Gleason. “I didn’t think we had a lot of energy and that’s disappointing because it’s our first home game and you’d think that we’d be ready to come and play.” Despite finishing the game with 13 hits and eight runs, the Terriers (9-17-1, 1-2 America East) were unable to pick up a victory against the Huskies (14-13), due in large part to a sluggish start and failure to hit the ground running in their first game of the season at the BU Softball Field. Senior pitcher Erin Schuppert picked up her fifth loss of the season after allowing five earned runs before being pulled out of the game in the top of the third with no outs and a runner in scoring position. Schuppert’s struggles were reflective of the apathy of the entire team in the first few innings of the game as the Terriers failed to generate baserunners or execute key defensive plays. The Terriers’ difficulties continued as freshman pitcher Lauren Hynes allowed three more runs — the first of which was credited to Schuppert — bringing the Huskies up 7-0 in the top of the third. UConn scored another run against Hynes in the top of the fourth before the BU offense finally started to click.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior catcher Amy Ekart hit a 3-run homer in BU’s loss to the University of Connecticut.

“I think Lauren came in, and she had a rough start right at the beginning but then she really settled down,” Gleason said. Leaving only one runner on base, the Terriers scored five runs on five hits in a highly productive bottom of the fourth. After coming in as the relief pitcher, Hynes started things off for her team offensively, singling down the left-field line. She then advanced to second on a single by freshman right fielder Haley King. Another

single by sophomore center fielder Mandy Fernandez loaded the bases for sophomore left fielder Emily Felbaum. “It just takes one hitter to get everybody else going and that’s what it took for us today. When Haley gets a line drive, [junior designated hitter] Chelsea Kehr hasn’t had a lot of at bats and she lines one out to right field and that just gets everybody else go-

Softball, see page 7

Throughout the early part of the 2013 campaign, the Boston University softball team has had strong pitching from its ace, senior pitcher Whitney Tuthill. Tuthill has won seven games this season and has compiled a 2.50 ERA to the lead the Terriers’ (9-17-1, 1-2 America East) pitching rotation. Although Tuthill has been strong in the circle, the rest of the staff has struggled, and this issue continued Wednesday afternoon when the Terriers narrowly fell to the University of Connecticut. In the home opener for the Terriers, it was not Tuthill getting the start in the circle, instead it was senior pitcher Erin Schuppert. Schuppert, the third pitcher in the Terrier trio, has struggled this season. Her ERA going into the contest against UConn (1413) was a rough 7.54 in 26 innings of work and opponents were batting .397 against her. In Schuppert’s last outing, she only recorded one out and surrendered a three-run home run in a mercy-rule loss to Binghamton University. “Sometimes we try to be too perfect,” said BU coach Kathryn Gleason. “We know where our pitches need to be. Sometimes we just try to be too sharp and it’s not where it’s supposed to be.” Regardless of whether Schuppert was trying to be too perfect with her pitches against the Huskies, she again struggled, and the UConn hitters feasted off of her. In the first inning, UConn jumped all over Schuppert, getting two runs on the board with an RBI double from right fielder Me-

Pitching, see page 7

Defensive breakdowns coupled with Lacrosse outmatched defensively vs. lack of execution dooms lacrosse team Albany in 17-9 blowout at Nickerson By Conor Ryan Daily Free Press Staff

Despite another solid game from the veterans on attack, the Boston University women’s lacrosse team fell to the University at Albany by a score of 17-9 on a windy Wednesday afternoon at Nickerson Field. The Terriers’ (3-6, 0-2 America East) combination of defensive breakdowns and lack of execution on offense ultimately made the contest a difficult game for BU coach Liz Robertshaw to watch. “Obviously, it’s disappointing,” Robertshaw said. “It was just a disappointing game. I thought Albany came out and was ready to go and was very aggressive on us, which I thought was smart. I know the last game they played against Stony Brook [University], they were kind of slowing it down … but they came at us. “On attack, we had some good looks, but we didn’t necessarily finish the ball the way I hoped. Overall, it is a disappointing game.” Albany (7-4, 2-1 America East) struck first when redshirt freshman Rachel Bowles scored to give the Great Danes a 1-0 lead at about three minutes into the contest. The Terriers responded five minutes lat-

er, as senior attack Danielle Etrasco scored two goals in less than two minutes to give the Terriers a 2-1 lead. Less than a minute after Etrasco’s second goal, junior attack Elizabeth Morse scored off on a free-position shot to give BU a two-goal lead. The Great Danes quickly answered back, scoring six straight goals in just over seven minutes to take a 7-3 lead. Etrasco scored her third goal of the day with 10:24 remaining to cut the deficit down to three. Etrasco and freshman midfielder Jill Horka both found the back of the net over the next 30 seconds to bring the Great Danes lead down to one. Despite the great response from the Terriers, Albany regained control during the final ten minutes of the first half, outscoring BU 5-1 to take a 12-7 lead into halftime. The Terriers scored the first goal of the second half, as Etrasco found the back of the net for the fifth time on the day to bring BU within four. The Great Danes put the game out of reach over the next 11 minutes of play, scoring five goals to extend their lead to 17-8 with less than three minutes to play in the game.

The Bottom Line

Thursday, April 4

Softball vs. Boston College, 4 p.m.

Friday, April 5 Track @ Florida Relays, All Day

lacroSSe, see page 7

By Matt Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

The Boston University women’s lacrosse team was back in action Wednesday afternoon against the University at Albany, but thanks in large part to the potent offense of the Great Danes (7-4, 2-1 America East) and the defensive struggles of the Terriers (3-6, 0-2 America East), BU fell 17-9. “Defensively we were rattled,” said BU coach Liz Robertshaw. “We didn’t have [junior defender] Christie Hart in there, who is one of our defensive leaders, and that took a toll on us.” Over the past few games, defense has been a point of weakness for the Terriers, and teams are beginning to expose it. In its previous matchup against Harvard, BU allowed the Crimson (2-6) to take a 6-0 lead to open the game before the Terriers even got on the scoreboard. “We had breakdowns and we didn’t recover,” Robertshaw said. “In the Harvard game, we started off with defensive breakdowns and clawed our way back.” Despite giving up the first goal of the game to the Great Danes, BU had a much better start than it did in the Harvard game, scoring three goals in the first 11 minutes

Saturday, April 6 Softball @ Hartford, 1 p.m./3 p.m. Track @ Florida Relays and George Davis Invitational, All Day

of play. However, the Terrier defense quickly fell out of sync, leaving junior goalkeeper Christina Sheridan scrambling to make difficult saves as Albany went on a six-goal run. “We started to miss marks and not play good one-on-one defense,” Robertshaw said. “Because of that, it got Christina Sheridan a little jammed up in cage trying to make saves rather than doing what she does very well, which is seeing the ball and getting saves that she can get.” In the first half of the game, Sheridan was left guessing on several shots, making just two saves and allowing 12 goals. In the second half, she came out and was able to tighten up her hold on the net, recording seven saves while only allowing five goals. “For the first eight minutes of the game, we were only playing defense,” Robertshaw said. During this time in the first half, the Great Danes still knifed through the Terriers’ defensive zone and created scoring opportunities, but BU cut down their attack on several occasions, forcing six turnovers

Sunday, April 7 Softball @ Hartford, 12 p.m.

DefenSive StruggleS, see page 7

Monday, April 8

No Events Scheduled Yu Darvish lost a perfect game with one out left in the 9th. You thought there was going to be a Yu pun here, didn’t you?


April 4th Daily Free Press